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Maintaining a healthy body is an important part of today’s fast-paced world, and our eyes are a large part of our overall health. We depend on our eyes for all aspects of daily functioning but we can also end up taking our eyes for granted, overlooking or even outright ignoring issues and visual clues of potential or existing problems, often until it’s too late. Ironic, isn’t it? It’s not always easy to bounce back from eye problems, and the best way to avoid them is to take care of your eyes. Here, you’ll learn about the basics of caring for your eyes by understanding the common problems that plague them and understanding the importance of seeing an eye doctor regularly.


PART I: TOP 5 COMMON EYE PROBLEMS

Some of the most common eye issues include: 1. ERRORS OF REFRACTION The most common eye problems encountered by doctors are errors of refraction, which include myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), and astigmatism (distorted vision). Nearsightedness is by far the most common of the three, and with increasing numbers of people suffering from it -- 40% of the population today as opposed to 25% in the 1970s -- it is becoming increasingly evident that environment and activity play a large part in causing these problems. 2. CATARACTS AND PRESBYOPIA Cataracts are caused by a loss of clarity in the lens of the eye. As we age, many people develop a condition known as presbyopia, a difficulty or outright inability to focus on nearby objects, as the lens hardens and loses suppleness. As the aging process advances, the hardened lens may develop cataracts, areas where the eye lens is no longer as clear. While many people will develop cataracts naturally as they age, certain conditions, such as diabetes, certain medications, and eye injuries can also predispose people to cataract formation.


PART I: TOP 5 COMMON EYE PROBLEMS

3. DIABETIC RETINOPATHY Diabetic retinopathy is caused by damage to blood vessels in the retinas of people with diabetes. Left untreated, it can lead to reduced eyesight and even blindness -- it is, in fact, the most common cause of blindness in the United States. A long history of uncontrolled high blood sugar levels is the avowed cause of diabetic retinopathy, and is the most common eye disease in people with diabetes. 4. DRY EYE SYNDROME Dry eye syndrome is caused by a lack of, or inability to produce, quality tears to keep the eye nourished and lubricated. This results in blurred vision, soreness, and even a burning sensation. While people can develop chronic dry eye as a result of the aging process, gender, medical conditions, and certain medications can all cause the condition, too.

5. GLAUCOMA Glaucoma is a collective term for diseases of the optic nerve. Age, family history, and genetic predisposition are the primary causes. Advanced cases of glaucoma can result in loss of vision and blindness; early detection and treatment is the biggest factor in preventing serious damage to your eyes. ooooo

Dry eye is a mild condition but it can often lead to complications. Get a closer look at dry eye in Part 2 of this ebook series.


PART II: CHRONIC DRY EYE SYNDROME - A CLOSE-UP

Dry eye syndrome is a condition caused by a lack of quality tears for washing your eyes, an activity that keeps your eyes nourished and lubricated. It’s not so much the inability to produce tears as much as the inability to produce the kind of tears your eyes need to function properly and maintain their health. However, it can also be caused by an inability to produce enough of these tears to maintain healthy eye function. Spotting Dry Eye The most common signs that you might have dry eye syndrome is the gritty or scratchy feeling in your eyes, a feeling of dryness or soreness that typically gets worse during the course of the day. You may even experience a burning sensation in your eyes, and they may appear red. Other signs of dry eye include your eyelids sticking together when you first wake up, and episodes of temporarily blurred vision which go away when you blink.

Addressing the Problem In many cases, chronic dry eye syndrome can be managed as an ongoing medical condition. After an initial consultation to determine that the problem is not being caused by another underlying medical issue, such as a problem in the tear glands themselves, treatment for dry eye typically consists of various types of eye drops, depending on the specifics of the situation.


PART II: CHRONIC DRY EYE SYNDROME - A CLOSE-UP

Often, environmental factors, such as living conditions which make it more likely for tears to evaporate without properly lubricating the eyes, will need to be addressed, too. Other potential remedies include changes in diet, the use of eyeglasses, and even acupuncture.

It is important to note that, with ongoing treatment, regular medical consultation is necessary. If current treatments aren’t effective, a change to prescription eye drops may be necessary, or the addition or substitution of other therapies. Failure to respond to the above treatments may even necessitate surgery to correct the problem. ooooo

Regular checkups with an eye doctor is indeed an important part of caring for your eyes’ health. More on this in Part 3 of this ebook series.


PART III: CLEAR YOUR SCHEDULE: THE IMPORTANCE OF REGULAR EYE CHECKUPS

The most important part of keeping your eyes healthy and functioning well is the ability to commit to regular, scheduled eye examinations. As with other issues, eye problems start small. Regular checkups can spot eye problems before they worsen, which makes it easier for them to be treated. And the sooner an eye problem is treated, the better the prognosis. Detecting eye problems early is the only reliable way to minimize their impact on your life. How frequently should you get an eye exam? Once you reach adulthood, you should be seeing your eye doctor anywhere from once every two years to once every year, depending on your age and any medical conditions or risk factors you might have. If you haven’t seen your doctor recently, or have missed your checkup for any reason, you should go see your doctor without delay. Optometrists, Ophthalmologists, and Opticians: Who’s Who? Optometrists, ophthalmologists, and opticians are all people who are involved in caring for people’s eye health. You will interact with one or more of them in the process of caring for your eyes. As such, it’s important to know how they differ.


PART III: CLEAR YOUR SCHEDULE: THE IMPORTANCE OF REGULAR EYE CHECKUPS

Optometrists are essentially eye doctors. They are licensed by the state, and can diagnose common vision and health problems. While the range of specific eye problems optometrists are allowed to treat and diagnose can vary slightly from state to state, in general an optometrist will be able to diagnose errors of refraction, prescribe eyeglasses or contact lenses, and provide care for patients with low vision problems. Ophthalmologists differ from optometrists in that they can prescribe and perform eye surgery. While they are able to do everything an optometrist can, they are also able to diagnose and treat more complicated cases and eye problems.

Opticians, on the other hand, are not eye doctors. Rather, they are technicians trained in fitting people with eyeglasses and other eyewear, including contact lenses. Before you see an optician, you will have to have consulted first with an actual eye doctor. ooooo

Understanding what’s going on with your eyes is the first step toward caring for them. The sooner you consult with an eye doctor, the sooner you can get started on caring for your eyes. Should you have any questions, don’t hesitate to get in touch with an eye care specialist in your area.


Shady Grove Eye and Vision Care 15200 Shady Grove Road, Suite 100, Rockville, MD 20850

(301) 859-4060 (301) 670-1212 youreyesite.com

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How To Maintain Healthy Eyesight  

The overall health of our eyes is an important factor in our daily lives. We depend on our eyes, so we need to make sure they're healthy.

How To Maintain Healthy Eyesight  

The overall health of our eyes is an important factor in our daily lives. We depend on our eyes, so we need to make sure they're healthy.

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