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Rafael Squirru & Shakespeare

I spoke of approximations and similarities. This translation has used as a permanent reference the version by Luis Astrana Marín, edited by Aguilar, Madrid, 1949, in its ninth edition. Although it is true that this translation is a bit anachronistic and of a kind of Spanish which is not well adapted to the LatinAmerican ear which I have tried to serve, it is also true that in its literality it becomes a valuable reference document. When Astrana comes up with a precise word, I have not looked for another one in order to be different; rather I have accepted his word and expression. And in this sense it is important to confess that his translation reveals a great deal of study. Taking a different approach to his translation, which is completely in prose, I have tried to maintain an approximation of Shakespearean verse, rhythm and even sound, and in Ophelia’s songs I have approximated, whenever possible, some sort of rhyme. For the English edition, I used A New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare, edited by Horace Howard Furness, in two volumes of five hundred pages each, which according to my information is the most complete commentated edition that exists. I also used the edition prepared by the Folger Shakespeare Library of Washington, edited by Louis B. Wright and Virginia A. La Mar. Although it is a students’ edition, the way it is laid out and designed in small volumes makes it very manageable and charming. With these references and a few dictionaries I have had all the instruments necessary in order to hopefully complete the work with some measure of success. Although I could create lengthy explanatory notes in order to make a more voluminous text than the translation itself, I have tried to avoid this, because the purpose of my translation is not an erudite reading, but rather the presentation of this play on Spanish-speaking stages. In almost every opportunity I have followed the orthodox interpretations of words and passages, but in some I have deviated, and those few cases perhaps justify the brief notes at the end of the text. I take this opportunity to thank my secretary María Cristina Thomson for her care and enthusiasm in retyping these notes, as well as my friend Sacha

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Rafael Squirru & Shakespeare (English Version)  

Rafael Squirru translated three of William Shakespeare’s plays: Hamlet, The Tempest, and Romeo and Juliet. His translations were illustrated...

Rafael Squirru & Shakespeare (English Version)  

Rafael Squirru translated three of William Shakespeare’s plays: Hamlet, The Tempest, and Romeo and Juliet. His translations were illustrated...

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