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Rafael Squirru & Shakespeare

Every writer then who approaches Hamlet in a different state of being than the one demanded by the innocence of the authentic spectator will be disappointed and unable to receive the richness of the deeper message registered by the dramatic arts of all epochs. Because the character of Hamlet, due to its own depth, resists all efforts of stereotyping to which it has been subjected. Hamlet is contradictory because the spirit of the man can only be glimpsed at this level of aesthetic penetration which results contradictory when applying more modest viewpoints. Hamlet has enough humanity to remain a mystery, and a large part of Shakespeare’s genius consists of this: in giving us the mystery of the man. For this reason, I resist creating capricious theories and I defer exclusively to the intent of translating the master's words as faithfully as possible. There is no small difficulty in having such humble intentions. Shakespeare is a poet, and being a poet means writing in such a way that what we say cannot be translated into any other language. Whoever really wants to fully experience Shakespeare will have to learn English sufficiently well to be able to delight in this jewel of the Anglo-Saxon language. All we can do is create an approximation, something which resembles Hamlet, and this is the most to which a translator can aspire. (On the other hand, the task of translating a work like Hamlet never ends. It is interrupted only when the translator decides that for the time being his energies are sapped.) Fortunately, the Hamlet problem is permanently up-to-date. Clueless youth, as any honest youth must be (there is nothing more odious and pompous than a young man sure of himself) presents the characteristics of a time of crisis, a time for Renaissance, just like the youth of Shakespeare’s time, where one era ended and another began. In this sense, Hamlet is a new man, as was Shakespeare; that is to say, a man who sees with new eyes the reality that most of his elders see with old eyes. For this reason, Hamlet is in large part a misfit in his environment, and for this

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Rafael Squirru & Shakespeare (English Version)  

Rafael Squirru translated three of William Shakespeare’s plays: Hamlet, The Tempest, and Romeo and Juliet. His translations were illustrated...

Rafael Squirru & Shakespeare (English Version)  

Rafael Squirru translated three of William Shakespeare’s plays: Hamlet, The Tempest, and Romeo and Juliet. His translations were illustrated...

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