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Shalice Reilly

Urban Planning Senior at the University of Cincinnati School of Design, Art, Architecture and Planning February, 2019


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TABLE OF CONTENTS Resume

5

CHCURC: Facade Improvement Program

6-7

RJT+R: Extended Stay America Prototype

8-10

University of Cincinnati: Carthage Neighborhood Study

11-15

Ohio University: Space Planning Projects

16-21

University of Cincinnati: 22-24 Report of Clifton Neighborhood University of Cincinnati: Devou Park Project

25-29

Hand Renderings

30

Paintings

31

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Shalice Reilly Urban Planning & Design

Call or Text: (614) 580-6438

Email: Shalice.Reilly@gmail.com

WORK EXPERIENCE August, 2018 - January, 2019

Colorado Department of Transportation, Denver, Colorado

Intern for the Office of Process Improvement • • • •

Prosci Change Management Certified Facilitated Division of Maintenance and Operation’s four-year strategic plan Developed internationally attended Transportation Lean Forum webinar Utilized Photoshop, InDesign, Excel, & Google Drive

January - May, 2018

Ohio University, Athens, Ohio

University Planning Intern • • •

Space planning for different schools of study that were moving into new facilities (design of new spaces and assigning temporary facilities) Presentation development Photoshop for visioning exercises and design

May - August, 2017

Rule, Joy, Trammell & Rubio (RJTR) Atlanta, Georgia

Architecture Intern • •

Problem solving for space needs Assisted in creation of drawings and renderings for a senior living facility in South Carolina, and the prototype for the new Extended Stay America hotels

July, 2016 - July, 2017

College Hill Community Urban Redevelopment Corporation (CHCURC) Cincinnati, Ohio

Planning & Design Coordinator • • •

Lead the Facade Improvement Program Researched and drafted a national historic district application Lead bidding processes

EDUCATION Graduate: May 2, 2019

Bachelor of Urban and Regional Planning University of Cincinnati, School of DAAP Cincinnati, Ohio

SKILLS -TECHNICALPublisher, AutoCAD, InDesign, Illustrator, Beginner in American Sign Language, Excel, Word, PowerPoint, Sketch Up, ArcMap (GIS) -PROFESSIONALVisionary, Compassionate, Resourceful, Detail Oriented, Multidisciplinary, Self-aware, Adapatable

ACHIEVEMENTS • Cincinnatus Academic Scholarship: 2013-2018 • Dean’s List: Fall and Spring Semesters of 2013-2018 • CDOT Leadership Coin: 2019 • Philanthropy Chair of Pi Beta Phi: 2014 • Certificate for Excellent Performance in the Principles of Planning Design Studio: 2013

January-April, 2016

INTERESTS

Planning Intern

• Painting • Hiking • Urban Exploration • Photography/videography • Psychology/Sociology

City of Muskegon Muskegon, Michigan • • •

Evaluated grant applications Applied for multiple grants (successful) Obtained a Redevelopment Ready Community State certification for the City

Instagram.com/shalicereilly.urbanplanner Online Portfolio: https://issuu.com/shalice.reilly/docs/portfolio2-6.11.18

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CHCURC: FACADE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Cincinnati, Ohio 2017

While working in the community and economic development field, I was given the opportunity to be the head facilitator of the facade improvement program for the business district I worked in. This role involved communicating with local business owners, preparation of bid packets, presentations at City of Cincinnati Meet & Confer meetings to gain contractor interest, coordinating with bidders, and preforming bid-walk through meetings. I would say my favorite part of this role was the opportunity to help business owners brainstorm ideas for their facade improvements. Part of this involved Photoshoping images of the existing buildings so they could better understand the potential of their building’s facade. Some examples of my design ideas and Photoshopped images can be seen on the next page. It was a great learning experience in understanding the cost of facade improvements, as well. I worked to balance the business owners desires with the feasibility of their cost constraints.

Project Take-Aways: • A better understanding of city-funded programs • Higher proficiency in writing professional, government documents • Increased my understanding of the bidding process for construction projects. • Use of Photoshop and Excel • Increased budgeting experience 6


CHCURC: Facade Improvement Program

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RJT+R: EXTENDED STAY AMERICA PROTOTYPE SET Atlanta, Georgia 2017

PPG Cool Charcoal - Replacement for P12 Painted Brick PPG 1010-2 - “VOICE OF COLOR” - REPLACEMENT FOR PT 10 - BM 1479 - “ALASKAN HUSKY” PPG 1011-1 - “PACIFIC PEARL” - REPLACEMENT FOR PT 13 - BM “WHITE” PPG 1010-5 - “DOWNPOUR” - REPLACEMENT FOR PT 11 - BM 1483 - “COS COB STONEWALL” PT 12 - BM CUSTOM COLOR - “PANTHER BROWN”

During my time working with RJT+R, I was tasked with developing drawings for the new Extended Stay America prototype set. The work included arrangement of rooms, researching ADA code, an exterior facade color study, creation of floor plans, RCPs, finish plans, interior elevations, detail drawings, window and door schedules, EOS plans, interior wall elevations, and some Photoshop rendering.

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CP21

RT20

CP20 LLC

TL20

CO20 7/25/17 Finish Updates

  

RT20

TL22

DRAWING NO:

A4.10

SEE AT-02 FOR PARTITION LEGEND

DATE 6/30/17 Pricing Set

7/25/17 Finish Updates

PRINTED



RT20

TL20

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CO20 

CO20

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CP21

CP20

RJTR: Extended Stay CP20 America Prototype ISSUE/REVISION

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 

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  

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

RT20

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DRAWING NO:

COMMISSION NO: 17-063.00

A4.10

COMMISSION NO: 17-063.00

CP21

RT20

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THIS DRAWING IS THE PROPERTY OF RULE JOY TRAMMELL + RUBIO, LLC AND MAY NOT BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN CONSENT © 2017

ISSUE/REVISION

300 Galleria Parkway Suite 740 Atlanta, Georgia 30339 770-661-1492 (phone) 770-661-1493 (fax) www.rjtrdesign.com

6/30/17 Pricing Set

LLC

INTERIOR DESIGN

THIS DRAWING IS THE PROPERTY OF RULE JOY TRAMMELL + RUBIO, LLC AND MAY NOT BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN CONSENT © 2017

BUILDING 3 - COLUMN DETAILS

NOT ISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION

PRINTED

INTERIOR DESIGN

PROTOTYPE V2.0

ARCHITECTURE

R ULE J OY TRAMMELL RUBIO

DATE

BOH FINSIH PLAN

 

300 Galleria Parkway Suite 740 Atlanta, Georgia 30339 770-661-1492 (phone) 770-661-1493 (fax) www.rjtrdesign.com

ARCHITECTURE

R ULE J OY TRAMMELL RUBIO

 

NOT ISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION



PROTOTYPE V2.0



BOH FINSIH PLAN

NOT ISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION

  

DRAWING NO

COMMISSION

A3


PR21 RB20

WD20

   

  

PT22

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PT20

PT20

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APP03

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IW-3

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SP-410

SP-410 RB20 CN20

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   WT20

WT20

PT20

CL21

MLW21

PT20

STAYPLAY ELEVATIONS

IW-1

MLW21

W2

PT20

W2

TV

ETS06 ETS09

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  

Project Take-Aways: • Better understanding of how to use ADA code when designing • Practice of Photoshop rendering skills • Consideration of cost effective hospitality design • Development of AutoCAD skills

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RJTR: Extended Stay America Prototype

NOT ISSUED FOR CONSTRUCTION

P-409

7/25/17 Fin

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DRAWING N

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UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI: CARTHAGE NEIGHBORHOOD STUDY Cincinnati, Ohio 2018

For our summer semester studio, we were broken up into groups of three, and asked to pick a neighborhood to study. The focus of this study would be implementing planning techniques of our choosing, to help enhance the existing sense of place within the neighborhood. My group chose Carthage Neighborhood because it was one of the only neighborhoods on the list that none of us had heard of before. Little did we know, we had actually chosen a very vibrant area. Carthage is located on the Northern edge of the City of Cincinnati boundary, near a Nature Preserve, the Mill Creek valley, and the Hamilton County Fairgrounds (the location of the County Fair that takes place each summer). Most Cincinnati resident’s that do know of Carthage’s business district, know about it because of its proximity to the Fairgrounds. Some lesser known facts about Carthage is that it’s residents are about 27% Hispanic. While this may not seem noteworthy in some other cities, the Hispanic population of Cincinnati makes up only 3% of the entire population. Moreover, the Hispanic population that exists within Carthage is actually a more recent shift.

So while attempting to understand the neighborhood in our first few site visits, we quickly realized that the community is very much defined by its history (the fairgrounds), its diversity, its ‘car culture’ (the neighborhood is home to a large number of car-oriented businesses) and its religious influence. The religious influence can be felt in the numerous churches in the area, mostly of Catholic denomination. As our first assignment, we were asked to take 8 photographs that depict the essence of Carthage.

The Essence of Carthage in Polaroids 11


We were then tasked with considering what was limiting the existing sense of place within the area, and creating three actions which would help to enhance and celebrate the community in Carthage. In order to do this, we established four core goals: 1. Creating an inclusive economic and social environment 2. Developing the neighborhood’s sense of place based on its history and vibrant community 3. Creating family-oriented social spaces that are unique to Carthage 4. Exploring implementable ideas

Next, we worked to further understand what sort of actions would not change Carthage in any way, but purely enhance its existing culture. In our efforts to do that, we identified what type of culture exists within Carthage currently with a series of six watercolor paintings, identifying aspects of Carthage: Opportunity, Story, Identity, History, Community, Ecology. I would say one of the biggest steps in better understanding the area came from speaking to the business owners within Carthage. One thing that really resonated with all of us was the concept of seeing the many used car lots and car-oriented service shops as symbols of opportunity. Since Carthage’s general population lives around the poverty line, it is essential that residents are able to find work, and find affordable transportation. The car lots assist in providing both of these needs.

12

UC: Carthage Neighborhood Study


Our Three Planning Actions Based on our neighborhood sensing exercises, we were able to define Carthage’s existing sense of place enough to formulate three actions that would reinforce this sense of place: 1. Creation of a pop-up shop within a historic bus, that would be placed on a vacant lot along the business district (community & economic enrichment). 2. Organization of a monthly neighborhood event taking place along the business district, incorporating the local businesses, but also incorporating vendor stalls and performers (providing opportunities for local start-up businesses). 3. Enhancement of the automotive identity (stregthening the local identity by creating a stronger sense of pride in the car-oriented industry). Each of us chose one of these actions to further develop on our own. I chose to focus on the monthly neighborhood event, ‘Carthage Night Out’. These events would require vendors and preformers both to apply for the event each month. In order to create a lasting group that would maintain the program, we allso suggest that creation of a business association would be the first step towards making these events continue on. Because the City of Cincinnati requires a $500 event permit for these sorts of events, we would need to require a non-refundable application fee of $15 , to help alleviate the permitting costs, and also to create reliability that the business is invested in following through with the costs necessary to begin this process. Other than these fees, the event would require $350/ event of donations or grants, totaling $1,800 annually. The purpose of these events are both to bring in a new sense of life to the business district, but also to help local families who may want to start a business, but do not have the funds to create one through traditional means. This opportunity would be created through a specific fundraising effort to sponsor local businesses that apply to have a vendor stall, but do not have the funds to pay for the application fee, and also apply for the funding program through the business association.

UC: Carthage Neighborhood Study

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Funding Needs

Because the City of Cincinnati requires a $500 event permit for these sorts of events, we would need to require a non-refundable application fee of $15 , to help alleviate the permitting costs, and also to create reliability that the business is invested in following through with the costs necessary to begin this process. Other than these fees, the event would require $350/event of donations or grants, totaling $1,800 annually. The purpose of these events are both to bring in a new sense of life to the business district, but also to help local families who may want to start a business, but do not have the funds to create one through traditional means. This opportunity would be created through a specific fundraising effort to sponsor local businesses that apply to have a vendor stall, but do not have the funds to pay for the application fee, and also apply for the funding program through the business association. Due to the high start-up costs in the first year, these events would not be able to support such a program right away, and may need to begin a year after the start of these events in order to establish the events first. After one year of events, then reliable donors would already be involved, allowing the business association to potentially increase the application fees, without losing vendors since they will already begin making a profit from previous events. There also is more potential for a larger group of returning vendors to help support the permit fees.

Carthage Night Out

Costs

Single Event (us)

Income

Total Net Loss/Gain

500

150

Event Annually (us)

6000

4200

Vendor (First Event)

-1163.875

612

-551.875

-494.875

612

117.125

Annual Vendor (if they attend every event)

-6607.5

7344

736.5

Following Vendor Years

-6302.5

7344

1041.5

Vendor (Following events, 6th event starts to make profit)

Up front costs

-350 -1800 (Annual need in grants/donations)

Following events

Expenses (for each vendor) Pre-operating expenditures Permit fee (to us)

15

15

659

40

legal services personal liscenses/permits* Tent purchase (*rental is more expensive)

50

Cost of production Total Vendor Costs

-724

(For events, annually)

14

Total event permit fees

6000

If avg. 10 vendors each event, then we need _ annually

4200

What we would need monthly

350

UC: Carthage Neighborhood Study Incomes

*Includes $120 for business incorporation in state of Ohio, 299/year for liability insurance, $25 once a year cost of transient vendors -55 license for state of Ohio, $15/three years for on-line food safety course, a national food safety certification, and $160, once, for a food vendor license and placard (based on city of Cleveland’s costs). After first event, costs only include $40 temp food permit.


Physical Orientation of Event Usage Below is an aerial map of the central part of the business district (along Vine Street). In the image, you can see that the abutting roads to the north end in culdasacs, due to the railroad tracks that run parallel to Vine Street. We would plan to utilize these culdasacs as gathering areas for the Night Out events, since they would not prohibit regular traffic flows along Vine Street, but are still centrally located. The yellow highlighted buildings represent businesses that would likely participate in the night out events, either in providing food, or sale of goods. The Green buildings represent institutional buildings, with the southern most green building being the local elementary school, the middle one being one of the prominent churches in the area, and the northern most green building represents the historic, but still active fire station. These three building are highlighted due to their potential participation in the events as well. All of our events work towards bringing the community together, despite religious affiliations, language barriers, or cultural differences, over the prospect of increasing the economic vitality of Carthage as a whole.

Project Take-Aways: • A more comprehensive studio experience that considers not just what should be done but how to do it • Use of Excel, Photoshop, Google Earth, & GIS

UC: Carthage Neighborhood Study

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OHIO UNIVERSITY: SPACE PLANNING PROJECTS Athens, Ohio 2018

While working for Ohio University, I was given the opportunity to learn about space planning, then apply that knowledge to the real space planning projects going on at Ohio University. I quickly learned there are multiple facets to campus space planning. Some of the work revolved around simply collecting and organizing data into easily understood charts in order to facilitate a project’s development process. Occasionally, I would also have the opportunity to interpret that data and problem solve proposed spaces to identify options for relocation plans. For example, as the College of Osteopathic Medicine works to develop new facilities on the edge of the existing campus, I was tasked at looking at the existing space uses of persons in that college, then organizing a plan for where and when to relocate individuals existing in the old facilities, that no longer served the needs of those programs.

HCOM Relocation Study

In this example from my HCOM Relocation Study, I analyzed and interpreted the data of existing building usage by department and type of use.

To begin this project, I first identified the buildings involved in the project, then analyzed and graphically organized the foundational data of those buildings. In the chart on the next page, I organized the different assigned space uses into one of six categories (Lab- Classroom, Classrooms, General Administrative spaces, Research Labs, Professor Offices, and spaces that are specifically designed to serve students in some way.

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NASF

ARC Grosvenor Grosvenor West Irvine Hall Konneker Life Sci. Bldg Parks Wilson Total

LabGen. Classroom Classrooms Admin

Research Prof. Lab Offices

Student Services

Total

197

0

3,371

17,528

910

431

22,437

15,302

3,652

24,292

0

2,810

796

46,852

43

2,641

3,968

0

0

4,498

11,150

185

8,623

11,464

13,111

1,093

212

34,688

0

0

0

997

0

0

997

161

20,541

0

727

21,429

0 0

0

19,388

0

0

324

19,712

0

0

11,020

0

0

0

11,020

15,727

14,916

73,664

52,177

4,813

6,988

168,285

% Total % Total NASF in % Total NASF in Building NASF NASF in Building NASF 34,353 44.79% 44.79% uilding 34,353 BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES 12,356 16.11% 16.11% 53.82% BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES 12,356 OFFICE 5,004 6.52% 6.52% 53.82% OFFICE 5,004 OFFICE SERVICE 220 0.29% 0.29% OFFICE SERVICE 220 3.08% RESEARCH/NONCLASS LABORATORY 6,146 8.01% 8.01% RESEARCH/NONCLASS LABORATORY 6,146 18.52% RESEARCH/NONCLASS LABORATORY SERVICE 986 1.28% 1.28% RESEARCH/NONCLASS LABORATORY SERVICE 986 12.13% COM ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 8,953 11.67% 11.67% COM ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 8,953 1.73% CLASSROOM 5,829 CLASSROOM 5,829 7.60% 7.60% 0.14% CLASSROOM SERVICE 1,414 CLASSROOM SERVICE 1,414 1.84% 1.84% 1.01% OFFICE 452 OFFICE 452 0.59% 0.59% 7.86% OFFICE SERVICE 1,028 OFFICE SERVICE 1,028 1.34% 1.34% 1.33% STUDY ROOM 230 STUDY ROOM 230 0.30% 0.30% 0.27% DEAN COM 9,062 DEAN COM 9,062 11.82% 11.82% CENTRAL STORAGE 2,831 CENTRAL STORAGE 2,831 3.69% 3.69% 6.43% CLASSROOM 1,380 CLASSROOM 1,380 1.80% 1.80% CONFERENCE ROOM 377 0.49% CONFERENCE ROOM 377 0.49% 1.33% LOUNGE 234 0.31% LOUNGE 234 0.31% MEDIA PRODUCTION SERVICE 344 0.45% MEDIA PRODUCTION SERVICE 344 0.45% 0.20% 0.28% MERCHANDISING 152 MERCHANDISING 152 0.20% 4.03% 0.28% OFFICE 3,089 OFFICE 3,089 4.03% 0.58% 0.28% OFFICE SERVICE 443 OFFICE SERVICE 443 0.58% 0.28% STUDY ROOM 212 STUDY ROOM 212 0.28% 0.65% HCOM RUSP 495 HCOM RUSP 495 0.65% OFFICE 495 0.65% 0.27% OFFICE 495 0.65% IINR NEURMUSCSKEL INSTITUTE 3,229 4.21% 0.27% IINR NEURMUSCSKEL INSTITUTE 3,229 4.21% 0.05% CLASS LABORATORY SERVICE 39 0.27% CONFERENCE ROOM 229 CLASS LABORATORY SERVICE 39 0.05% 0.30% OFFICE 1,082 CONFERENCE ROOM 229 0.30% 1.41% RESEARCH/NONCLASS LABORATORY 1,082 1,847 OFFICE 1.41% 2.41% 0.84% RESEARCH/NONCLASS LABORATORY SERVICE 32 RESEARCH/NONCLASS LABORATORY 1,847 2.41% 0.04% 0.84% MEDICAL INFORMATICS 258 RESEARCH/NONCLASS LABORATORY SERVICE 32 0.04% 0.34% OFFICE 258 MEDICAL INFORMATICS 258 0.34% 0.34% 0.84% OFFICE 258 0.34%

COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE MEDICINE

Next, I looked at each individual building and organized data on the different colleges that have programs within the buildings in order to understand how much space each program used, and how much space the individual programs actually require.

Summary by Unit: Summary by Unit: COM ACADEMIC

MEDICAL

COM ACADEMIC AFFAIRS AFFAIRS 8,953 NASF 8,953 NASF

MEDICAL INFORMATICS INFORMATICS 258 NASF 258 NASF

DEAN COM 9,062 NASF 9,062 NASF

BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES SCIENCES 12,356 NASF 12,356 NASF

3,229 NASF

41,549 NASF

DEAN COM

BIOMEDICAL

IINR IINR BIOLOGICAL NEURMUSCSKEL SCIENCES BIOLOGICAL NEURMUSCSKEL INSTITUTE 41,549 NASF SCIENCES 3,229 NASF INSTITUTE HCOM RUSP

495 NASF HCOM RUSP 495 NASF

Ohio University Space Planning Projects

17


NE

Lastly, I depicted the amount of space occupied by the College of Osteopathic Medicine on each floor of each building, to help express how much of what types of space are needed for these programs, and what programs work together, and therefore, need to be located in close proximity of each other.

18

Ohio University Space Planning Projects

IINR NEURMUSCSKEL INSTITUTE 3,229 NASF

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 1,167 NASF

DEAN COM 1,950 NASF

HCOM RUSP 80 NASF

BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES 3,592 NASF


Engagement Campus Planning

In this project, I was able to take a similar process as used in the HCOM project to establish the foundational information and gather all the data I would need. In this phase, I established the current space uses and needs of the different honors programs on Ohio University’s campus. I also collected data on how the space use of these programs are looking to change, and what needs their current spaces are not meeting.

Program

Honors Tutorial College

Cutler Scholars Program

Center for Campus & Comm. Engagement

Combined

New Programs Office of

Lindley Hall Current Location 35 Park Place Trisolini House Engagement Students served 315 students up to 70 scholars # Rms NASF # Rms NASF Space profile # Rms NASF # Rms NASF 232 1 108 1 240 3 580 1 Conference Room Office 7 1,265 10 1,756 2 315 19 3,336 OHIO Honors 1 200 - - 1 257 2 457 Reception 1 119 - - - - 1 119 Break Room 1 77 - - - - 1 77 Copy Room OHIO Fellows - - 1 270 - - 1 270 Lounge 1 668 0 - - 1 668 Study Room 920 12 821 - - 18 1,741 6 Storage TOTAL NASF

3,481

2,955

812

7,248

Will remain in 35 Park Place; becomes part of Engagement campus

Ohio University Space Planning Projects

President’s Leadership Society

19


Next, I worked to organize four relocation options/ proposals for the different Honors programs, within the two buildings proposed for their relocation. I based the proposed layouts on the concerns that the leaders of these groups identified as being most essential (for example, having enough collaborative student work space).

20

Ohio University Space Planning Projects


I then organized spacial data for the different options to help the leaders of these programs better understand the differences in their relocation options (above).

Project Take-Aways: • Clearer understanding of space planning as a whole • Increased ability to simplify complex data to make it understandable to stakeholders • Practice with cleaning up and accuracy checking data from multiple sources • Development of thorough Power Point presentations and graphics • Enhanced understanding of large development processes

Ohio University Space Planning Projects

21


UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI: REPORT OF CLIFTON NEIGHBORHOOD Spring Semester Studio, 2015

During the second semester of my Freshman year in Urban Planning, we were asked to work in groups to learn how to analyze demographics and existing layouts of neighborhoods in order to think abstractly about problem-solving for issues within the community. My group’s focus neighborhood was in Clifton, Cincinnati. Clifton boarders UC’s campus and has a large mixture of demographic characteristics, making it a valuable first learning experience in neighborhood analysis.

Land Use

22


These are cross-section analyses based on current sections of Clifton Neighborhood. The bottom picture is of a neighborhood cross-section analysis and the picture above is a Central Business District analysis.

University

of

Cincinnati: Report

of

Clifton Neighborhood

23


Clifton Multi-use Development Final Presentation

In the final stage of the project, I created a sketch-up representation of the central business district, then symbolized our prospective lot in red. This area represents the existing lay of the land in this part of Clifton currently. As our final proposal, we created a plan for a mixed-use development, with space for at least six stores on the first level, and two floors of residential above, and a green roof. The plan also included a built-in parking garage in the back, and the enhancement of a nearby, existing parking lot into a parking garage. The two images to the left are my sketch-up representations of the multi-use building we decided on.

24


UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI: DEVOU PARK PROJECT Site Planning Studio 2016

For the entirety of my summer semester studio course, I worked in a group with two other classmates. During this semester, we were first asked to pick a park in or around Cincinnati and study the area as if it were undeveloped land. Together, we worked to gather, then analyze the geographic and demographic information surrounding the site. As a final product, we were asked to create plans for a planned community on our site, and depict our plans through writings, maps, computer and hand renderings, and a 3D model. The site we chose was Devou Park in Covington, Kentucky.

University

of

Cincinnati: Devou Park Project

25


Part One: Site Analysis

In the beginning stages of the project, we worked to analyze the current conditions of the site, before starting to make suggestions. Below is a map I made on the accessibility to amenities within walking distances of the park. Something to consider, however, are the slopes of the site, as those too will affect the walkability and time it takes to get to the different types of amenities. I also looked at the existing street hierarchy surrounding the site.

26

University

of

Cincinnati: Devou Park Project


Next, our group looked at the suitability of the site for development in different desirable areas of the park. We looked at many factors, but of those factors, weather, slope, vegetation and soil were the ones I mainly focused on. As you can see from the chart on the next page, we decided that the most desirable and suitable area of land for development would be site three, the eastern-most location.

University

of

Cincinnati: Devou Park Project

27


Final: Concept Poster and 3D Mode

28


In the end, we presented two posters and our 3-D Model to the class. The features of our final presentation that I directly worked on are pictured in these two pages, but we also had another poster as well.

Project Take-Aways: • • • •

Learned what it felt like to be a team member instead of a team leader Learned how to build physical models Improved understanding of SketchUp Improved understanding of site suitability analyses

University

of

Cincinnati: Devou Park Project

29


HAND RENDERINGS

Renderings from Fall Semester, 2014

30


PAINTINGS

31

Profile for Shalice.Reilly

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