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PATTERNMAKING FOR MENSWEAR


PATTERNMAKING FOR MENSWEAR Gareth Kershaw

Laurence King Publishing


Published in 2013 by Laurence King Publishing 361–373 City Road, London, EC1V 1LR, United Kingdom T +44 20 7841 6900 F +44 20 7841 6910 enquiries@laurenceking.com www.laurenceking.com Š text 2013 Gareth Kershaw Published in 2013 by Laurence King Publishing All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage or retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. A catalog record for this book is available from the British Library. ISBN: 978 1 78067 016 4 Technical drawings: Elisha Camilleri Fashion illustrations: Thom Davies Design: Lizzie Ballantyne, Lizzie B Design Senior editor: Peter Jones Picture researcher: Julia Ruxton Printed in China


CONTENTS introduction

7

patternMAKing in contemporary menswear

8

chapter ONE

The patterns: shirts long-sleeved collarless shirt

74

short-sleeved polo shirt

80

hooded sweatshirt

88

casual long-sleeved shirt lumberjack shirt

Preparation for PatternMAKING Tools and equipment Studio practice

chapter three

18

20

104 116

short-sleeved safari shirt

126

bib shirt

138

chapter FOUR

MEasuring the male figure

24

taking measurements

26

DRESS FORMS

30

The patterns: PANTS

FIT MODELS

31

high-waisted PANTS

150

Size charts

32

chinos

158

basic sweatpants

168

chapter TWO

tailored shorts

176

cargo pants

186

The Patternmaking process

jeans

196

THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE DESIGN

36

Basic upper body SLOPER

40

Basic sleeve SLOPER

42

Basic PANT SLOPER

45

creating a master plan

48

anorak

206

how to trace off a pattern

50

fitted denim jacket

220

grading

52

trench coat

232

principles of Patternmaking

57

single-breasted jacket

252

using technology

68

double-breasted jacket

268

waxed jacket

288

parka

302

glossary

316

INDEX

318

chapter five The patterns: outerwear

FURTHER READING picture credits acknowledgments

320


INTRODUCTION Contemporary menswear has evolved from a staple of traditional silhouettes and styles. The development of these styles has been directly influenced by social, economic, and cultural requirements, played out through the many roles men have inherited: formal clothing, workwear, leisure-, and activewear. The boundaries of these styles are less clearly defined than in previous decades as trends move and change as quickly as seasons pass—from Fall/Winter to Spring/Summer. Again and again the cyclical nature of the fashion industry throws up reinterpretations of classic silhouettes. Patternmaking as a craft is integral to the whole fashion production process, linking the designer’s concepts—a twodimensional illustration—with the three-dimensional realization of shape-making, proportions, and silhouettes. Very few people who study fashion end up specializing in pattern technology and many who practice it have come from other disciplines. The holistic nature of the fashion industry increasingly requires practitioners to have a broad understanding and experience of most, if not all, the stages involved in the creation of clothes. A designer or practitioner who can research and conceptualize ideas, cut patterns and identify their target sizing, construct and technically finish a garment, develop, market, and sell their product will be able to direct their team and product to a satisfactory conclusion. A broad skills base is needed to succeed in today’s fashion industry.

This book uses generic menswear garment styles to teach the principles of pattern construction that will be encountered throughout the fashion industry. Each pattern not only offers a selection of shapes and design hints but also explores the related techniques associated with its construction and development. Working your way through each section will build your knowledge, allowing you to further explore and adapt generic styles. Most designers / labels work toward a set of predetermined body measurements (the target consumer) or an industryacquired size chart. These are used in conjunction with a human fit model or a size-specific dress form or mannequin. Chapter 1 discusses how to take measurements to create your own size chart or use the industry charts provided. It highlights the importance of developing visual awareness of the landmark points used for taking measurements, which correlate to the human body in relationship to fit. The chapter also outlines studio practices related to sizing and technological advancements through computer-aided design (CAD) and its applications. The designs for a garment style can be developed quickly by using the basic sloper, or block, template described at the beginning of Chapter 2. Tracing off the sloper and transferring the design development onto it creates a master plan. The master plan serves as a blueprint for the development. This process uses only half of the pattern sloper, thus eliminating possible duplication errors, which would result in an unbalanced pattern—the human body is generally seen as equal in proportion but not symmetrical. Even if your design is asymmetric, copying over the drafted shape to create the other side is a quick way to achieve the desired pattern style. Where possible the different pattern pieces are kept proportional to one another but occasionally to show detail or to ensure that the text is readable this is not the case.

A modern interpretation of a classic icon, Woolrich Woolen Mills’ “Balmac” trench coat. The company’s use of original fabrics (Maxima Poplin) from the Woolrich looms emphasizes the functionality and detailed approach they take to creating outerwear. INTRODUCTION

7


PATTERNMAKING IN CONTEMPORARY MENSWEAR Patternmaking for Menswear brings together a collection of patterns that have become established classics of contemporary men’s fashion. By working on these garment silhouettes you will learn the basic principles needed for patternmaking. Using these styles as building blocks to explore ideas and your creative flare, you can interchange techniques and processes to develop new interpretations and solutions to your designs. To appreciate how far the exploration of shaping fabric to the human body has come, one needs to look at its origins. Contemporary patternmaking is intrinsically entwined with the history of fashion. The first notions of patterns as we now know them appeared in the West in the fifteenth century as men’s silhouettes began to be redefined by the demands of social organizations such as the military, royal courts, and religious bodies. From these origins spring the two dominant forms of male dress construction: the first is characterized by the technique of draping and the second developed from the craft of shaping, currently known as tailoring. The latter, the most commonly used and popular technique, was to become highly prized. Guilds of tailors championed the profession and their craft was meticulously developed during the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries through numerous fitting sessions with an elite clientele in the ateliers of Western Europe. As with any craft, the greatest teacher is the practice itself: copious hours chalking, basting (loose stitching), pinning, and cutting the patterns for clients of every conceivable size and shape would develop the knowledge needed to call oneself a master cutter. More complex forms of men’s clothing evolved through cutting and shaping as coat and doublet styles developed into structured jackets with opened sleeves, worn with breeches. These were first documented as simple illustrated patterns in one of the earliest books on tailoring: Juan de Alcega’s Libro de Geometría Práctica y Traça (Madrid, 1589). Three main periods followed which shaped the evolution of men’s clothes through cut, fit, and construction, beginning with the civil wars of England and France in the seventeenth century. Clothes had to respond to

8

Patternmaking in contempoRary menswear

turbulent times: there was a societal shift from softer fabrics to clothes produced from harsher, woolen cloth with the garment shapes made more rigid with more robust qualities that would survive the rigors of battle and the outdoor life. By the start of the eighteenth century, clothes began to reflect a more stable economic environment. The first garment of notoriety to be adopted by the aristocracy of Europe was referred to as a cassock or coat: It was a simple garment cut above the knee with two front panels and two back panels sewn to the waist with three-quarter sleeves. This style later included a collar and vented pleats and was made from silk or satin with flamboyant decorative details, creating a softer feminine silhouette. It was the forerunner of the clothing shapes we see today. As the profession developed, M. de Garsault wrote the first serious manual to detail all the principles behind pattern construction and tailoring, L Art du Tailleur, published by the Académie Royale des Sciences, for the encyclopedia Description des Arts et Métiers (Paris, 1769). Garsault describes the whole procedure of making the coat from start to finish, beginning with the notion of measurement taking. He introduces the use of a thin strip of paper that was cut to the required length to record the parameters of an individual client’s height and width, as well as detailing construction processes with illustrated patterns that accompanied the text. Later, in 1796, an English manual was published: The Taylor’s Complete Guide or a Comprehensive Analysis of Beauty and Elegance in Dress presented a new way to perceive the art, not too dissimilar from the present format; instructions were given on how to draw the coat with measurements made directly onto the material by following a series of illustrated diagrams. These publications brought new audiences and extended the dialogue between practitioners and their clientele.

Issey Miyake interprets the idea of layering for men with a cape, Fall 2012 collection. Designed from the Japanese premise of “KASANE”— simple functionality for everyday life.


9


Modern patternmaking developed with the industrialization of sewing and the development of mechanical processes. From the start of the Industrial Revolution technology defined the way the clothing industry developed. Craftsmen and women invented labor-saving devices to increase production. As the cultural trend toward uniformity gathered pace, the demand for standardized clothing began to outstrip supply. Replication was needed and templates (patterns) for gentlemen’s clothes began to be produced. Initial attempts resulted in poorly fitting garments; the sizing of patterns would take considerable experimentation before a recognized sizing system was achieved through the use of the newly conceived 1-yard measurement tape. Laid out in inches, this gave tailors a regulated tool to record human dimensions. From these observations a mathematical drafting system was conceived, which was based on both the principles of geometry and anatomical proportions. In the first half of the nineteenth century numerous technical publications appeared to support the new drafting technique: The Improved Tailor’s Art by J. Jacksons (1829), Science Completed in the Art of Cutting by W. Walker (1839), and A Practical Guide for the Tailor’s Cutting-Room by J. Coutts. It was during this period, particularly in France, that technical

10 Patternmaking in contempoRary menswear

training was established; Elisa Lemonnier opened one of the first professional schools in Paris to offer cutting and tailoring among its programs. Along with the demand for cheaper clothing, in 1860 the first mail order fashion catalogs to publish paper patterns appeared; the latest styles could be bought by the middle and working classes throughout Europe and the US, bringing the ability to produce cheaper clothing to a wider audience and creating a forerunner of the ready-towear genre. At the beginning of the twentieth century the craft of tailoring began to divide into specialisms—designer, patternmaker, and seamstress. It is a working model that has survived to the present day, replicated in fashion houses and garment factories all over the world. Mass production brought duplication and the development of standard sizes but fit was still of crucial importance throughout the first half of the last century. Although clothing was preconstructed, the discerning gentleman would have it adapted to the sartorial fashions of his day. Alterations were made and silhouettes tailored through subtle changes to the cut, line, or proportion of the garment. The process of standardization was then speeded up by the onset of the two World Wars, when standardized patterns


and size charts were needed to produce military uniforms for both officers and infantry alike. Clothing the army gave the garment industry an opportunity to review its procedures and attitudes toward sizing and construction, and this resulted in the formation of national registered organizations to regulate clothing production. Away from the austerity of war, social hierarchy still demanded that a gentleman’s wardrobe should have multiple dress options, even though a new era was dawning as the genderrole ideologies of the prewar period were vanquished and modernism was embraced. The 1950s brought a new approach to male dress, championed by a younger generation who rebelled against the constraints of tradition. With the growing influence of American youth cultures, formal attire with its stiff silhouettes began to lose its appeal. New modes of informal dressing appeared throughout towns and cities across Europe and America. Menswear producers responded to the growth in consumerism and this new attitude by importing or recreating foreign styles associated with music, film, or leisure activities (Italian tailoring, US varsity, German activewear). Relaxed attitudes toward life brought a new direction for men’s fashion assisted by technological advances in textiles and the uses of synthetic materials to create easy-wear, functional clothing.

Opposite left: Yohji Yamamoto’s enigmatic approach to masculinity is portrayed in a return to his signature oversize proportions at Paris Fashion Week 2008–09. Opposite right: Italian sensibility crafted with technical design inspires C. P. Company’s relaxed tailored garments at the Via Savona, Milan Fashion Week, Fall/Winter 2010. Above left: A master of gender bending, Thom Browne’s Fall/Winter 2012 menswear show questions masculine identity and its perceived role in society. Above right: Walter Van Breirendock’s Spring 2010 menswear collection challenges fashion orthodoxy. His burly-bodied biker models question our perception of masculinity. Overleaf: Thom Browne’s signature aesthetic, models wear uniformed tailored suits combining two-button jackets, Bermuda shorts, and kneesocks. Spring/Summer 2011 menswear show, Paris.

INTRODUCTION

11


Young men sought to differentiate with the restrictive forms of dress associated with the modes of work their forefathers had done. Self-expression and an individualistic approach to dress would see previous historical notions of style redefined throughout the 1960s and 70s. Activewear would contribute immensely to shaping the future of men’s style through the introduction of lifestyle branding and the public promotion of health through sport. Formal, casual, leisure, sports, active, work, military, and business clothing styles are today combined together in an eclectic attempt to redefine the ideologies of fashion. The modern man’s closet comprises many different clothing styles, shapes, fabrics, colors, and textures, forming an eclectic mix of creative ideas for different occasions (workwear, formalwear, sportswear, and casualwear). No longer is the contemporary male restricted by the social stereotypes of a previous generation. The phenomenon of men’s ready-to-wear (after 1980) brought a new perspective; men’s fashion found a new language—individualism—liberated through globalized choice and the breaking down of sexual stereotypes. With the rise of new men’s fashion journals and magazines such as The Face and I-D, and the reinvention of established titles such as Esquire, GQ, and Uomo Vogue, new avenues were opened. Strict codes of dress are no longer adhered to; advertising and the media have broken the social molds and helped to redefine the boundaries of how a man wants to dress. Social acceptance is less of a concern; rebellion has become the way to invigorate and refresh what came before. Contemporary patternmaking no longer follows but increasingly defines and contributes to the innovative ideas and trends in men’s fashion. What distinguishes today’s craft from previous decades is not necessarily the practice or the documented techniques; the human body has remained relatively the same and the required outcomes—clothes—have kept their defining uses. It is the conceptual approach taken by contemporary fashion that has directed the views and practices of patternmakers and designers alike. During the 1980s and 90s, Western notions of fashion and patternmaking took a new direction, away from the previous obsession with body-conscious image and the conventions associated with traditional forms of dress. The influence of a group of pioneering Japanese designers—Issey Miyake, Kenzo Takada, Yohji Yamamoto, and Rei Kawakubo—and their sculptural design philosophy brought a new deconstructed / asymmetrical approach to notions of shape. Their garments and thus patterns were minimalist; devoid of most recognizable human features. This new aesthetic revolutionized the relationship between the perceived processes and established approaches to fashion creation of European and American

14 Patternmaking in contempoRary menswear

designers. It is a legacy that has defined contemporary menswear and contributed to new ideas of masculinity. Breaking free from previous modes of thinking, a new generation of designers has established ways of encapsulating the body through shape. Martin Margiela, Rick Owens, Walter Van Beirendonck, Aitor Throup, Carol Christian Poell, and Christopher Raeburn have all appropriated traditional techniques through patternmaking, using the juxtaposition of functionality and intelligent design to reinvent hybrid genres. Cultural trends no longer appropriate generic garments alone; contemporary menswear is concerned with communicating a personal vision. Patterns have become a medium to bring new ideas into physical constructs; boundaries are redrawn as seams become structural architecture for the body, what was once hidden is now exposed. Clothes can now have an abstract relationship with the anatomy of the wearer; sleeves are turned into voluminous tubes; jackets fold into bags; coats respond to environmental changes by becoming habitable. Technology plays an increasing role within design development; computer-generated patterns, 3-D shape profiling, virtual avatars, and intelligent textiles continue to shape our consciousness. Questioning our identity will remain the pursuit of contemporary men’s design. Centers known for their creative diversity will continue to influence and direct the evolution of the male silhouette: Milan, Paris, Antwerp, London, New York, Tokyo, all act as magnetic generators pulling in creative practitioners who respond to the ever-changing demands of global consumerism. The future challenges to practicing this craft will be the ability to generate innovative products through new vocabularies while conserving elements of the past. With the continuing advance of computer-generated solutions to patternmaking and the replacement of learning processes that have traditionally been done by hand, the contemporary designer / patternmaker has to be able to retain the integrity of their creative pursuit in the face of increasingly powerful market forces. Young designers have become custodians of historical techniques through the appropriation of generic styles which are invested with inherent meanings.

Engineered Garments have become one of the major brands behind the resurgence in American sportwear. The brand’s designer, Daiki Suzuki,has a conceptual aesthetic toward design, research, fabric, and manufacturing processes.


CHAPTER one

PREPARATION FOR PATTERNMAKING


Tools and Equipment The starting point for all patternmaking, or patternmaking, is the acquisition of a good set of tools and an understanding of how to use them. Like any other trade, patternmaking has its own specialist tools, which have been developed to aid the processes of drawing and measuring. Shown here is a selection of tools that you need to buy. As a beginner, you will not need all of them to start drafting, but most are recommended as you progress through the book. • Tape measure—used to measure the circumference and length of the body. The three that are particularly useful are all dual sided with centimeters and inches: a 60in (150cm) glass fiber–coated vinyl tape will not react to changes in temperature by expanding or shrinking; a 120in (300cm) glass fibre–coated vinyl tape is useful when you are using extremely long lengths of fabric, perhaps when draping fabric on the bias; a 60in (150cm) glass-fiber tailor’s measure that is encased in metal at one end allows the user to hold it further away from the tip for discreet measuring around the crotch area. • Yardstick or meter rule—essential for starting the pattern development as it gives an uninterrupted straight line that will be longer than half the length of most human bodies. It is usually made from aluminum or steel. • Right-angled ruler—14in x 24in (35cm x 60cm) drawing angles of 90 degrees. It is usually made from plastic, aluminum, or steel. • Grading ruler—18in with a 1⁄8in grid of vertical and horizontal lines. Used for grading and adding seam allowances to patterns. It is usually made from clear plastic. • 45-degree set square—a large set square will help you draw angles for shoulders and darts. Buy one that has a 180-degree range printed on it so that it can double up as a protractor. It is usually made from clear plastic. • French curves and pattern masters—there are many varieties to choose from. Not to be mistaken for the smaller geometry curves, these are designed to mimic the curves of the human body—neckline, armhole, waist shaping, and side seams. Buy from a fashion retailer. They are made from clear plastic, aluminum, or steel. • Hip curve—designed to replicate the shape from the lower body, it is used to draw side seams on skirts and pants and also to draw hems. It is usually made from metal, plastic, or wood. • Notcher—cuts a small rectangular shape from paper or card and is used for marking seams, ease allowances, notches on armholes, zipper ends, and for pattern alignment. It is usually made from cast metal.

18 Chapter ONE Preparation for PatternMAKing

• Tracing wheel—used to copy a pattern or garment shape through layers of fabric, card, or paper. Can be bought with a wooden or plastic handle that is attached to a circular wheel with pointed needles. • Compass—the best versions have an extendable arm for drawing circles or arcs. • Paper scissors—patternmaking scissors have been developed with heavy, cast-metal arms for cutting card and paper. This is the tool that you will use the most so it is important to buy a quality pair that will stay sharp for longer than normal scissors. • Fabric scissors—fabric scissors come in a variety of lengths with long, slim blades on cast-metal handles. Never cut paper or card with fabric scissors as this will blunt the blades, making them tear the fabric instead of slicing through it. • Craft knife—used to cut openings in patterns. • Eyelet punch or pattern drill—there are many kinds of pattern drill that cut a small circle from card or paper; some only cut one size of hole while others have changeable heads to cut different sizes. Used to mark dart leg ends, button placement, and pocket corners. • Awl—a sharp tool used to mark holes in fabric and card. • Pattern hole punch—cuts a large circular hole through card or paper to allow a pattern hook to be inserted for hanging. • Pattern hooks—these are available in various sizes and are used to hold a complete set of patterns suspended from a rail. • Board pins—used to hold and position patterns when drafting. • Dress pins—used to secure fabric when working on the dress form or for holding seams during construction. Buy long, industrial-quality pins. • Drafter’s pencils—with removable leads in sizes of 0.5 / 0.7 / 0.9 mm for drawing fine to thick lines. • Pattern weights—usually made from flat rectangles of steel with attached handles for holding down patterns or fabric. • Manila pattern card, plain, or dot and cross pattern marker paper—used for development, tracing, and for final patterns. • • • • • • • • •

Cutting mat Glue stick Marker pens in blue, black, green, and red—ditto, biros Highlighter pen Various types of adhesive tape Seam ripper Pencil sharpener Eraser Tailor’s chalk and dispenser


Fabric scissors

Tailor’s chalk and chalk dispenser Seam ripper

Awls

Tracing wheels (x 2) Pencil sharpener and soft eraser

2H pencils

French curves

Paper/card scissors Pattern drill with parts

Geometry curves

Meter rule

Hip curves

Metal ruler

Grading ruler Tape measure

Pattern hooks

Pattern master (old version)

45-degree set square 90-degree set square

Pattern master (new version)

Tools and Equipment

19


Studio Practice There are two forms of patternmaking that are practiced within industry: flat patternmaking and draping. Both are equally valid routes to the development of silhouettes for garments, and each has their own individual characteristics that will appeal; the first is static and methodical, while the second is more fluid and intuitive. Both are creative and can contribute to a working process during the creation of patterns for a design. Flat patternmaking is a process where the practitioner begins by using a mathematical formula and a size chart to map out a flat shape on paper or card which represents a section of the human body—the chest, arm, or leg—in a basic two-dimensional form without any style lines (see page 36). These shapes, known as basic slopers, or blocks, are used, together with a sketch or technical drawing of the design, to create patterns for a stylized garment through sloper manipulation. Draping, also known as modeling or moulage, is a technique in which the practitioner drapes, pins, shapes, gathers, and cuts the fabric directly on a model or garment stand. It is usually associated with haute couture. The process does not rely on precut shapes but on the skill of the designer or pattern cutter and his or her understanding of the body. Working directly on the figure allows you to see the proportion of seam lines, panels, pockets, buttons, and dart positions almost instantaneously. Some sections of the garment industry will predominantly use the flat patternmaking process because it is cheaper and has a shorter lead time between design and the manufacture of the garment ready for wholesale in the ready-to-wear market.

An accomplished and experienced designer or patternmaker working for a luxury brand or haute couture house will often successfully use a combination of both draping and flat patternmaking. This method also encourages an understanding of how flat patterns relate to the three-dimensional figure and is often used in teaching environments, too. Although patternmaking can be seen as a stand-alone specialism, it is an integral part of the production system of the modern garment industry. Most fashion brands will employ several in-house patternmakers who will work hand in hand with the design and marketing teams and the sample machinists to develop the product through from initial concept to finished product in a studio environment. This centralized operational structure is traditional practice within the industry and offers continuity throughout the production chain. Another commercial practice employed increasingly by many independent fashion labels, who may work within tighter financial restraints, is to outsource most of their development processes. These companies rely heavily on freelance practitioners and garment makers for the production of patterns and samples for their designs. Key to both methods of working is the use of good communication between each element of the increasingly long production line, particularly if part or parts of that line are out of house or even in different parts of the world. Outlined below are the two main production-line processes you may come across within the industry.

Designer and patternmaker working on a collection in a studio.

20 Chapter ONE Preparation for PatternMAKing


Bespoke and semibespoke process Bespoke, or made-to-measure as it is also known, is the production of patterns and garments for individuals made from their personal measurements; each pattern is, therefore, unique. Semibespoke is the production of patterns from a set of

industry average measurements. The garment is manufactured to a semiconstructed stage before final adjustments are made according to the client’s own measurements before finishing.

Bespoke production chain

Description

Design sketches produced

Ideas, styles, and fabric are discussed with the client.

Measurements taken and recorded

Once the design is chosen, the fabric is purchased and measurements are taken and recorded.

Pattern drafted from measurements

Measurements are used to draft basic slopers to the client’s size. The sloper is adapted to the design.

Muslin cut and sewn

Prototype muslin is cut and sewn either from muslin or the final fabric.

Muslin fitted and adjustments made

Modifications are made to the pattern based on the fitting. Muslin may be recut and a second fitting done before moving to the next stage.

Final garment cut and basted for final fitting

Final fabric cut and part assembled through basting. Fit checked on the client with possible adjustments made for proportion.

Final garment sewn

Machine sewing and hand finishing done according to characteristics of fabric.

Finishing

Buttonholes are sewn and labels attached before final pressing and dispatch.

Senior male tailor measuring cloth in a store.

STUDIO PRACTICE

21


Ready-to-wear or prêt-à-porter Ready-to-wear, or prêt-à-porter as it is also known, is the process of producing garments en masse in a variety of sizes. This process is designed to meet the needs of a broader range of customers in terms of fit and shape. Standard measurements from industry-regulated charts are used, or specific customer

Mass-production chain

data is researched through sales or gathered from external providers to create a standard size profile that fits the demographic of the target market. This mode of production now predominates over bespoke or semibespoke as it produces a cheaper product.

Description

Trend research collected

Forecasting sites such as Prostyle and WGSN are consulted, previous sales are reviewed, and customer profile data is collected.

Range planned

The season’s themes, looks, colors, silhouettes, fabrics, and price points are agreed upon.

Design development

Fashion illustrations and technical flats are produced and trade shows visited to research technical advancements and to collect fabrics and trims for moodboards.

Designs finalized and specification document developed

Designers and garment technologists meet to produce a specification document that contains all the production information needed for manufacture. Sample fabric and trims are ordered.

Patterns outsourced or produced in house

Patterns are developed or adapted from previous generic styles to a sample size.

Samples manufactured and fitted

Samples are sewn, usually in final fabrics according to specification sheets. Printing and speciality finishes are outsourced. Samples are fitted and adaptations made.

Wholesale orders taken

The collection is either shown to buyers and press through a runway show or via private sale meetings. Often external sales agents are appointed.

Mass-production process begins

Orders are collated into sizes and styles, delivery times are agreed, and bulk fabric and trims are ordered.

Patterns graded

Pattern slopers are enlarged or reduced from the base sample size either manually or digitally to create a size range that meets customer and regional requirements.

Order dispatched to cut, make, and trim (CMT)

Fabrics, trims, patterns, and samples are sent with the specification document to the manufacturer.

Style marker and cutting

Fabric is laid out in volume and the paper pattern marker is made ready for cutting. This sheet of paper shows all the pattern pieces laid out in an arrangement so that as little fabric as possible is wasted. If the fashion company has its own in-house pattern department then a computer-aided pattern design system may be used to generate the marker, allowing the company to control the wastage. Component parts are cut en masse ready for sewing.

Opposite: A man sews a suit jacket at a factory on the outskirts of Shanghai, China. 22 Chapter ONE Preparation for PatternMAKing


Mass-production chain

Description

Prepare for sewing

Some styles may need fusing added to component parts before construction. Styles are then sorted into bundles of units depending on construction processes.

Sewing

Bundles are dispatched to the factory floor and the production line of machinists. It is very unlikely that a single machinist will sew a garment from start to finish. Teams of machinists usually sew component parts of the garment— collars, pockets—in multiple units. Each component is then passed to another team for assembly.

Finishing and pressing

The finishing team will trim threads and attach buttons and details.

Quality control and dispatch

Known as QC, this is the end of the production line where garments are measured, and sewing and details are inspected to ensure that a quality standard is upheld and customer returns minimized. The product is sorted into wholesale orders, either by size, color, and / or style, ready to be shipped.

23


Measuring the male figure The taking of accurate measurements and the creation of good size charts are vital to ensure that the result of the pattern making process is a garment that fits comfortably. This can only be done with a thorough understanding of human anatomy and the tools used to test those measurements—the garment stand and the fit model. Body mapping is the act of physically recording the body’s surface by taking measurements. These measurements are geometrically mapped out using the basic sloper methodology to create a shaped template pattern that, when assembled, will mirror the human form. As a continual surface the human body has no boundary lines, unlike those found on a garment. Establishing these boundary lines on the body is the first step in understanding the segmented parts of a pattern. Boundary lines always stay in the same position, no matter how a body grows upward or outward. Gaining an understanding of these dividing lines will help you create designs in proportion to the human form.

posterior aspect

Median plane The median line passes longitudinally through the middle of the body from front to back, dividing it into right and left halves. coronal plane This is a vertical plane at right angles to the median plane, dividing the body into front (anterior) and back (posterior) portions. transverse Horizontal planes These lines pass horizontally through the body at right angles to the median and coronal planes, dividing the body into upper and lower portions. The chest plane runs around the largest expanse of the ribcage. The waist plane runs around the center of the body and the hip plane runs around the widest part of the lower body.

Coronal plane

median plane

transveRse horizontal chest plane

transveRse horizontal waist plane transveRse horizontal hip plane

anterior aspect

24 Chapter ONE Preparation for PatternMAKing


Landmark points There are various landmark points on the body that are used when taking measurements. These are extensions of the body mapping above and denote the areas of separation between the parts of the pattern. Top of the head or crown—the highest point of the body Center back neck point—the protrusion of the seventh vertebra High point shoulder—identified by the raised edge of the trapezius muscle Center front neck point—the hollow where the clavicles meet the sternum Shoulder tip—the most lateral aspect of the acromion Underarm point—the position at which the arm joins the body under the arm

Sternum

Chest nipple point—the point at which the nipple protrudes the most Elbow point—the point at which the joint between the humerus, radius and ulna protrudes the most Wrist point—the point at which the hand and wrist bones join the radius and ulna Seat protrusion point—the point at which the buttocks protrude the most Knee point—the middle of the patella Refer back to the male skeletal form to start to identify the positions of these points within the bone structure. This will help you to pinpoint these landmarks accurately on your model when following the measurement steps below.

pectoral girdle Clavicle scapula

cervical vertebrae

acromion ribs

thoracic vertebrae

humerus ILLIAc radius

vertebral column lumbar vertebrae

sacrum ulna

coccyx

pelvic girdle

femur patella

tibia

MEASURING THE MALE FIGURE

25


Taking measurements The measurement system shown here includes the minimum landmark points needed to reproduce an accurate set of basic pattern slopers for the male figure.

Tools needed to take accurate body measurements • Anthropometer or a 2-yard pole or piece of wood used to gauge height • A new cloth or fiber tape measure (cloth tape measures stretch through use, so always use a new one) • A yardstick or meter rule • A set square or right-angled ruler • Notebook, pencil, and chalk • In order for you to take measurements accurately your fit model should not be wearing any clothes apart from a pair of fitted shorts. Make sure that the shorts are not too tight or they will distort the waistline. Ask your model to stand in an erect position, keeping his eyes looking forward in a horizontal position (so that the head does not tip up or down) with relaxed shoulders and arms falling naturally to the side and palms turned inward to the body. 1. Chest circumference / fig: (A) & (B) Place the tape around the widest point on the chest, which will be roughly level with the nipple. Make sure the tape is sitting horizontally under the armpits. 2. (Natural) waist circumference / fig: (A) & (B) Place the tape horizontally around the smallest circumference of the torso between the chest and the hips. 3. Low waist circumference / fig: (A) & (B) Place the tape horizontally around the abdomen, 2in below the natural waist. This additional measurement is used when constructing a pant sloper for a more casual style. 4. Hip (seat) circumference / fig: (A) & (B) Place the tape at the greatest buttock protrusion keeping it parallel to the floor when passing over the buttocks. 5. Back waist length (Center back neck to the natural waist) / fig: (B) Place the tape at the base of the neck (the last cervical vertebrae) then measure down to the natural waist point. Mark for future measurements. 6. Center front waist length (Center front neck to the natural waist) / fig: (A) Place the tape at the base of the neck at the front (the sternal notch), then measure down to the natural waist point. Mark for future measurements.

26 Chapter ONE Preparation for PatternMAKing

7. Center back neck to front waist length / fig: (A) & (B) Place the tape at the base of the center back neck (the last cervical vertebra), then measure around the neck and over the shoulder down toward the center front natural waist point. Mark for future measurements. 8. Neck base circumference / fig: (A) & (B) Place the measure at the base of the back of the neck at the point that you identified earlier. Continue to the high point shoulder, which can be identified by the raised edge of the trapezius muscle, mark, and continue around to the front neck point, which is denoted by a hollow at the top of the chest at the center front (sternum bone). 9. Head circumference / fig: (A) & (B) Place the tape around the widest part of the head, running above the ears and over the forehead. 10. Head length / fig: (A) Place the tape under the chin point with the head in a vertical position and measure up so that the measurement is taken level with the crown point on the top of the head. 11. Across back width / fig: (B) Measure between the points at which the arms are connected to the body. On a pattern this is between the back notches. 12. Across front width / fig: (A) Measure between the points at which the arms are connected to the body, where a crease is formed by the armpit. On a pattern this is between the front notches. 13. Shoulder length / fig: (A) Place the tape at the high point shoulder that you identified previously and measure along the top of the muscle to the shoulder tip. 14. One-piece sleeve length / fig: (A) Measure from the shoulder tip down the arm and over the elbow to the wrist with the arm hanging naturally but slightly bent. You can also take the underarm measurement in this position by placing the tape 3⁄4in underneath the model’s armpit and measuring down to the wrist. 15. Wrist and hand circumference/ fig: (A) & (B) Measure around the wrist joint where the bone protrudes. Together with the width of the hand this measurement will help you establish the minimum cuff width. Measure around the widest point of the hand with fingers and thumb held as if the model is putting his arm in a sleeve.


FIGURE A 9 10

13 8 7

12

1 14

6 2 3 19 4

15 a 15 b

21

17

20

22

23 a 23 b

TAKING MEASUREMENTS

27


16. Center back neck height from floor / fig: (B) This measurement will allow you to gauge the proportions of all the other body length measurements and evaluate the silhouette of the garment.

FIGURE B

To measure the model’s body length accurately use an anthropometer. Ask the model to stand in an erect position with his feet together and arms hanging naturally in relaxed position. Direct the model’s head into an upright position where his eyes and ears are on the same horizontal plane.

9

Lower the arm of the anthropometer down onto the center back neck point. Take the height reading from the dial on the anthropometer. If you don’t have an anthropometer, use a 2-yard pole or a piece of wood against a flat surface. If using a tape measure, make sure it is a new one.

8 7

11

17. Low waist to floor length / fig: (A) Place the tape on the side of the body at the low waistline and measure down vertically to the floor.

1 5

18. Natural waist to hip length / fig: (B) Place the tape at the natural waistline, on the side or the side back, then measure down to the hip level.

2

19. Crotch length (Center front and center back) / fig: (A) & (B) Place the tape on the low waistline at the center front. Pass between the lowest part of the crotch and up between the buttocks to the low waistline on the center back. This measurement can also be separated into front crotch length and back crotch length.

3 18

19 4

20. Inside leg length / fig: (A) Place the tape end in a central position under the crotch, then measure down the inside of the leg to the ankle.

15 a 15 b

21. Thigh circumference / fig: (A) & (B) Place the tape around the widest point on the leg, 2in below the crotch. Keep the tape parallel to the floor.

21

22. Calf circumference / fig: (A) & (B) Place the tape around the widest point of the lower leg below the knee line. Keep the tape parallel to the floor. 23. Ankle and heel-foot circumference / fig: (A), (B) & (C) Ankle—measure around the narrowest point (the medial malleolus) above the ankle. Keep the tape parallel to the floor. Heel foot—measure around the heel passing the tape measure over the widest part (the dorsal juncture) of the foot at a 45-degree angle to the floor.

16

22

24. Seat depth / fig: (C) Ask your model to sit upright with his knees at a right angle to his torso. Place the tape on the low waistline at the side and measure down vertically to the seated buttocks. 23 a 23 b

28 Chapter ONE Preparation for PatternMAKing


The measurement model pictured in figures (A), (B), and (C) is a professional model working within the fashion industry. He was selected because he has an industry-endorsed average body shape for a size 38in (96cm) chest. The summary of the model’s measurements provided below was recorded by a TC2 3-D Body Measurement Scanner.

FIGURE C

Use the information below to make comparisons with your fit model’s measurements.

1 Chest circumference 2 (Natural) waist circumference 3 Low waist circumference (2in below natural) 4 Hip (seat) circumference 5 Center back neck to natural waist length

24

23 a 23 b

6 Center front neck to natural waist length 7 Center back neck to front waist length 8 Neck base circumference 9 Head circumference 10 Head length 11 Across back width 12 Across front width 13 Shoulder length 14 One-piece sleeve length 15a Wrist circumference b Hand circumference 16 Back neck height from floor 17 Low waist to floor length 18 Natural waist to hip length 19a Front crotch length (natural waist) b Back crotch length (natural waist) 20 Inside leg length (crotch to ankle) 21 Thigh circumference 22 Calf circumference 23a Ankle circumference b Heel-foot circumference 24 Seat depth

38in 331⁄8in 331⁄2in 373⁄8in 173⁄4in 153⁄4in 221⁄4in 151⁄2in 227⁄8in 91⁄2in 153⁄8in 141⁄8in 61⁄8in 243⁄4in 63⁄4in 97⁄8in 603⁄8in 403⁄4in 81⁄4in 143⁄8in 143⁄4in 287⁄8in 217⁄8in 141⁄8in 93⁄4in 123⁄4in 123⁄8in

TAKING MEASUREMENTS

29


DRESS FORMS

Fit mannequins or dress forms are used in the clothing industry for developing patterns and for fitting muslins and garments. Choosing the right one is important when establishing your size range. Modeled to represent the dimensions of the human body, they are made from fiberglass with a covering of foam and linen. They can be bought in many sizes and in different body configurations (three-quarter, full-, or half-body, with or without arms). Standard forms are three-quarter length, finishing below the hip. They are generally sold without arms and are mounted on a central metal adjustable pole, with or without wheels. These are the perfect starting point when building up a studio as you can use one to fit and assess patterns, muslins, and garment silhouettes during line development. Full-body versions are available and generally hang on a pole from the crown point. They are available with removable arms and legs and collapsible shoulders. Recent advances in 3-D body scanning technology have seen the development of a new, technically superior form with an accurate body shape that is truly representative of age and customer profile. Produced from sizing data collected through surveys, these forms can be manufactured to a high level of 30 Chapter ONE Preparation for PatternMAKing

accuracy with collapsible shoulders, collapsible hips, removable arms, and a soft abdomen. They also have measurement lines incorporated and come with an adjustable stand. If your form comes without any measurement lines, use seam tape to mark them before use. This will help you in your understanding of pattern construction as the front and back slopers represent the segmented parts of the human body. Attach the seam tape with pins or sew the landmark lines to the linen—center front and back, neckline circumference, chest circumference, waist circumference, hip circumference, side seams, shoulder seams, and armholes. To find these positions use your tape measure to divide the circumferences and lengths of the form.

Above: The evolution in the shape of the dress form from three different manufacturers, all produced to a size 40in. Left to right: Siegel & Stockman tailor’s dummy, France, c.1960; Alvanon full-body form created using bodyscan data, US, 2005; Kennett & Lindsell’s British body shape line, UK, 1980.


Fit models When considering and selecting a fit model around which to develop a collection, it is important to identify your customer’s silhouette or normal body shape first. This can be achieved by undertaking comparative research among your competitors. Take photos and collect tearsheets from magazines or from street style blogs. This information will help you identify what your consumer may look like and thus help you to select the best fit model. Remember that fashion models on the catwalk are not real customers; they are marketing tools used to project the image of the brand. It is wise to have several fit models reflecting different male silhouettes. Once you have recruited your fit models it is important to record certain fundamental elements, such as posture, weight, eating habits, and exercise routines. This will help you to make accurate judgments in future fitting sessions; if your model’s shape changes you can avoid unnecessary corrections and adjustments to samples and patterns. Posture and drop Posture and drop are also important factors when selecting a fit model. Unlike the dress form, the human body may not be symmetrical. Posture Posture refers to the physical manner in which the body frame is carried. Incorrect posture can affect the balance of patterns, resulting in numerous figure adjustments.

The following are some of the most common posture variations that will also affect the balance of a garment. Normal The head and neck are held centrally over the shoulders, which sit back and down. The chest is slightly lifted above a taut stomach. Arms hang naturally with elbows bent forward over a straight back. Erect The chest is lifted, which creates an arched upper back, thus shortening the upper back length and increasing the front chest length from the prominence of the chest to base of the neck. Rounded / slumped back The head is slumped forward with curved shoulders and a rounded upper back and hollow chest, which leads to a narrow chest with increased back length and width. Sloped or square shoulders Sloping shoulders will require an increase in the pitch of the shoulder slope from the armhole, while square shoulders will need a decrease in the pitch.

Drop Drop is the term used to describe the ratio between the circumference of the chest and that of the waist. Identifying this will help you to visualize the silhouette of the figure: a larger waist than chest will give you a triangular silhouette; a waist that is the same as the chest will lead to a rectangular silhouette.

Men’s ready-to-wear has traditionally offered a wider range of fitting groups with short, medium, and tall heights accommodated. Increasingly retailers have categorized these into five general silhouettes: • Slim—straight back with low muscle definition on chest, abdomen, and lower body; • Regular / normal—a flat chest and stomach with a straight back; • Large / athletic—a pronounced chest with a straight back and enlarged muscle definition; • Stocky—rounded shoulders with a curved back and a slightly protruding stomach and chest; • Obese—a corpulent abdominal area that results in stooped shoulders and a curved back. As your product may appeal to one or more of these figure types it is important that you can identify these variations, giving you the ability to make corrections to your patterns and thus achieve a better fitting garment for your customer.

Designer Yohji Yamamoto conducting a fit session as he prepares for his Spring 2011 menswear show. FIT MODELS

31


Size charts All the size charts provided are to create proportionally balanced patterns, which would be adjusted to the individual requirements during the sampling process. SAMPLE CHINESE BODY SIZE CHART Code 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 a 15 b 16 17 18 19 a 19 b 20 21 22 23 a 23 b 24

Body Measurements Chest circumference 72 76 80 84 (Natural) waist circumference 62 66 70 74 Low waist circumference 65 69 73 77 Hip (seat) circumference 71 75 79 83 Back waist length 42.2 42.5 42.8 43.1 Center front waist length 39.2 39.5 39.8 40.1 Front waist from center back neck 56 57 58 59 Neck base circumference 37 38 39 40 Head circumference 56.2 56.5 56.8 57.1 Head length 24 24.2 24.4 24.6 Across back width 36 37 38 39 Across front width 32 33 34 35 Shoulder length 13.2 13.5 13.8 14.1 One-piece sleeve length 58 58 58 58 Wrist circumference 14.8 15 15.2 15.4 Hand circumference 20.8 21 21.2 21.4 Body length 125.8 128.2 130.6 133 Low waist to floor length 97.8 98 98.2 98.4 Low waist to hip length 18 18 18 18 Front crotch length 35.3 35.5 35.7 35.9 Back crotch length 33.9 34.5 35.1 35.7 Inside leg length 69.4 70 70.6 71.2 Thigh circumference 37.2 39 40.8 42.6 Calf circumference 31.6 32.5 33.4 34.3 Ankle circumference 22.2 22.5 22.8 23.1 Heel-foot circumference 30.2 30.5 30.8 31.1 Seat depth 31 31 31 31

32 Chapter ONE Preparation for PatternMAKing

88 78 81 87 43.4 40.4 60 41 57.4 24.8 40 36 14.4 58 15.6 21.6 135.4 98.6 18 36.1 36.3 71.8 44.4 35.2 23.4 31.4 31

92 82 85 91 43.7 40.7 61 42 57.7 25 41 37 14.7 58 15.8 21.8 137.8 98.8 18 36.3 36.9 72.4 46.2 36.1 23.7 31.7 31

96 100 104 108 86 90 94 98 89 93 97 101 95 99 103 107 44 44.3 44.6 44.9 41 41.3 41.6 41.9 62 63 64 65 43 44 45 46 58 58.3 58.6 58.9 25.2 25.4 25.6 25.8 42 43 44 45 38 39 40 41 15 15.3 15.6 15.9 58 58 58 58 16 16.2 16.4 16.6 22 22.2 22.4 22.6 140.2 142.6 145 147.4 99 99.2 99.4 99.6 18 18 18 18 36.5 36.7 36.9 37.1 37.5 38.1 38.7 39.3 73 73.6 74.2 74.8 48 49.8 51.6 53.4 37 37.9 38.8 39.7 24 24.3 24.6 24.9 32 32.3 32.6 32.9 31 31 31 31

Grade 4 4 4 4 0.3 0.3 1 1 0.3 0.2 1 1 0.3 0 0.2 0.2 2.4 0.2 0 0.2 0.6 0.6 1.8 0.9 0.3 0.3 0


SAMPLE US BODY SIZE CHART Code 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 a 15 b 16 17 18 19 a 19 b 20 21 22 23 a 23 b 24

Body Measurements Chest circumference (Natural) waist circumference Low waist circumference Hip (seat) circumference Center back neck to natural waist length Center front neck to natural waist length Center back neck to front waist length Neck base circumference Head circumference Head length Across back width Across front width Shoulder length One-piece sleeve length Wrist circumference Hand circumference Back neck height from floor Low waist to floor length Natural waist to hip length Front crotch length Back crotch length Inside leg length Thigh circumference Calf circumference Ankle circumference Heel-foot circumference Seat depth

34” 84.9 69.7 72.2 84.9 48.9 44.8 53.5 35.6 56.4 25.1 38 36 15.3 62.6 16.5 21.6 160.5 105.8 20 32.5 34.6 80.5 53.4 34.6 21.3 32.4 28.0

36” 90.7 75.5 78.0 90.7 49.2 45.8 54.5 36.8 56.7 25.3 39 37 15.6 62.9 17.2 21.8 160.7 106.1 20 33.4 35.5 80.9 55.9 35.6 22.1 32.7 28.0

38” 96.5 81.3 83.8 96.5 49.5 46.7 55.5 38.1 57.0 25.5 40 38 15.9 63.2 17.8 22.0 160.9 106.4 20 34.3 36.4 81.3 58.4 36.5 22.9 33.0 28.0

40” 102.3 87.1 89.6 102.3 49.8 47.7 56.5 39.4 57.3 25.7 41 39 16.2 63.5 18.4 22.2 161.1 106.7 20 35.2 37.3 81.7 60.9 37.5 23.7 33.3 28.0

42” 108.1 92.9 95.4 108.1 50.1 48.6 57.5 40.6 57.6 25.9 42 40 16.5 63.8 19.1 22.4 161.3 107 20 36.1 38.2 82.1 63.4 38.4 24.5 33.6 28.0

44” 113.9 98.7 101.2 113.9 50.5 49.6 58.5 41.9 57.9 26.1 43 41 16.9 64.2 19.7 22.6 161.5 107.4 20 37 39.1 82.5 66.0 39.4 25.3 33.9 28.0

Grade 5.8 5.8 5.8 5.8 0.32 0.95 1 1.27 0.3 0.2 1 1 0.32 0.32 0.64 0.2 0.2 0.32 0 0.9 0.9 0.4 2.52 0.95 0.79 0.3 0

SAMPLE EUROPEAN BODY SIZE CHART Code 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 a 15 b 16 17 18 19 a 19 b 20 21 22 23 a 23 b 24

Body Measurements EU34 EU36 EU38 EU40 EU42 EU44 Chest circumference 88 92 96 100 104 108 (Natural) waist circumference 72 76 80 84 88 92 Low waist circumference 76 80 84 88 92 96 Hip (seat) circumference 90 94 98 102 106 110 Center back neck to natural waist length 44.1 44.4 44.7 45 45.3 45.6 Center front neck to natural waist length 39.9 40.2 40.5 40.8 41.1 41.4 Center back neck to front waist length 55.1 56.1 57.1 58.1 59.1 60.1 Neck base circumference 38 39 40 41 42 43 Head circumference 56.7 57 57.3 57.6 57.9 58.2 Head length 24.8 25 25.2 25.4 25.6 25.8 Across back width 37 38 39 40 41 42 Across front width 32 33 34 35 36 37 Shoulder length One-piece sleeve length Wrist circumference Hand circumference Back neck height from floor Low waist to floor length Natural waist to hip length Front crotch length Back crotch length Inside leg length Thigh circumference Calf circumference Ankle circumference Heel-foot circumference Seat depth

13.7 64 17.2 21.6 154.4 111.3 20 25.9 29.5 83.4 52.7 35.1 24.4 32.4 30

14 64 17.4 21.8 154.6 111.5 20 26.7 30.3 83.8 54.5 36 24.7 32.7 30

14.3 64 17.6 22 154.8 111.7 20 27.5 31.1 84.2 56.3 36.9 25 33 30

14.6 64 17.8 22.2 155 111.9 20 28.3 31.9 84.6 58.1 37.8 25.3 33.3 30

14.9 64 18 22.4 155.2 112.1 20 29.1 32.7 85 59.9 38.7 25.6 33.6 30

15.2 64 18.2 22.6 155.4 112.3 20 29.9 33.5 85.4 61.7 39.6 25.9 33.9 30

Grade 4 4 4 4 0.3 0.3 1 1 0.3 0.2 1 1 0.3 0 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0 0.8 0.8 0.4 1.8 0.9 0.3 0.3 0

SIZE CHARTS

33


CHAPTER two

The PatternMAKing process


the development of the design There are five stages in the development of a design in patternmaking: the basic sloper pattern, the master plan or pattern, the design development pattern, the designer pattern from which the muslins are cut, and, finally, the production pattern.

How pattern slopers relate to the body The boundary lines of the basic pattern slopers—bodice, sleeve, pant—and their alignment to the male figure. Use this template to assist you in your design development when determining proportional placement of style features on your silhouette.

SIDE HIGH POINT SHOULDER

WAISTLINE

CHEST LEVEL SIDE SEAM

SEAM

WAISTLINE

CURVE

UNDERARM FRONT

GRAINLINE

HIP LEVEL

CR OTCH

UNDERARM BACK SEAM

GRAINLINE

CHEST LEVEL

BICEPS LEVEL

CENTER FRONT

CENTER FRONT NECK

CHEST LEVEL

GRAINLINE

INSEAM

SEAT LEVEL

OUTSEAM

UNDERARM FRONT

SEAM

C OT

HEMLINE

CR

HIP LEVEL

GRAINLINE

WAISTLINE

RVE H CU

WAISTLINE

KNEE LEVEL

BICEPS LEVEL

UNDERARM BACK SEAM

GRAINLINE

SIDE SEAM

CHEST LEVEL

CENTER BACK

INSEAM

CENTER BACK NECK

OUTSEAM

SIDE HIGH POINT SHOULDER

GRAINLINE

SEAT LEVEL

KNEE LEVEL

HEMLINE

Right: A student cutting out patterns for his final-year collection.

36 Chapter TWO: the patternmaking process

UNDERARM/ SIDE SEAM CORNER


The basic sloper When developing any pattern, the first stage is to create a basic sloper. Drafted from a size chart or from a company’s fit model’s measurements, these patterns offer only the basic pattern shape, broadly following the contours of the body. For menswear the following basic slopers are usually needed: • Basic upper body sloper—a front and a back body shape • Basic sleeve sloper, which can be one or two piece • Basic pant sloper, which consists of a front and back leg shape

All patterns in the book are based on these three basic slopers (see pages 40–47). Once the basic sloper has been created, it is made up as a muslin and fitted. After any necessary adjustments are made, the sloper is then cut from heavy card or thin plastic with no seam allowance. The exception to the rule is the tailored two-piece sleeve, which is drafted direct with no sloper used (see Trench Coat pages 244–45).

The master plan or pattern CENTRE BACK NECK POINT POINT

FRONT SHOULDER SHOULDER POINT TIP

BACK BACK SHOULDER SHOULDER POINT TIP

4.5 CM

4 CM

7 CM YOKE BACK 7 CM

14 C

7 CM

M

10 CM

WAISTLINE WAISTLINE

NEW HEMLINE HEMLINE

3 CM

14 CM 3 CM

SIDE SEAM SIDE SEAM

SIDE PANEL SEAM

FRONT MASTER MASTER PLAN

14 CM

BACK MASTER PLAN

BREAST POCKET

12 CM

YOKE LINE

2 CM

WELT WELT

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

CENTRE FRONT CENTER FRONT

SIDE SEAM

FRONT MASTER PLAN

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

WAISTLINE WAIST LINE

SIDE SEAM

CENTER BACK CENTRE BACK

BACK MASTER PLAN

FRONT MASTER PLAN

CENTRE BACK CENTER BACK

CHEST LEVEL LINE

CHEST LEVEL

6 CM

POCKET BAG

17 CM

CHEST LINE

3 CM

6 CM

3 CM

FRONT FRONT NOTCH PITCH POINT

BACK MASTER PLAN

7 CM FRONT YOKE

CENTRE FRONT FRONT CENTER

BACK PITCH BACK POINT NOTCH

FRONT SHOULDER HIGH POINT NECK SHOULDER POINT

2 CM 12.5 CM

HEMLINE HEM LINE

A master plan for pattern development is, like an architectural blueprint, the starting point for any design. The master plan begins from the basic pattern slopers that hold no design features. It allows visual pattern planning, and design details can be investigated for positioning or depth before the basic slopers are adapted. Start each pattern by selecting the appropriate sloper or slopers from which you can then create a master plan; a jacket design, for example, might start with both the basic sloper and the sleeve sloper. The master plan (above left) is created by tracing around the shape of the sloper onto pattern drafting paper following the instructions on pages 48–49. The style details of the design, such as yokes, style lines, darts, and pockets, are then drawn onto the master plan (above right).

Most master plans are traced from half of the sloper, and one side of the pattern is then developed before being copied, or mirrored, to create the other side of the pattern piece (see page 50). This saves time in the patternmaking process and serves to eliminate possible errors in duplicating design features from one side of the pattern to the other. The human body is generally symmetrical and, therefore, shape and silhouette development need only be done to one half of the body if the design is balanced. Even if the design is asymmetric, drafting one half of the pattern and then copying over the drafted shape to create the other side before working on the full front or back body pattern is a quick way to achieve the desired style. Pattern shapes are then traced off the master plan, which is never cut but instead left intact for reference, serving as a blueprint and record of the pattern development. development of the design

37


4 CM

4 CM

⁄16" CM 0.4

3

0.4 ⁄16" CM

3

⁄16" CM 0.4

3

⁄16" CM 0.4

UNDERARM /UNDERARM SIDE SEAM CORNER POINT

3

FRONT RIGHT CUT 1 SELF

2⁄4"CM

3

GRAINLINE

Designer patterns The pattern shapes may be either traced directly from the master plan or from design development patterns onto patternmaking paper to create the designer pattern. The designer pattern is then used to create a muslin, sample, or test garment for fitting prior to production. At this stage patterns that have been designed in half, and that need to be created as shapes with a left- and right-hand side, are copied or mirrored. Annotation is also added, such as grainlines, notches, and drill holes for darts, together with seam allowances (see pages 50–51).

GRAINLINE

CENTER BACK NOTCH

SHOULDER NOTCHES

CUT 1 LINING

BACK LINING LEFT

COLLAR CUT 1 PR SELF

CUT 1 LINING

GRAINLINE

BACK LINING RIGHT

In this book designer patterns are shown in blue; patterns for linings are shown in pink.

SHOULDER NOTCHES

COLLAR STAND CUT 1 PR SELF

GL

HEMLINE

38 Chapter TWO: the patternmaking process

HEMLINE

GRAIN LINE

CENTRE FRONT

CENTRE FRONT

GRAIN LINE

5 1.5 ⁄8" CM

T M OU E SEA MOV

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

FRONT SIDE SEAM

Design development patterns While developing the pattern, it may be necessary to trace off shapes from the master plan for further development—these are called design development patterns. Complicated design features may need to be slashed and spread (see page 56) to add fullness or pleats, or panel shapes may need to be opened up through pivoting techniques (see page 56) to achieve cylindrical silhouettes on the final pattern. When tracing the pattern shapes from the master plan all marks made on the master plan, such as notches or seam allowance, should also be transferred to the development pattern. Once the pattern shapes have been developed, these development patterns can then be taped to another piece of paper before the designer pattern is traced off.

0.4 ⁄16" CM

3


Production patterns Once the muslin or sample garment has been approved the production patterns are traced from the designer patterns. These are then graded (see pages 52–53) and used for mass garment manufacture. They are cut from card with all annotations added. Every part of the garment will have a corresponding pattern piece.

Left and right patterns In this book, all the master plans and pattern developments start with the pattern shape for the right-hand side of the garment as you would see it if you were the wearer, and this is how all the patterns are labeled. If you are looking at the pattern, or a pair of patterns, from the front, the right pattern would be on the left and vice versa.

Left: Production patterns. Below: A woman uses a band blade to cut multiple garment pieces.

39


Basic UPPER Body SLOPER

Step 1 Developing the basic upper body sloper frame • Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of your torso or fit model. • Using a yarstick, draw a vertical line down the left-hand side of your drafting paper; make a mark at the top of this line and label it (0). • From (0) measure down 3⁄4in, mark and label (1). This is the center back neck point. • From (1) measure down 85⁄8in (armhole depth); mark and label (2). This is a variable measurement dependent on the figure type and arm girth. • From (1) measure down 177⁄8in (back neck to waist); mark and label (3). • From (1) measure down 253⁄4in (garment length); mark and label (4). The garment length is a variable measurement dependent on the silhouette you want to create. In this instance, it is determined by adding the center back neck to back waist measurement (177⁄8in) to the waist to hip measurement (77⁄8in). • From (2) square across one-quarter of the chest measurement plus one-quarter of the garment ease 105⁄8in; mark and label (5) (chest level). • Repeat this from (0): square across one-quarter of the chest measurement plus one-quarter of the garment ease 105⁄8in; mark and label (6). • From (3) square across one-quarter of the chest measurement plus one-quarter of the garment ease 105⁄8in; mark and label (7) (waistline). From (4) square across onequarter of the chest measurement plus one-quarter of the garment ease 105⁄8in; mark and label (8) (hip level). • Join points (6), (5), (7), and (8) with a straight line; this will become your side seam. • From (1) square out one-fifth of the neck base circumference plus 1⁄4in = 33⁄8in; mark and label (9). 40 Chapter TWO: the patternmaking process

Armhole (scye) depth Small = 81⁄4in; Medium = 85⁄8in; Large = 9in; X-large = 93⁄8in (grade increment = 3⁄8in) Measurements needed to draft sloper Quarter chest circumference = 91⁄2in Armhole (scye) depth = 85⁄8in Center back neck to waist = 177⁄8in Waist to hip = 77⁄8in Garment length = 253⁄4in Half across back measurement = 77⁄8in Neck base circumference = 153⁄8in

0 1 13

6

10 9

16 14

17 11

2

ACROSS BACK

3

12

CHEST LEVEL

45

5

15

SIDE SEAM

Measurements used for this size 38in block Chest circumference = 38in Full garment ease = 5in

Half chest circumference = 19in Half ease = 23⁄8in Quarter chest circumference = 91⁄2in Quarter ease = 13⁄16in

CENTER LINE

The method introduced here is a guide to developing the basic men’s upper body sloper with no annotation or seam allowances. All the measurements given are an approximation of a UK standard size 38in (chest circumference 38in plus 5in full body garment ease = 43in), which is generally regarded as a medium in the industry. The half front upper body sloper is developed on top of the half back upper body sloper and will need to be traced off and mirrored over separately before following the pattern adaptations in subsequent chapters. These slopers will serve as a starting point for all the drafts in this book (except pants) or for your own designs. You can also use measurements from the size charts on pages 32–33 to make the sloper in a different size to fit your model or form.

WAISTLINE

7

HIP LEVEL

4

8

• From (9) square up 3⁄4in and label (10). Using a French curve, draw in the back neckline from (10) to (1). • The measurement (1) to (11) is half the measurement (1) to (2) = 43⁄8in; mark and label (11). • Square out from (11) half the across back measurement 77⁄8in; mark and label (12). This is a variable measurement and 3⁄8–1⁄4 in of ease may need to be added depending on the amount of ease added to the chest circumference. If the armhole shape is too deep or flat at the underarm, add


Step 2 TRACING OFF THE FRONT AND BACK slopers • Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the sloper you have just developed and twice the width. • Draw a vertical line down the center of the piece of paper longer than the upper body sloper. This will be the side seam line for the front and back upper body slopers once traced. • Place the new paper over the master pattern you have just drafted, aligning side seams together. To the left-hand side trace the upper body sloper off with the back neckline from the master. Turn over the paper so that the back upper body sloper is now aligned to the right side of the seam line. • Trace around the same sloper, drawing in the front neckline. Turn over the paper and retrace around the front upper body

sloper so that you have both sides of the upper body sloper marked on one side. • Mark the back and front notches on the slopers you have just traced; measure up 43⁄4in from (15) on the back upper body sloper where it intersects the back armhole line. Make two marks and label back notch. • Measure up 31⁄8in from (15) on the front upper body sloper where it intersects the front armhole line. Mark and label front notch.

BACK NECKLINE

1

BACK HIGH POINT SHOULDER

BACK SHOULDER SEAM

FRONT SHOULDER TIP

BACK SHOULDER TIP

10

CENTER BACK NECK POINT

FRONT SHOULDER SEAM

10

FRONT NECKLINE

16

16

FRONT HIGH POINT SHOULDER

17 BACK NOTCH

CHEST LEVEL

2 10

15

10

1 16

16

17 BACK NOTCH

2

CHEST LEVEL 15

5

15

FRONT NOTCH

5

45º

CHEST LEVEL

WAISTLINE

2

15

7

WAISTLINE

3

Calculating the width and depth of the front neckline To measure the position of the front high point shoulder and the center front neck point, through which to draw the front neckline, 3 10 hold a right-angled ruler against the neck of your fit model or dress form, keeping it horizontal to the ground. This will give you the depth of the CF neck.

2 CENTER FRONT

CHEST LEVEL SIDE SEAM

CENTER BACK

2

3

45º

CENTER FRONT NECK POINT

31⁄8"

43⁄8"

FRONT NOTCH

BACK ARMHOLE

FRONT ARMHOLE

CENTER FRONT

SIDE SEAM

high point shoulder to (16); this is your front and back shoulder seam. • From (15) at a 45-degree angle measure out 13⁄16in; mark. • Draw in the armhole shape from (16) using the whole French curve, draw a line that passes through (12), continuing down to pass through the mark you made from (15) to finish at (5). This is the front and back armhole. • From (1) measure down one-fifth of the neck base circumference minus 5⁄16in (23⁄4in); mark and label (17). Using the cylindrical part of a French curve draw a line from (10) to (17). This is the front neckline.

CENTER BACK

ease to the across back measurement; this will narrow the underarm and extend the shoulder length. From (1) square down one-eighth of the armhole depth minus 5 ⁄16in (3⁄4in); mark and label (13). From (13) square across the same measurement from (11) to (12) half the across back measurement plus ease if needed; mark and label (14). From (14) square down through (12) until you reach the line (2) to (5); mark and label (15). At (14) square out 11⁄16in; mark and label (16); this is your front and back shoulder tip. Draw a line from (10) front and back

5

4

HIP LEVEL

8

HIP LEVEL

CENTER FRONT POINT

4

HIGH POINT SHOULDER

4

basic UPPER body sloper

41


Basic Sleeve SLOPER The method introduced here is a guide to developing the basic men’s sleeve sloper with no annotation or style lines. All the measurements given here are for a sample size 38in. This sloper will serve as a starting point for all the drafts in this book, or for your own designs. You can also use measurements from the size charts on pages 32–33 to make the sloper in a different size, or use your own measurements taken from your fit model or male dress form. Measurements used for this sleeve sloper, corresponding to a size 38in upper body sloper Armhole = 191⁄4in + 1in ease = 201⁄4in Sleeve length to wrist = 271⁄2in Top of sleeve cap to elbow length = 161⁄8in Upper biceps circumference = 14in

BACK SHOULDER TIP

FRONT SHOULDER TIP

FRONT

BACK

CENTER FRONT

CHEST LEVEL

SIDE SEAM

CENTER BACK

CHEST LEVEL

Taking the armhole measurement from the basic upper body sloper The armhole measurement needs to be taken from your basic upper body sloper. Place a tape measure at the back shoulder tip and walk it round the curve up to the front shoulder tip. If you are developing your basic slopers to your own measurements, just replace the armhole measurement above with the one you have taken.

42 Chapter TWO: the patternmaking process

Step 1 Developing the basic sleeve sloper • Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of your sleeve measurement or the arm length of your fit model. • Using a ruler, draw a vertical line down the left-hand side of the drafting paper; make a mark at the top of this line and label it (1). This is the back underarm seam. • From (1) square across 14in to the right (the circumference of the biceps); make a mark and label it (3). • From (1) square down 271⁄2in (the length of the sleeve); make a mark and label it (2). Square across from (2) and down from (3) to create a rectangle. • Divide the width of the rectangle vertically into four narrower equal-sized rectangles, naming the lines between them, from the left, back line, center line, and front line. Label the long side of the rectangle on the right-hand side front underarm seam. Label the top of the center line (4). • From (1) measure down one-third of the armhole measurement—63⁄4in, which is the height of the sleeve cap; make a mark and label it (5). This is the sleeve corner at biceps level. Square across to intersect the front underarm seam from (3); make a mark and label it (6). This is the sleeve corner at biceps level. The line you have drawn is the biceps level. Label the point where this line intersects the back line as (7) and the front line as (8). • From (7) measure up 4in (one-sixth of the armhole measurement of 33⁄8in + 5⁄8in = 4in); draw a notch and label it (A). This is the back notch. • From (8), measure up 33⁄8in (one-sixth of the armhole measurement); draw a notch and label it (B). This is the front notch.

Shape of the armhole The front notch is lower than the back notch to allow for the deeper curve at the front of the sleeve. This accommodates the shape of the sleeve and also allows the arm to move forward.


14"

4

1

TOP OF SLEEVE CAP

3

⁄8"

5

5

8

7

6

SLEEVE CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

1"

ELBOW LEVEL

FRONT UNDERARM SEAM

1"

271⁄2"

FRONT LINE

BACK LINE

103⁄8"

CENTER LINE

BICEPS LEVEL

203⁄4"

103⁄8"

SLEEVE HEMLINE

2

TOP OF SLEEVE CAP

BACK NOTCH

FRONT NOTCH

SLEEVE CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

SLEEVE CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL FRONT UNDERARM SEAM

FRONT LINE

BICEPS LEVEL

CENTER LINE ELBOW LEVEL

123⁄8" SLEEVE HEMLINE

1"

6

Step 2 Shaping the underarm seams • Measure in 3⁄4in from both back and front underarm seams at the sleeve hemline and mark. • From both points redraw the new back and front underarm seam lines back up to the corners of the sleeve at biceps level to create a tapered sleeve shape.

2

SLEEVE CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

⁄8"

3

BACK LINE

8

FRONT NOTCH

⁄16"

Measuring the sleeve cap and adding ease At this point you should measure your newly drafted sleeve cap, which should be 1in larger than the armhole. This ease is distributed during construction between the 4notches to give 3shape to the sleeve cap. You can add more or less ease depending on your sleeve shape, fabric, A or design. B 7

B

3

1"

5

A

63⁄4"

BACK UNDERARM SEAM

1

⁄4"

3

BACK NOTCH

BACK UNDERARM SEAM

• Now you will draw in the curved sleeve cap. • Draw a straight line from (5) to (A); halfway along this line square down 3⁄16in; connect (5) to (A) with a hollow curve through this point. • Draw a straight line from (A) to (4); halfway along this line square up 5⁄8in; connect (A) to (4) with a raised curve through this point. • Draw a straight line from (4) to (B); halfway along this line square up 3⁄4in; connect (4) to (B) with a raised curve through this point. • Draw a straight line from (B) to (6); halfway along this line square down 3⁄8in; connect (B) to (6) with a hollow curve through this point. • Divide the length of the sleeve below the sleeve cap in half (subtract the sleeve cap height from the sleeve length (271⁄2in – 63⁄4in = 203⁄4in) and divide in half (203⁄4in ⁄ 2 = 103⁄8in). Measure 103⁄8in from (5) down the back underarm seam and mark, then square across. From this line measure 1in back up toward the biceps level, make a mark, and square across. This is the elbow level. • Notch the top of the sleeve cap by measuring 3⁄16in from (4) along the sleeve cap toward the front notch.

Basic Sleeve SLOPER

43


TOP OF SLEEVE CAP

Step 3 To shape the sleeve hemline for the addition of a cuff

FRONT NOTCH

SLEEVE CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

44 Chapter TWO: the patternmaking process

⁄16"

3

⁄16"

3

FRONT UNDERARM SEAM

FRONT LINE

CENTER LINE

BACK LINE

ELBOW LEVEL

• From the center line, divide the width of the new sleeve hemline at the front and back of the sleeve in half and mark. • On the back sleeve hemline, measure down 3⁄16in from this point and mark; and on the front measure up 3⁄16in and mark. • From the corner of the back underarm seam, draw a convex curve to the center line through the point on the back, then reverse and draw a concave curve to the front underarm seam through the point on the front.

SLEEVE CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

BICEPS LEVEL

BACK UNDERARM SEAM

Adding a cuff to a sleeve The sleeve hemline is shaped for the addition of the cuff panel with a curve that is concave on the back sleeve and convex on the front. This is to balance the cuff shape around the cylindrical shape and hinged movement of the arm.

BACK NOTCH


Basic PANT SLOPER The method introduced here is a guide to developing the basic men’s pant sloper with a 3⁄4in back waist dart for shape above the buttocks and a 15⁄8in front pleat for ease of movement. The silhouette is straight with no annotation or style lines added. All the measurements given are for a sample size 32in (81cm) waist, which accompanies a size 38in (96.5cm) chest. This sloper will serve as a starting point for all the pant drafts in this book, or for your own designs. You can also use measurements from the size charts on pages 32–33 to make the sloper in a different size, or use your own measurements taken from your fit model or male dress form.

The modern man has diligently followed fashion when it comes to how he wears his pants and jeans. From high-waisted to lowriding, the waistline seems to be in a state of cultural flux. The natural waist in most men is the smallest measurement around the circumference of the abdomen or stomach. Generally most pants are designed to sit between this and the hip—the most comfortable point for movement, with the waistband line being dropped 2in below the natural waist on average, depending on the design.

Measurements used for this size 32in (81cm) pant sloper Waist circumference = 32in + 13⁄16in ease = 333⁄16in Total hip circumference = 373⁄4in + 4in ease (1in ease on each of the four panels) = 413⁄4in Front hip measurement = 187⁄8in Back hip measurement = 227⁄8in Crotch depth = 101⁄4in Outside leg measurement = 421⁄8in Inside leg measurement = 32in

63⁄4" 101⁄4"

CENTER FRONT

1

WAISTLINE

5

HIP LEVEL

4

9 ⁄2" 1

6

2"

8

CROTCH LEVEL

2

91⁄2"

32"

INSEAM

Step 1 Developing the basic pant sloper frame • Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of your pant design or the leg length of your fit model. • Using a ruler, draw a vertical line down the right-hand side of the paper; make a mark at the top and label it (1). This is the outside leg or outseam. Square across to the left. This is the waistline. • From (1) measure down 101⁄4in; make a mark and label it (2). This is the crotch depth. • From (2) measure down 32in; make a mark and label it (3). This is the length of the inside leg. Square across to the left. This is the hemline. • From (1) measure down 63⁄4in; make a mark and label it (4). • From (4) square across to the left one-quarter of the hip circumference minus 1in to find the front hip measurement (101⁄2in – 1in = 91⁄2in); make a mark and label it (5). This is the hip level. • From (2) square across to the left one-quarter of the hip circumference minus 1in (101⁄2in – 1in = 91⁄2in); make a mark and label it (6). This is the crotch level. • From (6) measure up 101⁄4in; make a mark and label it (7). This line is the center front. • From (6) square across to the left one-quarter of the measurement from (4) to (5) minus 3⁄8in (23⁄8in – 3⁄8in = 2in); make a mark and label it (8). • From (8) measure down 32in to intersect with the hemline; make a mark and label it (9). This is the inseam.

101⁄4"

7

HEMLINE 9

3

Basic pant SLOPER

45


CROTCH CURVE

C B WAISTLINE 33⁄4"

5

HIP LEVEL

10

1

7

4

13 ⁄16

"

FRONT CROTCH POINT

PLEAT

31⁄2"

8

FRONT CROTCH LEVEL D

6

2

FRONT

8 11

F

KNEE LEVEL 31⁄8"

43⁄8"

OUTSEAM

GRAINLINE

12

43⁄4"

1 ⁄2 INSIDE LEG

9

46 Chapter TWO: the patternmaking process

A

7

15⁄8"

CENTER FRONT WAIST

INSEAM

Step 2 Developing the front pant sloper • To find the waist measurement, you need to work back from the wider front hip measurement. From (7) measure across 31⁄2in toward the side seam; make a mark and label it (A). From (A) square down to the hemline and label it grainline. This will also become one side of the pleat. • From (A) continue to measure across 15⁄8in for the pleat; make a mark and label it (B). The pleat width can be adjusted according to the fit required. • From (B) measure across the remainder of the front hip measurement minus 5⁄8in (43⁄8in – 5⁄8in = 33⁄4in) and label it (C). Shape down to (4). This is the outseam. • To shape the crotch, measure out 13⁄16in from (6) at a 45-degree angle and make a mark. Draw a curved line from (5) to (8) passing through this point. • Make a mark where the grainline passes through the crotch level and label it (D), and another where the grainline meets the hemline and label it (E). • To find the knee level, divide the measurement from (D) to (E) along the grainline (which is also the inside leg measurement) in half; make a mark and then measure up 31⁄8in; make a mark and label it (F); square across 43⁄8in toward the inside leg and 43⁄4in toward the outside leg or side seam. This is the knee level. • To create the hem width, from (E) square across 43⁄8in toward the inside leg and make a mark and 43⁄8in toward the outseam and make a mark. • Draw the inseam and the outseam as gentle curves from these points back to (8) and (4) respectively, passing through the points you marked at each end of the knee level.

HEMLINE 43⁄8"

E

43⁄8"

3 9


CENTER BACK WAIST

5 1⁄2" WAISTLINE H 2" B

13⁄4"

2"

10"

A

G

10

2 ⁄2"

⁄16"

12

8

11

PLEAT

J

1

33⁄8" K 13⁄16"

HIP LEVEL

5 D

6

⁄16"

9

14

BACK CROTCH LEVEL

4

2 13

L

BACK

F

KNEE LEVEL

53⁄8"

53⁄8"

9

1 ⁄2 INSIDE LEG

HEMLINE 4 ⁄8" 7

E

53⁄8"

OUTSEAM

9

C I

INSEAM

BACK CROTCH POINT

1

CR O TC

H CURVE

7

31⁄2"

Step 3 Developing the back pant sloper • The back pant sloper is developed over the front and then the two are separated when both are traced onto separate pieces of paper. 7 1 • From (7) measure up 2in; make a mark and label it (10). Then square across to the right to a point beyond (1). • From (1) measure out 2in; make a mark and label it (J). Square up to meet the line you drew from (10). • From (8) measure down 5⁄8in; make a mark and label it (11). 5 4 Do the same from (2) and label the mark (13). Square across from (11) to (13). This is the back crotch level. • From (11) measure out 31⁄2in; make a mark and label it (12). 2 8 This is the back crotch point. 6 3 • From (10) measure across 1 ⁄4in; make a mark and label it (G). This is the center back waist. • From (G) draw a 10in line to (J). This is the back waist measurement including the dart width of 3⁄4in. • From (G) measure 51⁄2iin along the line you have just drawn; make a mark and label it (H). This marks the center of the dart. • From (H) square down 33⁄8in; mark and label it (I). This is the length of the dart. From (H) measure out 3⁄8in on both sides. Draw a line from each point to (I) to create the dart legs. • Measure up 3⁄16in from the top of both dart legs and redraw the waistline back to (G) and (J). This will keep a straight line along the waistline when the dart is taken in. • To shape the crotch, continue the center front line down from (5) through (6) to meet the new back crotch level; make a mark and label it (14). From (5) measure up 13⁄16in; make a mark and label it (K). From (14) measure out 21⁄2in at a 45-degree angle and make a mark. With a French curve draw a line from (12) to (K) passing through this point and continue up with a straight line to (G). This is the center back rise. • At the knee level from (F) measure out 53⁄8in toward the inside leg and 53⁄8in toward the outseam and mark. • At the hemline from (E) measure out 47⁄8in toward the inside leg and 53⁄8in toward the side seam. • From the back crotch point 3 to 9 at (12) draw a curved line down the mark at the knee level and continue with a straight line down to the mark at the hemline. This is the inseam. • At (13) measure out 3⁄4in; make a mark and label it (L). • From the waistline at (J) draw a curved line passing through (L) to the mark you made at the knee level, continuing with a straight line down to the mark you made at the hemline. This is the outseam.

3

Basic pant SLOPER

47


Creating a Master Plan from a Basic SLOPER To adapt each sloper into the final pattern, the first stage is to create a master plan onto which the various features of the design are drawn. In each case, you will need to ensure that you draw the master plan onto a piece of paper that is large enough for you to draw additional elements onto the outside of the sloper.

BACK NOTCH

FRONT NOTCH

FRONT MASTER PLAN

CENTER FRONT

SIDE SEAM

BACK MASTER PLAN

GRAINLINE

CHEST LEVEL

CENTER BACK

To create a master plan from the basic UPPER body sloper • Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the shirt, jacket, or coat you want to develop. • Using a ruler, draw a vertical line down the center of the drafting paper labeling it side seam. • Using a set square, draw a horizontal line through the middle of the vertical line, labeling it waistline. • Place the front sloper to the right side of the vertical line, lining up the waistline and the side seam. • Draw round the sloper, making sure that you indicate all the notches marked, and transfer the grainline. Label it front master plan and also label the center front. • Place the back sloper to the left side of the vertical line, lining up the waistline and side seam. • Draw round the sloper as before. Label it back master plan and also label the center back. • If the sloper you have chosen has chest level and hip level indicated, transfer these to the master plan and label them chest level and hip level.

WAISTLINE

HIP LEVEL

TOP OF SLEEVE CAP

BACK NOTCH

FRONT NOTCH

NEW BACK PITCH POINT

1.75 CM 3 CM

UNDERARM FRONT SEAM

FOREARM LINE

CENTER LINE

BACK LINE

ELBOW LEVEL

HEMLINE

48 Chapter TWO: the patternmaking process

SLEEVE CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

BICEPS LEVEL

3 CM

SLEEVE CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

UNDERARM BACK SEAM

To create a master plan from the sleeve sloper • Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the sleeve you want to develop. • Draw a vertical line down the center of the drafting paper, longer than the sleeve sloper, and label it center line. • One-quarter of the way down use a set square to draw across a horizontal line through the center line and label it biceps level. • Align the center line and the biceps level on the sleeve sloper with the center line and the biceps level drawn on the paper. • Draw round the basic sleeve sloper, making sure that you indicate all the notches and the top of the sleeve cap.

OL NE


URV

E

Look at design features such as the placket on a shirt or the closure on a cuff. Look

CROTCH LEVEL

INSE AM

GRAINLINE

OUTSEAM

BACK MASTER PLAN

OUTSEAM

GRAINLINE

HEMLINE

Assessing the design Before starting to create any pattern you should first assess the design using a menswear dress form or fit model. The sloper that you have selected might be longer or shorter than the design you are developing. Analyze by taking a measurement from your fit model or form and by consulting your size chart, or even using competitors’ garments as comparison.

HIP LEVEL

FRONT MASTER PLAN

KNEE LEVEL

C RO

C TCH

CROTCH CURVE

HIP LEVEL

CROTCH LEVEL

INSEAM

To create a master plan from the pant sloper • Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the pant you want to develop. • Using a ruler, draw a vertical line down the center of the drafting paper, longer than the pant sloper, and label it center grainline. • One-quarter of the way down use a set square to draw across a horizontal line through the center grainline and label it crotch level. • Align the center grainline and the crotch level on the basic pant leg slopers with those you have drawn on the paper. • Draw around the slopers, making sure that you indicate the notches, waist dart, and hip level. • It is important that you align the front and back pant slopers horizontally.

KNEE LEVEL

HEMLINE

at the length and consider the way that a garment might be worn. Shirts, for example, are generally tucked into jeans, pants, or shorts, so the length of the sloper that you have selected might need to be extended. Refer back to your dress form, samples, or drawings and photos that you may have collected. For example, the yoke at the back of a shirt would start part way down the back shoulder; to find this position you can attach a piece of cotton tape to your form to help you assess the proportions against your design drawing.

Creating a Master Plan from a Basic SLOPER

49


How to trace off a pattern from the master plan or development patterns Tracing half the pattern shape from the master plan and then creating the full pattern shape Collars, stands, yokes, and some body panels are developed as half patterns on the master plan. When complete they will need to be mirrored to create the full pattern shape. When doing this, the center of the pattern is usually aligned on the center front or center back lines. • Using opaque paper placed over the master plan or development pattern, trace off the half pattern shape, leaving enough room on the paper to the other side of the pattern shape to fold the paper in half down the center front or center back.

2

1

2

1

TRACE 4

3

Adding details to one half of the pattern only If a detail, such as a pocket, appears on only the right side of the pattern, add it before mirroring (and then avoid copying it during the mirroring process); if it appears on the left-hand side, add it after the pattern has been mirrored.

FOLD 2

3

• Transfer all the annotation marked on the master plan, including the grainline, notches, and drill holes. • Add seam allowance in accordance with the construction process (see page 60). • Fold the paper in half down the center front or center back line. • Turn the paper over and retrace the pattern shape on the other side to create the full pattern shape. Add all the annotation necessary to complete the pattern.

1

RETRACE 2

1

Tracing complete pattern pieces directly from the master plan Some pattern pieces, such as a sleeve or a pocket, can be traced directly from the master plan or from a development pattern. • Using opaque paper placed over the master plan or development pattern, trace off the pattern shapes. • Transfer all the annotation marked on the master plan, including the grainline, notches, and drill holes. • Add seam allowance in accordance with the construction process (see page 60).

4

3

3

COMPLETE PATTERN

50 Chapter TWO: the patternmaking process


Annotation Annotation is the technical language placed on the pattern to communicate information about the pattern, garment, or its construction to the manufacturer. It should be written onto each production pattern piece clearly and centrally, or it can be marked on using a range of symbols. The language used varies between countries, manufacturers, fashion labels, and patternmakers. Some of the annotation can also be written onto the master plan or development patterns during the patternmaking process, such as the grainline, drill holes, or notches. Listed below are basic annotations used throughout the industry.

Piece name This identifies the pattern shape; whether it is a sleeve, the front right or front left body panel, or a pocket bag. Style identifying number or name This could be an abbreviation, such as FW/001 (Fall/Winter collection style number 1), or could include the name of the theme of the collection. Piece number Since many patterns are made from several pattern pieces, this identifies the pattern piece within the set. It is either written as 1/7 or 1 of 7, meaning piece one in a set of seven. Pattern size This is the size of the garment, for example: 34, 36, 38, 40, 42 (or S, M, L, XL, etc.) Number of pieces to be cut from each pattern piece This is abbreviated to the following symbols:

NOTCH

PIECE NAME: FRONT BODY PIECE NUMBER: 001/012 STYLE NAME: FW/2016 - ANORAK PATTERN SIZE: 38 PIECES TO CUT: CUT 1 SELF DRILL HOLE

FOLD

GRAINLINE

(Self)—Cut the pattern from the main fabric for the garment (Cut 1 PR Self)—Cut one pair (right and left) from the main fabric for the garment (Cut 1 Self)—Cut a single pattern piece from the main fabric (Cut 1 Mirrored)—cut one of this pattern piece flipped over onto its other side. You can also add additional information for cutting patterns from fusing or lining fabric (Cut 1 Self & 1 Fusing). Asymmetric designs need to be marked with the abbreviation RSU (right side up), meaning place the pattern right side up on the right side of the fabric. Fold line or symbol Indicates that the pattern should be folded along this line. Grainline The grainline indicates the direction in which you want the pattern shape to be placed on the fabric. Most pattern pieces are placed on the straight grain, which runs parallel to the selvage of the fabric (see page 57). Seam allowances Seam allowances can be drawn on the pattern, can be indicated by notches, or the instruction can simply be written on the pattern—“3⁄4in seam,” for example. If there is no seam allowance, use the abbreviation NSA. SEAM ALLOWANCE

Notches and drill holes Notches and drill holes are used to convey the construction process of the garment. Notches are made in the edge of the pattern for seam alignment, panel placement, or to indicate an area of ease. Drill holes are used to indicate pocket placements, button positioning, and dart lengths. Place the drill hole 3⁄16 to 3⁄8in before the tip of a dart or the corner of a pocket position so that the mark is not seen from the front of the finished garment.

How to trace off a pattern from the master plan or development patterns

51


Grading Once the pattern is made, an understanding of grading and the use of technology in the patternmaking studio and in industry will ensure that your patterns are transferred accurately for use in production.

Grading At its most basic, grading is the technique of increasing the size of a garment pattern. It is not, however, a process of enlarging patterns to fit the idiosyncrasies of individual figures; those adjustments need to be carried out while adapting the sloper or in construction. Instead, grading is a system used in conjunction with a size chart to create proportional enlargements of a garment to best fit your customer base.

Grade rules dictate the growth between sizes. The starting point, or base size, represents the size that you used when developing the pattern. It may not have been the smallest size in the customer range, in which case you will have to grade both down and up.

+Y

0

The manual grading technique outlined here is shown on basic sloper patterns without any style lines or adaptations. Once you have understood the principles of growth 3 related to specific areas of the male +X +Y body you should be able to apply 4 them successfully to your styled patterns. The instructions are for a one-size grade up for the basic upper body, sleeve, 5 and pant slopers with a 15⠄8in +X increment between sizes. Consult the size charts (pages 32–33) for different grade values.

+X -Y

2

-Y

4

52 Chapter TWO: the patternmaking process

8

7

chest level

side seam

5

back

waistline

6

Right: Back pattern showing growth increments between sizes S to XXL.

1

1

3

Incremental growth is recorded along two axes which are given numerical values, or coordinates. These are written as (Y), which is vertical movement plus or minus, and (X), which is horizontal movement plus or minus. These axes are at right angles to each other and the point at which they intersect is called the zero point. In the figure above values (measurable distances) are added to the X and Y coordinates which are applied to the cardinal points on the perimeter of a pattern to map out the next size or sizes.

2

6

center back

The grading of clothes began to appear in the middle of the nineteenth century as a very simple system that relied on measurements of height and circumference to enlarge and shrink the garment in proportional increments to create small, medium, and large sizes. Not until the commercialization of the ready-to-wear market after the 1950s did a sizing system that offered -X +Y consistency of proportion begin to be adopted by manufacturers. The modern grading system is a process of adding growth values to a base pattern. Incremental measurements -X (the variable distance between two fixed points on a pattern) define intervals between sizes. Growth values have been defined within the clothing industry through the -X -Y collection of measurement data on growth ratios (circumferences of the body and variable heights of the body) related to age and figure types. Grading can be performed both manually and by computer.

To establish the cardinal point of a one-size grade, from the zero point take the required measurement horizontally (X); then square up the required measurement vertically (Y); connect (Y) to the zero point to create the grade line.

7

hemline

8

S M L XL XXL


2

+Y

3

4 back NOTCH

chest level 5

back

waistline 6

6

7

2 3

center back

5

side seam

Back UPPER -X +Y body sloper +X +Y Mark (1) at the center back neck point and measure up vertically (Y) value = 5⁄16in Mark (2) at the high point shoulder measure up vertically (Y) value = 5⁄16in and horizontally out (X) value = 1⁄8in Mark (3) at the shoulder tip and measure up vertically (Y) value = 1⁄4in and horizontally out (X) value = 3⁄16in 0 +X -X Mark (4) at the back notch and measure up vertically (Y) value 1 3 = ⁄8in and horizontally out (X) value = ⁄16in Mark (5) at the underarm / side seam corner and measure horizontally out (X) value = 3⁄8in Mark (6) at the waistline point and measure up vertically (Y) value = 3⁄16in and horizontally out (X) value = 3⁄8in +X -Y Mark (7) -Xat-Ythe hemline point and measure horizontally out (X) value = 3⁄8in and down vertically (Y) value = 3⁄16in Mark (8) at the center back hemline and measure down -Y vertically (Y) value = 3⁄16in

1

hemline

8

2

1

3

+X +Y

7

8

1 4

front NOTCH chest level center front

5 side seam

Front UPPER body sloper 4 Mark (1) at the center front neck point and measure up 1 vertically (Y) value = ⁄4in Mark (2) at the high point shoulder measure up vertically (Y) value = 5⁄16in and horizontally out (X) value = 1⁄8in 5 Mark (3) at the shoulder tip and measure up vertically (Y) +X= 1⁄4in and horizontally out (X) value = 3⁄16in value Mark (4) at the front notch and measure up vertically (Y) value = 1⁄8in and horizontally out (X) value = 3⁄16in Mark (5) at the underarm / side seam corner and measure horizontally out (X) value = 7⁄16in Mark (6) at the waistline point and measure up vertically (Y) value = 3⁄16in and horizontally out (X) value = 7⁄16in +X -Y 6 Mark (7) at the hemline point and measure horizontally out (X) value = 7⁄16in and down vertically (Y) value = 3⁄16in Mark (8) at the center front hemline and measure down vertically (Y) value = 3⁄16in

7

front

waistline 6

7

hemline

8

GRADING

53


7

SLEEVE CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

BICEPS LEVEL

back

4

6

seam

center line

3

front

elbow LEVEL

2

7

Front pant sloper 2 (1) at the center front waist point and measure up 3 vertically (Y) value = 3⁄16in and horizontally out (X) value = 1⁄8in 1 Mark (2) where the hip level meets the crotch curve measure up 1 vertically (Y) value = ⁄16in and horizontally out (X) value = 1⁄8in 4 Mark (3) at the front crotch point and measure horizontally out (X) value = 1⁄4in Mark (4) at the inseam knee 5 point and measure down vertically (Y) value = 3⁄16in and horizontally out (X) value = 1⁄8in Mark (5) at the outseam knee point and measure down vertically (Y) value = 3⁄16in and horizontally out (X) value = 1⁄8in Mark (6) at the inseam hem point and measure down vertically (Y) value = 3⁄8in and horizontally out (X) value = 1⁄8in Mark (7) at the outseam hem point and measure down vertically 6 (Y) value = 3⁄8in and horizontally out (X) value = 1⁄8in Mark (8) where the hip level meets the outseam point and measure up vertically (Y) value = 1⁄16in and horizontally out (X) value = 1⁄4in Mark (9) where the waistline meets the outseam point and 8measure up vertically (Y) value 8 7 = 3⁄16in and horizontally out (X) 1 value = ⁄4in

1Mark

1

CURVE 2

C

HIP LEVEL

seat leVEL

2

3

KNEE LEVEL 5

OUTseam

front

4

4

hemline

12

10

8

3

6

54 Chapter TWO: the patternmaking process

9 1

TC H

2

5 front NOTCH

1

7

6

back NOTCH

RO

4

6

SLEEVE CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

INSEAM

3

12

11 Sleeve sloper 9 Mark (1) at the back underarm seam hemline and measure 10 8 horizontally out (X) value = 1⁄4in and vertically down (Y) value 1 = ⁄8in 8 2 Mark (2) at the front underarm seam hemline and measure horizontally out (X) value 3= 1⁄4in and vertically down (Y) value = 1⁄8in Mark (3) at the back sleeve corner at biceps level and measure horizontally out (X) value = 5⁄16in 5 Mark (4) at the front sleeve corner at biceps level and measure horizontally out (X) value = 5⁄16in 4 5 Mark (5) at the front notch and measure horizontally out (X) 3 value = ⁄16in Mark (6) at the back notch and measure up vertically (Y) value = 1⁄8in and horizontally out (X) value = 1⁄16in Mark (7) at the top of the sleeve cap and measure up vertically (Y) value = 1⁄4in

back underarm seam

1

2

TOP OF SLEEVE CAP

9

front underarm

1

7 6


6

7

CUR VE TC H

2

CR

O

12

11

9

10 HIP leVEL

8

seat leVEL

3 back

OUTseam

4

1

M

3

BACK pant sloper Mark (1) at the center back waist point and measure up vertically (Y) value = 3⁄16in and horizontally out (X) 1 9 value = 1⁄8in Mark (2)1where the hip level meets the crotch curve measure up vertically (Y) value = 1⁄16in and horizontally out (X) value = 1 ⁄8in 2 Mark (3) at the back crotch point and measure horizontally out 8 1 (X) value = ⁄4in Mark (4) at the inseam knee point and measure3 down vertically (Y) value = 3⁄16in and horizontally out (X) value = 1⁄8in Mark (5) at the outseam knee point and measure down vertically (Y) value = 3⁄16in and horizontally out (X) value = 1⁄8in Mark (6) at the inseam hem point and measure down vertically (Y) value = 3⁄8in and horizontally out (X) value = 1⁄48in 5 Mark (7) at the outseam hem point and measure down vertically (Y) value = 3⁄8in and horizontally out (X) value = 1⁄8in Mark (8) where the hip level meets the outseam point and measure up vertically (Y) value = 1⁄16in and horizontally out (X) value = 1⁄4in Mark (9) where the waistline meets the outseam point and 8 measure up vertically (Y) value = 3⁄16in and horizontally out (X) value = 1⁄4in Mark (10) at the dart tip and measure up vertically (Y) value = 3⁄16in and horizontally out toward the outseam (X) value = 1⁄8in 7 6 Mark (11) at the top of the dart leg toward the outseam and measure up vertically (Y) value = 3⁄16in and horizontally out toward the outseam (X) value = 1⁄8in Mark (12) at the top of the dart leg toward the center back and measure up vertically (Y) value = 3⁄16in and horizontally out toward the outseam (X) value = 1⁄8in

INSEA

5

2

4

6

KNEE leVEL

hemline

5

7

The main body growth principles • The center front and center back seams will grow in length. • Neck and shoulder tips will grow in length and width. • Armholes will grow in length and width. To retain the balance of the sleeve the same value would be applied to the sleeve cap. • Side seams will grow in width. • Pants have to accommodate growth in length and width.

GRADING

55


Adapting patterns and slopers Adapting the basic sloper into different garment styles involves a range of manipulation techniques that fit the garment to the contours of the body. These include the use of darts and style lines to help remove fabric from the sloper and to fit

it more closely to the body, and the use of pleats and gathers to help generate fullness over the curves of the body. Patternmaking techniques can also be used to shape different pattern pieces and add volume.

⁄16"

3

FRONT PANEL 3 ⁄16SELF " CUT 1 PR

⁄16"

3

13⁄16"

CHEST LEVEL

⁄16"

3

⁄16"

GRAIN LINE

KET

OPE

NING

CHEST LEVEL

POC

WAISTLINE

CENTER FRONT

E/P T LIN DAR

OCK

ET

3

CENTER FRONT

CENTER BAC

K

DRILL HOLE OLD HEMLINE

WAISTLINE

FOLD FACING

OLD HEMLINE

Pivoting Pivoting is used to redistribute volume and add in flare or a dart to a pattern piece without the need to cut through the pattern. • Trace around the original pattern piece and then draw in the style line. Use a pattern drill to mark the end of the line. • Pivot the pattern by placing an awl through the drill hole and then move the pattern so that the style line moves to its new position and volume is added into the pattern shape. • Retrace the pattern with the outline of the pattern moved to its new position.

56 Chapter TWO: the patternmaking process

NEW HEMLINE

Slash and spread Slash and spread can also be used to add or remove volume from a pattern piece. • Trace around the original pattern piece onto a separate piece of paper. Draw style lines equidistant from each other through the area you want to expand. • Cut through the style lines, leaving one outer edge of the pattern attached by a fraction of an inch. • Either overlap the sections evenly along the cut style lines to remove volume, or open them up to add volume. • Tape the slashed pattern to a new piece of paper and then retrace the new pattern shape.


Principles of Patternmaking

WARP STRAIGHT GRAIN

Grainline Straight grain Garments are generally cut with the straight grain running down the body. The straight grain is the warp yarn, which is the yarn that runs down the length of woven fabrics parallel to the selvage. This yarn is stronger than the weft yarn, which is the yarn that is woven horizontally across the fabric. The weft, therefore, has more give or stretch. Clothes that are cut on the straight grain are more stable and hang straighter.

AS N BI AI R G

Bias grain The bias runs at a 45-degree angle to the straight grain and to the selvage of the fabric. Garments that are cut on the bias will stretch and therefore mold to the contours of the body, fitting many different silhouettes.

WEFT HORIZONTAL GRAIN

Horizontal or cross grain The horizontal or cross grain runs across the fabric from selvage to selvage. Since this grain follows the less stable weft yarn, garments cut in this direction will tend to stretch and hang softly with pleats and tucks.

BIAS GRAIN CUT 1 SELF

BIAS GRAIN CUT 1 PR SELF

BIAS GRAIN CUT 1 SELF

CUT 1 SELF

BIAS GRAIN

BIAS GRAIN CUT 1 SELF

BIAS GRAIN CUT 1 SELF CUT 1 PR SELF

BIAS GRAIN CUT 1 PR SELF

BIAS GRAIN

IN STRAIGHT GRA CUT 1 SELF

Above: Straight grain. Anorak pattern pieces are laid along the fabric parallel to the selvage, providing stability as the warp thread runs along the length of the garment.

CUT 1 SELF

BIAS GRAIN

STRAIGHT GRAIN CUT 1 SELF

STRAIGHT GRAIN CUT 1 SELF

STRAIGH T GRAIN CUT 1 SE LF

CUT 1 SELF

GRAIN IGHT STRA LF PR SE CUT 1

CUT 1 SELF

STRAIGHT GRAIN

CUT 1 SELF

STRAIGHT GRAIN CUT 1 SELF

STRAIG HT GRA IN CUT 1 SEL F

STRAIGHT GRAIN CUT 1 PR SELF

STRAIGHT

GRAIN CUT 1 SELF

STRAIGHT GRAIN

STRAIGHT GRAIN CUT 1 PAIR

BIAS GRAIN

Right: The figure shows the directions of warp, weft, and bias grains in relation to the body.

Above: Bias grain. Anorak pattern pieces are laid along the fabric at a 45-degree angle to the selvage, giving the garment an element of stretch as warp and weft threads at this angle are more flexible as a result of gravity and hang-weight.

PRINCIPLES OF Patternmaking

57


Ease Ease needs to be added to the measurements taken directly from the body or from a size chart to ensure that the garment is comfortable to wear. Ease is the measurable difference between the dimensions of the human body and the garment, a difference that allows the body to move in the garment without restraint. Adding to the measurements taken from the body—to its circumference and length—when creating the pattern, creates the space. Lack of sufficient ease will cause the garment to appear tight or wrinkled when worn. Calculating the amount of ease Knitted fabrics stretch and so generally require negative ease. As a result the garment is made smaller than the original measurements and uses the fabric’s stretch properties to achieve its full dimensions. For most other fabrics, you will need to add ease. There are no agreed international sizing standards for the amount of ease that should be added to any particular sloper or style of garment. Calculating the amount of ease can be subjective and is reliant on fabric, body size, movement, function, and garment style (formal-wear, workwear, activewear). Analyze your competitors’ garments, or even garments in your own closet, to gain an understanding of ease. As a general rule, ease is added to outerwear to accommodate the space needed for garments worn underneath. Ease is also added to pants around the hip and crotch area so that the wearer can sit comfortably. It is also added to all garments at almost every point that the body moves: underarms, shoulders, chest, spine (at the back of the neck), hips, elbows, and knees.

Left: A student analyzing the fit of a design on a dress form. 58 Chapter TWO: the patternmaking process


tolerance Tolerance relates to the stability of the fabric and is measured by the amount of movement in the fabric generated through the manufacturing process. Woven fabrics generally have less movement than knitted fabrics, which have a natural stretch in their construction. The type of fiber used in a woven or knitted fabric, however, can affect the amount of tolerance—a loosely spun or natural fiber might generate greater amounts of tolerance than a more stable nonwoven or synthetic fiber. Tolerances are calculated in fractions of an inch across the width and length of the fabric. Across a whole garment they can add considerably to the amount of fabric required for a comfortable fit. Assess the properties of the fabric before calculating additional allowances required for each pattern. Allowances for tolerance and ease are calculated together and either added or taken away. By looking at the size charts on pages 32–33 and comparing the circumferential measurements you will be able to establish the ease ratio on which to base your calculations.

Drafting the pattern with ease Ease can be added either to the sloper or later to the pattern itself. Direct drafting The sloper is drafted using measurements taken directly from the fit model or dress form with no ease added. These slopers will fit skintight to the body. Ease is then added during the pattern development process to create the desired silhouette. This method is generally used for bespoke tailoring, allowing greater control over the fit of the garment. Drafting with ease In this case the sloper is drafted to include the ease allowance, which is added to the measurements taken from the fit model, the dress form, or the commercial size chart. The sloper is, therefore, slightly larger than the human body at any give size. The pattern is then manipulated to create the given style. This method is used mainly in mass manufacture.

Sleeve cap ease Additionally, ease is added to the sleeve cap between the front and back notches with the greatest amount distributed over the top of the cap. This means that the sleeve cap is generally larger than the armhole into which it will be inserted; ease allows the relatively flat shape of the sleeve to sit comfortably over the rounded shape of the cap without stretching or wrinkling. Shirt sleeves generally take 1⁄5in to 3⁄4in of ease around the cap and jackets from 3⁄4in to 15⁄8in, depending on the type of fabric.

Ease used throughout this book All the slopers in this book are drafted with basic ease given to the basic sloper. Ease has been added according to the style or silhouette given on each pattern. Ease has been taken away or added according to the garment design.

addition of ease

FOREARM LINE

CENTER LINE

BACK LINE

UNDERARM BACK SEAM

SLEEVE CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

ADDITION OF EASE

BICEPS LEVEL

PLACEMENT OF SLEEVE HEAD AGAINST ARMHOLE

SEAM

SLEEVE CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

TOP OF SLEEVE CAP FRONT NOTCH

UNDERARM FRONT

BACK NOTCH

STRETCH ARMHOLE

SLEEVE CAP EASE ARMHOLE

INNER SLEEVE

ELBOW LEVEL

CUFF HEMLINE

PRINCIPLES OF Patternmaking

59


Seam allowance Seam allowance is added to the pattern once all the development is complete. Trace off the pattern shape from the master plan or development pattern and then add the seam allowance to create the final pattern. The width of the seam allowance will vary according to the fabric, style, and construction technique. It is also important to consider the specialist machinery that will be used in construction before Seam allowances

adding the seam allowance. Different machines have a different bite (the width between the needle and the cutting edge of an overlocker, or serger, for example) that can vary from 1⁄80 to 5 ⁄8in or more; the seam allowance will need to correspond to the bite. Check the lengths of the seams for corresponding pattern shapes and add alignment notches on both seams for assembly.

Light- / medium- Heavyweight fabrics Sewing machinery Seams weight fabrics

⁄4in Hems, facings, necklines, collars 1

Three-thread baby overlocker stitch; binding machine; single-needle lockstitch; single-needle chain stitch

Lapfelled, welted

Single-needle lockstitch; single-needle chain stitch; 4 / 5 thread overlocker stitch; cover-stitch

Plain superimposed

⁄8in

Front, side, waist, Armholes, sleeves, shoulder, and pocket collars, facings, seams that will be enclosed seams. overlocked together

⁄8in

Hem allowances

3

5

⁄4in Hem allowances

3

Capped, slotted

Side, waist seams, hem allowances

1in

Hem allowances

2in

Double-turned or Blind-hemmer blind-hemmed seams

Shrinkage Some fabrics, like denim and cotton jersey, shrink when washed. A shrink test should, therefore, be carried out on any fabric likely to shrink when the garment is first washed. Cut a square yard of the fabric and mark the grainline using permanent marker or a stitching line. The fabric should then be washed using an industrial technique, or one relevant to the final product. Remeasure the square yard: this will give you the ratio by which the square has shrunk; then apply this to the pattern or sloper. Alternatively, make up the garment in its entirety and apply the washing technique relevant to the style. Remeasure the garment and adapt the pattern to accommodate the shrinkage ratio. A further method is to manufacture the garment from preshrunk fabric.

Left: Blue jersey being removed from the dyeing tank; fabric dyed before manufacture is less likely to shrink.

60 Chapter TWO: the patternmaking process


Fitting After drafting a sloper or pattern, a muslin should be made. This is a test garment, usually made from muslin, which is sewn together to check the fit. Use the muslin to check the balance of the garment, fit and also the proportion of different areas of the garment in relation to each other. Balance When drafting a pattern, you need to consider the relationship between the garment and the human body—the balance. Balance is achieved when the center front and center back lines on a jacket or shirt hang equally from both sides of the body and the side seams of a pair of pants are perpendicular to the ground. Symmetry can be achieved by distributing volume and

ease equally between the different pieces of the pattern during the drafting of the sloper. Balance can, however, also be achieved by ensuring that the grainline of the pattern is marked correctly (see page 57) and that it is aligned to the grainline of the fabric with the warp and weft threads aligned at 90 degrees to the chest level, waistline, and along the center front and center back lines. Gravity, which also works in conjunction with the grainline, can also affect the balance of the garment if fabric is distributed unequally around the body. Faults in the figure and poor posture can also affect balance.

Balance control areas on the male figure Balance of a garment can be corrected on the patterns after fitting has occurred. Illustrated here are the two areas of the garment that affect the balance.

HIGH POINT SHOULDER

CHEST LEVEL

WAISTLINE

Jackets and shirts can be adjusted through the fit of the neckline, shoulder slope and seam position, armholes, and chest by adjusting the volume between the front and back patterns.

CROTCH LEVEL

Pants can be adjusted through the fit of the waist, hips, and front and back crotch by adjusting the volume from front to back or vice versa.

Evaluating the fit of a garment can help to rectify figure faults and problems caused by poor posture and is done through assessing the muslin. Structural seam lines should fall in the expected positions on the body. Shoulders are particularly important in fitting as the clothing hangs from them.

Any deviation created by wrong proportions will appear as wrinkles, creases, or tightness, giving the wearer visual and physical discomfort. These areas will then need to be readdressed to reinstate the balance in the pattern and another muslin will need to be made. PRINCIPLES OF Patternmaking

61


Line and proportion In menswear line refers to the structural seam lines, also called style lines, that separate the component parts that make up the garment—sleeves, yokes, collar, and front and back body panels. Proportion is the space taken (in terms of length and width) by the various pattern pieces between these lines and their relationship to each other. Together they make up the garment silhouette, the overall shape that encloses the body. When fitting the muslin you need to assess all of the above, checking to see that seams fall correctly, especially at the shoulders from which most garments hang. Any discrepancy in the balance or proportions will manifest itself as wrinkles, creases, or areas of tightness that give the wearer physical discomfort or create visual distortion. Address these discrepancies by adjusting the muslin, taking notes, and then redrafting the sloper or pattern before creating a second muslin to retest the fit.

Collar terminology The collar stand is a band that raises the collar from the neckline to the point at which the collar rolls over. It can either be incorporated into the shape of the collar itself, or it can be a separate pattern; it can be either visible or hidden. Most collars rise up from the neck edge and turn over at some point to sit on the shoulders, where they hide the neckline. The point at which they turn over is called the collar roll.

There are many variations in collar shape, both traditional and contemporary. neck sizes and Collars Neck sizes vary among shirt brands and styles; minor variations in the way shirts are constructed will account for slight differences in collar fit, which can be assessed through the insertion of two fingers between the neck trunk and buttoned collar to give ease. Traditional shirt sizing is classified according to neck circumferences, which are displayed as numerical figures and take into account the sleeve length for styles worn with a button collar and tie. Casual shirt styles are classified with descriptive sizing: Extra small, Small, Medium, Large, Extra large, which are based on corresponding chest circumference measurements. Neck opening styles are constantly in flux; they can be determined according to fashion trends or garment styles, depending on what is in vogue.

• A band or mandarin collar rises up from the neckline of the shirt and has a slight convex curve to the neckline and its upper edge so that it sits close to the neck. This type of collar does not have a collar roll (see Bib Shirt, pages 138–47). • A turned-down collar is a rolled collar. It has a convex neckline and can be attached to a stand (see Casual Long-sleeved Shirt, pages 104–15). • A convertible collar is a rolled collar. It also has a convex neckline and can be attached to a stand (see the Doublebreasted Jacket, which has a shaped convertible collar with a hidden stand, pages 268–87) or can be sewn straight onto the neckline. • Straight collars are rectangular in shape with a straight neckline and are generally sewn onto the neckline without a stand. The collar rolls naturally from the center back neck, moving in a concave line down to the center front. They are often used in activewear where the collar is a single layer and made from a manufactured preknitted rib (see Short-sleeved Polo Shirt, pages 80–87). • A sailor collar sits flat over the shoulders and is created by aligning the front and back upper body slopers at the shoulder seam and then drafting the shape on top.

Neck Sizing Chart USA—Sizes S

M

L

XL

XXL

15” – 15 1/2”

16” – 16 1/2”

17” – 17 1/2”

18” – 18 1/2”

XS S

M

L

XL

XXL

To fit collar (inches) 14”

14 1/2”

15”

16”

17”

17 1/2”

18”

(centimeters)

37cm

38cm

41cm

43cm

44cm

46cm

To fit collar (inches)

UK—Sizes

XXS

35.5cm

14” – 14 1/2”

European—Sizes

XS S

M

L

XL

To fit collar (centimeters)

37–38cm

41–42cm

43–44cm

44–45cm

62 Chapter TWO: the patternmaking process

38–40cm


• A Peter Pan collar is generally used on womenswear but can be adapted with good results for men’s clothing. It has a similar construction method to the sailor collar except that the shoulder seams are overlapped. • A turtleneck or funnel collar is drafted from a rectangle whose sides are then shaped so that the upper edge is smaller than the neckline. It is generally used with stretch fabrics or can be cut from woven fabrics with a zippered or buttoned opening.

Necklines and collar styles There are broadly three types of neckline that are associated with different collar styles. When developing patterns you need to consider whether to lower the center front neckline, and how much by, depending on the collar style you have chosen. In the images below the black lines represent the actual neckline, while the red lines represent the collar neckline. • A high neckline is also referred to as an English neckline. Reminiscent of the neckline of the Victorian wingtip collar, this neckline sits close to the neck and is high at the center front.

• A mid-height neckline is also referred to as an French-style neckline. Associated with the classic turned-down collar, this neckline sits close to the neck but is lower at the center front.

• A low neckline is also referred to as an Italian loose neckline. Usually associated with a cutaway or widespread collar style, this neckline sits away from the neck and is lower at the center front, offering a loose, casual style.

Right: Suit jacket with hunting details. Junya Watanabe’s Fall 2011 show presents a distant yet familiar image of Americana.


Classic collar styles with high and midstyle necklines. OFFICER COLLAR

WINGTIP COLLAR

CAMBRIDGE BOATING COLLAR

WIDESPREAD CUTAWAY COLLAR

CLUB COLLAR

OXFORD BUTTON-DOWN COLLAR

Adjusting the collar When developing any collar that rolls over, it is important that the outer edge of the collar sits flat on the body and hides the neckline. If the outer edge of the collar is too short, it will rise up above the body when closed. If the outer edge is too long then it will bunch up and not sit flat.

The best way to evaluate how long the outer edge of the collar needs to be is to make up a muslin of the top half of the garment with the collar sewn in to assess the fit on the dress form. When deciding the width of your collar, make sure that it is not narrower than the stand. This will ensure that the stand will not be visible when the collar is turned over.

• If the outer edge is too wide, cut open the collar muslin and overlap the sections evenly until the collar sits flat.

• Record the new shape by taping the sections before removing the muslin and measuring the outer edge.

• If the outer edge is too short, cut open the collar muslin into equal sections from the outer edge toward the neckline and open them out evenly until the collar sits flat on the shoulders.

• Record the new shape by taping the sections before removing the muslin, then measure the outer edge of the collar.

64 Chapter TWO: the patternmaking process


Plackets

Grown-on placket

Sewn-on placket

There are many types of placket, including concealed, wrap and strap, and decorative bias, but there are only two ways to construct a placket. You can either grow on the required material that you then fold back to form the placket or you can construct it as a separate piece of material that will be sewn onto the front opening. Both are popular methods.

Concealed placket

• Before you construct the placket, establish the diameter of the buttons you will be using. This will determine the finished width of the placket. • Identify the fitting line, which is the line on which the buttons and buttonholes are placed, usually the center front. • The placket extends beyond the fitting line by approximately half the diameter of the button, or its radius plus 3⁄16–3⁄8in. • The placket is attached to both sides of the shirt and, when fastened, the left side overlaps the right. The side underneath holds the buttons and the top holds the buttonholes.

Pockets There are many different styles of pocket, from patch pockets, concealed pockets that can be welted or jetted, to cargo or bellows-style pockets with gussets. When developing the internal parts of a concealed pocket, keep in mind the job a pocket performs and the wear and tear on the integral parts. The area where a pocket is attached to the main fabric is usually reinforced with fusing to stabilize the fabric and to prevent it from stretching and becoming misshapen. The width and depth of the pocket bag itself is determined by the opening you have drawn on your master plan and the internal space available to position the pocket within the design; it should be shaped so that the bag is not caught up in any seams.

Pocket terminology A flap, or welt stand, can be used to hide the pocket opening and give a tailored finish. A welted pocket is finished on the outside with one band of fabric. A jetted pocket has its opening hidden by two bands of fabric that are narrower than a welt.

PRINCIPLES OF Patternmaking

65


Hems The hem allowance is turned up and connected to the lining during construction to create an internal facing. The hem can be fused to give rigidity.

There are many different methods for constructing internal linings for jackets and coats. The lining is larger or of a similar size to the external shell of the garment, which allows for movement of the body. The linings of jackets and coats need to have ease added across the back of the shoulderblades, for example, in the form of a center back inverted box pleat to allow for movement. Ease is frequently added to the chest front in the form of a tuck or pleat, to allow for the expansion of the chest. Lining patterns for sleeve caps and armholes are made larger to avoid pinching. Ease is also added in the form of extra length to the hems of the body and sleeve lining, to allow stretch when the body is bent over or arms raised.

Sleeves The cut of the sleeve is largely determined by the sleeve cap height (the distance between the top of the sleeve cap and the biceps level) and its relationship to the width of the underarm. A sleeve with a higher sleeve cap will be tighter and the underarm shorter. This type of sleeve is often used for fitted jackets (see Single and Double-breasted Jackets,

SHIRT

HIGH CAP

Linings The job of the lining is to hide the various parts of the garment’s internal construction, such as seams, fusing, interlining, and pocket bags, if you have chosen not to make these a design feature.

SEAM LINE

LOW CAP

SEAM LINE

SHIRT SLEEVE

pages 252–67 and pages 268–87). A sleeve with a shorter sleeve cap will be wider and the underarm will also be wider. This type of sleeve is used for more casual garments (see Casual Long-sleeved Shirt, pages 104–15). When lowering the top of the sleeve cap to create a more casual, wider sleeve you also need, therefore, to remember to widen the biceps level. To create a more casual sleeve first create a larger armhole on the front and back upper body slopers. This can be done by either lowering the armhole (see Hooded Sweatshirt, pages 88–103) or by extending the shoulder, or both (see Casual Longsleeved Shirt, pages 104–15). Take the measurement of the new armhole from the front and back upper body slopers by laying a tape measure held on its side around the new shape.

66 Chapter TWO: the patternmaking process


Tailored two-piece

Casual two-piece

One- and two-piece sleeves Most sleeves are constructed from one pattern piece with a single underarm seam, and called a set-in sleeve (see Casual Long-sleeved Shirt, pages 104–15). Tailored sleeves (see the Single-breasted Jacket, pages 252–67), and other casual jacket sleeves (see the Fitted Denim Jacket, pages 220–31) are made from two pieces (a top and a bottom panel).

sleeves and for casual sleeves. The casual two-piece sleeve keeps the original sleeve cap shape of the basic sloper because padding is not needed. The two panels needed for the sleeve (top and bottom) can therefore be drafted from the basic sloper. This is achieved by folding in the outer sections of the sleeve sides to give you the bottom panel. A tailored sleeve, however, has to be drafted from scratch and is developed to give you the more pronounced sleeve cap needed for the padding and rolls.

There are two methods of drafting a pattern for a two-piece sleeve that broadly divide into the method used for tailored

Cuffs and cuff guards Although not illustrated here in any depth, there are many different styles of cuff, from single cuffs to more elaborate historical designs. The single cuff used on the shirts illustrated in this book holds in the volume at the end of the sleeve, has ease added so that it fits comfortably around the wrist and can rise up when the arm moves forward. Before adding a cuff or hem allowance to any pattern, first establish your sleeve length. The function of the cuff guard is to finish and provide support to the opening that allows the hand to pass through the cuff. It is rectangular in shape with either a shaped or a flat end. The length of the guard can vary and it can be closed with a button midway along its length. When the guard is attached, 3⁄8in is taken for the seam on the shirt opening.

• Single-button, cut corner barrel cuff • Single-button, rounded barrel cuff • Two-button, cut corner barrel cuff • Two-button, turned barrel cuff

PRINCIPLES OF Patternmaking

67


USING Technology CAD / CAM are acronyms for two innovations that have revolutionized the working practices of the clothing industry. Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacture cover a number of software and hardware solutions that are used in the patternmaking and manufacturing processes. Clothing design and manufacturing technology has become increasingly reliant on computer-based operational systems to reduce expenditure and to respond to the ethical expectations of the consumer by using resources more efficiently. These systems have enabled brands to reduce lead times, to lower costs, to increase workforce efficiency, to communicate more effectively with manufacturers, and to develop Web-based profiles for customers. CAD / CAM and the Internet have revolutionized all stages of the design process. The high-quality output offered by these applications has speeded up product development and enabled brands to become more competitive. The work of an entire design studio can now be contained on a single laptop, and this has changed the way designers and patternmakers practice their craft. Style libraries, photographs and drawings, patterns, colors, and textures can be scanned, modified, and digitally enhanced to create line stories, moodboards, and lookbooks in a matter of hours. Awareness, use, and integration of the products now available is essential to any menswear brand if it wants to stay competitive in a global market.

A studio environment showing the AccuMark pattern design system on screen.

68 Chapter TWO: the patternmaking process

Anorak pattern parameters being digitized via the Gerber digitizer XLd workstation table.

However, computer-aided technology has been developed to enhance the manual process of patternmaking, not to replace it. Without the competence and knowledge gained from the practices of flat patternmaking and draping, computerized patternmaking technology cannot be used effectively. The advantages of using these systems are: increased speed, greater accuracy in measurement, the ability to store patterns as digital data, accurate reproduction of patterns when needed from a template library, and reduced use of space and the physical costs of paper and card. There are many CAD / CAM companies catering for small and large businesses that provide a range of solutions for the patternmaking industry. Choosing the appropriate one for your business will require some research; information can be gathered from trade shows, Web forums, and other companies’ experiences of the product. Most offer schemes for ongoing technical support with training, system installation, and maintenance, as well as software upgrades. Software companies that provide patternmaking solutions to larger businesses are Gerber (US), Lectra (France), Vetigraph (France), Pad System (Canada), Grafis (Germany), OptiTex (Israel), Gemini (Romania), [TC]2 (Textile Clothing Corp, US), and Alvanon (US). Companies catering for smaller patternmaking businesses are Telestia (Greece), Fashion Cad (Australia), Wild Ginger (US), Browzwear Solutions (Singapore), and VR Software Limited (UK).


Outlined here are the basic approaches to generating patterns and the associated software and hardware products used by design and manufacturing teams throughout the apparel and educational sectors. Digitizing and scanning patterns Digitizing is the process whereby manual patterns are mapped or traced through the use of an electronic point locator (cursor), which is moved across a digitizing table; this data is converted into pattern parameters and stored for later use. The process described here is that for Gerber AccuMark software. To start, the pattern piece is placed on the digitizing table with the grainline horizontal to the floor; it is secured with tape. Before the digitizing process can begin certain preference tables have to be set up on the system. A storage area for the data to be saved to is created, a user environment is set up, and parameter and grade rule tables are created. Once these have been established, the process of entering the data can begin. Points on the pattern are located using the digitizing cursor crosshairs and information is input by pushing the relevant keys on the cursor pad. Digitizing starts by entering in the piece name, piece category, and the piece description, then the rule table is selected from the alphabetical list on the table menu.

Pattern being fed through a Graphtec image scanner, which converts full-size patterns into CAD data.

Next the grainline is recorded and the process starts at the top left-hand corner on a cardinal point (shoulder tip), working clockwise, selecting the inputting code from the key pad: (AB1)—for a graded point followed by a rule number, (A)—for intermediate curves, (AB1C1)—for a graded point, rule number, and notch. The digitizing scanner is another method of inputting patterns into the system; patterns are passed between plastic sheets which are fed though the scanner, so it is faster than the manual process. It takes a matter of minutes for the scan to be processed into parameter data, which can be converted for checking and manipulation compatibility with Gerber AccuMark.

Piece name being entered on the menu board of the digitizing table using the 16-button cursor.

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69


Screen shot of Gerber’s AccuMark Pattern Design System (PDS) software. A shirt pattern is shown in the work area.

Generating patterns Patterns can also be created directly on the computer: Basic slopers can be created using your landmark parameters (chest, waist, hips, and body lengths) from the size charts provided. Gerber AccuMark PDS (Pattern Design System) allows you to generate new patterns or to open digitized or scanned patterns from your storage area. Menu slopers can be manipulated to add fullness, or can be stretched or shrunk for fabric tolerance; they can be scaled to change size ratios, copied to make common pieces, or even mirrored to create full patterns. Seams, notches, and annotations can also be applied to your pattern pieces. Digitally grading patterns The principles of grading are the same for manually grading a pattern and grading a pattern on the computer. As grading by hand can be a time-consuming process, computer grading is now the process of choice for the apparel industry. With the added benefit of accuracy, patterns can be graded automatically. Like the manual method, the (X) and (Y) coordinates have to be assigned a measurement value. This is done through establishing a rule table to define the movement of the cardinal points of your pattern (horizontal and vertical axes). You will need to establish your incremental body growth between sizes before completing the rule table. This information can be taken from an industry-published size chart or from your own customer profiling. Lay planning and marker making These two technical terms refer to parts of the production process. The lay plan is the mapping out of pattern pieces in sequential order on a piece of paper (the marker). The marker is the width and length of the fabric lay. This will be determined by the number of garments to be cut and the sizes ordered.

70 Chapter TWO: the patternmaking process

Although manual marker making is still practiced, generating markers on the computer offers considerable benefits. Material utilization and fabric wastage can be controlled by optimizing small and large sizes. Gerber AccuNest software offers an automated function where the fabric parameters and quantity are set, and then pattern pieces are selected to generate the most economical marker plan. Digital output Many CAD programs for patternmaking are now compatible with other design software, enabling pattern data to be exported and e-mailed around the world. Factories have the hardware to be able to print out patterns to make samples, and to make lay plans or markers in paper or card ready to be processed by single- or multiple-vector cutting systems. The 3-D Runway Creator program allows pattern data to be turned into virtual garments on avatars so that manufacturers, retailers, and buyers are able to view products while they are in the development stage. Changes to style, color, and fit can be reviewed even before samples are made. Emerging technologies At the forefront of apparel engineering is the advancement in digital technology and virtual software solutions for pattern generation. As the emerging market seeks to refine its production and output processes, computer-generated solutions will increasingly play a pivotal role in how the designer, patternmaker, manufacturer, and consumers interact. New software programs allow design teams and patternmakers to view manual processes yet to be actualized. Many leading apparel companies have been developing interactive pattern design systems (PDS) that feature 3-D flattening technology, a solution to flat patternmaking and virtual three-dimensional prototyping. Basic pattern slopers can be rendered into full body


Screenshot of Browzwear’s V-Stitcher 2-D to 3-D garment modeling software. A shirt pattern with virtual avatar is shown in the work area.

samples which are then fitted onto a library of customizable, computer-generated avatars, or 3-D styles which can be rendered into 2-D patterns. Fit, proportion, ease, tightness, and other vital technical aspects of a garment can be modified. Simulated fabric and print design can be applied prior to production, reducing the need for multiple samples. Many of the Pattern Design Systems work on collaborative platforms specifically developed for the fashion industry, allowing pattern data to be easily incorporated into design or other product management programs. Body scanning This new technology has changed how the apparel industry develops its size charts; research into fit and shape analysis among brand demographics has reduced the need to have multiple sizing by targeting specific body shapes. Brands and

patternmakers now have access to regional size surveying data for almost any target market or country’s consumers. Many companies now offer a range of services from fit analysis, customer profiling, demographic body surveys to basic pattern sloper creation based on market research. Through this new technology patternmakers are able to influence brand positioning and capture new audiences via target sizing. Body scanning has contributed to garment creation analysis in almost every studio practice. The production of tailor-made forms with core realistic body shapes developed from sizing data also allows for greatly improved customer fit. Screenshots of [TC]²’s (Textile Clothing Corp) 3-D body scanning program. Measurements are extracted to generate 3-D avatars and body mapping diagrams.

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CHAPTER three

The Patterns: shirts


pattern long-sleeved collarless shirt

This pattern includes development of the following features: Shaping the body Lowering the neckline Creating a front placket Shaping the hemline Shortening the sleeve cap height Shaping the sleeve

BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

step 1 Developing the master plan

WAISTLINE

HIPLINE HIP LEVEL

74 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BACK MASTER PLAN

SIDE SEAM

CENTER CENTRE BACK

Start by selecting the basic men’s upper body sloper, or by drafting the basic sloper according to the instructions on page 40. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the vest you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions following the directions on page 48.

CHESTLINE CHEST LEVEL


step 2 Shaping the body

CENTRE FRONT CENTER CENTRE FRONT CENTER

2.5 CM 1" NEW NEW SIDE SIDE SEAM SEAM

NEW N EW SIDE SIDE SEAM SEAM 2.5 CM 1"

SIDE SEAM

WAISTLINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

BACK MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CHEST LEVEL LINE

CENTRE BACK CENTER

• From the side seam at the waistline measure out 1in on both sides and mark. From the hemline at the side seam measure out 3⁄4in on both sides and mark. • Connect these points with a straight line from the hemline to the waistline, then continue with a curved line to the underarm / side seam corner.

UNDERARM /UNDERARM SIDE SEAM CORNER POINT

3 2 CM ⁄4"

3 2 CM ⁄4"

HEMLINE

step 3 Shaping the hemline • Extend the center front and back lines down 3⁄8in at the hem and mark. • Connect both of these points back to the bottom of the side seam with a shallow curve. • Measure up 9⁄16in along this line to indicate the hem allowance and mark with a dotted fold line.

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

BACK MASTER PLAN

1.59⁄CM 16" 3 1 CM ⁄8"

FOLD FOLD NEW HEMLINE

NEW NESIDE W SIDSEAM E SEAM

SIDE SEAM

WAISTLINE

N EW SSIDE IDE SESEAM NEW AM

CENTRE BACK CENTER

CHEST LINE LEVEL

9 1.5 ⁄16" CM

ALL FA OW CIANC NG E

long-sleeved collarless shirt

75


step 4 Lowering the front neck and placket development

1.5 ⁄16" CM

16 61⁄4"CM

9

CHESTLINE CHEST LEVEL

OLD FOL F

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

ALLOWANCE F ACING

NEW HEMLINE

step 5 Front pattern

step 6 back pattern

• Trace off the front onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape, which will be cut down the right-hand side of the placket to create an opening.

• Trace off the back onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape.

NTRE FRONT ECK POINT

16 CM

.5 CM

BACK CUT 1 SELF

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE GRAIN GRAINLINE LINE

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

GRAIN LINE

76 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

CENTRE BACK

BACK CUT 1 SELF

FRONT CUT 1 SELF

CENTRE CENTER BACK

FRONT CUT 1 SELF

CENTRE FRONT

CM

1.5 ⁄16" CM

9

NEWSIDE SIDE SEAM SEAM NEW

SIDE SEAM

WAISTLINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

SIDE NNEW EW SID E SEASEAM M

BACK MASTER PLAN CENTRE CENTER BACK

• Measure down 9⁄16in from the center front neck point. Using the basic upper body sloper as a guide to the shape, draw in the new neckline. • Continue to measure down a further 61⁄4in—the length of the placket. From the new center front neck point, measure back along the neckline 5⁄16in and then out 5⁄16in. • At both these points, drawn a vertical line down to create a rectangular shape the length of the placket and 9 ⁄16in wide.

CENTER CENTRE FRONT NECK POINT

NEW NECKLINE NEW NECK LINE

FRONT CUT 1 SELF


1 CM

1.5 3 1 ⁄8CM " CM

UNDER PLACKET FACING CUT 1 SELF

9 CM 1 1.5 ⁄16"CM

FOLD

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FOLD FOLD FOLD

UNDER PLACKET FACING CUT 1 SELF

" 13⁄8CM 17 CM FOLD FOLD

3 ⁄4CM " 6 17

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FOLD FOLD

1 16 ⁄4CM " 6

16 CM

CUT 1 SELF

FOLD FOLD FOLD

UPPER PLACKET FACING

3 1 ⁄8CM "

9 1.5 " CM 1⁄16CM

1.5 ⁄16" CM 1.5 CM GRAIN LINE

FOLD

CUT 1 SELF

9

1.5 CM

• Draw a rectangle 61⁄4in long and 15⁄8in wide. • Indicate the 3⁄8in seam allowance on one long side and divide the rest of the width in half to give a 9⁄16in facing when folded. This will form the upper placket facing. • Draw another rectangle 63⁄4in long and 13⁄8in wide. • Indicate the 3⁄8in seam allowance on the two long sides, leaving a 9⁄16in facing. This will then form the under placket facing.

UPPER PLACKET FACING

step 7 Developing the upper and under placket facings

TOP OF

SLEEVEPOINT CAP CROWN BACK

BACK PITCH POINT NOTCH

FRONT SLEEVE SLEEVE FRONT MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

RM M SEA ERA SEA UND RM KERA BAC UND

M

UNDE FRON T RARM SEAM SEAM UNDERARM

BACK SLEEVE SLEEVE BACK MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

CENTER LINE CENTRE LINE

BICEPS UNDERLEVEL ARM LINE

step 8 Developing the sleeve master plan Start this development by selecting the basic men’s sleeve sloper, or by drafting the basic sleeve sloper according to the instructions on page 42. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the shirt you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 48. The sleeve sloper that you have selected might be longer or shorter than the design you are developing. Analyze by taking a measurement from your fit model or dress form and by consulting your size chart, or even by using competitors’ garments for comparison.

FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

HEMLINE CUFF HEM

long-sleeved collarless shirt

77


TOP OF SLEEVE CAP

⁄8"

3

BACK NOTCH

FRONT NOTCH

BICEPS LEVEL

BACK SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

FRONT SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

ELBOW LEVEL

CENTER LINE

Ease for knitted and stretch fabrics Knitted and stretch materials, such as jersey, fleece, and spandex, need very little or no ease allowance on the sleeve cap because the ease is found in the stretch of the fabric itself. You will therefore need to reduce the sleeve cap on some patterns.

SLEEVE CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

UNDERARM SEAM

• Reduce the sleeve cap by measuring 3⁄8in down the center line from the top of the sleeve cap. • Using the basic sleeve sloper as a guide, draw in the new sleeve cap shape.

SLEEVE CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

UNDERARM SEAM

step 9 Reducing the sleeve cap height

HEMLINE

TOP OF SLEEVEPOINT CAP CROWN BACK NOTCH

UNDERARM LINE BICEPS LEVEL

1.5 ⁄16" CM 3 13⁄CM 16"

FOL FOLDD

33⁄CM 1 16"

NEW UNDERARM SEAM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

ELBOWLINE LEVEL ELBOW

9

78 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

FRONTSLEEVE SLEEVE FRONT MASTERPLAN PLAN MASTER

BACK SLEEVE SLEEVE BACK MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

FACING

ALLOWANCE

MLLIINNEE EM HE

1.5 ⁄16" CM

9

33⁄CM 1 16"

GRAIN LINE

AT BICEPS LEVEL

UNDERARM SLEEVE POINT CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

SLEEVE

UNDERARM SLEEVE POINT CORNER

33⁄CM 1 16"

• First measure 1 ⁄16in in at the sleeve hemline from both sides and mark. Repeat at the elbow level and mark. • From the corner of the sleeve at biceps level on both sides, join these new points with a curved line to the elbow level and a straight line to the hemline. These are the new underarm seams. • At the sleeve hemline measure up 9⁄16in to indicate the sleeve hem allowance and mark with a dotted fold line. 3

FRONT NOTCH

M SEAM RARM UNDERAR NEW UNDE

step 10 Sleeve shaping


CROWN POINT

UNDERARM POINT

LINE GRAIN GRAINLINE

UNDERARM POINT UNDERARM LINE

FRONT SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

1.5 CM 3 CM

FOLD

FACING

HEMLINE

CUT 1 PR SELF

SLEEVE

NEW UNDERARM SEAM

GRAIN LINE

ELBOW LINE

GRAIN LINE

3 CM

3 CM

Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the BACK SLEEVE MASTER PLAN sleeve pattern.

NEW UNDERARM SEAM

step 11 Sleeve pattern

1.5 CM 3 CM

long-sleeved collarless shirt

79


pattern Short-sleeved polo shirt

This pattern includes development of the following features: Creating a front placket Creating a collar stand Lowering the armhole Widening the sleeve cap Developing a short sleeve Incorporating a ribbed collar and cuff BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

step 1 Developing the master plan

WAISTLINE WAISTLINE

HIP LEVEL HIPLINE

80 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

CENTER CENTREFRONT FRONT

FRONT MASTER MASTER FRONT PLAN PLAN

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

BACK MASTER MASTER BACK PLAN PLAN

SIDE SEAM SIDE SEAM

CHEST LEVEL CHESTLINE

CENTREBACK BACK CENTER

Start by selecting the basic men’s upper body sloper, or by drafting the basic sloper according to the instructions on page 40. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the shirt you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions following the directions on page 48.

FRONT

FRONT NOTCH PITCH POINT


BACK NOTCH FRONT NOTCH

2 3 CM ⁄4" FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

SIDE SEAM

BACK MASTER PLAN

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

LINE CHEST LEVEL

CENTRE BACK CENTER

• Measure 3⁄4in down the side seam from the underarm / side seam corner and mark. Using the original sloper, recreate the shape of the armhole and transfer the back and front notches to their new positions on the lowered armhole.

UNDERARM /UNDERARM SIDE SEAM POINT CORNER

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

step 2 Lowering the armhole on the body

WAISTLINE

HEMLINE

CENTRE CENTER FRONT NECK POINT

step 3 Developing the center front placket and hem width

NEW FRONT NOTCH

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN SIDE SEAM

BACK MASTER PLAN

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

2.51" CM

LINE CHEST LEVEL

CENTRE BACK CENTER

• From the center front neck point measure down 4in—the length of the placket. • From the center front neck point measure 1⁄2in back along the neckline and then out 1⁄2in. • At both of these points draw a vertical line down to create a rectangular shape the length of the placket and 1in wide. • At the bottom of the pattern measure up 9⁄16in from the hemline and draw in the hem allowance.

10 CM 4"

NEW BACK NOTCH

WAISTLINE

FOLD

NEW HEMLINE

FACING ALLOWANCE

short-sleeved polo shirt

1.5 ⁄16" CM

9

81


step 4 Front pattern

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

FRONT CUT 1 SELF CENTRE FRONT

GRAIN LINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN

BACK MASTER PLAN

SIDE SEAM

CENTRE BACK

• Trace off the front onto a UNDERARM new piece of paper and, following POINT the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape, which will be cut down the right side of the placket to create CHEST LINE an opening. 2 CM

WAISTLINE

HEMLINE

step 5 back pattern • Trace off the back onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape.

82 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BACK CUT 1 SELF

CENTRE CENTER BACK

GRAIN LINE

CENTRE FRONT

FRONT CUT 1 SELF


step 6 Upper and under placket facing patterns

⁄8" 13CM

1"

2.5 CM

1"

2.5 CM

⁄8"

1 CM

1 3CM

1 CM

2.5 CM

FOLD

UNDER PLACKET FACING CUT 1 SELF GRAIN LINE

FOLD

UNDER PLACKET FACING CUT 1 SELF

GRAINLINE

1 CM

10 CM

FOLD

4"

GRAIN LINE

FOLD

UNDER PLACKET FACING CUT 1 SELF

⁄8"

3

1 CM

UPPER PLACKET FACING CUT 1 SELF GRAIN LINE 1 CM

1 CM

GRAIN LINE

1 CM

FOLD

10 CM

10 CM

FOLD FOLD

CUT 1 SELF

FOLD FOLD

10 CM

CUT 1 SELF GRAINLINE

UPPER PLACKET FACING UPPER PLACKET FACING

FOLD

⁄8"

3

⁄8"

3 FOLD

4"

2.5 CM

2.5 CM

1 CM 1 CM

1 CM

⁄8" 13CM

1" FOLD

1 CM

1 CM

⁄8"

3

2.5 CM

CM 13

⁄8"

• Draw a rectangle 43⁄4in long by 13⁄4in wide; this measurement includes a 3⁄8in seam allowance around all four edges. • Indicate the 3⁄8in seam allowance around all four sides, leaving a 4in x 1in facing. This will form the upper placket facing. • Draw a rectangle 43⁄4in long by 23⁄4in wide; this measurement includes a 3⁄8in seam allowance around all four edges. • Indicate the 3⁄8in seam allowance around all four sides and divide the rest of the width in half to give a 1in facing when folded. This will form the under placket facing.

short-sleeved polo shirt

83


step 7 Developing a collar stand for a knitted ribbed collar • Draw a rectangular box 3⁄4in wide and 93⁄4in long. Label the narrow side as the center back neck and the long side as the neckline. • From the center back measure 33⁄8in along the neckline and mark a notch. This is the half back neck measurement; the remaining 61⁄4in is the half front neck measurement, including half the placket width, 1⁄2in. • At the front end of the collar stand measure up 3⁄8in and make a mark. From this mark, with a shallow curve, draw a new line blending back to the shoulder notch. • Complete the stand by drawing another new line 3⁄4in from

1⁄.2" 5 C

M

the first and blending it back. Square up from the end of the new neckline to complete the front of the stand, drawing a curved line at the upper corner. • Measure 1⁄2in (half the width of the placket) from the front of the stand back toward the shoulder line, square across, and label it center front neck.

1 2

N

23 ⁄4C" M

COLLAR MASTER PLAN

NTTREER EN CE C ONNTT RO F FR NEECCKK

23CM ⁄4"

CENTER BACK NECK

SHOULDER NOTCH

3 CM 1 ⁄8"

NECKLINE NECKLINE 16 " 61⁄4CM T T ENEN EMEM URUR AS AS ME CKME T NE NECK

8.5 33⁄8"CM NECK MEASUREMENT BACK NECK MEASUREMENT HALF BACK

ONT FRON HALF FR

CF

Step 8 Collar stand pattern • Trace off the collar stand onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape. 1.25 CM CENTRE T FRON NECK

2 CM

COLLA CUT 1

Knitted ribbed collars Knitted ribbed collars are piecemanufactured to order, or can be bought in specific standard neck measurements according to style and inserted between the two parts of the stand.

1 CM

84 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

SHOULDER SHOULDER NOTCH NOTCH CF CF

COLLAR COLLARSTAND STAND CUT PR SELF CUT 1 1PR SELF

GRAIN GL LINE

CF C F

SHOULDER SHOULDER NOTCH NOTCH

CB NECK CB NECK

16 CM EMENT NECK MEASUR


TOP OF SLEEVE CAP CROWN POINT BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

Step 9 Developing the sleeve master plan

FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

BICEPS LEVEL UNDER ARM LINE

FRONT SLEEVE FRONT SLEEVE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

RARM SEAMSEAM UNDE RARM BACKUNDE

BACK SLEEVE BACK SLEEVE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

FRONTUNDER SEAM UNDARM ERAR M SEAM

CENTER LINELINE CENTRE

Start this development by selecting the basic men’s sleeve sloper, or by drafting the basic sleeve sloper according to the instructions on page 42. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the sleeve you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions following the directions on page 48. The design illustrated is a short sleeve with a ribbed cuff. The sleeve sloper that you have selected might be longer or shorter than the design you are developing. Analyze it by taking a measurement from your fit model or dress form and by consulting the size chart, or even by using competitors’ garments for comparison.

HEMLINE CUFF HEM

Step 10 Widening the sleeve cap for the lowered armhole

10 7 ⁄8"

BACK PITCH FRONT NOTCH POINT NOTCH PITCH PONT UNDERARM LINE BICEPS LEVEL

UNDERARM SLEEVE POINT CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

FRONT UNDER UNDEARM RARM SEAM SEAM

CENTRE LINE CENTER

SEAMM RMSEA ERARM UNDERA BACK UND

FRONT FRONT SLEEVE SLEEVE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

BACK SLEEVE SLEEVE BACK MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

9 1.5 ⁄16" CM

Knitted materials need very little ease on the sleeve cap, so in this case ease was not added to the new sleeve cap measurement.

1C ⁄2"M 2170

Measure the front and back of the original armhole on the master plan (in this case 93⁄4in and 97⁄8in respectively), then the new armhole (101⁄2in and 107⁄8in respectively). Compare this to the sleeve cap measurement and increase the length of the sleeve cap by the same amount.

UNDERARM SLEEVE POINT CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

9 1.5 ⁄16" CM

Adjusting the sleeve cap to fit the armhole Having enlarged the sleeve circumference in Step 2, you will need to check the length of the sleeve cap and increase it according to the new armhole measurement.

TOP OF CROWN SLEEVE POINTCAP

• Extend the biceps level out 9⁄16in on both sides. • Using the original sleeve sloper as a template, redraw the new sleeve cap shape and indicate the new notch positions to match those on the lowered armhole. short-sleeved polo shirt

85


TOP OF CROWN SLEEVE CAP POINT BACK BACK NOTCH PITCH POINT

Step 11 Developing the short sleeve

FRONT FRONT NOTCH PITCH POINT

UNDER ARM LINE BICEPS LEVEL 6 23CM ⁄8"

7 ⁄8" 155 CM

⁄8" 1557CM

1 ⁄CM 8" 3

BACK BACK SLEEVE SLEEVE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

CENTRE LINE CENTER

FRONT PITCH POINT

UNDER ARM LINE

Step 12 POLO Sleeve pattern

6 CM

15 CM

UNDERARM POINT

15 CM

SEAM

1 CM

CENTRE LINE

UNDERARM SEAM

86 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

POLO SLEEVE CUT 1 PR SELF

FRONT SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

ATTACH KNIT RIB CUFF HERE UNDERARM SEAM

BACK SLEEVE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the MASTER PLAN sleeve pattern.

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

UNDERARM POINT

UNDERARM SLEEVE POINT CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

POLO SLEEVE CUT 1 PR SELF

FRONTSLEEVE SLEEVE FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN MASTER

CROWN POINT BACK PITCH POINT

SEAM SEAM

ATTACH KNIT RIB UNDER UNDERARM ARM SEAM

UNDERARM SLEEVE POINT CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

UNDERARM SEAM

• Measure 23⁄8in down the center line from the biceps level and square across the sleeve width. • From the center of this new line measure 57⁄8in out to both sides and mark. This is the new sleeve cuff width. • Join the extended sleeve cap to the edge of the cuff width with a curved line on both sides. • Continue to measure a further 3⁄8in down the center line and square across to create a seam to attach the knitted ribbed cuff. Both ends of this seam allowance should be extended by 3⁄8in so that when it is folded up, the seam allowance matches the shape of the cuff.


short-sleeved polo shirt

87


pattern Hooded sweatshirt

This pattern includes development of the following features: Creating a side panel Lowering the neckline Constructing a muff pocket Lowering the armhole Widening the sleeve cap and lowering the cap height Constructing a raglan panel sleeve Reducing the length of the sleeve Incorporating a ribbed cuff and waistband Constructing a hood

88 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

Assess the function of the garment Before embarking on any pattern development, first identify the purpose of the garment. A hooded sweatshirt is generally worn over other clothes, so you would need to make the pattern slightly larger to accommodate the clothes worn beneath it.


BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

step 1 Developing the master plan

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

SIDE SEAM

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

BACK MASTER PLAN

CENTRE CENTER BACK

• Start by selecting the basic men’s upper body sloper, or by drafting the basic sloper according to the instructions on page 40. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the sweatshirt you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions following the directions on page 48.

CHESTLINE CHEST LEVEL

WAISTLINE

HIPLINE HIP LEVEL

step 2 Moving the shoulder seam

BACK HIGH POINT SHOULDER

BAC K SH OUL DER SEA M

Raglan sleeve development The first stage in raglan sleeve development is to move the shoulder seam from the back of the shoulder forward to the front of the pattern. This balances the front and back pattern pieces, so that when the raglan shapes are drawn, the new shoulder seam sits centrally on the top of the shoulder.

13⁄8C" M

M 8" 13 ⁄C

SIDE SEAM

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BACK MASTER PLAN

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

CHEST LINE CHEST LEVEL

CENTRE CENTER BACK

• To move the shoulder seam forward, remove 3⁄8in from the front shoulder seam and add 3⁄8in to the back shoulder seam. Measure the new front shoulder seam. The back shoulder seam should be the same length, so it will extend beyond the original back high point shoulder. You will need to redraw the back neckline, blending it back from the new back high point shoulder.

M SEA LDER HOU NT S O R F

WAISTLINE

HEMLINE

hooded sweatshirt

89


NEW BACK PITCH POINT NOTCH POSITION

33⁄CM 16" 1

NEW FRONT FRONT NOTCH PITCH POINT POSITION POSITION

CENTRE NEW CENTER NECK FRONT NECK POINT POINT

UNDERARM / SIDE SEAM UNDERARM CORNER POINT LINE CHEST LEVEL 33CM 1 ⁄16"

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

SIDE SEAM SEAM

CENTRE BACK CENTER

step 3 Lowering the armhole on the body and center front neckline

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

BACK MASTER PLAN

• Measure 13⁄16in down the side seam from the underarm / side seam corner and mark. Using the original sloper as a template, recreate the shape of the armhole and transfer the back and front notches to their new positions on the lowered armhole. • Measure down 13⁄16in from the center front neck point and mark. Using the sloper as a template, redraw the new lowered neckline.

WAISTLINE

HEMLINE

BACK SHOULDER POINT

FRONT SHOULDER POINT

4 CM

0.5 CM

0.

5

CM

ALIGNMENT NOTCH

5 ⁄8" NEW BACK 4 1CM PITCH POINT POSITION

FRONT FRONT HIGH POINT SHOULDER SHOULDER POINT 15⁄8"

.5

CM

ALIGNMENT NOTCHES

4 CM

C

M

10

12

BACK BACK HIGH POINT SHOULDER SHOULDER POINT

4 CM

CM .5

53 C⁄1 6M "

CENTER FRONT

CENTRE FRONT

FRONT MASTER PLAN MASTER FRONT PLAN GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE

BACK MASTER PLANMASTER BACK PLAN

SIDESEAM SEAM SIDE

SIDE SEAM

CHEST LEVEL CHESTLINE

CENTER BACK CENTRE BACK

CENTRE BACK

FRONT MASTER PLAN

NEW FRONT NOTCH NEW FRONT POSITION PITCH POINT POSITION 3 ⁄4" 2 CM

GRAIN LINE

BACK MASTER PLAN

• First measure 15⁄8in down the back neckline from the back high point shoulder and mark, and 15⁄8in down the front neckline from the front high point shoulder and mark. • Next measure 3⁄4in down from the new front notch on the armhole and square across to the back armhole and mark. From these points draw a straight line up to each ofWAISTLINE the marks you made on the front and back necklines. • From the back neckline measure 43⁄4in down this line, and from the front neckline measure 41⁄8in. Square up 3⁄16in on each line and mark. • With a shallow curve, draw lines from the points on the back and front necklines to the armholes, this time passing HEMLINE through the marks at 3⁄16in.

0.

CENTRE FRONT

CM

⁄16" 0.5 CM

3

10

12 "

step 4 Creating the raglan shoulder shapes onCHESTLINE the UPPER body sloper

ALIGNMENT ALIGNMENT NOTCH NOTCH

NEW BACK NEW BACK NOTCH PITCH POINT POSITION POSITION

41 ⁄8"

3 4

4⁄

NEW FRONT PITCH POINT ALIGNMENT ALIGNMENT POSITION NOTCHES NOTCHES 2 CM

WAISTLINE WAISTLINE

90 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

GRAIN LINE

HEMLINE HEMLINE


POSITION

0.5 CM

5

C

M

NEW FRONT PITCH POINT POSITION 2 CM

FRONT MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE

SIDE SEAM

CENTRE BACK

BACK MASTER PLAN

CENTRE FRONT

CHESTLINE

WAISTLINE

FRONT SHOULD HIGH POINT ER POINTER SHOULD

step 5 DEVELOPING The raglan shape • Trace off the shoulder shapes, which will be used to create the raglan sleeve, adding front and back notches for alignment.

E LINE NECKLIN

EAM ER S ULD SHO

HEMLINE

FRONT SHOUL SHOULD ER SHAPE DER

SHO ULD ER

ALIGNMENT NOTCH NOTC H

E LIN CK NE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BACK BACK HIGH POINT SHOULD ER SHOULD ER POINT

SEA M

ALIGNMENT NOTCHES NOTCHES

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

SHAPE BACK SHOULDER SHAPE

FRONT SHOULDER POINT

EAM

NECKLINE

ER S

ULD

FRONT SHOULDER SHAPE

hooded sweatshirt NMENT TCH

SHO

91


step 6 Developing the side panel

8 ⁄8 " 31CM

81CM ⁄8" 3

81CM 3 ⁄8"

81CM 3 ⁄8"

ALIGNMENT NOTCH

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

SIDE SEAM WAISTLINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

BACK MASTER PLAN

ALIGNMENT NOTCHES

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

HEMLINE

step 7 Side panel pattern • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the new side panel shape and mark the side panel style lines with notches, two for the back and one for the front, to aid alignment during construction.

SIDE PANEL

CUT 1 PANEL PR SELF PR SELF

CENTRE FRONT

GRAIN LINE

T MASTER PLAN

NMENT CH

CHES CHESTTLINE LEVEL

CENTRE CENTER BACK

• First measure 31⁄8in out from the side seam along the waistline toward the center front and center back. Repeat at the hemline and draw two vertical lines up to the raglan style line to create the side panel.

92 Chapter three the patterns: shirts


step 8 Developing the center front muff pocket POCKET POCKET MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

CENTER FRONT CENTRE FRONT

CHEST LEVEL CHEST LINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN FRONT MASTER

PLAN

SIDE PANEL SEAM SIDE PANEL SEAM

• Start by developing half of the muff pocket from the center front. Measure up 2in from the hemline and mark, continue measuring up a further 71⁄8in and mark. From both these points square across 53⁄4in toward the side panel style line and mark. Create a rectangle by joining all four points. • Measure in 1in from the bottom left corner of the rectangle. Connect this point back to the vertical left-hand side with an angled line 2in in length. Measure in 13⁄16in from the top left corner. From this point, draw a shallow curved line down to connect with the top of the angled line. This will become the curved pocket opening. • To create a facing for the front opening, measure in a further 1in along the shallow curved line of the front opening, and draw in the shape of the facing.

13⁄CM 16" 3

53⁄4" CM 14.5

1" CM 2.5 WAISTLINE WAISTLINE

⁄8" 7118

CM

52"CM 2.51"CM

2" CM 5 HEMLINE HEMLINE

step 9 muff pocket and facing patterns

MUFF MUFFPOCKET POCKET CUT CUT11SELF SELF GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE

MUFF POCKET FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE

MUFF POCKET FACING

GRAINLINE

• Trace off the muff pocket shape onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape. • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the facing pattern.

FRONT CUT 1 SELF

GRAIN LINE

CENTRE BACK GRAIN LINE

BACK CUT 1 SELF

hooded sweatshirt

93


MUFF POC CUT 1 PR S

GRAIN LIN

step 10 Front pattern

step 11 back pattern

• Trace off the front onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape, adding drill holes for the muff pocket placement.

• Trace off the back onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape.

POCKET ASTER PLAN

BACK BACK CUT 1 SELF CUT 1 SELF

CHEST LINE

FRONT CUT 1 SELF

14.5 CM

2.5 CM WAISTLINE

GRAINLINE

18 CM

GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE

STER

CENTERBACK BACK CENTRE GRAIN LINE

CENTRE FRONT

FRONT CUT 1 SELF

5 CM HEMLINE

TOP OF SLEEVE CROWNCAP POINT BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

SEAM ERARMSEAM UNDRARM BACK UNDE

Start this development by selecting the basic men’s sleeve sloper, or by drafting the basic sleeve sloper according to the instructions on page 42. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the sleeve you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 48. The sleeve sloper that you have selected might be longer or shorter than the design you are developing. Analyze it by taking a measurement from your fit model or dress form and by consulting the size chart, or even by using competitors’ garments for comparison.

CUFF HEM HEMLINE

94 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

FRONT SLEEVE FRONT SLEEVE MASTER MASTERPLAN PLAN

FRONT UNDER UNDER ARM SEAM ARM SEAM

BACK SLEEVE SLEEVE BACK MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

step 12 Developing the sleeve master plan

CENTER LINE CENTRE

BICEPS LEVEL UNDER ARM LINE


step 13 Widening the sleeve cap WITH A LOWERED CAP AND reducing the SLEEVE length • To make the sleeve cap larger, to fit the larger armhole created in Step 3, and give the finished raglan a casual fit, you will need to reduce the cap height. Measure down the center line 3⁄4in. • Extend the biceps level out by up to the measurement that you lowered the armhole by, and not beyond. In this case, extend the line out by 1in on both sides.

Altering the sleeve cap to fit the armhole You must take the new measurement from the armhole so you can match it with the sleeve cap plus or minus ease, depending on fabric and fit.

step 14 Moving the center line forward to develop the raglan sleeve

Moving the center line on the raglan sleeve In the same way that you adjusted the shoulder seams in Step 2, you now need to move the seam on the sleeve.

• Measure 3⁄8in from the center line toward the front underarm seam. At this 3⁄8in measurement, draw a straight line from the top of the sleeve to the hem. The top of this line is the new top of the sleeve cap.

TOP OF SLEEVE CAP

• Using the original sleeve sloper as a template, redraw the sleeve cap shape and add the new back and front notch positions to match those on the lowered armhole. Redraw the underarm seam lines from the new points at the end of the biceps level down to the hemline at the cuff. • Reduce the sleeve length by measuring up 4in from the hemline and redraw the line following the shape on the original sloper.

NEW BACK NOTCH POSITION NEW FRONT NOTCH POSITION

BICEPS LEVEL ⁄4"

3

1"

BICEP LEVEL

SEAM

RARM SEAM

1"

RM BACK UNDERA

⁄8"

3

3 8"

FRONT SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

CENTER LINE

BACK SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

NEW FRONT NOTCH POSITION

FRONT UNDE

NEW BACK NOTCH POSITION

FRONT UN DERARM SE AM

CENTER LINE

AM RARM SE BACK UNDE

BACK SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

CUFF HEM

4"

4"

CUFF HEM

HEMLINE

hooded sweatshirt

95


SHOULDER SHAPE

R OU LD E SH

FRONT

FR ON T

M EA RS DE

L OU SH

SE

AM

CK BA BACK

SHOULDER SHAPE

TOP OF THE SLEEVE CAP

step 15 Creating the raglan shape of the sleeve • Trace the raglan shoulder shapes from Step 4 onto the sleeve cap by placing the shoulder tips together at the new top of the sleeve cap and aligning the tips of the raglan shapes to the sleeve cap lines.

BICEPS LEVEL

FRONT SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

FRONT

BACK UN

UNDERA

DERARM

SEAM

RM SEAM

NEW CENTER LINE

BACK SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

CUFF HEM

SHOULDER SHAPING FRONT

SHOULDER SHAPING BACK

step 16 smoothing out the TOP OF THE SLEEVE CAP RARM SEAM

FRONT SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

BACK UNDERA

FRONT UNDE

RM SEAM

BACK SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

NEW CENTER LINE

BICEPS LEVEL

CUFF HEM

96 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

• Trace the raglan sleeve onto a separate piece of paper. To create smooth lines around the raglan sleeve cap, shape the top of the sleeve cap so that it is less angular, and smooth out the joins on the sleeve cap with shallow curves. When closing the shoulder shapes the removed volume will help to avoid extra width through the shoulder seams.


CENTER LINE ROTATING SHOULDER LINE IN CLOSING SEAM

ROTATING SHOULDER LINE IN CLOSING SEAM

TOP OF SLEEVE CAP

NG UP

NEW POSITION OF BICEPS LEVEL

ONE-PIECE RAGLAN SLEEVE CUT 1 PR SELF

FRONT UN

DERARM

FRONT SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

BACK UN

BACK SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

DERARM

LINE MOVI

BICEPS LEVEL

LINE MOVI

• To create a one-piece raglan sleeve you must close the front and back shoulder shape on the sleeve cap. Measure the front and back shoulder seam lines from the neckline down to the top of the sleeve cap. Then extend the new center line up from the top of the sleeve cap to beyond the shoulder seam length. • Trace the raglan sleeve from Step 16 onto a separate piece of paper; repeat the process for the back raglan sleeve master plan. Then place the front traced sleeve cap over the original one, aligning the underarm lines. From the top of the sleeve cap moving up the new center line, rotate the front shoulder seams along the center line. Mark the sleeve width of the shoulder panel periodically as you move along the center line until you reach the neckline; draw in the new position of the front neckline. Place the back traced sleeve cap over the original one, aligning the underarm lines. From the top of the sleeve cap moving up the new center line, rotate the back shoulder seams along the center line. Mark the sleeve width of the shoulder panel periodically as you move along the center line until you reach the neckline. • By closing the shoulder seams you have raised the biceps level to a new position, straightening the curved shoulder

line. To establish the front and back sleeve seams, align them with the biceps width. Once you are able to connect these three lines, redraw the sleeve length in its new position. • Place the front and back sleeve seams at the new neckline position. To keep the same sleeve cap height, measure the biceps width, place the front shoulder seam at the new neckline, trace down the length, and redraw in the new position of the front shoulder seam to the biceps level. • Draw in the new position of the back neckline, place the back shoulder seam at the new neckline, trace down the length, and redraw in the new position of the back shoulder seam to the biceps level.

NG UP

step 17 closing the raglan shoulder shapes on the sleeve cap to create a casual, one-piece raglan sleeve

GRAINLINE

NEW POSITION OF CUFF HEM

CUFF HEM

step 18 one-piece raglan sleeve PATTERN • Following the instructions on p. 50, trace off the final one-piece raglan sleeve pattern.

hooded sweatshirt

97


Taking measurements for the hood There are three measurements you need to create the pattern for the hood: 1. The front and back neck measurements, taken from the pattern—here they are 61⁄2in and 33⁄4in. 2. The front and back neck height, found by placing the front pattern on top of the back pattern and aligning them at the

chest level, then measuring the distance between the front and back neck heights —­ here it is 41⁄2in. 3. The vertical circumference of the head, taken for the hood opening by measuring around the face of the model’s head, starting and finishing at the center front neck point—here it is 311⁄2in.

CB NECK POINT BACK PANEL HEAD HEIGHT

FRONT PANEL

CENTER BACK NECK POINT

MEASUREMENT FOR HEAD CIRCUMFERENCE

CHEST LEVEL

NECK HEIGHT

CENTER FRONT NECK POINT

CENTER FRONT NECK POINT

SHOULDER TIP

CENTER BACK NECK POINT

41⁄2"

• Starting at the bottom left-hand side of a piece of paper, draw a 101⁄4in horizontal line—the length of the combined back and front neck measurements. • Square up and draw a 153⁄4in line (half of the head circumference). Square across and then down to complete the rectangular box. • Mark the bottom left corner and label as the center back neck point. • From the bottom left and right corners measure down 41⁄2in (the neck height) and mark. Join the marks to form a rectangle.

153⁄4"

step 19 Developing the hood

101⁄4"

98 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

NECK HEIGHT

CF NECK POINT


Taking the combined front and back neck measurements (101⁄4in), use a French curve to draw the neck shape from the center back neck point until it joins the line at the bottom of the rectangle, and mark. This is the center front. This measurement will fall short of the bottom right corner of the rectangle.

• The central panel is 23⁄8in wide. Remove half of the measurement from the center back neck point and the other half from the top of the sleeve cap. • From the top right corner measure down 41⁄8in and square out 1in. Now draw the hood shape according to 1.5 CM 1.5 CM the design. • Finally, to create the pattern for the central panel, measure the back hood line—here it is 201⁄4in. TOP OF CROWN SLEEVE CAP POINT

Design of the hood This hood design has a central panel. The width of the panel needs to be deducted from the hood shape at the center back neck point and at the top of the sleeve cap. The overall shape of the hood is determined by the design, head size, neck opening, and usage, which in this case is as outerwear.

33CM 1 ⁄16"

LI N BA CK HO OD

2.5 CM 1"

51. 20 15 ⁄4"CM

FOLD

1.5 CM

1.5 CM HOOD HOOD MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

Step 21 Hood pattern LINE HOOD LINE BACK HOO BAC

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the hood pattern.

33CM 1 ⁄16"

9.5 CM 3 3⁄4"

3C

M

NOTCH SHOULDER NOTCH LINE CENTRE CENTER FRONT LINE

CENTRE CENTER BACK NECK POINT

FRO NT H OO OD D OO PPEE NNIN INGG

GL

HOOD OPENING EDGING CUT 1 RIB

1 10.5 4 ⁄8" CM

NE

70 CM

SIDE HOOD CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE

CM

FAC ING LIN E

6161 ⁄2."5

HOOD MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

2.5 CM

step 20 Shaping the hood

hooded sweatshirt 3 CM

99

HOO CUT


3 MC

Step 22 Hood opening facing strip and edging patterns

FOLD

HOOD FACING GNICAF DOOH CUT 1 SELF FLES 1 TUC

• The hood opening facing is a strip of fabric, 13⁄16in in depth, that follows the curved shape of the hood opening. The edging finishes the hood opening. • On the hood side panel pattern, measure in 13⁄16in at the neckline and mark and 13⁄16in at the top of the front hood opening and make a mark. Connect these points to create a curve 13⁄16in in depth along the opening. • Trace off the hood opening facing strip onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the 1.5 CM full pattern shape. 1.5 CM • With a tape measure held upright measure along the outer edge of the facing strip—in this case 271⁄2in. Draw a rectangular box 271⁄2in long by 13⁄16in wide and mark a fold line lengthways down the center to create the edging.

31 3C ⁄

M "

16

HOOD FACING CUT 1 SELF

LG GL

FAC ING IN LIN INE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

HOOD HOOD MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

3 13CM ⁄16"

1.5 9CM ⁄16"

EDGING HOOD OPENING EDGING CUT 1 RIB

100 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

GL

70 271CM ⁄2"

1.5 9CM 16"

FOLD

9 1.5 ⁄16"CM

9 1.5 ⁄16"CM


Step 23 Center back hood panel pattern • Draw a rectangular box 23⁄8in wide by 201⁄4in long. This will become your final center back hood panel.

13⁄16" CENTER CENTRE BACK NECK POINT POINT NECK

1 ⁄16" 3

BACK HOOD CUT 1 SELF

GRAINLINE

201⁄4"CM 51.5

7 7 ⁄8"CM 20

8 31CM ⁄8"

• The cuff is a folded pattern. Draw a rectangular box 61⁄4in wide and 77⁄8in long. Mark the fold line halfway along the width.

RIBBED CUFF CUT 1 PR RIB

GRAINLINE

Step 24 Ribbed cuff pattern

31CM ⁄8 " 8

8 31CM ⁄8"

FOLD

31CM ⁄8 " 8

20 77⁄8"CM

91 CM

8 CM

8 CM

91 CM

hooded sweatshirt 101


Step 25 Ribbed waistband pattern

20 CM

• The waistband is a folded pattern. Draw a rectangular box 8 CM 61⁄4in wide and 353⁄4in long. Mark the fold line halfway along the width.

8 CM

8 CM

8 CM

20 CM

91 CM

313⁄4"

31⁄8"

8 CM

8 CM

RIBBED WAISTBAND CUT 1 RIB

GRAINLINE

31⁄8"

FOLD

8 CM

8 CM

31⁄8"

31⁄8"

91 CM

102 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

313⁄4"


hooded sweatshirt 103


pattern Casual long-sleeved shirt

This pattern includes development of the following features: Shaping the body Creating a grown-on placket Adding length to the body Extending the shoulder, moving the shoulder seam, and enlarging the armhole Creating a back yoke Creating a breast pocket OFFICER COLLAR WING-TIP COLLAR Creating a two-piece collar Lowering the armhole Reducing the sleeve cap height Developing a cuff with cuff guard

CAMBRIDGE BAOTAING COLLAR

WIDE SPREAD CUTAWAY COLLAR

CLUB COLLAR

BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

FRONT NOTCH PITCH POINT

Start by selecting the basic men’s upper body sloper, or by drafting the basic sloper according to the instructions on page 40. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the shirt you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 48. 104 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

WAISTLINE

HIP LEVEL HEMLINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

SIDE SIDE SEAM SEAM

BACK MASTER PLAN

CENTER FRONT FRONT CENTRE

Step 1 Developing the master plan

CENTRE CENTER BACK BACK

CHEST LEVEL LINE

O D


Step 2 Developing the enlarged armhole, extending the shoulder, moving the shoulder seam, and adding length and width to the body

2⁄ "CM 34

2.5 1" CM

HEMLINE

6 23CM ⁄8"

5 41CM ⁄8"

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN

OLD FRONT SIDE SEAM

WAISTLINE

NEW SIDE SEAM

BACK MASTER PLAN

OLD BACK SIDE SEAM

3

2 CM ⁄4" 3 ⁄4" 2 CM

CHEST LINE LEVEL

CENTRE BACK CENTER

• To create the relaxed fit of this shirt style, add 3⁄4in each to the front and back side seams. This will enlarge the armhole and give the shallower sleeve cap of an extended shoulder style. You will need to reposition the front and back upper body slopers to add 15⁄8in at the side seams and redraw the master plan. • From the front shoulder tip measure out 3⁄4in over the armhole, square down 3⁄4in, and mark. At the front high point shoulder measure 1in down the neckline and draw a new line across to meet the new mark at the armhole. • Trace this shape onto a new piece of paper and cut it out. Add the shape to the top of the back shoulder seam and trace around it. This will create a shorter shoulder on the front and a longer shoulder on the back. • Extend the center front and center back lines down 23⁄8in from the hemline and square across to create a new hemline.

ER ULD SHO AM SE

4"M 23 ⁄C

SHO ULD SEA ER M

23⁄4C" M

1" 2.5 CM

3 2 ⁄4"CM

FRONT SHOULDER NECK POINT FRONT HIGH POINT SHOULDER

NEW HEMLINE

Step 3 Developing the new armhole and body shaping NEW NEW BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

UNDERARM / SIDE SEAM UNDERARM CORNER POINT

3 ⁄8" 1CM

1⁄8"CM

3

CENTRE CENTER FRONT FRONT

3 ⁄8"CM 1

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

BACK MASTER PLAN

3 ⁄8" 1CM

NEW NEW FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

CHEST LEVEL LINE

1" CM 2.5

52" CM

3 ⁄4" 124CM

CENTRE CENTER BACK BACK

• Measure 1in down the new side seam and make a mark. From this point on the front and back master plans, using the basic upper body slopers as a template, trace the new lowered armhole shape, continuing it up to connect with the new shoulders. Transfer the back and front notches to their new positions on the lowered armhole. • To develop the side seam, measure out 3⁄8in in both directions where the new side seam intersects the waistline. • Connect both these points up to the new underarm / side seam corner and down to the new hemline at the bottom of the new side seam with straight lines. • Create a side back dart by measuring 43⁄4in from the center back along the chest level and the original hemline. Draw a vertical line to connect these two points. • Measure 2in down this new line from the chest level and mark. This point will be the starting point of the side back dart. Where the new line intersects the waistline, measure 3 ⁄8in out on both sides and mark. This will become the widest point of the dart. Draw in the dart legs, connecting all the above points and the end of the dart line at the original hemline.

WAISTLINE

HEMLINE ⁄4" 1243CM NEW HEMLINE

Casual long-sleeved shirt 105


CENTRE CENTER PRONT FRONT NECK POINT

9 1.5 CM ⁄16" 9 1.5 CM ⁄16"

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

BACK MASTER PLAN

CENTRE CENTER BACK

• The placket width in this style is 13⁄16in and is centered over the center front line. Measure 9⁄16in out from the center front neck point and mark, and back 9⁄16in along the neckline and mark. Repeat at the hemline and connect all four marks to make a rectangle. • Add another rectangular placket shape, 13⁄16in wide, to the front of the first rectangle, and then add a further 3⁄8in seam allowance. • The overall measurement of the placket excluding the seam allowance is now 23⁄8in.

CHEST LEVEL LINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

Step 4 Developing the grown-on placket

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

NEW FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

313CM ⁄16" 3 1 CM ⁄8"

NEW NEW BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

WAISTLINE

HEMLINE

CENTER CENTRE BACK NECK POINT

NEW BACK SHOULDER POINT

3 3 1CM ⁄16" 3 1 CM ⁄8"

3

3 1CM ⁄16"

NEW HEMLINE

NEW BACK SHOULDER TIP

M 81⁄8C" 3

NEW FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

CHEST LEVEL LINE

5 2" CM 5 2" CM 45CM ⁄8" 1 12 43CM ⁄4"

73CM 2 ⁄4"

4.513CM ⁄4" 4.513CM ⁄4"

BACK MASTER PLAN

WAISTLINE

HEMLINE NEW HEMLINE

106 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

NEW NEW BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE CENTRE CENTER FRONT

• To create the back yoke measure 31⁄8in down the center back from the center back neck point and mark. Measure 31⁄8in from the new back shoulder tip down the armhole and mark. Connect these two points with a straight line. • From the front armhole measure 43⁄4in in along the chest level and mark. At this point square up 15⁄8in and down 23⁄4in and draw a vertical line. At the top of the line square out 2in on each side and mark. These points will become the pocket corners. • Measure up 3⁄8in from the bottom of the vertical line and square out 13⁄4in to either side and mark. Join these points back to the bottom of the vertical line with straight lines. Connect these points back up to the pocket corners to create the final pocket shape.

CENTRE CENTER BACK

Step 5 Developing the back yoke and front breast pocket

⁄8 " 831CM

FR CU


GRAI

GRAI

FRONT LEFT CUT 1 SELF

8 CM

8 CM

FRONT RIGHT CUT 1 SELF

Step 6 Front pattern CHEST LINE

NEW BACK PITCH POINT NEW FRONT PITCH POINT

Step 7 back pattern

5 CM 5 CM 4 CM

CENTRE BACK

4.5 CM 4.5 CM

FRONT MASTER PLAN

BACK MASTER PLAN

• Trace off the back onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape.

GRAIN LINE CENTRE FRONT

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front 12 CM 7 CM pattern, indicating the breast pocket position on the right front panel with drill holes at the corners.

BACK CUT 1 SELF

FOLD

FOLD

FOLD

FOLD

WAISTLINE

FACING FACING FOLD FOLD

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BREAST POCKET BREAST CUT 1 POCKET CUT 1 SELF SELF

FOLD FOLD

GRAIN LINE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the breast BACK pocket pattern, adding 1in facing to the top. CUT 1aSELF

2.5 1"CM

Step 8 Breast pocket pattern

Step 9 Back yoke pattern

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FRONT LEFT CUT 1 SELF

2.5 1"CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FOLD

FOLD

FOLD

FRONT RIGHT CUT 1 SELF

FOLD

NEW HEMLINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

HEMLINE

BACK YOKE BACK YOKE CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

• Trace the back yoke onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions of page 50, create the full pattern shape.

Casual long-sleeved shirt 107


Step 10 Developing the collar stand

Step 11 Developing the top collar • Trace off the stand shape from Step 10 onto another piece of paper. • Continue the center back line vertically up 3in from the top of the stand, square across 91⁄2in, and make a mark. This is the collar point. Connect this point back down to the center front neck with a straight line. You have now created the basic top collar shape. • At the collar point extend the front edge of the collar out and up by 3⁄8in and draw a curved line back to meet the outer edge. This will give the collar a smoother shape. • Measure up 1in from the top of the stand along the center back and make a mark. From here, square across to a point above the shoulder notch. From this point draw a curved line to meet the center front neck, mirroring the curve of the stand. This is the inner edge of the 2in-wide top collar shape.

Measuring half the neck from the master plan We will develop half the collar stand before creating the full collar stand. By taking measurements from the master plan, which is drawn in half, you will be measuring half of the neck measurement. • On the master plan measure the length of the back neck, in this case 43⁄8in, and the front neck from the shoulder tip down past the center front line to the point at which the placket finishes, in this case 53⁄8in. • Add these two measurements together to give half the neck measurement, in this case 93⁄4in.

COLLAR DEVELOPMENT

COLLAR COLLAR POINT 13⁄8CM "

SHOULDER NOTCH

CB

5 CM2"

REMOVE 0.3 CM

CUT 1 SELF

GRAIN LINE

CENTER FRONT NECK

SHOULDER NOTCH

CB NECK

CENTER BACK NECK

13. 53⁄85" CM

11 " 43⁄8CM

CF

2.5 CM1"

CB

• On a new piece of piece of paper, draw a rectangle measuring 93⁄4in by 1in, which is the half neck measurement by the width of the collar stand. Label the narrow side as the center back neck and the long side as the neckline. • From the center back neck, measure 43⁄8in (the half back neck measurement) along the bottom line of the rectangle and place a notch. Label it the shoulder notch. Do the same 43⁄8in along the top line of the rectangle. • Measure up 9⁄16in at the front edge of the rectangle and join this point back to the lower shoulder notch with a slight curve. • From the shoulder notch, measure 53⁄8in (the half front neck measurement) along this curved line. At the front of the curved line, square up 1in (the width of the collar stand). Then draw another curved line to connect this line back to UNDER COLLAR the top shoulder notch.

OUTER EDGE OF TOP COLLAR

TOP COLLAR 9 CUT 1 SELF ⁄16" CUT 1 FUSE

53⁄8"

43⁄8" 93⁄4" NECKLINE

GRAIN LINE INNER EDGE OF TOP COLLAR

108 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

CF

CB NECK

STAND WIDTH

COLLAR STAND CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 FUSE

OUTER EDGE OF STAND GRAIN LINE

INNER EDGE OF STAND

CF

1"

CB

1"


Step 12 Top collar pattern Collar stand pattern under collar Pattern • Trace off the collar stand pattern and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape. • Trace off the top collar pattern and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape. • The under collar is a copy of the top collar reduced by 1⁄8in at the center back neck, which is blended back with a line to both collar points; this reduction, when sewn, will pull the seam edge under the collar slightly so as not to be seen. Make a separate pattern for the under collar.

GRAIN LINE

TOP COLLAR TOP COLLAR CUT 1 SELF CUT 1 SELF CUT 1 FUSE CUT 1 FUSE

GRAINLINE

CFF C

COLLAR STAND STAND COLLAR CUT 11 FUSE FUSE CUT CUT 11 PR PR SELF SELF CUT

CB NECK

C CFF

STAND WIDTH

OUTER OUTER EDGE EDGE OF OF TOP TOPCOLLAR COLLAR

GRAIN LINE

GRAINLINE

INNER EDGE OF TOP COLLAR

SHOULDER NOTCH

SHOULDER NOTCH

REMOVE 1⁄8"

UNDER COLLAR UNDER COLLAR CUTCUT 1 SELF 1 SELF

OUTER EDGE OF STAND

GRAIN LINE

GRAINLINE

CB NECK

INNER EDGE OF STAND

Casual long-sleeved shirt 109


TOP OF

SLEEVEPOINT CAP CROWN BACK

BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

Step 13 Developing the sleeve master plan

FRONT

FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

BICEPS LEVEL

M

M SEA SEARM RMERA K UND UND BACERA

CUFF HEM CUFF HEM

Measurements for developing the sleeve You will need three measurements here: 1. Half the armhole measurement—measure the new armhole on the front and back patterns. In this case the front armhole is 101⁄4in and the back 11in. Add these measurements together (211⁄4in) and divide in half, making 105⁄8in. 2. Half the biceps measurement—measure the biceps width from the master plan. In this case it is 14in. As this is a casual-fitting shirt you can determine the amount of ease according to the design. In this case we will add 5in ease to the biceps measurement, making 19in. Divide this measurement in half, making 91⁄2in. 3. The cuff measurement, which in this case is 91⁄2in (the wrist measurement), plus a 2in tuck, making 111⁄2in.

110 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

FRONTSLEEVE SLEEVE FRONT MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

UNDE FRON RARM T UNDE SEAMSEAM RARM

BACK BACK SLEEVE SLEEVE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

CENTERLINE LINE CENTRE

UNDER ARM LINE

• Start this development by selecting the basic men’s sleeve sloper, or by drafting the basic sleeve sloper according to the instructions on page 42. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the sleeve you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 50. The design illustrated is shaped and has a gathered tuck on the back of the sleeve for even more shaping.


Step 14 Developing the sleeve with a reduced sleeve cap height and shaping the cuff hemline • Measure 1in down the center line from the top of the sleeve cap to reduce the height of the sleeve cap by the same amount that you lowered the armhole in Step 3. • At an angle from the new top of the sleeve cap, draw out a line measuring half the new armhole—105⁄8in. From the center line, draw out a line measuring half the new biceps measurement—91⁄2in. Adjust these lines until they meet to form a triangle and repeat on the other side of the sleeve. This will become the frame around which you construct the new shortened sleeve cap.

• From the cuff hemline measure 5in up the center line and square out 53⁄4in on both sides (the wrist measurement plus 2in for the tuck) and mark. To create the shaping at the bottom of the sleeve, measure down 3⁄16in on the back sleeve from the center of the new cuff hemline and mark this point. On the front sleeve, measure up 3⁄16in from the center of the new cuff hemline and mark this point. Join the points with a curved line that is convex on the back sleeve and then reverses at the center line so that it is concave on the front. • Now draw in the new underarm seam lines from either end of the new cuff hemline to the new corners of the sleeve at biceps level to create the sleeve shape.

" M 5 ⁄8C 1207

BICEPS LEVEL UNDERARM

FRONT SLEEVE FRONT SLEEVE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

BACK SLEEVE SLEEVE BACK MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

EAEMAM M MSS EERRARR ND UD KN BACU

LINE

CENTER LINE CENTRE LINE

T UU NN DEDRE AR RM AR SEM A

MSE

ELBOW LEVEL ELBOW LINE

⁄ " 0.5 CM 3

NEW UND POI

NEW FRONT FRONT NEW SLEEVE UNDERARM CORNER AT POINT BICEPS LEVEL

91⁄2" CM 24

AM

91⁄2" 24 CM

16

53⁄4" CM 14.5

FRON

NEW BACK BACK NEW SLEEVE UNDERARM CORNER AT POINT BICEPS LEVEL

21075⁄8 C" M

HEIGHT

CM 2.5 1"

SLEEVE CAP HEAD SLEEVE HEIGHT

TOP OF CROWN SLEEVE CAP POINT

⁄ " CM 0.5 3

16

53⁄4" CM 14.5

5" 13 CM

CUFF HEM HEMLINE CUFF

Casual long-sleeved shirt

111


• Add shape to the sleeve cap by measuring 33⁄8in from the new top of the sleeve cap along the diagonal line toward the new front corner of the sleeve at biceps level, square out 1 ⁄2in, and mark. Then from the front corner of the sleeve at biceps level measure 4in up along the diagonal and mark. On the back measure down 31⁄2in on the diagonal, square out 1 ⁄2in and mark; measure 31⁄8in up from the back corner of the sleeve at biceps level and mark.

• Using a French curve, draw in shallow raised curves from the new top of the sleeve cap through the marks on the upper portion of the sleeve cap, reversing the curves at the marks on the lower portion of the sleeve cap, and finishing these hollow curved lines at the corners of the sleeve at biceps level. To add in the notches, first measure the distance on the front and back body panels between the corners of the sleeve at biceps level and the notches around the armhole. Then transcribe the measurements to the sleeve cap, measuring from the sleeve corners toward the cap. • From the back underarm seam line measure in 3in along the new cuff hemline and square up 61⁄4in. This is the cut line for the cuff guard. From the bottom of the cuff guard line, continue to measure 13⁄4in and mark, and a further 2in and mark. This will become the tuck.

CROWN TOP OF SLEEVE CAP POINT

1 1.3 CM ⁄2"

1 " 3 ⁄2M

9C

83.3⁄58"

⁄2" CM 1.3

1

CM

10

⁄ "M

8 3C 1 8

91⁄2"

BICEPS LEVEL LINE UNDERARM

NEW FRONT FRONT NEW SLEEVE UNDERARM CORNER AT POINTLEVEL BICEPS

91⁄2"

FRONT SLEEVE FRONT SLEEVE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

CENTER LINE CENTRE LINE

RSME S

AEMAM

BACK SLEEVE BACK SLEEVE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

1 6 ⁄4" CM 16

TU CK TUCK 3" CM 7.5

" 1 ⁄4CM 4.5 3

CUFF HEM HEMLINE CUFF

112 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

C4"M

FRNON U DE TR UN ADREM RA

NEW BACK BACK NEW SLEEVE UNDERARM CORNER AT POINTLEVEL BICEPS

M EAM SESA ARM RM DAER UN R K E C D A B UN

ONT ARM

Step 15 DEveloping the new sleeve shape

CM 5 2"

NEW CUFF HEM


CROWN POINT

M

9C

8.5

CM

1.3 CM

10

UNDERARM LINE

CM

Step 16 Sleeve pattern

NEW FRONT UNDERARM POINT

RARM

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

SEAM

SLEEVE SLEEVE CUT 1 1 PRPR SELF CUT SELF

UNDE

CENTRE LINE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the sleeve pattern, indicating the top of the cuff opening position with FRONT SLEEVE a drill hole. MASTER PLAN

6 CM

TUCK

NE

5 CM

Step 17 Developing the cuff

Measuring the cuff The cuff is a double pattern piece that is sewn onto the end of the sleeve and turned inside out. The cuff shape will start and finish at the guard opening. Measure this width from the pattern, in this case 113⁄8in, and subtract 2in for the tuck and 3⁄8in for the seam allowance (3⁄16in on either side) on the cuff guard opening, making 9in.

• On a separate piece of paper, draw a box 9in long by 61⁄4in wide to create a rectangular-shaped cuff. • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line across the center, and label it fold.

23 9" CM

1 83CM ⁄8"

SLEEVE CUFF SLEEVE CUFF

CUT SELF CUT11PR PR SELF 1 83CM ⁄8 "

FOLD FOLD

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CM

Casual long-sleeved shirt 113


2 CM

FOLD FOLD

FOLD GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

1 16 6 ⁄4"CM

BOTTOM CUFF GAURD

CUT 1 PR SELF

TOP CUFF GUARD GAURD CUT 1 PR SELF 2 CM

1 CM

2 CM

1 CM

⁄8"

⁄4"

3

1 CM

⁄4"

3

⁄8"

3

3

BOTTOM EDGE STITCHED TO CUFF 6 CM

2 ⁄8" TO CUFF BOTTOM EDGE STITCHED 3

4 CM

1 CM

2.5 CM

TOP CUFF GAURD

⁄8"

3

2 CM

1 CM

1 CM

114 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

E STITCHED UFF M

4 CM

15⁄8"

1 CM

⁄8"

3

CUT 1 PR SELF

CUT 1 PR SELF

GUARD BOTTOM CUFF GAURD

16 CM

61⁄4"CM 16

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FOLD

FOLD

FOLD

FOLD FOLD

2 CM

• Create a rectangular box 61⁄4in by 23⁄8in. • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line down the center, and label it fold. • At each end square out 3⁄4in from the fold line and mark on both sides. Join these points with straight lines. This will leave you with a 3⁄8in seam allowance on each long side.

1 CM

TOP EDGE

Step 19 Developing the bottom cuff guard

M

16 CM

GRAIN LINE

• On a separate piece of paper, create a rectangular box 61⁄4in long by 23⁄8in wide. • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line down the center, and label it fold. • At each end square out 3⁄4in up and 3⁄4in down from the fold line and mark. Join these points with straight lines. This will leave you with a 3⁄8in seam allowance on each long side. • From the top left corner measure 1in along the long side of the rectangle and square across 3⁄4in. This small rectangular shape will be removed from the pattern. • From the bottom right corner measure 3⁄8in down the long side of the rectangle and mark, and measure 3⁄4in in on the short side and mark. Join these points with an angled line. • Now measure 3⁄8in in along the top edge of the rectangle you drew in the top left corner and join this point to the top of the first angled line to give a pointed shape to the top of the cuff guard.

FOLD FOLD

FOLD

1 3C ⁄8"M

2.5 1" CM

2 CM

FOLD

3

1 3C ⁄8"M

TOP EDGE

FOLD

2 CM

Step 18 Developing the top cuff guard

⁄4"

3

⁄4"

⁄4"

3

TOP EDGE


Casual long-sleeved shirt 115


pattern Lumberjack Shirt

This pattern includes development of the following features: Shaping the body Creating a sewn-on placket Adding length to the body Creating a baseball hemline

Creating a classic Western-style front yoke shape that doubles up as pocket flaps to the internally sewn pocket bag Creating a back yoke with center back pleat Creating a two-piece collar Creating a set-in sleeve Developing a cuff with cuff guard

BACK MASTER PLAN PLAN

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

Start by selecting the basic men’s upper body sloper, or by drafting the basic sloper according to the instructions on page 40. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the shirt you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 48. 116 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

WAISTLINE

HIPLINE HIP LEVEL

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

GRAIN LNE GRAINLINE

SIDE SEAM

Step 1 Developing the master plan

CENTRE CENTER BACK

CHEST LINE LEVEL


BACK MASTER PLAN PLAN

Step 2 Lengthening the body and developing the baseball hemline

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

GRAIN LNE GRAINLINE

• Extend the center front, side seam, and the center back lines down 23⁄8in from the original hemline. • Join these three points with a straight horizontal line to create a new hemline. • On this new hemline measure in 15⁄8in from the center back and the center front. • From these points draw graduated curves up to meet the end of the side seam on the original hemline. You have now created a generic baseball hemline.

SIDE SIDE SEAM

CENTRE CENTER BACK

CHEST LEVEL LINE

WAISTLINE

623CM ⁄8 "

HEMLINE

5 ⁄8" 41CM

NEW HEMLINE

5 ⁄8" 41CM

NEW HEMLINE

1.59CM ⁄16"

FOLD FOLD FOLD CENTRE CENTER FRONT

SIDE SEAM

GRAIN LNE GRAINLINE

CHEST LEVEL CHEST LINE

CENTER BACK CENTRE

FOLD FOLD

WAISTLINE

FOLD FOLD

CENTRE FRONT

GRAIN LNE

SIDE SEAM

HEMLINE 6 CM

HEMLINE

NEW HEMLINE 4 CM 2.5 CM 1"

NEW HEMLINE

1.59⁄CM 16"

NEW HEMLINE

2.5 CM 1"

CENTRE BACK

• The placket width is 1in and is drafted over the center front as aCHEST template to be traced off and attached later. LINE • From the center front neck point measure back 1⁄2in along the neckline and mark, and measure out 1⁄2in and mark; repeat this at the new hemline and connect these points with straight lines and label the outer one fold. • From the outer line measure out another 1in at the neckline for the placket width and mark; repeat at the hemline. Measure out another 9⁄16in to create the seam allowance; WAISTLINE repeat at the hemline. Again, join these points and label the first line fold. • The overall measurement of the placket is now 21⁄2in, including the seam allowance.

4 CM

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

BACK MASTER PLAN

1" 2.5 CM

Step 3 BACK MASTER FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN Developing the sewn-on placket

2.5 CM 1"

CENTER CENTRE FRONT NECK POINT

2" 21⁄CM 6.5

lumberjack shirt 117


BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

FOLD

19 ⁄2" 71CM

FOLD

3 13CM ⁄16"

Step 4 Developing the front yoke shape

CHEST LINE LEVEL

BACK MASTER PLAN PLAN

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

SIDE SEAM

CENTRE BACK CENTER

FOLD

WAISTLINE

FOLD

• From the front notch on the armhole square across to meet the new placket shape. • Measure between the front notch and the placket, in this case 71⁄2in. • Divide this measurement in half, in this case 33⁄4in, and at this new point square down 13⁄16in and mark. This will be the apex of the curve on the Western-style front yoke. • Draw a curved line from the front notch to the point at the apex of the curve, followed by another curved line to the point at the other end of the horizontal line you drew to the placket line.

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

HEMLINE

NEW HEMLINE

Step 5 Developing the breast pocket and flap

FRONT MASTER PLAN FRONT MASTER PLAN

1⁄8"CM

FRONT FRONT NOTCH PITCH POINT

⁄8"

4 11⁄ " CM POCKET POSITION POCKET POSITION 3

SIDE SEAM SIDE SEAM

CENTRE BACK

118 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

4

8

D

3

• To make a pocket 43⁄8in wide, measure 3⁄8in down from center of the pitch line you drew and square out 21⁄8in either side. Each end of this horizontal line should intersect the curved line of the yoke to create a triangular shape. Mirror this shape above to create a diamond shape, the apex of which sits 3⁄8in above the horizontal pitch line. Add a 3⁄8inwide facing strip that follows the curve of the yoke from both sides of the diamond shape. This shape will become the concealed pocket flap described in Step 11 below. • In this example the pocket depth is 53⁄4in measured from the WAISTLINE middle of the diamond shape. Draw vertical lines from each point where the pocket intersects the curve of the yoke to create a rectangle 53⁄4in x 43⁄8in. Mark the lower corners of the pocket with drill holes.

FOLD FOLD

3

5⁄" 14.5 CM

CHEST LINE

FOLD FOLD

3

3 ⁄8" 1 CM

CENTER FRONT CENTRE FRONT

BACK PITCH BACK NOTCH POINT

FOLD

Pocket size BACK MASTER PLAN Pocket widths generally reflect the width of a human hand or a group of fingers. The depth can depend on your design ethos or the depth of a hand from fingertip to wrist.


BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

FOLD

UNDERARM UNDERARM / SIDE SEAM POINT CORNER

Step 6 Developing the front shirt panel

POCKET POSITION

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

SIDE SEAM

SIDE SEAM NEW FRONT

CHEST LEVEL LINE

CENTRE CENTER BACK

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

WAISTLINE

• Where the waistline intersects the side seam measure 9⁄16in toward the center front and mark. • From the underarm / side seam corner draw a slightly curved line down to meet the new point on the waistline and carry through with a curve back to the hemline at the bottom on the side seam.

HEMLINE

NEW HEMLINE

⁄2 9 3CM 1

"

1 ⁄4"C 166

Step 7 Developing the back yoke shape, center back pleat, and shaped back panel

BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

BACK MASTER PLAN PLAN

M

FRONT MASTER PLAN

FOLD

3 2 CM ⁄4"

FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

FOLD

UNDERARM / SIDE SEAM UNDERARM CORNER POINT CHEST LINE LEVEL 14 51⁄2"CM

4.5 13⁄4CM "

13CM ⁄8"

3 CM 1 ⁄8"

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

FOLD

1.59CM ⁄16"

WAISTLINE

NEW BACK SIDE SIDESEA SEAMM SIDE SEAM

POCKET POSITION

CENTRE BACK CENTER

10 4" CM

HEMLINE

FOLD

• From the back armhole notch square across to the center back to create the back yoke panel. • From where this line intersects with center back measure out 3⁄4in. • Connect this point to the bottom of the new hemline at the center back with a straight line. This will create half of the pleat width. • Where the waistline intersects the side seam measure 9⁄16in toward the center back and mark. • From the underarm / side seam corner draw a curved line down to the new point on the waistline; carry through with a curve back to the hemline at the bottom of the side seam. • From the center back measure 51⁄2in along the chest level. • From this point, square down to the original hemline. • Measure 13⁄4in down this line and mark. Measure 4in up the line from the original hemline and mark. Where this line intersects the waistline measure out 3⁄8in on each side and mark these points. Join all these points with straight lines to create the dart.

FOLD

FOLD

1.59⁄16 CM "

Shaping for a fitted silhouette Side seam shaping will give the shirt a fitted silhouette. Back shaping with a dart will give you an even more fitted silhouette.

FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

FOLD

BACK MASTER PLAN PLAN

NEW HEMLINE

lumberjack shirt 119


Step 8 Developing the collar stand

Step 9 Developing the top collar • Trace off the stand shape from Step 8 onto another piece of paper. • Continue the center back line vertically up 3in from the top of the stand, square across 97⁄8in, and make a mark. Connect this point back down to the center front line with a straight line. You have now created the basic top collar shape. • At the collar point extend the front edge of the collar by 3⁄8in and draw a curved line back to meet the outer edge. This will give the collar a smoother shape. • Measure up 1in from the top of the stand along the center back and make a mark. From here, square across to a point above the shoulder notch. From this point draw a curved line to meet the center front line, mirroring the curve of the stand. This is the inner edge of the 2in-wide top collar shape.

COLLAR STAND DEVELOPMENT

CENTER BACK NECK

CENTER FRONT NECK

SHOULDER NOTCHES

1" 2.5

2.5 CM1"

⁄4" 6 16 1

⁄" 9 3CM 5

8

NECKLINE NECKLINE

7 9 ⁄8" 25

CM

CM 61⁄4"

16 CM

120 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

CM

9 ⁄16" CM 1.5

7 25 ⁄8 " 9

CM

COLLAR POINT 3 ⁄8"CM 1

5 CM2"

CB CB

• On a new piece of piece of paper, draw a rectangle measuring 97⁄8in by 1in, which is half the neck measurement by the width of the collar stand. Label the narrow side as the center back neck and the long side as the neckline. • From the center back neck, measure 35⁄8in (the half back neck measurement) along the bottom line of the rectangle and place a notch. Label it the shoulder notch. Repeat along the top of the rectangle. • Measure up 9⁄16in at the front edge of the rectangle and join this new point back to the lower shoulder notch with a slight curve. • From the shoulder notch, measure 61⁄4in (the half front neck measurement) along this curved line. At the front of the curved line, square up 1in (the width of the collar stand). Then draw another curved line to connect this line back to the top shoulder notch. • From the top right corner of the stand measure along 1in (the width of the placket) and from this point square across to the lower curved line. Label this center front neck. Round off the top right corner with a slight curve.

SHOULDER NOTCH SHOULDER NOTCH

2.5 CM1" CB CB

Measuring half the neck from the master plan We will develop half the collar stand before creating the full collar stand. By taking measurements from the master plan, which is drawn in half, you will be measuring half the neck measurement. • On the master plan measure the length of the back neck, in this case 35⁄8in, and the front neck from the high point shoulder down past the center front line to the point at which the placket finishes when folded, in this case 61⁄4in. • Add these two measurements together to give half the neck measurement, in this case 97⁄8in.

COLLAR DEVELOPMENT


9 CM SEAM ALLOWANCE 1.5 ⁄16" SEAM ALLOWANCE

2.5 CM 1"

2.5 CM 1"

3 CM SEAM ALLOWANCE 1 ⁄8" SEAM ALLOWANCE

ALLOWANCE NEW SEAM ALLOWANCE

Step 11 Front yoke and concealed pocket flap facing patterns • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the shape of the front yoke pattern from Steps 4 and 5. • Indicate the concealed pocket flap position with a broken line. • Trace off the flap facing pattern separately.

GRAIN LINE

FRONT YOKE CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CUT 1 PR SELF

FRONT YOKE CUT 1 PR SELF

PLACKET FRONT PLACKET

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the placket pattern from Step 3, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance to the right-hand side of the placket pattern.

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

Step 10 Front placket pattern

CUT 2 FUSE

FOLD

BUTTON PLACEMENT

FOLD

FLAP STITCH LINE

GRAIN LINE

LINE GRAIN GRAINLINE

FLAP STITCH LINE

FLAP FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

FLAP FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

Step 12 Front breast pocket bag pattern

Step 13 Back yoke pattern

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front pocket bag pattern from Step 5.

• Trace off the back yoke from Step 7 onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape.

FRONT POCKET BAG FRONT BREAST CUT 1 PR SELF

BACK BACK YOKE YOKE

GRAINLINE

CUT 1 PR SELF

CENTER BACK CENTRE GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE

POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR SELF

lumberjack shirt 121


Step 14 Front pattern

Step 15 Back pattern

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off a copy of the lower front shirt panel from Step 7. Follow the curve from the armhole to where the curve meets the top of the pocket bag, draw a horizontal line across the pocket, and then follow the curve toward the center front. This will create the pocket opening edge under the flap.

• Trace off the back shirt panel and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape.

PLEAT

CENTRE BACK CENTER GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BACK CUT 1 SELF

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FRONT PR CUTCUT 1 PR1SELF

• Trace off the collar stand pattern and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape. • Trace off the top collar pattern and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape. • The under collar is a copy of the top collar, reduced by 1⁄8in, at the center back neck, which is blended back with a line to both collar points; this reduction, when sewn, will pull the seam edge under the collar slightly so as not to be seen. Make a separate pattern for the under collar.

STAND WIDTH STAND WIDTH

STAND WIDTH STAND WIDTH OUTER EDGE OF STAND

COLLAR COLLARSTAND STAND CUT CUT 11FUSE FUSE CUT 11 PR PR SELF SELF CUT

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CENTER BACK

TOP COLLAR TOP COLLAR CUT 1 SELF CUT 1 SELF CUT CUT1 FUSE 1 FUSE

OUTER EDGE OF TOP COLLAR OUTER EDGE OF TOP COLLAR

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE INNER EDGE OF TOP COLLAR

SHOULDER NOTCH

SHOULDER NOTCH

REMOVE1⁄8 "

UNDER COLLAR UNDER COLLAR CUTCUT 1 SELF 1 SELF

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

INNER EDGE OF STAND CENTER BACK

122 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

CCFF

C CF F

Step 16 Collar stand pattern Top collar pattern Developing the under collar


TOP OF SLEEVEPOINT CAP CROWN BACK PITCH BACK POINT NOTCH

FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

Step 17 Developing the sleeve master plan UNDERARM LINE BICEPS LEVEL

BACK BACK SLEEVE SLEEVE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

UNDERARM SLEEVE POINT CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

CENTRE CENTER LINE

1 61.5 24 ⁄4"CM NEW SLEEVE LENGTH

FRONT FRONT SLEEVE SLEEVE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

FRONT UNDERAR UNDERARM M SEAM SEAM

UNDERARM SLEEVE CORNER POINT AT BICEPS LEVEL

SEAM UNDERARMSEAM BACK UNDERARM

Start this development by selecting the basic men’s sleeve sloper, or by drafting the basic sleeve sloper according to the instructions on page 42. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the shirt you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 48. The design illustrated is shaped and has a gathered pleat on the back of the sleeve for even more shaping. The sleeve sloper that you have selected might be longer or shorter than the design you are developing. Analyze by taking a measurement from your fit model or dress form and by consulting your size chart, or even by using competitors’ garments for comparison. The sleeve length is 241⁄4in and the cuff measurement is calculated by adding 13⁄16in to the wrist measurement of 97⁄8in for a tuck, giving 11in.

28 CM 11" NEW CUFF HEM WIDTH

CUFF HEM

OF TOP CROWN SLEEVE CAP POINT

BACK BACK NOTCH PITCH POINT

UNDERARM LINE BICEPS LEVEL

UNDERARM SLEEVE POINT CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

FRONT SLEEVE SLEEVE FRONT MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

NEW UN FRON DERA T UN RM DESE RA AM RM SEAM

CENTRE CENTER LINE

BACK SLEEVE SLEEVE BACK MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

16 61⁄4"CM

61.5 241⁄4"CM NEW SLEEVE LENGTH LENGHT

0.53CM ⁄16"

8 31CM ⁄8"

5 " ⁄16" 3 1 CM ⁄8 41CM NEW CUFF HEM 3

0.5 3CM ⁄16"

UNDERARM SLEEVE POINT CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

AM SEAM SERM DERA UNRM DERA BACK NEW UN

• To create the shaping at the bottom of the sleeve, measure down 3⁄16in on the back sleeve from the center of the new cuff hemline and mark this point. On the front sleeve, measure up 3⁄16in from the center of the new cuff hemline and mark this point. Join the points with a curved line that is convex on the back sleeve and then reverses at the center line so that it is concave on the front. • Now draw in the new underarm seam lines to create the sleeve shape. • From the back underarm seam line measure in 31⁄8in along the new cuff hemline and square up 61⁄4in. This is the cut line for the cuff guard. Measure in a further 15⁄8in at the bottom of this line and mark and then a further 13⁄16in and mark. This will become the tuck.

FRONT FRONT NOTCH PITCH POINT

TUCK

Step 18 Developing the sleeve shape

CUFF HEM

lumberjack shirt 123


Step 19 Sleeve pattern

Step 20 Developing the cuff

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the sleeve pattern.

GRAINLINE GRAIN

SLEEVE CUT 1 PR SELF

LINE

SLEEVE CUT 1 PR SELF

Measuring the cuff The cuff is a double pattern that is sewn onto the end of the sleeve and turned inside out. The cuff shape will start and finish at the guard opening. Measure this width from the pattern, in this case 11in, and subtract 13⁄16in for the tuck and 3⁄8in for the seam allowance (3⁄16in on either side) on the cuff guard opening, making 91⁄2in.

• On a separate piece of paper, draw a horizontal box 91⁄2in long by 51⁄2in wide to create a rectangular-shaped cuff. • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line across the center, and label it fold.

91⁄2"

24 CM

SLEEVE CUFF CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 PR FUSE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

SLEEVE CUFF CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 PR FUSE

FOLD FOLD

3

TOP EDGE

3

13C ⁄8"M

13C ⁄8"M

TOP EDGE

⁄4"

TOP CUFF GUARD GAURD CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

16 61⁄4"CM

FOLD

FOLD

3

FOLD FOLD

2.5 1" CM

2 CM

⁄4"

2 CM 3

⁄4"

2 CM 3

BOTTOM EDGE STITCHED TO CUFF 6 CM

1 CM

⁄8"

3

23⁄8" TO CUFF BOTTOM EDGE STITCHED

⁄8"

1 CM

124 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

⁄4"

2 CM

• On a separate piece of paper, create a rectangular box 61⁄4in long by 23⁄8in wide. • Divide the box in half lengthways, drawing a line across the center, and label it fold. • At each end square out 3⁄4in from the fold line on both sides and mark. Join these points with straight lines. This will leave you with a 3⁄8in seam allowance on each long side. • From the top left corner measure 1in down the long side of the rectangle and square across 3⁄4in. This small rectangular shape will be removed from the pattern. • From the top right corner measure 3⁄8in down the long side of the rectangle and mark, and measure 3⁄4in across the short side and mark. Join these points with an angled line. • Now measure 3⁄8in down from the edge of the rectangle you drew in the top left corner and join this point to the top of the first angled line to give a pointed shape to the top of the cuff guard.

⁄4"

2 CM

Step 21 Developing the top cuff guard

14 ⁄2 " 51CM

FOLD FOLD

3


FOLD

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FOLD

61⁄4"CM 16

CUT 1 PR SELF

BOTTOM CUFF BOTTOM CUFF GUARD GAURD

15⁄8"

4 CM

⁄8"

3

⁄8"

3

1 CM

1 CM

• Create a rectangular box 61⁄4in by 23⁄8in. • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line down the center, and label it fold. • At each end square out 3⁄4in on both sides from the fold line and mark. Join these points with straight lines. This will leave you with a 3⁄8in seam allowance on each long side.

FOLD

Step 22 Developing the bottom cuff guard

lumberjack shirt 125


pattern Short-sleeved safari shirt

Step 1 Developing the master plan Start by selecting the basic men’s upper body sloper, or by drafting the basic sloper according to the instructions on page 40. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the shirt you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 48. 126 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

FRONT NOTCH PITCH POINT

WAISTLINE

HIP LEVEL HEMLINE

CENTRE CENTER FRONT FRONT

FRONT MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BACK MASTER PLAN

SIDE SEAM

CHEST LEVEL LINE

CENTRE CENTER BACK BACK

This pattern includes development of the following features: Creating a darted body Constructing a grown-on and a sewn-on placket Adding length to the body Creating a baseball hemline Creating a shoulder yoke Creating an epaulet and sleeve tab Creating a patch pocket with flap Creating a two-piece collar Lowering the armhole Reducing the sleeve cap height Developing a short sleeve incorporating a cuff


CENTRE FRONT CENTER NECK POINT BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

Step 2 Lengthening the body and creating a grown-on and sewn-on placket

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

FOLD

SIDE SEAM

CENTRE BACK CENTER

BACK MASTER PLAN

FOLD

WAISTLINE

HEMLINE 3 62CM ⁄8"

6 23CM ⁄8"

2.5 CM 1"

Step 3 Developing the new armhole, body, and hem shaping

3 2 ⁄4"CM

5 CM 2"

FRONT FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

9 1.5 CM ⁄16"

3 ⁄8" 1 CM

3 1 ⁄8"CM

FOLD

9 1.5 ⁄16CM "

SIDE SEAM

CENTRE CENTER BACK

BACK MASTER PLAN

WAISTLINE

16 61⁄4"CM

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

CHEST LINE LEVEL 11.5 41⁄CM 2"

NEW NEW FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

UNDERARM UNDER / SIDE SEAM ARM CORNER POINT

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

NEW NEW BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

Shaping the body There is no side seam shaping in this design because the side back and side front darts give enough shape to the silhouette.

FOLD

NEW HEMLINE

2.5 CM 1" 1.5 9CM ⁄16"

6 CM ⁄8" 2 3

HEMLINE

5.5 21⁄8"CM

11.541CM ⁄2"

NEW HEMLINE 3 0.5 CM ⁄16" 3 0.5 CM ⁄16"

• Measure 3⁄4in down the side seam and mark. From this position on the front and back master plan, using your basic upper body slopers as a template, trace the new lowered armhole shape, continuing it up to connect with the shoulders. Draw in the new lowered notch positions. • Create the front dart by measuring 61⁄4in along the chest level from the old underarm / side seam corner and mark, square down and draw a line to connect with the new hemline. Where this line intersects the waistline measure out 3 ⁄8in on both sides and mark. This will become the widest part of the dart. Repeat at the new hemline, measuring out 3 ⁄16in on both sides and mark. Draw in the dart legs from the chest level down, connecting all of the above points. • Create the side back dart by measuring 41⁄2in along the chest level and the original hemline from the center back and mark. Draw a vertical line to connect these two points. Measure 2in down this new line and mark and up 21⁄8in and mark. Where this new line intersects the waistline measure out 9⁄16in on both sides and mark. This will become the widest point of the dart. Draw in the dart legs, connecting all of the above points. • Develop the hem shaping from the center front to the side seam using a French curve. When you reach the front dart

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

CHEST LEVEL LINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

• Extend the center front and center back lines down 2 ⁄8in from the hemline and square across. • The front left body panel has a grown-on placket of 1in and the front right body has a sewn-on placket. You can create both from one pattern development. • From the center front neck point measure back 1⁄2in along the neckline and mark, and measure out 1⁄2in and mark; repeat this at the new hemline and connect these points with straight lines and label the outer one fold. • From this line continue to measure out 1in at the neckline and mark, and then a further 9⁄16in for the seam width; repeat at the hemline. Again, join these points, mark, and label the first line as a fold line. • The overall measurement of the placket is now 21⁄2in, including the seam allowance.

FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

3

you will need to step the hemline down so that it continues in a smooth line when the dart is folded. Do this by tracing the dart legs and the hemline onto a separate piece of paper, fold the dart, and then redraw the hemline. Cut it out and, when you open up the paper, you will have a template off which to trace the step. Continue to draw in the hemline up to the side seam and then back down to the center back. short-sleeved safari shirt 127


FRONT FRONT SHOULDER SHOULDER POINT TIP

BACK BACK SHOULDER SHOULDER POINT TIP

10 4" CM

NEW NEW FRONT FRONT NOTCH PITCH POINT

LINE CHEST LEVEL

FRONT FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

BACK BACK MASTER PLAN PLAN

FOLD

SIDE SEAM

CENTRE BACK CENTER

81⁄CM 3 8"

NEW NEW BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

FOLD

WAISTLINE

HEMLINE NEW HEMLINE

Step 5 Yoke pattern • Trace off the yoke onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape.

FRO N SHO T U NEC LDER K PO INT

R

4 CM

CENTRE BACK

FRO

ELF

CENTER BACK

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

NT

YOK E CUT 1 PR S

B

ACK BACK NOT CH NOTCH

FOL

D

FOL

D

CEN

IN L

YOKE CUT 1 PR SELF

TRE

INE

BAC BACK K NOT CH NOTCH

SHOSHOU ULDLDER ER SSEAM EAM

FRONT

FRO NT NONOTCH TCH

128 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

E KLIN NECKLINE

NEC

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

• For the back yoke shaping measure 33⁄4in down the center back line and mark, and 31⁄8in from the back shoulder tip down the armhole and mark. Connect these two points with a straight line. • For the front yoke measure 31⁄8in down the armhole from the front shoulder tip and mark, square across 4in, and mark, and measure 15⁄8in down the front high point shoulder and mark. Connect all the above points with straight lines. • Trace off the back yoke onto a separate piece of paper. Next, align the back shoulder seam you have just traced with the front shoulder seam on the master plan and trace off the front yoke shape to complete the yoke.

1 8 3CM ⁄8 "

1 ⁄8" 45CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

9.5 33⁄4"CM

Step 4 Developing the front and back yoke shapes

FRONT SHOULDER HIGH POINT NECK POINT SHOULDER

NECKLIN

NECKLI

NE

EAM

ER S

ULD

E

SHO

SHO

U

EAM

RS LDE

FRONT T FRON NOTCH H NOTC


Step 6 Developing the front patch pocket and flap

Front patch pocket shape The front patch pocket is placed directly over the side front dart and is 31⁄2in wide by 41⁄2in long at the lowest point of its spade shape.

NEW FRONT

BACK MASTER PLAN • Measure up 3⁄8in from the center at the top of the pocket and square out 13⁄4in on both sides and mark. This is the upper edge of the pocket flap. WAISTLINE • From the center of this line square down 2in and mark; this is the lowest point of the spade shape. Measure 3⁄8in back up this line, square out 2in on both sides, and mark. Join these points up to the upper edge of the pocket flap and down to the lowest point of the spade shape.

1

2

1⁄ " CM 1 " 3⁄ CM

3

2"

5 CM

13⁄4" 13⁄4" 4.5CM 4.5CM 4" 10 CM

⁄ " 1.5 CM 9

SIDE SEAM SIDE SEAM

CENTRE BACK

Pocket flap shape The pocket flap is also spade shaped and is developed on top of the pocket for fit purposes. The top flap is positioned 3 ⁄8in above the pocket opening edge.

⁄" 9 3CM

16

FRONT MASTER PLAN

FRONT MASTER PLAN

8

3

16

2 73⁄4"CM

FOLD FOLD

NEW NOTCH FRONT PITCH POINT

CENTER FRONT CENTRE FRONT

CHEST LINE

NEW BACK PITCH POINT

FOLD

• From the dart point measure out 13⁄4in on both sides along the chest level and mark to create the 31⁄2in pocket width. • From these points, square up 13⁄16in and mark. From the same points, square 23⁄4in down from the chest level and mark. Measure down 9⁄16in on the dart line and mark. Join all the above points to create the spade-shaped pocket.

HEMLINE NEW HEMLINE

short-sleeved safari shirt 129


NEW BACK PITCH POINT NEW FRONT PITCH POINT

9 CM 5 CM

BACK MASTER PLAN

1 CM 3 CM

10 CM

7 CM

1.5 CM

NEW BACK PITCH POINT

FRONT MASTER PLAN

SIDE SEAM

CENTRE BACK

Step 7 Pocket patterns

4.5CM 4.5CM

0.53⁄16 CM "

CENTRE FRONT

CHEST LINE

⁄4"

3

4.5CM 4.5CM

1 CM 3 CM

10 CM

7 CM

FRONT MASTER PLAN

SIDE SEAM

BACK MASTER PLAN

FOLD

1.5 CM

0.5 CM

FOLD FACING

FOLD

0.5 CM

FOLD

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE

NEW HEMLINE

⁄"

⁄4"

FOLD FOLD

CUT 1 PR SELF 2 CM

NEW HEMLINE

3 1 CM 8

2 CM

POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR SELF

HEMLINE

HEMLINE

3 ⁄16CM " 0.5

POCKET BAG POCKET BAGSELF CUT 1 PR

FOLD

WAISTLINE

FOLD

2 CM

FOLD

5 CM

FOLD FOLD

3

FOLD FOLD

FOLD CENTRE FRONT

CENTRE BACK

CHEST LINE

9 CM

FACING FACING

2 CM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the pocket patterns, adding a 3⁄8in allowance to the top of the pocket WAISTLINE flap and a 3⁄4in facing plus a 3⁄16in seam allowance to the top of the pocket bag. NEW FRONT PITCH POINT

FOLD FOLD

⁄"

3 1 CM 8 FOLD

FOLD

FOLD

FOLD POCKET FLAP CUT 2 PR SELF

GRAINLINE

1 CM

GRAIN LINE

POCKET FLAP CUT 2 PR SELF FOLD

1 CM

FOLD

GRAIN LINE

POCKET FLAP CUT 2 PR SELF

BACK CUT 1 SELF

2.5 CM 1 CM

1 CM 2.5 CM

• Trace off the back onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape.

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

Step 8 Back pattern

1 CM

1 CM

FRONT RIGHT CUT 1 SELF

LD

130 Chapter three the patterns: shirts


CENTRE FRONT CENTER

CENTRE FRONT

G

FRONT RIGHT CUT 1 SELF

FRONT LEFT CUT 1 SELF

FRONT LEFT CUT 1 SELF

FOLD FOLD GRAIN LINE

FOLD FOLD

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BACK CUT 1 SELF

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

• The right-hand side of the front pattern has a sewn-on FRONT RIGHT placket as a design feature and the left-hand side hasCUT a 1 SELF grown-on placket that is folded back and sewn. Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front pattern including the placket to create the left-hand panel, and then retrace the front panel without the placket development to create the right-hand panel.

GRAIN LINE

Step 9 Front pattern

GRAIN LINE

1 CM 1 CM

2.5 1" CM 3 ⁄8CM " 1

13⁄8CM " 2.5 CM 1"

1 CM

1 CM

13⁄8CM "

3 1 CM ⁄8"

Step 10 Placket pattern

FRONT LEFT PLACKET PLACKET CUT 1 SELF CUT 1 FUSE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FOLD

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the placket pattern separately to be cut with fusing.

3 1 CM ⁄8" 2.5 CM 1"

2.5 CM 1" 1 CM 3 ⁄8"

13⁄8CM "

3 1 CM ⁄8"

short-sleeved safari shirt 131


Step 11 Developing the collar stand

Step 12 Developing the top collar

Measuring half the neck from the master plan We will develop half the collar stand before creating the full collar stand. By taking measurements from the master plan, which is drawn in half, you will be measuring half the neck measurement. • On the master plan measure the length of the back neck, in this case 31⁄2in, and the front neck from the shoulder tip down past the center front line to the point at which the placket finishes when folded, in this case 61⁄4in. • Add these two measurements together to give half the neck measurement, in this case 93⁄4in.

Collar shape There are many variations in collar shape, both traditional and contemporary. Here we are developing a straight collar shape. Again, only half of this pattern will be drafted.

CENTER BACK NECK

DEVELOPMENT

1⁄8" CM

SHOULDER NOTCH SHOULDER NOTCH

CB CB

5 CM2"

1" 2.5 CM 33⁄8" CM 8.5

CENTER FRONT NECK

SHOULDER NOTCHES

1" CM 2.5 31⁄2" CM 8.5

6 ⁄4"CM 16 1

UNDER COLLAR CUT 1 SELF 24.5 93⁄4CM " NECKLINE NECKLINE

⁄16" CM 1.5 9

GRAIN LINE CB NECK

1" 2.5 CM

TOP COLLAR CUT 1 SELF CUT 1 FUSE

COLLAR POINT 3

CB CB

• On a new piece of piece of paper, draw a rectangle measuring 93⁄4in by 1in, which is the half neck measurement by the width of the collar stand. Label the narrow side as the center back neck and the long side as the neckline. • From the center back neck, measure 31⁄2in (the half back neck measurement) along the bottom line of the rectangle and place a notch. Label it the shoulder notch. Repeat along the top side of the rectangle. • Measure up 9⁄16in at the front edge of the rectangle and join this point back to the shoulder notch with a slight curve. • From the shoulder notch, measure 61⁄4in (the half front neck measurement) along this curved line. At the front of the curved line, square up 1in (the width of the collar stand). Then draw another curved line to connect this line back to the top shoulder notch. • From the top right corner of the stand measure along 1in (the width of the placket) and from this point square across to the lower curved line. Label this center front neck. Round off the top right corner with a slight curve.

• Trace off the stand shape from Step 11 onto another piece of paper. • Continue the center back line vertically up 3in from the top of the stand, square across 91⁄2in, and make a mark. This is the collar point. Connect this point back down to the center front line with a straight line. You have now created the basic top collar shape. • At the collar point measure up 3⁄8in from the front edge of the collar extend the front edge of the collar by 3⁄8in and draw a curved line back to meet the outer edge. This will give the collar a smoother shape. • Measure up 1in from the top of the stand along the center back and make a mark. From here, square across to a point above the shoulder notch. From this point draw a curved line to meet the center front line, mirroring the curve of the stand. This is the inner edge of the 2in-wide top collar shape. COLLAR

OUTER EDGE OF TOP COLLAR

GRAIN LINE

132 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

INNER EDGE OF TOP COLLAR

61⁄4"CM 16


Step 13 Collar stand pattern Top collar pattern Developing the under collar • Trace off the collar stand pattern and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape. • Trace off the top collar pattern and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape. • The under collar is a copy of the top collar reduced by 1⁄8in at the center back neck, which is blended back with a line to both collar points; this reduction, when sewn, will pull the seam edge under the collar slightly so as not to be seen. Make a separate pattern for the under collar.

COLLAR STAND COLLAR STAND CUT1 1PR PRSELF SELF CUTCUT 1 FUSE 1 FUSE CUT

CCFF

STAND WIDTH

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CB NECK

CFF C

STAND WIDTH

TOP COLLAR COLLAR CUTTOP 1 SELF 1 SELF CUTCUT 1 FUSE CUT 1 FUSE

OUTER EDGE OFOF TOP COLLAR OUTER EDGE TOP COLLAR

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

INNER EDGE EDGE OF OF TOP TOP COLLAR COLLAR INNER

SHOULDER NOTCH

SHOULDER NOTCH

REMOVE 1⁄8"

UNDER COLLAR UNDER COLLAR CUTCUT 1 SELF 1 SELF

OUTER EDGE OF STAND

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CB NECK

INNER EDGE OF STAND

short-sleeved safari shirt 133


Step 14 Developing the shoulder epaulet and sleeve tab • For the sleeve tab, draw a rectangle 1in wide by 85⁄8in long. • Create the point at the end of the tab by measuring 3⁄8in back down both long sides of the rectangle and then joining these two points back to a central point. • At the other end of the rectangle, measure in 3⁄8in and square across for the seam allowance, and a further 1in and

square across for the fold line. The tab on the sleeve that the sleeve tab folds over is prebought herringbone cotton tape. • For the shoulder epaulets draw a vertical rectangle 1in wide and 41⁄2in long. Follow the instructions for the sleeve tab, but with a 9⁄16in seam allowance and no fold line.

22 CM

85⁄8" FOLD

FOLD

2.5 CM

SLEEVE TAB CUT 2 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE

SLEEVE TAB CUT 2 PR SELF

1 CM

2.5 CM

1 CM

FOLD FOLD

FOLD FOLD

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

11.5 CM

⁄8"

3

1" 2.5 CM

1⁄8"CM

3

41⁄2"

11.5 CM

SHOULDER EPAULETE CUT 2 PR SELF

2.5 CM 1"

FOLD

SHOULDER EPAULET CUT 2 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

2.5 CM

FOLD

SHOULDER EPAULETE CUT 2 PR SELF

9 1.5 ⁄16" CM

1⁄8"CM

3

GRAIN LINE

BACK BACK PITCH POINT NOTCH

1 CM

1.5 CM

TOP OF SLEEVE CAP CROWN POINT

FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

BICEPS LEVEL

CENTER LINE HEMLINE CUFF HEM

134 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

FRONTSLEEVE SLEEVE FRONT MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

UNDERARM SEAM FRON T UNDERARM SEAM

M

Start this development by selecting the basic men’s sleeve sloper, or by drafting the basic sleeve sloper according to the instructions on page 42. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the shirt you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 48. The design illustrated has a short sleeve with turned-up cuff.

BACKSLEEVE SLEEVE BACK MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

CENTRE LINE

UNDER ARM LINE

Step 15 Developing the sleeve master plan

ERARM SEA UND BACKUNDE RARM SEAM

1"

SLEEVE TAB CUT 2 PR SELF


CROWN TOP OF POINTCAP SLEEVE

Step 16 Developing the sleeve with a reduced sleeve cap

1207 5 C ⁄8"M

C ⁄ "M

5 8

2170

Measurements for developing the sleeve You will need three measurements to develop the sleeve: 1. Half the armhole measurement—measure the new armhole on the front and back patterns. In this case the front armhole is 101⁄4in and the back 11in. Add these measurements together (211⁄4in) and divide in half, making 105⁄8in. 2. Half the biceps measurement—measure the biceps width from the master plan. In this case it is 14in. As this is a casual-fitting shirt you can determine the amount of ease according to the design. In this case we will add 3in ease to the biceps measurement, making 17in. Divide this measurement in half, making 81⁄2in. 3. Half the cuff measurement, which in this case is 175⁄8in.

21.75 " 81⁄2CM

21.75 81⁄2" CM

BACK BACK SLEEVE SLEEVE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

NEW BACK UNDERARM POINT

FRO UNDNT ERA UND RM ERA SEARM M SEAM

CENTRE INE CENTER LINE

SEAM M SEAM UNDERARM UNDERAR BACK

FRONT SLEEVE FRONT SLEEVE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

SLEEVE HEAD HEIGHT

CROWN OF TOP POINT SLEEVE CAP

1 1.3 CM ⁄2"

M 3 7 CM ⁄4" 25"C 2

1.3 ⁄2" CM

1

⁄ "M C

3 8

8.53

3 0.5 ⁄16" CM

UNDERARM BICEPS LEVEL LINE

63CM ⁄8" 2

3 0.5 CM ⁄16"

21.75 CM

UNDERARM SEAM

CENTRE INE

• Shape the sleeve cap by measuring 23⁄4in from the new top of the sleeve cap along the diagonal line toward the new front sleeve corner at biceps level, square out 1⁄2in, and mark. Then measure 23⁄8in up along the diagonal line from the front corner of the sleeve at biceps level, square 3⁄16in down, and mark. On the back measure 2in down the diagonal line from the sleeve cap top, square out 1⁄2in, and mark; measure 33⁄8in up along the diagonal line from the back sleeve corner at biceps level, square down 3⁄16in, and mark. • Using a French curve draw in shallow raised curves from the new top of the sleeve cap through the marks on the upper portion of the sleeve cap, reversing the curves at the marks on the lower portion of the sleeve cap, and finishing these hollow curved lines at the corners of the sleeve at biceps level. Add in the notches taken from the body panels.

CENTRE CENTER INE LINE

Step 17 Completing the new sleeve shape

NEW FRONT UNDERARM SLEEVE POINT CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

FRONT SLEEVE FRONT SLEEVE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

BACKSLEEVE SLEEVE BACK MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

FRONTUND UND ERA ERA RM RMSEA SEAMM

NEW BACK UNDERARM SLEEVE POINT CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

FRONT SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

M SEAM RARM UNDERAR BACK UNDE

BACK SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

UNDERARM SEAM

8.5

UNDERARM LINE BICEPS LEVEL

• Measure 3⁄4in down the center line from the top of the sleeve CROWN cap to reduce the height of the sleeve cap by the same POINT amount that you lowered the armhole in Step 3. • At an angle from the new top of the2 CM sleeve cap, draw out a line measuring half the new armhole—105⁄8in. From the center line, draw out a line measuring half the new biceps 27 CM M CAdjust measurement—81⁄2in. these lines until they meet to 7 2 form a triangle and repeat on the other side of the sleeve. This will become the frame around which you construct the UNDERARM LINE new shortened sleeve cap. 21.75 CM

SLEEVE HEAD CAP HEIGHT

3 2 CM ⁄4"

short-sleeved safari shirt 135


NEW TOP OF SLEEVE CAP POINT NEW CROWN

EW FRONT NDERARM OINT

M 5 C 7 CM

CM

0.5 CM

UNDERARM LINE

UNDERARM BICEPS

6 CM

0.5 CM

CENTRE INE

UNDERARM SEAM

• From the top of the sleeve cap measure 10in down the center line and square out 75⁄8in on both sides. This is the new cuff NEW BACK NEW FRONT hem width. Join the ends of this line back up to the corners UNDERARM UNDERARM BACK SLEEVE FRONT SLEEVE POINT of the sleeve atMASTER biceps level with a curve. POINT PLAN MASTER PLAN • To add the folded cuff to the cuff hem, measure 1in up from ELBOW LINE this line, and square across, drawing a dotted line to meet the lines at the sides. This is the line to which the cuff will fold up. From the cuff hem continue to measure down 1in and square across with another dotted line, the same width as the first dotted line. Measure a further 1in down and square across with a line the same width as the cuff hem. Join all these points at the sides. • Add a further 3⁄8in seam to the end.

LEVEL LINE

SHO

CUT 19.25 75⁄8CM " CUFF HEM CUFF HEMLINE FACING FACING FOLD FOLD BACK SLEEVE SLEEVE BACK MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

CENTRE LINE CENTER

8.5

25.5 10" CM

1.3 CM

Step 18 ShortenING the sleeve

19.25 " 75⁄8CM FOLD

2.5 CM 1" 2.5 1" CM

FOLD

2.5 CM 1" 13⁄CM 8"

FRONTSLEEVE SLEEVE FRONT MASTERPLAN PLAN MASTER

Blending a seam To find out how to create the steps in the curved underarm seam so that it is smooth when the cuff is folded, try folding the pattern and then drawing in the curve of the underarm seam. Either trim the seam with the paper still folded or mark with a tracing wheel, before opening out the pattern.

NEW CROWN POINT

25.5 CM

• Following the instructionsUNDERARM on page 50, trace off the LINE sleeve pattern.

SHORT SLEEVE

GRAIN L INE GRAINLINE

Step 19 SHOrt Sleeve pattern

CUT 1 PR SELF 19.25 CM

CUFF HEMLINE FACING

FOLD

FOLD

BACK SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

136 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

CENTRE LINE

CM

1.3 CM

UNDERARM SEAM

SLEEVE HEAD HEIGHT

CROWN POINT

19.25 CM FOLD

2.5 CM 2.5 CM

FOLD

2.5 CM 1 CM

FRONT SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

FOLD

FOLD

FOLD

FOLD

FOLD

FOLD


short-sleeved safari shirt 137


pattern Bib shirt

Start by selecting the basic men’s upper body sloper, or by drafting the basic sloper according to the instructions on page 40. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the shirt you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 48. 138 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

FRONT NOTCH PITCH POINT

WAISTLINE

HIP LEVEL HIPLINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

CENTRE CENTER FRONT FRONT

BACK MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

LEVEL CHEST LINE

SIDE SIDE SEAM SEAM

Step 1 Developing the master plan

BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

CENTRE CENTER BACK

This pattern includes development of the following features: Shaping the body Creating a concealed front placket Adding length to the body Shaping the hem with a lowered back Creating a pleated bib panel Creating a mandarin collar Lowering the armhole Widening the sleeve cap Developing a cuff with cuff guard


1.25 CM 1" 1.25 CM 1" 2.5 CM 1"

BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

Step 2 Developing the left placket and the concealed right placket and adding length to the body

FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

• The hem shape in this design has a lowered back. On the front body extend the center front and side seam lines down 23⁄8in from the hemline and square across. • On the back body, extend the center back and side seam lines down 31⁄2in from the hemline and square across. • From the center front neck point measure back 1⁄2in along the neckline and mark, and measure out 1⁄2in and mark. Repeat this at the new hemline and connect these points with straight lines. This will become the right placket width of 1in. • From the outer line measure out another 1in at the neckline and mark; repeat at the hemline and join these points with straight lines. This will become the underside of the placket.

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BACK MASTER PLAN

SIDE SEAM

CENTRE BACK CENTER

LINE CHEST LEVEL

WAISTLINE

HEMLINE 3 ⁄8" 62CM

2.5 CM 1"

6 ⁄8" 23CM

2.5 1" CM 3 CM 1 ⁄8"

" 13⁄8CM

CONCEALED LEFT PLACKET CONCEALEDPLACKET SELF CUT 11SELF CUT 1 FUSE

AM SE

ATTACH TO SHIRT RIGHT SIDE UP

FOLD SE AM FOLD

FOLD FOLD

FOLD

ILLUSTRATION OF THE END OF THE FOLDED CONCEALED PLACKET

3 1 CM ⁄8"

2.5 CM 1"

2.5 CM 1"

" 13⁄8CM 2.5 CM 1"

1 CM

3 1 CM ⁄8" 3 1 CM ⁄8" 2.5 CM 1"

1 CM 2.5 CM

2.5 CM

1 CM 2.5 CM

FOLD

FOLD

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

ATTACH TO SHIRT RIGHT SIDE UP

FOLD FOLD FOLD

FOLD

FOLD

GRAIN LINE

FRONT LEFT PLACKET CUT 1 SELF CUT 1 FUSE 1 CM 1 CM

1 CM 2.5 CM 1 CM 2.5 CM 2.51CM CM

13⁄8CM "

FOLD

GRAIN LINE

FOLD

FOLD LINE

FOLD LINE 2.5 CM 1" 3 ⁄8" 1 CM

1 3CM ⁄8"

2.5 1" CM

3 1 CM ⁄8"

CONCEALEDPLACKET CUT 1 SELF CUT 1 FUSE

FOLD

1 CM

2.5 1" CM

3 1⁄8"CM 2.5 1" CM

1 CM

1 CM

2.5 CM 1 CM

2.5 CM

1 CM

FOLD

13⁄8CM "

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CENTRE FRONT

GRAIN LINE 6 CM

2.5 CM FRONT LEFT RIGHTPLACKET PLACKET 2.5 CM CUT 1 SELF CUT 1 FUSE

6 CM

⁄8" 1 CM 2.5 CM 1"

2.5 CM

2.5 CM

FRONT MASTER PLAN

3

SIDE SEAM

GRAIN LINE

CENTRE FRONT

FRONT PITCH POINT

6 CM 9 CM

2.5 CM 1" " 13⁄8CM

1.25 CM 1.25 CM 2.5 CM

1.25 CM 1.25 CM 2.5 CM

3 1 CM ⁄8"

2.5 CM

• Trace off the placket shape from the front body twice more and position the two plackets side by side. Add 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides to create the final left placket pattern. The concealed placket is made by folding the placket together in the directions indicated by the arrows.

1 CM 2.5 CM 2.51CM CM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the placket shape you have just developed onto a separate piece of paper, adding 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides to create the final front right placket pattern.

1 CM 2.5 CM

Step 4 Concealed left placket pattern

13⁄8CM " 2.5 CM 1"

Step 3 Front right placket pattern

BACK PITCH POINT

ER

2.5 CM 1"

1 93 CM ⁄2"

9 ⁄2" 31CM

bib shirt 139


2"M 5C NEW BACK NEW PITCH BACK POINT NOTCH

LINE CHEST LEVEL

23⁄4CM " FRONT MASTER MASTER PLAN

6.5 21CM ⁄2 "

SIDE SEAM

CENTRE CENTER BACK BACK

BACK MASTER PLAN

GRAINLINE

WAISTLINE

HEMLINE

BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

FRONT NOTCH PITCH POINT

WAISTLINE

⁄8" 1 CM 3

SIDE SEAM

CENTRE CENTER BACK 1⁄8"CM

3

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FRONT MASTER MASTER PLAN PLAN

BACK MASTER PLAN PLAN

3 1 ⁄8"CM

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

CHEST LEVEL LINE

OLD HEMLINE

140 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

5 CM 22 8 ⁄8"

NEW NEW FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

Step 6 Developing the body shaping • To develop the side seam, measure out 3⁄8in in both directions where the side seam intersects the waistline. • Connect both these points with straight lines up to the new underarm / side seam corner and down to the hemline at the bottom of the side seam. • From the center back measure 3⁄8in along the waistline. From this point draw a straight line to the intersection of the chest level and the center back, and another line down to the new hemline.

CENTER FRONT NECK POINT

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

Step 5 Developing the new armhole, bib, and hem shaping • Measure 3⁄4in down the side seam and make a mark. From this position on the front and back master plan, using your basic upper body slopers as a template, trace the new lowered armhole shape, continuing it up to connect with the shoulders. Transfer the back and front notches to their new positions on the lowered armhole. • The bib shape is developed on the front body master plan by measuring 85⁄8in down from the center front neck point, then squaring across 21⁄2in. • Next measure 2in down the front shoulder seam from the front high point shoulder. Connect this point to the line you drew previously. Draw in a shallow curve connecting the two lines at the bottom. • Redraw the hemline with a French curve from the new lowered center front up to the side seam on the original hemline and back down to the lowered hemline at the center back.

FRONT HIGH POINT SHOULDER


1.25 CM

1.25 CM

BACK CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front body pattern.

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FRONT CUT 1 PR SELF

Step 8 back pattern

1

⁄2" CM 1.25

• Trace off the bib shape from the master plan onto a separate piece of paper. • Decide on the type of pleats and their ratio. In this design we have ten knife pleats at a distance of 1⁄2in apart, with a fold between each pleat of 1⁄2in (1⁄4in when folded). • On another piece of paper, draw out the pleating scheme and then fold the paper into the pleats. • With the paper still folded, place the center front of the bib shape against the edge of the first pleat and draw around the shape. Still with the paper folded, cut out the shape and then open up the paper to reveal the pattern for the pleated bib shape. bib shirt 141

0.6 CM 0.6 CM

1 0.6 CM ⁄4" 1 0.6 CM ⁄4"

1 0.6 CM ⁄4" 1 0.6 CM ⁄4"

1 0.6 CM ⁄4" 1 0.6 CM ⁄4"

1 0.6 CM ⁄4" 1 0.6 CM ⁄4"

1 0.6 CM ⁄4" 1 0.6 CM ⁄4"

1 ⁄4" 0.6 CM 1 ⁄4" 0.6 CM

1 ⁄4" 0.6 CM 1 ⁄4" 0.6 CM

1 ⁄4" 0.6 CM 1 ⁄4" 0.6 CM

1 ⁄4" 0.6 CM 1 ⁄4" 0.6 CM

1.25 CM

" 0.6 ⁄4CM 1

0.6 CM 0.6 CM

Pleating In a production scenario pleating would always be sourced from a professional pleater. The fabric would arrive prepleated to your requirements, at which stage the patterns for the pleated panels would be cut. The steps described here show how you can investigate pleating ratios yourself.

1.25 CM

1 1.25 ⁄2" CM

⁄2" CM 1.25 1

1 ⁄2" CM 1.25

1.25 ⁄2" CM 1

1 1.25 ⁄2" CM

⁄2" CM 1.25 1

⁄2" CM 1.25 1

1 ⁄2" CM 1.25

Step 9 Developing the pleated bib panel

0.6 CM 0.6 CM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the back body pattern.

0.6 CM 0.6 CM

.6 CM

Step 7 Front pattern


0.6 0.6

0.6 0.6

0.6 0.6

0.6 0.6

0.6 0.6

0.6 0.6

0.6 0.6

0.6 0.6

0.6 0.6 0.6 CM

.25 CM

Step 10 Pleated bib pattern

BIB

CUT 1 PR SELF

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace around the pleated shape to create the bib pattern.

PLEAT FOLD DIRECTION

Step 11 Developing the mandarin collar • On a new piece of piece of paper, draw a rectangle measuring 97⁄8in by 1in, which is the half neck measurement by the width of the mandarin collar. Label the narrow side as the center back neck and the long side as the neckline. • From the center back neck, measure 35⁄8in (the half back neck measurement) along the bottom line of the rectangle and place a notch. Label it the shoulder notch. Repeat along the top line of the rectangle. • Measure up 9⁄16in at the front edge of the rectangle and join this new point back to the shoulder notch with a slight curve. • From the shoulder notch, measure 61⁄4in (the half front neck measurement) along this curved line. At the front of the curved line, square up 1in (the width of the mandarin collar). Then draw another curved line to connect this line back to the top shoulder notch. • From the top right corner of the stand measure along 1in (the width of the placket) and from this point square across to the lower curved line. Label this center front neck. Round off the top right corner with a slight curve.

Measuring half the neck from the master plan We will develop half the collar before creating the full collar. By taking measurements from the master plan, which is drawn in half, you will be measuring half the neck measurement. • On the master plan measure the length of the back neck, in this case 35⁄8in, and the front neck from the shoulder tip down past the center front line to the point at which the placket finishes, in this case 61⁄4in. • Add these two measurements together to give half the neck measurement, in this case 97⁄8in.

CENTER CENTRE BACK BACK NECK NECK

CENTER CENTRE FRONT FRONT NECK NECK

SHOULDER SHOULDER NOTCHES NOTCHES

1" 2.5 CM 1" 2.5 CM

1 " ⁄4 CM 6 16

5 ⁄8" 9 3CM

25 97⁄8CM " NECKLINE NECKLINE

142 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

⁄16" CM 1.5

9


CENTRE BACK NECK

2.5 CM 2.5 CM

16 CM

9 CM

• Trace off the mandarin collar onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape.

CF

SHOULDER NOTCH

MANDARIN COLLAR CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 FUSE

TH D WID STAN

SHOULDER NOTCH

CB NECK

STAN D WID TH

1.5 CM

25 CM NECKLINE

OUTER EDGE OF STAND

CF

Step 12 Mandarin collar pattern

CENTRE FRONT NECK

SHOULDER NOTCHES

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE INNER EDGE OF STAND

TOP OF SLEEVE CROWN POINT CAP BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

Step 13 Developing the sleeve master plan

FRONT SLEEVE FRONT SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

UNDERARM SEAM FRONT UNDE RARM SEAM

MASTER PLAN

61.5 CM

ERARM SEAM BACK UND UNDERARM SEAM

MASTER PLAN

241⁄4" NEW SLEEVE LENGTH NEW SLEEVE LENGTH

BACK SLEEVE MASTER PLAN BACK SLEEVE

CENTER LINE CENTRE LINE

BICEPS LEVEL UNDERARM LINE

Start this development by selecting the basic men’s sleeve sloper, or by drafting the basic sleeve sloper according to the instructions on page 42. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the shirt you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 48. The design illustrated is shaped and has a gathered tuck on the back of the sleeve for even more shaping. The sleeve sloper that you have selected might be longer or shorter than the design you are developing. Analyze it by taking a measurement from your fit model or dress form and by consulting the size chart, or even by using competitors’ garments for comparison. The sleeve length is 241⁄4in and the cuff measurement is calculated by adding 13⁄16in to the wrist measurement of 97⁄8in for a tuck, making 11in.

28CM 11" NEW CUFF HEM WIDTH NEW CUFF HEM WIDTH

CUFF HEM CUFF HEM

bib shirt 143


TOP OF CROWN SLEEVE POINTCAP

Step 14 Developing the sleeve for a lowered armhole NEW BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

CUFF HEMLINE

1.5 CM

BICEPS LEVELLINE UNDERARM

UNDERARM SLEEVE POINT CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

BACKSLEEVE SLEEVE BACK MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

UNDERARM SLEEVE POINT CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

FRONT SLEEVE FRONT SLEEVE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

RARM SEAM 1 16 6 ⁄4"CM

TUCK

5 ⁄16" 13CM 41CM ⁄8" 3

CUFFCUFF HEMLINE OLD HEMLINE

NEW CUFF HEMLINE

UNDERARM SEAM

SEAM DERARM BACK UN

UNDERARM SEAM

UNDERARM SEAM

144 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

FRONUNDER T UNDEARM SEAM RARM SEAM FRONT PITCH NOTCH PONT

831CM ⁄8"

0.5 CM

UNDERARM SEAM

CENTRE LINE

0.5 CM NEW CUFF HEMLINE

3 0.5 CM ⁄16"

BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

Step 15 DEVELOPING the sleeve • From the back underarm seam line measure in 31⁄8in along the new cuff hem and square up 61⁄4in. This is the cut line for the cuff guard. Measure in a further 15⁄8in and mark, then a further 13⁄16in and mark. This will become the tuck.

UNDERARM SLEEVE POINT CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

TOP OF SLEEVE CROWN CAP POINT

FRONT UNDE

1.5 CM

FRONT SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

BACK SLEEVE MASTER PLAN

UNDERARM POINT

3 0.5 ⁄16" CM

CUFF HEMLINE

NEW FRONT PITCH PONT

UNDERARM LINE 1.5 CM

NEW CUFF HEMLINE

• Extend the biceps level out 9⁄16in on both sides so that the new sleeve cap measures 207⁄8in, the same measurement as the new armhole. • Using the basic sleeve sloper as a template, redraw the new sleeve cap shape, and indicate the new lowered notch positions. • To create the shaping at the bottom of the sleeve, measure down 3⁄16in on the back sleeve from the center of the new cuff hemline and mark this point. On the front sleeve, measure up 3⁄16in from the center of the new cuff hemline and mark this point. Join the points with a curved line that CROWN is convex on the back sleeve and then reverses at the center POINT line so that it is concave on the front. • Now draw in the new underarm seam lines to create the sleeve shape.

CENTRE LINE CENTER

NEW BACK PITCH POINT

FRONT SLEEVE FRONT SLEEVE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

BACK SLEEVE SLEEVE BACK MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

ARM SEAM RARM UNDER BACK UNDE

Start by measuring the front and back of the new armhole on the upper body slopers (in this case 10in and 107⁄8in respectively). Add these measurements together (207⁄8in) and then measure the sleeve cap (201⁄8in). The sleeve cap, therefore, needs to be increased by 3 ⁄4in and not beyond, allowing for the amount of ease.

UNDERARM LINE BICEPS LEVEL

CENTRE LINE CENTER

UNDERARM SLEEVE POINT CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

1.5 CM

Having enlarged the sleeve circumference in Step 5, you will need to check the length of the sleeve cap and increase according to the new armhole measurement.

NEW FRONT PITCH NOTCH PONT


SLEEVE SLEEVE CUT 11PR CUT PRSELF SELF

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the sleeve pattern.

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

Step 16 Sleeve pattern

Step 17 Developing the cuff • On a separate piece of paper, draw a box 91⁄2in long by 51⁄2in wide to create a rectangular-shaped cuff. • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line across the center, and label it fold.

Measuring the cuff The cuff is a double pattern piece that is sewn onto the end of the sleeve and turned inside out. The cuff shape will start and finish at the guard opening. Measure this width from the pattern (11in) and deduct 13⁄16in for the tuck and 3 ⁄8in for the seam allowance on the cuff guard opening, making 91⁄2in.

9125 ⁄2"CM

7 CM

SLEEVE CUFF SLEEVE CUFF CUT 1 PR SELF

2 ⁄4" 7 CM 3

CUT SELF CUT11 PR PR FUSE CUT 1 PR FUSE

FOLD LINE FOLD

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

23⁄4"

bib shirt 145


⁄4" 2 3CM

FOLD FOLD LINE

FOLD LINE FOLD

FOLD LINE FOLD

1 3C ⁄8"M

1 3C⁄8M "

⁄4" 2 3CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

16 61⁄4"CM

GRAIN LINE

TOP CUFF GUARD GAURD

CUT 1 PR SELF

BOTTOM CUFF GAURD

CUT 1 PR SELF

16 CM

• On a separate piece of paper create a rectangular box 61⁄4in long by 23⁄8in wide. • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw down the center, and label it fold. • At each end square out 3⁄4in up and 3⁄4in down from the fold line and mark. Join these points with straight lines. This will leave you with a 3⁄8in seam allowance on each long side. • From the top left corner measure 1in down the long side of the rectangle and square across 3⁄4in. This small rectangular shape will be removed from the pattern. • From the top right corner measure 3⁄8in down the long side of the rectangle and mark, and measure 3⁄4in across the short side and mark. Join these points with an angled line. • Now measure 3⁄8in down along the right edge of the 1 CM 1 CM 4 CM rectangle you drew in the top left corner and join this point to the top of the first angled line to give a pointed shape to the top of the cuff guard.

23⁄CM 4"

2.5 1" CM

FOLD LINE

FOLD LINE

Step 18 Developing the top cuff guard

FOLD LINE

TOP EDGE

1 3CM ⁄8"

23⁄CM 4"

1 3CM ⁄8 "

3 2 CM ⁄4"

3 62CM ⁄8" BOTTOM EDGE STITCHED

TO CUFF

FOLD LINE

1 CM

2.5 CM

FOLD LINE FOLD

2 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BOTTOM CUFF GAURD GUARD 8" 13⁄CM

CUT 1 PR SELF

16 CM

1 16 ⁄4"CM 6

• Create a rectangular box 61⁄4in by 23⁄8in. • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line down the center, and label it fold. • At each end square out 3⁄4in up and 3⁄4in down from the fold line and mark. Join these points with straight lines. This will leave you with a 3⁄8in seam allowance on each long side.

FOLD LINE FOLD

Step 19 Developing the bottom cuff guard

FOLD LINE FOLD

TOP EDGE

4 ⁄8" 15CM

1 3CM ⁄8"

1 CM

146 Chapter three the patterns: shirts

2C

BOTTO


bib shirt 147


CHAPTER FOUR

The Patterns: PANTS


step 1 Developing the master plan Start by selecting the basic men’s pant sloper, or by drafting the basic pant sloper according to the instructions on page 45. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the pant you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions following the directions on page 49. 150 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

EK C TUBRAV SE HEC NTTCRBACK RI EO CR

HIP LEVEL HIP LINE

C ET TR C EN

HIP LINE HIP LEVEL HIP LINE

HIP LINE

SEAT LINE SEAT LEVEL SEAT LINE

HEMLINE HEMLINE HEMLINE

KNEE LEVEL KNEE LINE KNEE LINE

HEMLINE HEMLINE HEMLINE

BACK BACK MASTER MASTER BACK PLAN PLAN MASTER PLAN

IIN NSSEID AE M LE G SE INSID AM E LE G SE AM

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE

SEMAM E EA S OIUDTS M E SIDE S A

KNEE LINE KNEE KNEELEVEL LINE

SEAT LEVEL SEAT LINE

SEAT LINE

OU SIDTS E EA SEM AM

SIDE SEAM

FRONT MASTER FRONT FRONT MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE

C CRE NTTCR O HECFURROVN ET RISE

IINSEAM NSIDE LEG SEAM

This pattern includes development of the following features: Front pleats Straight legs Fly, fly facing, and fly extension Front right-angled welted pockets Back welted pockets Notched waistband

INSIDE LEG SEAM

CE

N TR E FRONT RISE

RISE

pattern High-waisted Pants


2⁄4"CM 3

1 8" 45⁄CM

HIP HIP LEVEL LINE

3 ⁄8 " 1 CM

FLY SHAPE FLY SHAPE

⁄8" 1143CM

OLD OLD PLEAT PLEATLINE LINE

C CR

EO N

TTCRHE CFURROVN ET RISE

33⁄8" CM 8.5

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the back pant leg pattern.

E

RIS ACK

BACK LEG LEG BACK LEGBACK CUT 11PR CUT PRSELF SELF CUT 1 PR SELF

CE

RB NT

7 CM ISE KER RV A UC

7 CM

3 ⁄4" 7 2CM

HIP LINE

KNEE KNEELEVEL LINEKNEE LINE

GRAIN LINE INSIDE LEG SEA M

SIDE SEAM

OUTSEAM S IDE SEAM

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

PLAN

BACK MASTER PLAN

AM NSSEID IN E LEG SEA M

BACK BACK MASTER MASTER PLAN

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

SEAT SEATLEVEL LINE SEAT LINE

GRAIN LINE

FRONT FRONTLEG LEG CUT CUT 11PR PRSELF SELF

RH BC NTTC CREO C

HIP HIPLEVEL LINE

13⁄CM 16" 3

WAISTLINE

step 5 Back leg pattern

• From the bottom of the back waist dart square out 23⁄4in to each side. This will become the pocket opening.

3 ⁄4" 7 2CM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front pant leg pattern.

step 4 Developing the back welted pocket position

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

step 3 Front leg pattern

3 17 6CM ⁄4"

NEW PLEAT NEW PLEATLINE LINE

• Move the pleat lines ⁄8in toward the center front along the waistline. Redraw and notch. • Measure 15⁄8in down from the waistline and 3⁄4in in from the outseam and mark. From this point square down 43⁄8in, and from the same point continue across 33⁄8in toward the center front, creating a right-angled shape. Measure in 3 ⁄8in from the vertical line and draw a parallel right-angled shape to make the width of the welt opening. Square off at both ends. • To create the fly shape, measure in 13⁄16in from the center front waist point and square down 63⁄4in. At the bottom of this line measure 13⁄16in back up and make a mark; draw a curved line from this point back down to the crotch curve. 3

NEW PLEAT NEW PLEATLINE LINE

3 1 CM ⁄8 "

5 ⁄8" 41CM

3 ⁄8" 1 CM

OLD OLD PLEAT PLEATLINE LINE

step 2 Developing the front right-angled welted pocket and fly shape and moving the pleats

13⁄CM 16" 3

CENTER CENTRE FRONT FRONT WAIST POINT

HEMLINE HEMLINE HEMLINE

High-waisted Pants 151


step 7 Front pocket bag pattern

• Measure 23⁄4in from the outseam along the waistline and mark; square down 107⁄8in and mark. • From the bottom of this line square out 25⁄8in toward the center front and mark, and from the outseam measure in 53⁄8in along the waistline and mark. Draw a line between these two points. This is the side pocket seam. From the bottom of the first line square out 25⁄8in toward the outseam; 13.5 CM from here square up 33⁄8in and then square out 3⁄4in to meet 7 CM 1 CM 5 the outseam. This point is 7 ⁄8in from the waistline, measured along the outseam. • To create a slight angle to the side of the pocket bag, at the top of the pocket measure 3⁄8in back along the waistline toward the outseam and redraw the side pocket seam. • Round off all the corners.

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front pocket bag pattern.

PLEAT LINE

PLEAT LINE

step 6 Developing the front pocket bag

FRONT POCKET FRONT POCKETBAG BAG CUT 22 PR PRPOCKETING POCKETING

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

27.5 CM

3 513.5 ⁄8" CM

2 ⁄4" 73CM

1 CM ⁄8"

WAISTLINE

PLEAT LINE

PLEAT LINE

3

2 CM

FRONT POCKET BAG CUT 2 PR POCKETING

GRAIN LINE

7 27.5 10 ⁄8"CM

6.75 CM

5 19.5 7 ⁄8" CM

6.75 CM

TTCRH ECFURROVE NT

RISE

7 10 ⁄8"CM 27.5

8.5 CM

CE

NT

RE F RO

NT RISE

27.5 CM

19.5 CM

OUTSEAM

8.5 33⁄8"CM

CCR

EO N

23CM ⁄4"

5 6.75 ⁄8" CM 2

152 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

5 26.75 ⁄8" CM


step 8 Developing the welt shape of the front right-angled pocket • At the top of the line square out 33⁄8in on each side (the width of the pocket opening). • From the end of each line square down 9⁄16in and mark; square in from these points, ending 9⁄16in from the fold, and mark. Square down and complete the end of the welt. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides of the shape to create the final pattern.

• The shape of the welt is developed on a fold so that a seam is not needed on all sides and will resemble a T shape. • Draw a 43⁄8in vertical line (the length of the pocket) down the center of a piece of paper. This is the fold line. • From the bottom of the line square out 9⁄16in on each side. This is the width of the welt.

3 " 3 8.5⁄8CM

8.5 33⁄8CM "

" 1⁄8CM

3

13CM ⁄8"

9 CM 1.4 ⁄16"

3 CM 1 ⁄8"

POCKET WELT POCKET WELT CUT SELF CUT1 PR 1 PR SELF

⁄ "

9 1.4 CM 16

13⁄CM 8"

FRONT POCKET FRONT POCKET WELT WELT SIDE

SIDE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

3 CM 1 ⁄8"

FOLD FOLD

113⁄CM 4 8"

9 CM 1.4 ⁄16"

9 CM 1.4 ⁄16"

⁄8CM "

3 1

3 3CM ⁄16" 1

3 1 CM ⁄8"

13CM ⁄8"

3 1

⁄8CM "

3 CM 1 ⁄8"

3 CM 1 ⁄8"

13⁄CM 8"

FLY FACING CUT 1 SELF R.S.U

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front fly facing pattern, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides.

173 CM 6 ⁄4"

FLY FACING CUT 1 SELF R.S.U

Zippers When developing the fly length it is important to select a zipper that is 3⁄8– 9 ⁄16in shorter than the fly facing shape.

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

step 9 fly facing pattern

⁄"

31 CM 8

13CM

⁄8"

High-waisted Pants 153


⁄8" 3

⁄8" 3

5 1 ⁄8" 4 CM

5

1 CM

1 CM

⁄8" 41 CM

1 CM

Fly extension The fly extension is attached to the right side of the center front and sits behind the left fly facing. The facing shape is 3⁄8in longer to cover the bulk of the zipper end.

⁄8 "

FLY EXTENSION FLY EXTENSION

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

3

3

⁄8 "

1 CM

step 10 Developing the fly extension

415CM ⁄8"

4 15CM ⁄8"

1 3CM ⁄8"

1 3CM ⁄8"

3

8" 1 ⁄CM

1 3CM ⁄8"

FOLD FOLD

• On a separate piece of paper, draw a vertical box 71⁄8in long by 31⁄8in wide to create the rectangular-shaped fly extension. • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line down the center, and label it fold. Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides.

181⁄CM 7 8"

CUT 1 SELF CUT 1 SELF

1871CM ⁄8 "

step 11 Developing the back welted pocket and bag • The welt opening is developed at the tip of the waist dart. The pocket bag is then drawn over the back leg pattern and traced off to make individual patterns. • From the center of the dart at the waistline draw a 91⁄2in perpendicular line down through the dart tip and make a mark; from this point square out 33⁄8in on each side and mark. From these points square back up to the waistline to create a rectangle. This is the basic shape of the pocket bag.

• From the bottom of the dart square out 23⁄4in on each side and mark; from these points square down 9⁄16in and mark. Connect these points to create a rectangular shape. This is the welt opening, which sits 9⁄16in from each outside seam of the pocket bag. • To shape the pocket bag measure 3⁄8in in along the waistline on each side and mark. Connect these points with a shallow curve back to the outside seams of the bag. From each bottom corner of the bag measure up 13⁄8in and in 13⁄8in and join these points with a curved line.

1⁄ "CM

3 8

1⁄ " CM

3 8

4"M 23 ⁄C 7

M 16" C 19 ⁄.5 M 1.5 C⁄16

"

4"M 7 23 ⁄C

"

3

⁄8"M 3.51 C 33 ⁄8" 8.5 CM 3

83.5⁄ "CM 3 8

BACK POCKET BACKWELTED WELT POCKET MASTER MASTERPLAN PLAN

154 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

ISE KER ARCV

CBU RHE TC OT ERN C

⁄8"M 3.51 C

3

⁄8"M 3.51 C

3 ⁄8"M 3.51 C

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

9

1.5 C⁄16M

2 914⁄2"CM

"

9

9

16 1.5 C⁄M


135"CM

step 12 UNDER pocket bag pattern (back welted pocket) UNDER POCKET BAGPOCKET BAG BOTTOM BACK CUT 2 PR POCKETING CUT 2 PR POCKETING

Pocket construction This pocket design has a self-facing strip sewn to the back of the bag so that when the pocket is open the pocketing material is not seen.

STITCHLINE LINE STITCH

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

STITCH STITCHLINE LINE

• When tracing this pattern you need to remove the dart. Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the top pocket bag pattern by placing the center grainline on one side of the dart leg and drawing around one side of the top of the pattern before moving the grainline to the other dart leg and drawing around the other side. • Reposition the grainline back to the center of the dart and continue to draw the remainder of the pocket bag and welt shape.

step 13 Top SECTION of under pocket bag pattern (back welted pocket)

BACK WAISTLINE BACK WAIST LINE

STITCH LINE

3 ⁄8" 1 CM

⁄"

1 3CM 8

WELT POCKET OPENING WELT POCKET OPENING

WELT POCKET OPENING OPENING WELT POCKET STITCH LINE STITCH LINE

13⁄CM 8"

STITCHSTITCH LINE LINE

BOTTOM SECTION OF UNDER

GRAINLINEGRAIN LINE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace this pattern from the lower stitch line of the welt opening, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance to the top edge.

CUT 2 POCKETING

STITCH STITCH LINELINE

STITCH LINE

⁄"

31 CM 8

POCKET BAG TOPBACK SECTION INNER TOP OF UNDER CUT 2 POCKETING POCKET BAG

GRAIN LINE

GRAINLINE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace this pattern from the waistline to the top stitch line of the welt opening, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance to the lower edge.

step 14 Bottom SECTION of under pocket bag pattern (back welted pocket)

FACING STITCH STITCH LINE FACING LINE

BACK POCKET POCKET BAG BAG INNER BOTTOM CUT POCKETING CUT2 2 POCKETING

High-waisted Pants 155


step 15 Developing the back POCKET self-facing strip

14 51⁄CM 2"

⁄8CM "

3 1 CM ⁄8"

3 1

WELT POCKET WELT POCKET OPENING OPENING ⁄16"

1.5 CM

BACK POCKET BACK POCKET FACING SELF-FACING CUT 2 SELF CUT 2 SELF

9

3 2 CM ⁄4"

⁄ "

STITCH LINE STITCH LINE 1.5 CM

⁄16"

STITCH LINE STITCH LINE

9 1.5 16 CM

9

1.5 9CM ⁄16"

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

• Trace the welt opening from the back pant leg, adding 9⁄16in to each end. Measure down 3⁄4in at each end of the lower edge of this rectangular shape to create a larger rectangle measuring 63⁄4in x 13⁄8in. Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to the top and bottom edges to create the final pattern.

3 CM 1 ⁄8"

3 1 CM ⁄8"

step 16 Developing the back POCKET welt strip

141⁄CM 5 2"

⁄ "

9 1.5 16 CM

• On a separate piece of paper, draw a horizontal box 51⁄2in long by 11⁄8in wide to create the rectangular welt strip. Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line across the center, and label it fold. • Add a 9⁄16in seam allowance to each of the shorter sides and a 3⁄8in seam allowance to the longer sides.

3 CM 2 ⁄4"

⁄16"CM 1.5

9

⁄8CM "

3 1 CM ⁄8"

1.5

3 1

⁄ "

9 CM 16

BACK POCKET WELT BACK POCKET WELT CUT 2 SELF

CUT 2 SELF

1.5 9CM ⁄16" 1

9 1.5 ⁄16"CM

FOLD FOLD

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

9 1.5 ⁄16"CM

⁄"

3 CM 8

3 CM 1 ⁄8" 9 1.5 ⁄16"CM

⁄ "

9 1.5 16 CM

step 17 Developing the left side of the waistband

Notched waistband This waistband design has a notched center back that is reminiscent of traditional tailoring, and buttons for the attachment of suspenders.

3

8

BUTTON POSITION

BUTTON POSITION

1⁄ " CM

• Draw a horizontal rectangle 163⁄8in long (half the length of the full waist measurement) by 13⁄8in wide (the depth of the waistband). Label the left-hand side center front and the right-hand side center back. • Add alignment notches for the front pleat by measuring 31⁄8in in from the center front. Continue measuring 41⁄16in toward the outseam, and a further 4in along mark the back pleat alignment notch. • Develop the notch shape by measuring 1in up the center back and then a further 13⁄16in and mark. Square in 3⁄8in and mark. Connect these two points with an angled line and draw a curved line from the top back to the outseam notch. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides to create the final pattern.

8 ⁄ ".5 CM 22

3

⁄8"

78

13⁄16"

⁄8"

13⁄8"

GRAINLINELINE GRAIN

LEFT WAISTBAND LEFT WAISTBAND

CUT 1 PR CUT 1 FUSE 1 FUSE CUT 1 SELF PR SELF CUT

1"

CB CB

CF CF

3

⁄8"

3

⁄8"

156 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

BACK DART NOTCH

⁄8"

5" CM 13

4" CM 10.3

16

OUTSEAM

1

3

4 ⁄ "CM 10.3

31⁄8" PLEAT ALIGNMENT NOTCH

3

⁄8"

3


step 18 Developing the right side of the waistband • Add the 15⁄8in fly extension to the center front then add a 3 ⁄8in seam allowance to all sides to create the final pattern.

1⁄ " CM 3

8

BUTTON BUTTON POSITION POSITION

⁄" C 228.5 M

3 CM 1⁄ "

8

1⁄ " CM 3

CB

2.5 CM1"

RIGHT WAISTBAND RIGHT WAISTBAND CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 FUSE CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 FUSE

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

3

8

⁄ " CM 1

1 CM⁄ "

3

OUTSEAM

16

⁄" 83 CM 1

8

⁄" 4 1CM 5

8

3

1

PLEAT ALIGNMENT NOTCH

" 10.34 ⁄CM

10.34"CM BACK DART NOTCH

8

3

135"CM

8

⁄8 "

8

1 CM⁄ "

3

8

1 ⁄ " CM 3.5

CF CF

16

CB

3

8

3

7

1⁄ " CM

• Repeat the steps above, but work with the center front on the right and the center back on the left, or trace the left-hand side and mirror. BUTTON BUTTON POSITION POSITION

FRONT EXTENSION

High-waisted Pants 157


Start by selecting the basic men’s pant sloper, or by drafting the basic pant sloper according to the instructions on page 45. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the pant you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions following the directions on page 49. 158 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

ISE

KVER CAUCR HB CE OTR EN ISE CR R K BAC TRE CEN

HIP LINE HIPLEVEL LINE HIP

HIP LINE HIP LEVEL

HIP LINE

SEAT LINE LINE SEAT LEVEL

HEMLINE HEMLINE

KNEE KNEE LEVELLINE KNEE LINE

HEMLINE HEMLINE

INSID EAEML EG SEA INSID M E LE GS EAM

BACK MASTER BACK PLAN PLAN MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

MM AA EE ES DTS S OIU

M SIDE SEA

KNEE KNEE LINE KNEE LINE LEVEL

SEAT LEVEL LINE

SEAT LINE

OU SIDTS ES EA EAMM

SIDE SEAM

FRONT MASTER FRONT FRONT PLANMASTER MASTER PLAN PLAN GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

N OTR CE H FCRUORNVTERISE

INSIDE LEG SEAM INSEAM

step 1 Developing the master plan

GRAIN LINE

CR E

CE

INSIDE LEG SEAM

This pattern includes development of the following features: Angled center front waist and crotch curve Angled center back waist Dropped crotch Straight legs Front fly, fly facing, and button stand and bearer Angled side pockets Back welted pockets Notched waistband with front tab

N TR E FRONT RISE

pattern Chinos


CE

15⁄8" ⁄16"

3

57⁄8" HIP LINE 3 13⁄CM 16" HIP LEVEL

4 15⁄CM 8"

SEATLEVEL LINE SEAT DROPPEDSEAT SEATLEVEL LINE DROPPED

3 13CM ⁄16"

FRONT LEG CUT 1 PR SE

FRONT MASTER MASTER PLAN

GRAINLINE

KNEE LINE LEVEL

SIDTS OU ES EA EA MM

INSEAM INSIDE LEG SEAM

3 13⁄CM 16"

4 15⁄CM 8"

33⁄CM 1 16"

GRAIN LINE

• Drop the seat level down 13⁄16in from the original seat level and redraw the bottom of the crotch curve and the inseam and outseam. • Taper the hem in 3⁄4in on both seams and redraw the lines back up to give the pant a slimmer profile. • Remove the 15⁄8in pleat volume by angling back the front crotch curve. To do this, measure in 13⁄16in from the center front waist point and from this point square up 3⁄8in. Connect this point back down to the dropped crotch and redraw the new waistline with a shallow curve back to the outseam. The remaining 3⁄8in will be taken out at the center back waist. • To create the fly shape, measure in 15⁄8in from the new center front waist point and from here measure down 71⁄8in. At the bottom of this line measure 13⁄16in back up and make a mark; draw a curved line from this point back to the center front crotch curve. • From the outseam waist point measure 15⁄8in toward the center front and 57⁄8in down the outseam and connect these two points to create the angled pocket opening. Extend the pocket opening line at the waistline by 3⁄16in and redraw it, blending the line back to the waistline to enlarge the opening.

PLEAT

3 ⁄8" 1 CM

RO NTT R CEH F CRUORNVTERISE

CENTRE CENTER FRONT FRONT WAIST POINT POINT

1 18 7 ⁄8"CM

step 2 Developing the dropped crotch, front fly, angled center front waist, and front angled pocket opening

4 CM

1 CM

SEAT LINE DROPPED SEAT LINE

FRONT LEG CUT 1 PR SELF FRONT LEG

CUT 1 PR SELF GRAIN LINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN

KNEE LINE

3 CM

SIDE SEAM

GRAIN LINE

NT

CE

3 CM HIP LINE

4 CM

INSIDE LEG SEAM

3 CM

18 CM

RONT RISE

3 CM

RE F

Enlarging the angled pocket opening to accommodate the width of the hand The pocket opening must be enlarged to allow for different hand widths orCENTRE the FRONT pockets will be too tight to use and WAIST POINT stretching will occur.

PLEAT

3

2 CM ⁄4"

3 2 CM ⁄4"

HEMLINE

GRAINLINE

step 3 Front leg pattern • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front pant leg pattern.

2 CM

2 CM

HEMLINE

chinos 159


step 4 Developing the dropped crotch, angled center back waist, and welted pocket position • Drop the seat level down 13⁄16in from the original seat level and redraw the bottom of the crotch curve and the inseam and outseam. • Taper the hem in 3⁄8in on both seams and redraw the lines back up to give the pant a slimmer profile. • From the center back waist point measure in 3⁄8in and from this point measure up 3⁄8in; redraw the shorter waistline and the longer back crotch curve. • From the bottom of the dart square out 23⁄4in to each side. Create a rectangular box 9⁄16in deep by 51⁄2in long.

step 5 Back leg pattern • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the back pant leg pattern.

CENTER BACK WAIST POINT 13⁄8CM " 8" 13⁄CM

1 CM

9 1.5 ⁄16"CM

7 CM

3

BACK MASTER PLAN

3 CM

KNEE LINE INSIDE SEAM

SIDE SEAM OUTSEAM

INSIDE SEAM INSEAM SIDE SEAM

KNEE LINE LINE

1 CM

HEM LINE 1 CM

3 1 CM ⁄8"

3 1 CM ⁄8"

HEMLINE HEM LINE

160 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

BACK LEG LEG CUT 1 PR PR SELF SELF

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

3 1 ⁄CM 16" SEAT LINE DROPPED SEAT LINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BACK MASTER PLAN PLAN

3 CM

K RISE BAC

SEAT LINE LEVEL DROPPED DROPPED SEAT SEAT LINE LEVEL

OCTE CNH

3 13⁄CM 16"

HIP LINE

BACK LEG CUT 1 PR SELF

E TR

E C TR

HIP LINE LEVEL

1.5 CM

14 CM

GRAIN LINE

1.5 CM

GRAIN LINE

VKERISE U BARC

14 51⁄2"CM

CR

1.59⁄CM 16"

1 CM

CE N

7 CM 2 ⁄4" 3


12 43⁄4"CM

5 4 1CM ⁄8"

1⁄8"CM 3

step 6 Developing the front pocket bag

15 57⁄8CM "

• First recreate the original shape of the front pant leg master plan before the shape for the angled side pocket was removed and redraw the pocket opening from Step 2 (without the extension for the enlarged opening). • Next create the pocket bag template by measuring 43⁄4in along the waistline from the top of the pocket opening to develop the pocket bag width. From this point square down 101⁄4in; this is the length of the pocket bag. • From the bottom of the pocket opening on the outseam, to create a step, measure down 15⁄8in and from this point measure in 3⁄4in; from here measure down a further 23⁄4in and connect this point to the pocket length to close the bag shape. • To create a slight angle to the side of the pocket bag, at the top of the pocket measure 3⁄8in back along the waistline toward the outseam and redraw the pocket length. At the bottom of the pocket, round off the corners (13⁄16in by 13⁄16in), and round off the step. • Develop the pocket facing depth by measuring in 13⁄16in from the opening and connecting the waistline with the step using a parallel curved line.

26 101CM ⁄4"

33⁄CM 1 16"

4 15⁄CM 8"

3

FCRUOR NVE RISE

7 CM 23⁄4" 133⁄CM 16"

CR EN OT R CE H

2⁄4"CM

FRONT FRONT POCKET BAG MASTER PLAN PLAN

⁄16" 313CM

33⁄CM 1 16" 3 CM 12 4 ⁄4"

3 13⁄CM 16"

C"M 03.5⁄16

NLINE

IT ST

INE

HL

LINE AIN AI GRGR

NG CI FA CH

E LIN

BAG G KET TIN POC OCKE TOP RP 1P CUT

NT FRO KET POC BAG R STE MA AN PL

E LIN AIN

GR

FRONT POCKET BAG MASTER PLAN

EPT

D INLG INE FEAPCTH

GD

IN FAC

• Trace off the pocket bag shape with the facing depth line onto a separate piece of paper, extend the pocket opening line by 3⁄16in, and redraw it, blending the line back to the top edge, as in Step 2.

ING ING PEONPEN TCO KET KEPO

POC

step 7 Developing the front pocket bag master plan

KET

POC INE

GL

NIN

GRAIN LINE

OPE

chinos 161


0.5 CM

0.5

CM

POCKET OPENING

FACING DEPTH LINE

CH STIT ING FAC

TOP POCKET BAG

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the top pocket bag pattern and the top pocket facing from the latest development in Step 7, including the extended pocket opening. Trace off the pocket bearer and the under pocket bag without the additional shape formed by the extended pocket opening. 0.5 CM

FACING DEPTH LINE

GRAIN LINE

FRONT POCKET BAG MASTER PLAN

G RA IN LI NE

LINE

POCKET OPENING

TOP POCKET BAG

CUT 1 PR POCKETING

INE

GRA IN L

GRAIN LINE

CH STIT ING FAC

The pocket bearer The pocket bearer is cut from the original fabric and is sewn to the under pocket bag, which is then sewn to the waistband and outseam behind the angled pocket opening. While the pocket opening was made longer in Step 2, the pocket bearer and under pocket bag will follow the original line of the waistline, holding the dimensions of the pocket parts together. LINE

NING OPE KET POC

CUT 1 PR POCKETING

step 8 Front pocket bag component patterns

FRONT POCKET BAG MASTER PLAN

0.5 CM

1 CM

13⁄CM 8"

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

GRAIN LINE

1 CM

1 CM GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

3 CM 1 ⁄8"

13⁄8CM "

FRONT FLY FACING CUT 1 SELF R.S.U

CUT 1 SELF R.S.U

FRONT FACING FRONT FLY FLY FACING CUT 1 SELF R.S.U

CUT 1 SELF

CUT 1 SELF

FRONT FLYFLYBUTTON STAND FRONT BUTTON STAND

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FOLD LINE FOLD

TOP POCKET FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE

E

TOP POCKET BEARER CUT 1 PR SELF

LIN

UNDER POCKET BAG

CUT 1 PR POCKETING

FOLD LINE

E

IN LIN

POSITIONS

⁄8"

3

GRA

CH

STIT

BUTTON POSITIONS BUTTON POSITIONS BUTTON

GRAIN LINE

ER

AR

BE

GRAIN LINE

FRONT FLY BUTTON STAND CUT 1 SELF

1 CM

1 CM

3

"

3 CM 1 ⁄8

⁄8"

1 CM 3

162 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

POCKET OPENING LINE

⁄8"

3

⁄8"

1 CM

1 CM

3 CM 1 ⁄8"

FRONT POCKET BAG MASTER PLAN

1 CM

POCKET OPENING

TOP POCKET BEARER CUT 1 PR SELF

TOP POCKET FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

E

IN LIN

GRA

FACING DEPTH LINE

NE

GRA IN LI

GRAIN LINE

GRAINLINE

GRAINLINE

1 CM

POCKET OPENING LINE

POCKET OPENING LINE

IN CCIN HL FA STIT

ER

AR

BE

E POCKET BEARER G TOP R A IN LIN H LIN LINE E STITC CUT 1 PR CHSELF ING STIT FAC G E

CUT 1 PR SELF

POCKET BAG

CUT 1 PR POCKETING

TOP POCKET FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

BAG POCKET UNDER POCKET BAG UNDER CUT 1 PR POCKETING CUT 1 PR POCKETING

G

FACIN KET POC TOP PR SELF 1 CUT

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the fly shape developed in Step 2 onto a separate piece of paper. Label the straight line, fold; flip the fly shape over along this line and mirror it to create a single pattern shape. Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides. • The pattern is folded along the straight line to give double thickness to the buttonholes once positioned. • Trace off the single fly shape from the left side of the button stand to create the fly facing pattern.

UNDER GRAIN LINE BAG TOPBAG POCKET TOP POCKET GRAIN LINE

CUT 1 PR POCKETING

CUT 1 PR POCKETING

GRAIN LINE

E

LIN

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

TINCE H H IL CT TITS SR ERE RR EAA BBE

GRAIN LINE

LINE RER ER BEAAR INEG KETT BE CE EGNLIN POK PC SELF TOPOENPIN TOO SELF P KEET 1 PRT 1 PR CCK PO PO TOP CUT C U

GRAINLINE

E

N LIN

step 9 Developing the front fly button stand and front fly facing

⁄8"

3

TOP POCKET FACING

1 CM 1 CM


8" 4 15⁄CM

FLY MASTER MASTE R PLAN

3 16" 13⁄CM

RIGHT RIGHT

LEFT

8" 45⁄CM 1

⁄8" 1 CM

⁄8" 1 CM

3

3

1 3 CM ⁄8"

BEARER CUT 1 PR SELF

step 11 Front fly button bearer pattern

GRAIN LINE

LEFT FLYFLY LEFT BUTTON BEARER BUTTON CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAINLINE

13CM ⁄8"

4 CM

45⁄CM 8" 1

CENTRE CENTER FRONT FRONT

• Create a master plan to draw the shape of the front fly button bearer by placing the front leg patterns together at the center front and tracing around the outline. • The button stand and fly facing are attached to the left pant leg and the button bearer is attached to the right pant leg. From the center front measure 15⁄8in along the waistline of the left leg for the positioning of the buttons and a further 15⁄8in for the overlap and make a mark. • From the bottom of the fly curve draw across and up, slightly curving your line, to meet this point on the waistline.

4 CM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the button bearer final pattern, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides.

CENTRE FRONT

R

step 10 Developing THE front fly button bearer

3 CM

LEFT

4 CM

1 3CM ⁄8" 3 1 CM ⁄8"

chinos 163


step 12 Developing the back welted pocket and bag shape

21 ⁄2C" M 6.5

⁄4"M 23C

.51 ⁄2"CM 62

1⁄ "CM

3 8

1⁄ "CM

3 8

4"M 7 23 ⁄C

1⁄ .5" CM

9 16

16" 1.5 C⁄M

4"M 7 23 ⁄C

9

1.5 C⁄16M" ⁄ "

⁄8"M 3.513C

2"M 5C

2"M 5C

3 ⁄8"M 3.51 C

TTRC ENO CR

⁄8"M 3.513C

8"M 13 ⁄C 3.5

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

1 CM 14 5 ⁄2"

ISE KVRE AUCR C B EH

9 16

1.5 CM

2 914⁄2"CM

9

• The welt opening is developed at the tip of the waist dart. The pocket bag parts are drawn over the back leg pattern and then traced off to make individual patterns. • From the center of the dart at the waistline draw a 91⁄2in perpendicular line down through the dart tip and mark; from this point square out 33⁄8in on each side and mark. From these points square back up to the waistline to create a rectangle. This is the basic shape of the pocket bag. • From the bottom of the dart square out 23⁄4in on each side and mark; from these points square down 9⁄16in and mark. Connect these points to create a rectangular shape. This is the welt opening, which sits 9⁄16in from each outside seam of the pocket bag. • To shape the pocket bag measure 3⁄8in in along the waistline on each side and mark. Connect these points with a shallow curve back to the outside seams of the bag. From each bottom corner of the bag measure up 13⁄8in and in 13⁄8in and join these points with a curved line.

BACK POCKET BACK WELT WELTED MASTER POCKET PLAN

MASTER PLAN

step 13 BACK pocket bag BOTTOM pattern (back welted pocket)

• When tracing this pattern you need to remove the dart. Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the pocket bag pattern by placing the center grainline on one side of the dart leg and drawing around one side of the top of the pattern before moving the grainline to the other dart leg and drawing around the other side. • Reposition the grainline back to the center of the dart and continue to draw the remainder of the pocket bag and welt shape.

164 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

BACK POCKET

BACK BACK POCKET BAG BAGOFBOTTOM CUT 2 PR POCKETING

⁄8" 393CM

CUT 2 PR POCKETING

STITCH LINE STITCH LINE

STITCH LINE STITCH LINE

51⁄2"

14 CM

63⁄4" 20

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

Pocket construction This pocket design has a self-facing strip sewn to the back of the bag so that when the pocket is open the pocketing material is not seen.

135" CM

CM

FACING STITCH LINE FACING STITCH LINE


BACK WAISTLINE BACK WAISTLINE

step 14 Top section of under pocket bag pattern (back welted pocket)

BACK POCKET BAG INNER TOP GRAINLINE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace this pattern from the waistline to the top stitch line of the welt opening, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance to the lower edge.

GRAIN LINE

TOP OF FRONT OF BACK POCKET BAG CUT 2 POCKETING

CUT 2 POCKETING

STITCH STITCH LINELINE ⁄"

31 CM 8

STITCH LINE STITCH LINE ⁄8"

1 CM 3

WELTED POCKET OPENING WELTED POCKET OPENING

WELTED POCKET OPENING OPENING WELTED POCKET

1 3CM ⁄8"

STITCH LINE

step 15 Bottom section of UNDER pocket bag pattern (back welted pocket)

13⁄CM 8"

STITCH LINE

STITCH LINE

STITCH LINE

BOTTOM FRONT BACK OF POCKET OF BACK POCKET BAG BAG INNER CUT 2 POCKETING GRAIN LINE

BOTTOM

GRAINLINE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace this pattern from the lower stitch line of the welt opening, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance to the top edge.

CUT 2 POCKETING

step 16 Developing the back self-facing strip

step 17 Developing the back welt strip

• Trace the welt opening from the back pant leg, adding 9⁄16in to each end. Measure down 3⁄4in at each end of the lower edge of this rectangular shape to create a larger rectangle measuring 65⁄8in x 13⁄8in. Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to the top and bottom edges to create the final pattern.

• On a separate piece of paper, draw a horizontal box 51⁄2in long by 11⁄8in wide to create the rectangular-shaped back welt strip. • Divide the box in half lengthways draw a line across the center, and label it fold. • Add a 9⁄16in seam allowance to each of the shorter sides and a 3⁄8in seam allowance to the longer sides.

51⁄2" 3 1 CM ⁄8"

1 3CM ⁄8"

⁄ "CM

91.5 16

BACK POCKET BACK POCKET FACING CUT 2 SELF FACING CUT 2 SELF

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

⁄4"

13⁄CM 8"

WELT OPENING WELTPOCKET POCKET OPENING STITCH STITCH LINE STITCH LINELINE STITCH LINE

1.59⁄CM 16"

2 3CM

14 CM

1.5 CM 9

⁄16"

⁄16"

1.59 CM 23⁄CM 4"

13⁄8CM "

1.5 ⁄16"CM

9

⁄16"CM 1.5

⁄2" 145CM 1

9

13⁄CM 8"

13CM ⁄8" 1.59⁄CM 16"

BACK POCKET BACK POCKET WELT WELT CUT 22 SELF GRAIN LINE CUT SELF GRAINLINE

1.59⁄CM 16"

9 CM 1.5 ⁄16"

FOLD LINE FOLD

1.5 9 CM ⁄16"

13CM ⁄8"

13⁄CM 8" 1.5 9 CM ⁄16"

⁄ "

1.5 CM 9 16

chinos 165


step 18 Developing the right side of the waistband • This style has a notched center back so the waistband will be drafted in two parts. • Take the waist measurement from the front and back leg patterns to create the waistband. Draw a vertical line 13⁄8in long (the depth of the waistband) and label it center back. Square across 87⁄8in for the back pant width and mark the outseam. Measure a further 71⁄2in for the front pant width

8

3

1 CM⁄ "

WAIST LINE LINE WAIST

8

POCKET POCKET NOTCH NOTCH

BACK DART BACK DART NOTCH NOTCH

FLYFLY NOTCH NOTCH

8

8

3

318 ⁄8" CM

71⁄2"

3

87⁄8"

⁄" 1 CM

8

⁄" 1 CM

3

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

3

BAND

CUT 1 PR SELFSELF CUT 1 PR

CF CF

RIGHT WAISTBAND RIGHT WAIST

CB CB

4

" 3.51 ⁄CM

8

2 CM⁄ " 3

1⁄ " CM

8

1 CM⁄ " 3

FLY EXTENSION

FLY EXTENSION FOR BUTTON FOR BUTTON BEARER BEARER

3

3

8

1⁄ " CM 1⁄ " CM

OUTSEAM SIDE SEAM

WAIST BAND CIRC - 83 CM / 2 CM EASE

and mark and label the center front. Measure a further 31⁄8in for the fly extension for the button bearer. Complete the rectangle. • Develop the notch shape by measuring 3⁄4in up the center back and in 3⁄8in along the top of the waistband and join these two points. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides to create the final pattern.

step 19 Developing the left side of the waistband • Develop the notch shape by measuring 3⁄4in up the center back and in 3⁄8in along the top of the waistband and join these two points. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides to create the final pattern.

1⁄ "CM

TAB

OUTSEAM SIDE SEAM

FRONT FRONT WAISTBAND TAB WAISTBAND

• Use the basic waist measurement from the right waistband to create the left waistband rectangle (71⁄2in + 87⁄8in) but then add the measurement for the center front waistband tab, which is 15⁄8in in length with an additional 9⁄16in to create the point. The waistband depth is 13⁄8in.

3

CUT 1 PR1SELF CUT PR

SELF

GRAINLINE GRAIN

87⁄8"

POCKET POCKET NOTCH NOTCH

NOTCH FLYFLY NOTCH

BUTTON BUTTON POSITION POSITION

9

⁄16"

1.5 CM

71⁄2"

166 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

LINE

WAISTLINE WAISTLINE

CB CB

LEFT WAISTBAND LEFT WAISTBAND

8

16

CF CF

11

3

⁄ " 1.75 CM

" 3.51 ⁄ CM

8

BACK DART BACK DART NOTCH NOTCH

5

8

4 1CM ⁄"

2⁄ "CM 3

4


chinos 167


Start by selecting the basic men’s pant sloper, or by drafting the basic pant sloper according to the instructions on page 45. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the pant you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 49. 168 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

ISE E R VK RC UA ETCB RH NTC EO SE CR I K R BAC RET T N CE

HIP LINE HIPLEVEL LINE HIP

HIPLEVEL LINE HIP HIP LINE

SEAT LINE SEAT LEVEL LINE

SEAT LINE SEAT LEVEL

KNEE KNEE LEVELLINE KNEE LINE

HEM LINE HEMLINE HEM LINE

HEMLINE HEM LINE HEM LINE

E SE AM

INSID

KNEE KNEE LINE KNEE LINE LEVEL

IIN NSID SEAE SE M A

M

BACK MASTER BACK PLAN PLAN MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

M SIDE SEA

MM AA EE ES DTS S OIU

SEAT LINE

SIDTS OU ES EA EA MM

SIDE SEAM

FRONT MASTERFRONT PLANMASTER MASTER PLAN GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CR EN OTR CE H FCRUO RN VTE RISE

CE

GRAIN LINE IINSEAM NSIDE SEAM

step 1 Developing the master plan

INSIDE SEAM

This pattern includes development of the following features: Angled center front waist and crotch curve Angled center back waist Dropped crotch Enlarged volume in straight legs Stitched front fly Side welted pockets Back patch pocket Drawstring ribbed waist Center back notch detail Ribbed cuff at hem

N TR E FRONT RISE

pattern Basic Sweatpants


45⁄CM 1 8"

3 ⁄8" 1 CM

3 ⁄CM 1 16"

181⁄8C 7 "M 3 1CM ⁄8 "

SEATLEVEL LINE SEAT DROPPEDSEAT SEATLEVEL LINE DROPPED

INSIDE SEAM INSEAM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

• Drop the seat level down 13⁄16in from the original seat level and redraw the bottom of the front crotch curve and the inseam and outseam. • Remove the 15⁄8in pleat volume by angling back the front crotch curve. To do this, measure in 13⁄16in from the center front waist point and from this point square up 3⁄8in. Connect this point back down to the dropped crotch and redraw the new waistline with a shallow curve back to the outseam. The remaining 3⁄8in will be taken out at the center back waist. • In this style the fly shape is stitched rather than constructed. To create the fly shape, measure in 15⁄8in from the new center front waist point and from here measure down 71⁄8in. At the bottom of this line measure 13⁄16in back up and make a mark; draw a curved line from this point back to the crotch curve.

HIP LEVEL

33⁄CM 1 16"

FRONT MASTER PLAN SIDTS OU ES EAMM EA

33⁄CM 1 16"

HIP LINE 33⁄CM 1 16" 5

OTC

CR

step 2 Developing the dropped crotch, front fly, and angled center front waist

H CURVE

3

LINE KNEE LEVEL

HEM LINE HEMLINE

CENTER BACK WAIST POINT

7 CM 23⁄4"

TCH

SEAT LEVEL LINE DROPPED SEAT LEVEL LINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

3 13⁄CM 16"

CRO

HIP LEVEL LINE HIP

EEAAMM ES DTS SIU O

• Drop the seat level down 13⁄16in from the original seat level and redraw the bottom of the crotch curve and the inseam and outseam. • From the center back waist point measure in 3⁄8in and from this point measure up 3⁄8in; redraw the shorter waistline and the longer back crotch curve. • From the bottom of the dart square out 23⁄4in to each side to create the pocket placement guide line of 51⁄2in, for the right leg only. The top of the patch pocket is aligned against this line.

1 14 ⁄2"CM 5

KNEE LEVEL LINE

3 13⁄CM 16"

BACK MASTER PLAN

IN INSE IDAEMS EAM

step 3 Developing the dropped crotch, angled center back waist, and welted pocket position

VE CUR

3 1 ⁄8"CM 3 8" 1 ⁄CM

HEMLINE HEM LINE

basic sweatpants 169


step 4 Adding volume to the front leg

step 5 Developing the front side welted pocket • From the new outseam waist point measure down 1in; from this point measure in 3⁄4in and down 57⁄8in to the hip level. Remove a 3⁄4in by 57⁄8in rectangle, which will become the welted pocket opening. 1.3 CM

2.5 CM

Pocket construction This pocket design has a self-facing strip sewn to the back of the bag so that when the pocket is open the pocketing material is not seen.

CR EN OTR CE H FCRUORN VTE RISE

CE NTR E FRO NT RISE

2.5 1" CM

• Cut up the grainline and open by 1in. • From the outseam waist point measure out 1⁄2in; draw inHIP theLINE new outseam line.

HIP LINE

step 6 Front leg pattern

HEMLINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE

SIDE SEAM

DROPPED SEAT LINE

KNEE LINE

HEMLINE

FRONT LEG

CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE

SIDE SEAM

REMOVE SIDE POCKET WELT SHAPE

FRONT LEG

HIP LINE

HEMLINE

CUT 1 PR SELF

15 CM

KNEE LINE

CUT 1 PR SELF

170 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

GRAIN LINE

KNEE LINE REMOVE SIDE POCKET WELT SHAPE

FRONT LEG HEMLINE

SIDE SEAM

GRAIN LINE

INSIDE LEG SEAM

SIDE SEAM

15 CM

GRAIN LINE

INSIDE LEG SEAM

SIDTS OU ES EA EA MM

CE NTR

INSIDE LEG SEAM

SIDE SEAM

GRAIN LINE

KNEE LINE

2.5 CM

DROPPED SEAT LINE

2.5 CM HEMLINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN

HEMLINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN

PLAN

KNEE KNEE LEVELLINE

HIP LINE

REMOVE SIDE POCKET WELT SHAPE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front FRONT pant leg pattern. MASTER

E FRO NT RISE

GRAIN GRAINLINE LINE

G SEAM 1.3 MLECM INSIEDAE

2.5 CM

CE NTR E FRO NT RISE

FRONT MASTER PLAN

DROPPED SEAT LINE

INSIDE LEG SEAM

E FRO NT RISE

CE NTR

HIPLEVEL LINE HIP

HIP HIPLEVEL LINE

DROPPEDSEAT SEAT LINE DROPPED LEVEL

KNEE LINE

DROPPED SEAT LINE DROPPED SEAT LEVEL

FRONT MASTER PLAN

FRONT MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE

CR EN OTR CE H FCRUORN VTE RISE

1

INSIDE LEG SEAM

1.3 ⁄2" CM

2.5 CM 1"

DROPPED SEAT LINE

7 15 5 ⁄8"CM


HIPLEVEL LINE HIP

E ISE RKVR BCAUC

1 CM 14 5 ⁄2"

Creating extra volume for the sweatpant silhouette in the back To create the sweatpant silhouette extra volume needs to be added. This is achieved by adding 1in through the middle of the pattern and by keeping the dart width (3⁄4in) but removing 1⁄4in from the outseam, giving an extra 11⁄2in ease in the waist of the back leg pattern.

POCKET PLACEMENT

R CEH OTT RN CE

7 CM 23⁄4"

2.5 CM 1"

3 2 ⁄4"CM

REMOVE 10.7 ⁄4" CM

step 7 Adding volume to the back leg

• Cut up the grainline and open by 1in. • Remove the dart legs and continue the waistline across, keeping the volume in the pattern. • From the outseam waist point measure in 1⁄4in; draw in the new outseam line.

INSI EDAEM LE

KNEE KNEE LEVELLINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

E SEEAAMM DTS SIU O

BACK MASTER PLAN

GS EA M

DROPPED SEAT SEAT LINE LEVEL DROPPED

5 2"CM

KNEE KNEE LINELEVEL KNEE LINE

E URV

GRAIN LINE

SEA M

GRAIN GRAINLINE LINE

C CH OT CR INSIE DAEML EG

BACK BACK BACK MASTER MASTER MASTER PLAN PLAN PLAN GRAIN LINE NEW GRAINLINE INSI DE L EG SEA M

NEW GRAIN LINE

EEAAMM ES DTS SIU O

DROPPEDDROPPED SEAT LINESEAT LINE DROPPED SEAT LEVEL

M SIDE SEA

SE AM

L EG

DE

INS I

SE AM

INS GRAIN LINE IDE

GRAIN LINE

L EG

M SIDE SEA

HEMLINE HEMLINE

HEMLINE HEMLINE

CUT 1 PR SELF

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the back pant leg pattern.

BACK LEG

CUT 1 PR SELF

step 9 Back leg pattern BACK LEG

M SIDE SEA

HIP LINE HIP HIP LEVEL LINE

RE NT CE

RE NT CE

• To remove the V shape detail, from point measure 33⁄8in down the back crotch curve and BACK BACK mark, and 2in along the waistline and MASTER MASTER mark. Connect PLAN these PLAN two points with a straight line.

center back DROPPED the SEAT LINE SEAT DROPPED LINEwaist

KNEE LINE KNEE LINE

CENTER BACK WAIST POINT

REMOVALREMOVAL OF CB OF CB ‘V’ SHAPE“V” ‘V’ SHAPE SHAPE 8.5 CM 3 CM 8.5 3 ⁄8"

R IS E

the center back notch detail LINE HIP LINE K BAC

14 Removing CM 14 CM

HIP

5 CM

2.5 CM

R IS E

step 7 CM 8

POCKET POCKET PLACEMENT PLACEMENT

K BAC

7 CM

2.5 CM 2 CM

2 CM REMOVE 0.7 CM

REMOVE 0.7 CM

HEMLINE

HEMLINE HEM LINEHEM LINE

basic sweatpants 171


5" CM 13

step 10 Developing the front side welted pocket position and bag

23CM ⁄4"

HIP LINE

GRAIN LINE

• From the outseam waist point measure 5in along the waist, and from this point square down to the hip level plus a further 31⁄8in; from here square back to the outseam. Measure 2in along this line and make a mark. CM • From the bottom of the welt opening shape13measure down 2.5 CM 13⁄16in along the outseam and connect this point to the 2 CM 2in point at the bottom of the pocket bag with a straight line. • To add curves to this line, divide its measurement into four and mark. From the bottom of the line square down 3⁄16in at the first mark and from the top of theFRONT lineSIDE square up 3⁄16in 15 CM WELTED POCKET MASTERPLAN at the first mark. Draw a curved line joining these points, starting at the bottom and reversing the curve in the middle of the line.

FRONT SIDE FRONT SIDE WELTED POCKET WELTED MASTERPLAN

2.5 1" CM

157⁄8CM 5 "

HIP HIP LEVEL LINE

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

POCKET MASTER PLAN

3 3CM 1 ⁄16" 1 83CM ⁄8"

⁄16"

3

0.5 CM

⁄160.5 " CM

3

5 CM 2"

DROPPED SEAT LEVEL DROPPED SEAT LINE

3 CM 8 CM 0.5 CM

0.5 CM

5 CM DROPPED SEAT LINE

FRONT POCKET BAG

FOLD

CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE

step 12 Developing the front welt strip

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front pocket bag pattern, and mirror it over to create both sides of the bag, with the opening on one side only.

• On a separate piece of paper, draw a horizontal box 57⁄8in long by 11⁄2in wide. • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line down the center, and label it fold. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to each side. GRAIN LINE

step 11 Front pocket bag pattern

1 CM

1 CM

⁄8"

CUT 1 PR SELF FRONT POCKET

CUT 1 PR RIB

1 CM

FOLD

GRAIN LINE 2 CM

1 CM 1 CM

GRAINLINE

15 CM

2 CM

2 CM

⁄4"

⁄4"

3

1 CM

1 CM

⁄8"

⁄8"

3

3

1 CM

1 CM

⁄8"

3

⁄8"

3

1 CM 1 CM

2 CM

FOLD

57⁄8"

FRONT POCKET BAG

FOLD FOLD CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM

GRAIN LINE

CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM

3

172 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

C

FOLD

15 CM

FRONT POCKET FRONT POCKET BAG BAG

CUT 1 PR RIB

FRONT POCKET WELT

FRONT POCKET WELT

CUT 1 PR RIB

1 CM 1 CM

1 CM

F

⁄8"

3

WELT

3

1 CM

1 CM

FOLD

3

3

⁄8"

⁄8"

1 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

1 CM


2 4" 73⁄CM

273⁄CM 4" 3 ⁄4" 2 CM

BACK POCKET LINE

1 ⁄2"CM 514

GRAIN LLIN INEE

• Use the pocket position line on the back leg pattern as the starting point for developing the patch pocket bag. From this line measure 3⁄4in up and 3⁄8in down at each end and join these points to create a rectangle. This is the folded facing shape. • Continue to measure down 51⁄2in on each side and square across. From each bottom corner of the bag measure up 15⁄8in and in 15⁄8in and join these points with a curved line.

CENTER LINE CENTRE

3 1 CM ⁄8"

4 ⁄CM 1 8" 5

HH IPIPLE LIN VEEL RISE

step 13 Developing the back right patch pocket bag

CR

O

CK RE BAVE CENTCUR H TC

145⁄CM 8"

FACING FACING FOLD LINE FOLD LINE

step 14 Back right patch pocket7 CMbag pattern 7 CM 2 CM

FACING STITCH LINE FACING STITCH LINE

FACING STITCH LINE LINE FACING STITCH

LINE

NE

PATCH POCKET CUT 1 SELF

GRAINLINE

4 CM

CK RIS RE BA

E

4 CM

CENT

CENTRE LINE

GRAIN

HIP LI

BACK RIGHT PATCH POCKET BACK RIGHT CUT 1 SELF

GRAIN LINE

BACK

1 CM • Following the instructions on page 50, trace offPOCKET to create the LINE back right patch pocket pattern and add on the self-facing allowance as shown. 14 CM

basic sweatpants 173


⁄"

31 CM 8

⁄"

31 CM 8

⁄"

CENTER CENTRE BACK INSERT CUT 1 RIB BACK INSERT CUT 1 RIB

⁄"

31 CM 8

3 C8M 1

⁄"

33⁄8"

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

8.5 CM

• The center back notch detail is purely a design feature. • Draw a horizontal line 4in in length and mark each end; from the center of the line square down 33⁄8in and mark. This is the center back line. • Connect these three points to form a triangle. • Extend the lines out by 3⁄8in at each end and draw a larger triangle to give 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides.

2"

5 CM

5 CM

2"

CENTER BACK CENTRE BACK

1

⁄"

31 CM 8

3 C8M

step 15 Developing the center back V notch style detail

step 16 Developing the ribbed waistband • On a separate piece of paper, draw a horizontal box 303⁄4in long (the length of the ribbed waistband calculated according to the standard stretch calculation given below) by 4in wide (double the depth of the waistband).

• Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line down the center, and label it fold. • Mark cord holes for the drawstring in the bottom left and bottom right corners. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides. ⁄8" 3

3

⁄8"

303⁄4"

⁄8"

⁄8"

3

2"

RIBBED WAISTBAND CUT 1 RIB

2" ⁄8"

GRAINLINE

3

2"

FOLD

2" ⁄8"

3

174 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

⁄8" 3

3 ⁄8" 1

HEM CUFF CUT 1 RIB

31⁄8" ⁄8"

⁄8" 3

85⁄8"

⁄8"

3

GRAINLINE

⁄8"

3

31⁄8"

FOLD 31⁄8"

3

⁄8"

⁄8"

3

85⁄8"

3

You may have to reduce the waistband further than this standard formula, depending on the stretch of the jersey rib. Use this calculation as a starting point and check the stretch ratio before making the final waistband pattern.

• On a separate piece of paper, draw a horizontal box 85⁄8in long by 61⁄4in wide (double the depth of the hem cuff). • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line across the center, and label it fold. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides.

⁄8"

A standard calculation for the waistband length can be made by measuring the circumference of the waist from the front and back pant patterns and then by dividing this measurement by four; one-quarter is then subtracted from the measurement of the waist circumference.

step 17 Developing the ribbed hem cuff

3

Sizing the waistband Before developing the waistband pattern for the ribbed jersey, it is important to calculate the amount by which you will need to reduce the waistband and this will vary depending on the stretch ratio of the rib you are using. The stretch of ribbed jersey will depend on the amount of elastic or spandex used by the manufacturer.

DRAW CORD HOLES

⁄8"

DRAW CORD HOLES

3

3

⁄8"

3


basic sweatpants 175


pattern Tailored Shorts

Shortened straight legs Front fly, fly facing, and button stand and bearer Angled side pockets Back welted pockets with flaps Straight waistband with side tab

This pattern includes development of the following features: Angled center front waist, crotch curve Angled center back waist Dropped crotch

step 1 Developing the master plan This shorts style is developed from the master plan of the chinos. Start by selecting the chinos master plan, or develop the master plan from the basic men’s pant sloper by following the instructions for the chinos on pages 158–60.

The adaptations already made for the chinos style are: Angled center front and back waist to remove the pleat volume Dropped crotch front and back Front fly development Alignment of back welted pockets

4 CM

3 ⁄8"CM 1

15⁄CM 8" 4

" 1 CM 13⁄8CM

7 18⁄8"CM

13⁄CM 16" HIP LEVEL HIP LINE 3

DROPPED SEATLEVEL LINE DROPPED SEAT

HIP LINE 13⁄CM 16" 3

3 31CM ⁄16"

SEAT LEVEL SEAT LINE DROPPED SEAT DROPPED SEATLEVEL LINE SEAT LINE

DROPPED SEAT LINE

KNEE LEVEL KNEE LINE

M

AM SAEM EE OIUDTS S

A SIDE SE

KNEE LINE

OU S IDTS E EA SEM AM

SIDE SEAM

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE

M SEAM INSIDE INSEA

INSIDE SEAM

3 CM

KNEE LINE KNEE LEVEL KNEE LINE

176 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

1 16" 33⁄CM

ES EAM INSI DE SEA M

SEAT LINE DROPPED SEATSEAT LINELEVEL 3 CM SEAT LINE

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

3 31CM ⁄16"

BACK BACK 714 1 1.5 CM MASTER PLAN MASTERPLAN ⁄2"CM 5CM BACK 1.5 CM MASTERPLAN 14 CM HIP LEVEL HIP LINE

15⁄8" 3 CM

3 CM

9 ⁄16" CM 1.5

1.5 9CM ⁄16"

3 CM HIP LINE 3 CM

FRONT MASTERPLAN FRONT FRONT MASTER PLAN MASTERPLAN

1 CM 23⁄4" 7 CM

1

18 CM

13⁄CM 16" 3

ININ SE SAID M

3 3 CM 1 CM ⁄8"

GRAIN LINE

1 CM

3 CM


15⁄CM 8" 4

⁄16"

3

step 2 Developing the front angled side pocket opening and front shorts length

57⁄8"CM 15

HIP LEVEL HIP LINE

CE RN OTC R

FRONT FRONT MASTER MASTER PLAN PLAN

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

133⁄4" CM 34.8

NEW HEMLINE NEW HEMLINE 5 0.8 CM ⁄16"

• From the bottom of the pocket opening measure 133⁄4in down the outseam and then square out 5⁄16in. Redraw the outseam back from this point. • From the bottom of the crotch curve measure 81⁄16in down the inside leg and then square out 5⁄16in. Redraw the inseam back from this point. • Draw a line between the two points to form the new hemline.

5 ⁄16" 0.8 CM

⁄16" 20.5 81CM

M EGSESAEMA LG SIIDDEELE INS

DROPPED SEAT DROPPED SEATLEVEL LINE

OU S IDTS E EA SEM AM

Enlarging the angled pocket opening to accommodate the width of the hand The pocket opening must be enlarged to allow for different hand widths or the pockets will be too tight to use and stretching will occur.

EC H FU RR OVNET RISE

• From the outseam waist point measure 15⁄8in toward the center front and 57⁄8in down the outseam and connect these two points for the angled pocket opening. Extend the pocket opening line at the waistline by 3⁄16in and redraw it, blending the line back to waistline to enlarge the opening.

KNEE LEVEL KNEE LINE

4 CM

E FRON

T RISE

15 CM

HIP LINE

step 3 Front leg pattern

FRONT FRONTLEG LEG CUT CUT 11PR PRSELF SELF

SIDE SEAM

GRAIN LINE

34.8 CM

0.8 CM

NEW HEMLINE 0.8 CM

20.5 CM

G SEAM INSIDE LE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front leg pattern. DROPPED SEAT LINE

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

CE

NTR

FRONT MASTER PLAN

tailored shorts 177

KNEE LINE


3 ⁄4" 124CM

5 ⁄8" 4 1CM

13⁄8CM "

step 4 Developing the front pocket bag

57⁄8"CM 15

"M

26 101⁄CM 4"

3 16 1 ⁄C 3

3 ⁄4"CM 2

FRONT FRONT POCKET POCKET BAG BAG MASTER MASTER PLAN PLAN

4 CM 15⁄8"

23⁄4" 7 CM 13⁄CM 16" 3

CE RN OT C RHE

C FU RROVN ET R

ISE

• First recreate the original shape of the front pant leg master plan before the shape for the angled side pocket was removed and redraw the pocket opening from Step 2 (without the extension for the enlarged opening). • Next create the pocket bag template by measuring along the waistline a further 43⁄4in from the opening to develop the pocket bag width. From this point square down 101⁄4in; this is the length of the pocket bag. • From the bottom of the pocket opening, to create a step, measure down 15⁄8in and from this point measure in 3⁄4in; from here measure down a further 23⁄4in and connect this point to the pocket length to close the bag shape. • To create a slight angle to the side of the pocket bag, at the top of the pocket measure 3⁄8in back along the waistline toward the outseam and redraw the pocket length. At the bottom of the pocket, round off the corners (13⁄16in by 13⁄16in), and round off the step. • Develop the pocket facing depth by measuring in 13⁄16in from the opening and connecting the waistline with the step using a parallel curved line.

13⁄CM 16" 3 13⁄CM 16" 3

13⁄CM 16" 3

43⁄4"CM 12

M

C ⁄ "

30.156

POC G

IN INNG PE ON TE CKOEP

KPEOT E

CH IT ST

LIN NT FRO ET K POC BAG R STE MA AN PL

E

AIN GR LIN E

FRONT POCKET BAG MASTER PLAN

KET POC

178 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

EE LININ GR AINL GRAIN

NG CI FA

BAG G KET TIN POC OCKE TOP RP 1P CUT

• Trace off the pocket bag shape with the facing depth line onto a separate piece of paper, extend the pocket opening line up 3 ⁄16in, and redraw it, blending the line back to the top edge.

N INELI PLTH TH PE DED GG ININ FFAACC

step 5 Developing the front pocket bag master plan

G

NIN

GRAIN

OPE


ET G TER AN IN FAC KET POC LF TOP PR SE 1 CUT

LINE

G

EL

HN ITHCLI INE

GRAIN LINE

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

GE LIN GIN INN P NE ETOPOE OCCKKET P PO

GRAINLINE

BAG POCKET BAG UNDER POCKET UNDER

1 PR POCKETING CUTPOCKETIN G CUT 1 PR

ERRER EA R LINE BEETAB SEE K LFLF KPEOTC 1 P PR RS P OC C UT1 CUT

POCKET OPENING

LINE

POCKET OPENING

IN LIN

GRA E

FRONT POCKET BAG MASTER PLAN

FOLD LINE

CUT 1 SELF CUT 1 SELF

FLY EXTENSION FLY EXTENSION

FLY EXTENSION CUT 1 SELF

18 71⁄CM 8"

4 CM

tailored shorts 179

1 CM

13⁄8CM " 4 CM 3

415CM ⁄8 " 1 CM

⁄"

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

" 13⁄8CM 13 CM 8

⁄8"

13 CM

4 15CM ⁄8"

4 CM

1 CM

⁄8CM " 3 1

FOLD LINE FOLD LINE

1 CM

4 CM

13⁄CM 8"

1 CM

13⁄CM 8"

5

3

1

GRAINLINE 1 CM

⁄8 " 41 CM

" 1⁄8CM

1 3CM ⁄8"

3

7 CM ⁄8" 18

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE

• On a separate piece of paper, draw a vertical box 71⁄8in long by 31⁄8in wide to create the rectangular-shaped fly extension. • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line down the center, and label it fold. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides.

" 1⁄8CM

4 CM

POCKET BEARER CUT 1 PR SELF

FRONT LEFT FLY FACING CUT 1 SELF R.S.U

E

INE HL

TC

STI

CUT 1 PR POCKETING

UNDER POCKET BAG

step 8 Developing the fly extension

FRONT LEFT FLY FACING FRONT LEFT FLY FACING 1 SELF R.S.U CUT 1CUT SELF R.S.U

1 CM 3

⁄8" 1 CM

3 CM 1 CM1 ⁄8"

4 CM

1 CM

IN LIN

ER

GRAIN LINE

18 CM

5 1 ⁄8" 4 CM

TOP POCKET FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

15⁄8" GRA

AR

BE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the fly shape developed in Step 1 onto a separate piece of paper and flip it over, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance to create the final fly facing pattern.

POCKET OPENING LINE

1 CM

POCKET BEARER CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE

E

IN LIN

GRA

POCKET OPENING LINE

TOP POCKET TOP POCKET FACING CUT 1FACING PR SELF CUT 1 PR SELF

FACING DEPTH LINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BAG KET INE ING POC NE CH L KET ER LI STIT POC UND ING CH FAC 1 PR IT CUT ST INE CH LINE ER IT L T S AR ING GRAIN BE FAC GRAINLINE TOP POCKET BAG GRAIN LINE TOP POCKET BAG

CUT 1 PR POCKETING

CUT 1 PR POCKETING

FRONT POCKET BAG MASTER PLAN

The pocket bearer The pocket bearer is cut from the original fabric and is sewn to the waistband and outseam behind the angled pocket opening. It is attached to the pocketing material of the under pocket bag. While the pocket opening was made longer in Step 2, the pocket bearer and under pocket bag will follow the original line of the waistline, holding the dimensions of the pocket parts together.

1 CM

FACING DEPTH LINE

GRA IN

0.5 CM

step 7 Developing the front fly facing

SITTC ERRST RRE

A EA BBE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the top pocket bag pattern and the top pocket facing from the latest development in Step 5, including the extended pocket 0.5 CM opening. Trace off the pocket bearer and the under pocket bag without the additional shape formed by the extended pocket opening.

8" 1 ⁄CM

IN GRA

step 6 Front pocket bag component patterns


step 9 Developing the back shorts length

9 ⁄16" CM 1.5 9 ⁄16" 1.5 CM

1 ⁄2"CM 5 14

BACK CUT 1

HE NTTCR EO CR

RI CVKE CBUAR

SE BACK BACK MASTER MASTER PLAN PLAN

LEG SE AM

DROPPED LEVEL DROPPEDSEAT SEAT LINE

IN NSSEI D AE M

5 ⁄8 " 49.819CM

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

HIP LEVEL HIP LINE

AM SAEM EE SIUDTS O

• From the waistline measure 195⁄8in down the outseam and then square out 5⁄16in. Redraw the outseam back from this point. • From the bottom of the crotch curve measure 81⁄8in down the inside leg and then square out 5⁄16in. Redraw the inseam back from this point. • Draw a line between the two points to form the new hemline.

5 0.8 CM ⁄16"

⁄16" 0.8 5CM

NEW NEW HEMLINE HEMLINE

KNEE KNEELEVEL LINE

step 10 Back leg pattern 1.5 CM

• Following1.5 the CMinstructions on page 50, trace off the back 14 CM leg pattern.

B TRE CEN

GRAIN LINE

BACK MASTER PLAN

IDE LEG SE AM

DROPPED SEAT LINE

IN S

49.8 CM

M SIDE SEA

HIP LINE

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

ACK

RIS

E

BACK LEG BACK LEG CUT CUT 11PR PRSELF SELF

KNEE LINE 180 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

0.8 CM

0.8 CM

NEW HEMLINE

20.5 CM

81⁄8" CM 20.5


step 11 Developing the back welted pocket and bag shape

M 6.52 ⁄C" 1 2

⁄4"M 2 3C

1 ⁄2"CM 62.5

1⁄ " CM

34

1⁄ " CM

3 8

"M 273 ⁄4C

CM 16" 19 ⁄.5 9 16

1.5 CM

⁄ "

"M 273 ⁄4C "

9 16

1.5 CM ⁄8"M 3.513C

2"M 5C

" 5 C2M

⁄8"M 3.513C

E

KE R ARCV CBU

RH TTC EON CCR

3

⁄8"M 3.51 C

3

⁄8 3.51 C

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

ISE

1 14 5 ⁄2"CM

"M

9214⁄2" CM

9

⁄ "

1.5 C⁄16M

• The welt opening is developed at the tip of the waist dart. The pocket bag parts are drawn over the back leg pattern and then traced off to make individual patterns. • From the center of the dart at the waistline draw a 91⁄2in line down through the dart tip and mark; from this point square out 33⁄8in on each side and mark. From these points square back up to the waistline to create a rectangle, which is the basic shape of the pocket bag. • From the bottom of the dart square out 23⁄4in on each side and mark; from these points square down 9⁄16in and mark. Connect these points to create a rectangular shape. This is the welt opening, which sits 9⁄16in from each outside seam of the pocket bag. • To shape the pocket bag measure 3⁄8in in along the waistline on each side and mark. Connect these points with a shallow curve back to the outside seams of the bag. From each bottom corner of the bag measure up 13⁄8in and in 13⁄8in and join these points with a curved line.

BACK WELT POCKET BACK WELTED POCKET MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

step 12 Under pocket bag pattern (back welted pocket)

• When tracing this pattern you need to remove the dart. Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the pocket bag pattern by placing the center grainline on one side of the dart leg and drawing around one side of the top of the pattern before moving the grainline to the other dart leg and drawing around the other side. • Reposition the grainline back to the center of the dart and continue to draw the remainder of the pocket bag and welt shape.

3 93CM ⁄8"

UNDER POCKET

BAG POCKET BAG BOTTOM BACK CUT 22PR POCKETING CUT PR POCKETING

STITCH LINE LINE STITCH

STITCH STITCHLINE LINE GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

Pocket construction This pocket design has a self-facing strip sewn to the back of the bag so that when the pocket is open the pocketing material is not seen.

5"CM 13

FACING STITCH LINE FACING STITCH LINE

⁄2 " 145CM 1

2063CM ⁄4"

tailored shorts 181


BACKBACK WAISTLINE WAIST LINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

step 13 Top SECTION of pocket bag pattern (back welted pocket) • Following the instructions on page 50, trace this pattern from the waistline to the top stitch line of the welt opening, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance to the lower edge.

STITCH STITCHLINE LINE

STITCH LINE STITCH LINE ⁄8"

1 3 CM

TOP SECTION OF BACK POCKET BAG POCKET INNER TOP BAG CUT 2 POCKETING CUT 2 POCKETING

⁄8"

1 3CM

WELT POCKET OPENING WELT POCKET OPENING

POCKET OPENING WELTWELT POCKET OPENING

1 3CM ⁄8"

GRAIN LINE

step 14 Bottom SECTION of pocket bag pattern (back welted pocket)

BACK POCKET BOTTOM BAG INNER BOTTOM SECTION OF CUT 2 POCKETING

POCKET BAG CUT 2 POCKETING

GRAINLINE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace this pattern from the lower stitch line of the welt opening, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance to the top edge.

3 CM 1 ⁄8"

STITCH LINE LINE STITCH

STITCHSTITCH LINELINE

step 15 Developing the back self-facing strip

⁄2" 145CM 1

⁄8CM "

3 1

3 1 CM ⁄8"

182 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

WELT OPENING WELTPOCKET POCKET OPENING STITCH LINE STITCH STITCH LINE STITCH LINE LINE

2 3CM ⁄4"

1.5 9 ⁄16"CM

BACK POCKET BACK POCKET FACING FACING CUT 2 SELF

CUT 2 SELF

1 3CM ⁄8"

GL

1.59⁄CM 16"

GRAIN LINE

• Trace the welt opening from the back pant leg, adding ⁄16in to each end. Measure down 3⁄4in at each end of the lower edge of this rectangular shape to create a larger rectangle measuring 65⁄8in x 15⁄16in. Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to the top and bottom edges to create the final pattern. 9

1.5 CM 9

⁄16"

1.59⁄16 CM "

⁄4CM "

3 2

3 CM 1 ⁄8"


step 16 Developing the back welt strip

⁄16CM " 1.5

⁄16"CM 1.5

⁄2"CM 5114

9

9

1 3CM ⁄8"

1 3CM ⁄8"

• On a separate piece of paper, draw a horizontal box 51⁄2in long by 11⁄8in wide to create the rectangular-shaped welt strip. • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line across the center, and label it fold. • Add a 9⁄16in seam allowance to each of the shorter sides and a 3⁄8in seam allowance to the longer sides to create the final pattern.

1.59⁄CM 16"

BACK POCKET BACK POCKET WELT CUT 2 SELF

WELT GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CUT 2 SELF

1.59⁄CM 16"

9 CM 1.5 ⁄16"

FOLD LINE FOLD

9 CM 1.5 ⁄16"

1 3CM ⁄8"

13CM ⁄8"

⁄ "CM

91.5 16

⁄ "

9 1.5 CM 16

OU SI DETS SEEA AMM

CERNT OTCH C

13⁄8CM "

3 1 CM ⁄8"

3 CM 2 ⁄4"

2⁄"

2⁄"

7 3CM 4

7 3CM 4

GRAIN G RAINLILNE INE

5 CM 2"

HIP H IPLLINEEV EL

CENTRE

1 CM

1 CM

step 18 Back welted pocket flap pattern

HIP LIN

E

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the flap pattern.

⁄"

⁄8"

31 CM 8

13CM

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

2 CM 7 CM

7 CM

E

5 CM

GRAIN LIN

SIDE SEA M

BACK RIS

E

• The pocket flap shape is developed over the back welt opening. From the top of the welt opening, at the dart point, square down 2in and mark. From this point square across 23⁄4in to each side and connect these two points with the top of the welt opening to create a rectangle. • From each bottom corner measure up 3⁄4in and connect these points back down to the center of the bottom line to form the pointed shape of the pocket flap. • Round off the bottom corners. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to the top edge of the flap.

VE RSE RE BACK CURI

step 17 Developing the back welted pocket flap

POCKET FLAP POCKET FLAP CUT 2 PR SELF CUT 2 PR SELF

tailored shorts 183


step 19 Developing the waistband • You can create the outseam tab on top of the waistband, which will allow you to define the correct proportion. • In this case create the waist side-seam tab 23⁄8in long by 13⁄16in wide. Measure 3⁄8in in from the left on each long side and connect these points to the center of the left-hand vertical to create the pointed shape of the tab.

OUTSEAM SIDE SEAM

• Create a rectangle 323⁄4in long (the waist circumference measurement) by 23⁄4in wide (double the waistband width). Draw a fold line lengthways across the center. Indicate the outside seams and center back, and mark notches for the pocket opening and back darts. • Add 15⁄8in to the center front for the fly extension.

1 7 ⁄2"CM 19

3 ⁄8"CM 1

POCKET POCKET NOTCH NOTCH

BACK DART DART BACK

BACKDART DART BACK

FOLD FOLD

POCKET POCKET NOTCH NOTCH

FOLD FOLD

CB CB

CF

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

5 2" CM ⁄8 " 311CM

9 1.5 CM ⁄16"

3 ⁄8" 1 CM

9 1.5 CM ⁄16"

FOLD

WAISTBAND CUT 1 SELF

GRAIN LINE

GL

184 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

WAISTBAND TAB CUT 2 PR SELF

FOLD

1 8" 45⁄CM

CF CF

7 822.5 ⁄8" CM

FLY FLYEXTENSION EXTENSION

7 822.5 ⁄8" CM

8" ⁄8" 3.513⁄CM 3.513CM

71⁄2"CM 19


1 CM

5 CM

1.5 CM 1 CM

FOLD

FOLD FOLD

3 CM

1.5 CM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the waistband pattern, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides. • Trace off the tab pattern, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides.

1 CM

1.5 CM

3 CM

5 CM

1.5 CM

step 20 Waistband pattern

FLY EXTENSION

1 CM

POCKET NOTCH

3.5 CM

BACK DART

POCKET NOTCH

BACK DART

POCKET NOTCH BACK DART

POCKET NOTCH

FOLD

BACK DART

FOLD

WAISTBAND CUT 1 SELF

GRAIN LINE

WAISTBAND WAISTBAND

GRAINLINEGRAIN LINE

CUT CUT 11SELF SELF

FOLD FOLD

GL

GL

FOLD

WAISTBAND TAB WAISTBAND TAB CUT CUT 22PR PRSELF SELF

WAISTBAND TAB CUT 2 PR SELF

tailored shorts 185


ISE E R VK RC UA ETCB CH NTR EO CR SE I CK R T BA TRE N E C

HIP LINE HIP HIPLEVEL LINE

HIP HIPLEVEL LINE HIP LINE

SEAT LINE

SEAT LEVEL LINE

SEAT LEVEL SEAT LINE

KNEE KNEE LINE LEVEL KNEE LINE

HEM LINE HEMLINE HEM LINE

HEMLINE HEM LINE HEM LINE

186 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

INSIID NS EILDEE GSE SA EM AM INSID E SE AM

KNEE KNEE LINE KNEE LINE LINE

step 1 Developing the master plan Start by selecting the basic men’s pant sloper, or by drafting the basic pant sloper according to the instructions on page 45. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the pant you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 49.

BACK BACK MASTER MASTER BACK PLAN PLAN MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

M SIDE SEA

MM AA EE ES DTS S OIU

SEAT LINE

SIDTS OU E SEA EAMM

SIDE SEAM

FRONT MASTERFRONT PLANMASTER MASTER PLAN GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CE RN OTTR CE H FCRUORNVTERISE IINSEAM NSIDE SEAM

GRAIN LINE

CE

INSIDE SEAM

This pattern includes development of the following features: Lowered front waist and angled crotch curve Angled center back waist Dropped crotch Back yoke Carrot leg Shaped knee patches Front fly, fly facing, fly extension, and button stand Angled side pockets Back inverted box-pleat patch pocket Cargo-style bellows pocket Sectioned waistband

N TR E FRONT RISE

pattern Cargo Pants


step 2 Developing the dropped crotch, lowered front waist, and angled center front waist

C

HIPLEVEL LINE HIP

OLD LINE SEATSEAT LEVEL NEWSEAT SEAT LINE DROPPED LEVEL

33⁄CM 1 16"

SIDTS OU ES EA EAMM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

3 31CM ⁄16"

KNEE LEVELLINE KNEE

INSIDE SEAM INSEAM 2.5 CM 1"

• Drop the seat level down 13⁄16in from the original seat level and redraw the bottom of the front crotch curve and the top of the inseam and outseam. • From the center front waist point measure in 13⁄16in and from this point measure down 9⁄16in. Redraw the new front crotch shape to the dropped crotch and redraw the new lowered waistline with a shallow curve back to the outseam. The remaining 3⁄8in will be taken out at the center back waist. • On the knee level measure in 1in from the inseam and mark, and 3⁄16in from the outseam and mark. On the hemline measure out 23⁄4in from the grainline toward the inseam and mark, and 31⁄2in toward the outseam and mark. Redraw the new leg seams to taper the front leg silhouette.

33⁄CM 1 16"

CER NOTT RCEHFCRU ORNVTERISE

9 1.5 CM ⁄16"

3 0.5 ⁄16" CM

HEM LINE HEMLINE 73⁄CM 2 4"

1 93CM ⁄2"

OLD LINE SEATSEAT LEVEL NEW SEAT SEAT LINE LEVEL DROPPED

33⁄CM 1 16"

EAM

9 1.5 ⁄16" CM

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

E SEEAAMM DTS S OIU

KNEE KNEE LEVELLINE

1.5 CM 9 ⁄16"

3 31CM ⁄16"

9 1.5 CM ⁄16"

• Drop the seat level down 1 ⁄16in from the original seat level and redraw the bottom of the back crotch curve and the top of the inseam and outseam. • From the center back waist point measure in 3⁄8in and from this point measure up 3⁄8in; redraw the shorter waistline and the longer back crotch curve. • From the waistline measure 23⁄4in down the crotch curve and mark, and 13⁄8in down the outseam and mark; connect these points with a straight line. This is the yoke line. • On the knee level measure in 9⁄16in from the outseam and mark, and 9⁄16in from the inseam and mark. On the hemline measure out 43⁄8in from the grainline toward the outseam and mark, and 4in toward the inseam and mark. Redraw the new leg seams to taper the back leg silhouette. 3

HIP LEVEL LINE HIP

IN INSE IDAEM LEG S

step 3 Developing the dropped crotch, angled center back waist, and back yoke position

E LINE YOKE LIN

C

3 3.5 1CM ⁄8"

3 1 ⁄8"CM ⁄8" 1 3CM

EISE KVR AUCR EH BC C R OTT REN

73⁄CM 2 4"

HEMLINE 3 ⁄8" 114 CM

104"CM

cargo pants 187


KNEE PATCH FRONT MASTER PLAN

8.5 CM

step 4 Developing THE front leg styling, front knee patch, fly, and pocket positions • To create the fly shape, measure in 15⁄8in from the new center front waist point and from here measure down 71⁄8in. At the bottom of this line measure 13⁄16in back up and make a mark, then draw a curved line from this point back to the crotch curve. • To create the angled pocket opening, measure in 15⁄8in along the outseam waist and connect this point back to where the hip level joins the outseam with a straight line. • Extend the pocket opening line at the waistline by 3⁄16in and redraw it, blending the line back to waistline to enlarge the opening.

5.5 CM

KNEE LINE

SIDE SEAM

8.5 CM

5.5 CM

INSIDE LEG SEAM

1 CM 1 CM

8.5 CM 1 CM 1 CM

8.5 CM

8"M 1 45 ⁄C

4 15⁄CM 8"

⁄16"

HIP LEVEL LINE HIP

33⁄C 1 16" M

CR EN OTR CE H FCRUORNV TE RISE 1 18 7 ⁄8"CM

3

GRAIN GRAINLINE LINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN

SIDTS OU ES EA EAMM

SEAT LINE SEAT LEVEL

EAM GS IDAEMLE INSE

63CM 2 ⁄8"

81⁄CM 3 8"

3 1 3⁄C 16" M

CARGO POCKET POSITION

2⁄4"CM

3

Enlarging the angled pocket opening to accommodate the width of the hand The pocket opening must be enlarged to allow for different hand widths or the pockets will be too tight to use and stretching will occur.

KNEE KNEE LINE LEVEL

7 CM 23⁄4" 10 CM 4"

10 CM 4" 2⁄4"CM

3

• To mark the cargo pocket position measure 23⁄8in down from the bottom of the slit pocket opening and 31⁄8in in from that point and mark. • To develop the front knee patch measure 23⁄4in up from the knee level on both the outseam and the inseam and square across; measure 4in down from the same points and square across. • From the center of these lines measure out 3⁄4in; redraw, passing through these points with a curved line.

HEMLINE

KNEE PATCH PATCH FRONT MASTER PLAN

3 8.5 3CM ⁄8"

3 8.53CM ⁄8"

1 25.5 ⁄8"CM

KNEE LEVEL LINE KNEE

INSEAMLEG INSIDE SEAM

3 1 CM ⁄8 " 3 ⁄8" 1 CM

18 CM

188 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

ONT RISE

4 CM

4 CM

3 CM 8.5 3 ⁄8"

5 21.5⁄8"CM

SID OUTS E SE EAAM M

step 5 Adding darts to the front knee patch • To add the knee darts trace off the knee patch shape onto a separate piece of paper. Divide it in half horizontally across the center (half the patch height of 63⁄4in). On both seams measure up 3⁄8in and down 3⁄8in from the center and connect each of these points to the center line with a 21⁄8in line, forming the darts.

73⁄CM 2 4"

" 13⁄8CM 13⁄8CM " 3 8.5 3 ⁄8"CM


step 6 Front leg patterns

step 7 Developing THE back leg styling, back knee patch, back yoke, and pocket positions

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the knee patch pattern and the upper front and lower front leg patterns.

UPPER FRONT CUT 1 PR SELF

UPPER FRONT CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM 1 CM

CARGO POCKET POSITION

ALIGNMENT NOTCH

3 1 CM ⁄8" 7 CM 23⁄4"

KNEE KNEE LINE LEVEL

BACK MASTER PLAN

SE AM

SEAT LEVEL LINE

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

CARGO POCKET POSITION

1 83CM ⁄8"

AMM DTESSEEA SIU O

LOWER FRONT CUT 1 PR SELF

HIP HIPLEVEL LINE 3 ⁄8 " 6 2CM

INSIEDAE MLE G

⁄4"M 723 C 4"M 7 23 ⁄C

E

73⁄CM 2 4"

3 ⁄8" 3.5 1CM 1 3CM ⁄8"

IS RKVER BCAUC RCEH T T NO

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FRONT KNEE PATCH CUT 1 PR SELF

ALIGNMENT NOTCH NOTCH

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

N

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

8.5 CM

CER

8.5 CM

• Trace off the back yoke shape onto a separate piece of paper, cut through the dart legs, and close up to create the curved yoke shape. • To remove the remaining volume left by the dart leg, measure 3⁄8in in from the outseam along the yoke line and reshape the outseam from this point back down to the hip level. • To mark the patch pocket position square out 23⁄4in in each direction from the bottom of the dart horizontal to the crotch curve. • To mark the cargo pocket position measure 23⁄8in down from the hip level and 31⁄8in in from that point and mark. • To develop the back knee patch measure 23⁄4in up from the knee level on both the outseam and the inseam and square across; measure 4in down from the same points and square across. • Find the center of these lines and mark. On both seams measure down 3⁄8in from the top line and up 3⁄8in from the bottom line and mark. Shape the knee by joining these points back to the center points with straight lines.

13⁄8CM " 73⁄CM 2 4"

10 4" CM

10 CM 4"

13⁄8CM "

3 1 CM ⁄8"

HEMLINE

cargo pants 189


step 8 Back leg patterns

step 9 DEVELOPING THe Front fly facing and button stand • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the fly shape developed in Step 4 onto a separate piece of paper. Flip over the fly shape along the straight edge line and redraw to create a mirror image. Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides. • The pattern is folded along the straight line to give double thickness to the buttonholes once positioned. • Trace off the single fly shape from the left side of the button stand to create the fly facing pattern. 1 CM

BACK YOKE CUT 1 PR SELF

4 CM

4 CM

1 CM

GL

CB

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the yoke pattern, the knee back pattern, and the upper back and lower back leg patterns.

13⁄CM 8"

⁄8" 41CM 5

1 CM

⁄8"

3

1 CM

⁄8"

3

1 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

KNEE BACK CUT 1 PR SELF

⁄8"

1 CM

3

4.5 CM

4.5 CM

1 SELF CUT 1CUT SELF

1 CM

FRONT FLY FACING CUT 1 SELF R.S.U

1 CM

4.5 CM

4.5 CM

FOL.D LINE

1 CM

19 CM

FLY EXTENSION CUT 1 SELF

FRONT FLY STAND FRONT FLYBUTTON BUTTON STAND

GRAIN LINE

18 CM

1 CM

GRAIN LINE

1 CM FOLD LINE FOLD LINE

BUTTON POSITIONS BUTTON POSITIONS

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

1 CM

19 CM

1 CM

FOL.D LINE

⁄8"

⁄8"

13 CM 1 CM

⁄8"

3

1 CM

1 CM

4 CM

1 CM

LOWER BACK CUT 1 PR SELF

15⁄48"CM

154⁄8CM "

⁄8"

3

13 CM

1 CM

ALIGNMENT NOTCHES NOTCHES

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FRONT FLY BUTTON STAND CUT 1 SELF

1 SELF R.S.U CUT CUT 1 SELF R.S.U

FRONT FLY FRONT FLYFACING FACING

181⁄8CM 7 "

ALIGNMENT NOTCHES

190 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

UPPER BACK CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

H P PATC ET K POC IO N ITION IT PPOOSS

CARGO POCKET POSITION

FOLD LINE

3 CM 1 ⁄8"

ALIGNMENT NOTCHES

1 CM 1 CM

1 CM

1 CM 1 CM

1 CM


3 14.5 ⁄4"CM

⁄"

3

1 CM

1 CM

14.3 ⁄54"CM

13⁄8CM "

FOL.D LINE FOLD

3 1 CM ⁄8"

38

⁄8"

1 CM

FRONT CUT 1 S

Fly extension size The front fly extension is wider and longer then the fly facing and button stand so that it will cover them both, because multiple seams may cause irritation to the wearer.

19 71CM ⁄2"

CUT 1 SELF CUT 1 SELF

FLY FLY EXTENSION EXTENSION

• On a separate piece of paper, draw a vertical box 71⁄2in long and 31⁄2in wide to create the fly extension. • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line down the center, and label it fold. • When folded and placed along the front crotch curve the top edge of the fly extension will need to be modified to follow the angle of the waistline. Trace across and redraw. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides.

1 CM 719 ⁄2"

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

1 3CM ⁄8"

3 CM 1 ⁄8"

13CM ⁄8"

13CM

⁄8"

1243CM ⁄4" 1⁄8"CM

step 11 Developing the front pocket bag

261CM ⁄4" 10

3

F CR UO RN VERISE

3 ⁄4" 7 2CM

33⁄CM 1 16"

CCRE O NT RH C E

145⁄8CM "

3 13⁄CM 16" 13⁄CM 16" 3 3 12 4 ⁄4"CM

3 13⁄CM 16"

⁄16"

I FAC

EN NPG TIO KEN CE POP TO H TH CKE EEPPT ED EIND LINIGNL NFGAC

PO ING

FRONT POCKET BAG MASTER PLAN

• Trace off the pocket bag shape with the facing depth line onto a separate piece of paper, extend the pocket opening line by 3⁄16in, and redraw, blending the line back to the top edge.

FRONT POCKET BAG MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

step 12 Developing the front pocket bag master plan

57⁄8"CM 15 133⁄CM 16"

0.5 3 CM

• First recreate the original shape of the front pant leg master plan before the shape for angled side pocket was removed and redraw the pocket opening from Step 4 (without the extension for the enlarged opening). • Next create the pocket bag template by measuring 43⁄4in along the waistline from the pocket opening to develop the pocket bag width. From this point square down 101⁄4in; this is the length of the pocket bag. • From the bottom of the pocket opening on the outseam, to create a step, measure down 15⁄8in and from this point measure in 3⁄4in; from here measure down a further 23⁄4in and connect this point to the pocket length to close the bag shape. • To create a slight angle to the side of the pocket bag, at the top of the pocket measure 3⁄8in back along the waistline toward the outseam and redraw the pocket length. At the bottom of the pocket, round off the corners (13⁄16in by 13⁄16in), and round off the step. • Develop the pocket facing depth by measuring in 13⁄16in from the opening and connecting the waistline with the step using a parallel curved line.

5 ⁄8 " 41CM

3

2⁄4"CM

step 10 developing the Front fly extension

FRONT POCKET BAG MASTER PLAN

cargo pants 191


RER BEA

ALIG NOT

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE

LINE

ALIGNMENT NOTCH

LINE

CH STIT

The pocket bearer The pocket bearer is cut from the original fabric and is sewn to the waistband and outseam behind the angled pocket opening. It is attached to the pocketing material of the under pocket bag. While the pocket opening was made longer in Step 4, the pocket bearer and under pocket bag will follow the original line of the waistline, holding the dimensions of the pocket parts together.

CH STIT

RER BEA

UNDER POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the top pocket bag pattern and the topALIGNMENT pocket facing from the latest NOTCH development in Step 12, including the extended pocket opening. Trace off the pocket bearer and the under pocket bag without the additional shape formed by the extended pocket opening.

RER BEA

LINE

UNDER POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

CH STIT

UNDER POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

step 13 Front pocket bag component patterns

GRAIN LINE

1 3CM ⁄8"

⁄8"

3

3

237⁄4CM "

1 CM 3

⁄8"

⁄8"

⁄8"

⁄8"

3

3

⁄8"

LINE

GRAIN LINE

E

LIN RER BEA ET F CK SEL PO PR TOP T 1 POCKET FACING CUCUT 1 PR SELF

3

CH STIT ING FAC

TOP POCKET BAG

CUT 1 PR POCKETING

ING

EN

1 CM 1 CM 1 CM 1 CM

OP

237⁄4CM "

ET

NOTCH

INE

TOP POCKET FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM

CK

ALIGNMENT ALIGNMENT NOTCH

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

13⁄CM 8"

1

15 CM

57⁄8" FOLDLINE FOLD

L ING

N PE

O ET

FOLDLINE FOLD

CK

GRAIN LINE

LINE

FOLDLINE FOLD

5 ⁄8"

GRAIN LINE

GRAINLINE

1 CM

157CM

PO

CH STIT ING FAC

TOP POCKET BAG

CUT 1 PR POCKETING

INE

1 CM

1

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE

RER BEA ET F CK SEL PO PR T1 CU

• For the patch pocket draw a rectangle 7in wide and 65⁄8in deep. • From the top of the center line measure out 3⁄8in on both sides and mark, and then a further 3⁄8in on both sides and mark. Repeat at the bottom of the vertical line. Join all these points with dotted vertical lines and label each fold. The two outside lines will be folded toward the center line to create the hidden inverted box pleat. ALIGNMENT NOTCH 3 • From the left bottom corner measure up ⁄4in and mark, and measure across 3⁄4in and mark. Join these two points to create a shaved corner. Repeat at the right bottom corner. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides.

BACK PLEATED PATCH POCKET BACK PLEATED CUT 1 PR SELF PATCH POCKET CUT 1 PR SELF

FOLDLINE FOLD

TOP POCKET FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

step 14 Developing the back inverted box-pleat patch pocket and panel top

ALI NO

PO

GRAIN LINE

CH L

STIT

NOTCH

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

FA

LINE CING

ALIGNMENT ALIGNMENT NOTCH

⁄4" 2 CM

⁄4" 2 CM

3

3

13⁄8CM "

192 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

TOP POCKET FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

CH STIT ING FAC

BAG

CUT 1 PR POCKETING

TOP POCKET TOP POCKET BAG

CUT 1 PR POCKETING

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE

TE E LIN KG E LIN BEARER C NIN PE POO INGPOCK1ETPR SELF EN T CU OP

ET

CK

PO

INE

CH L INE STLIT

LINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CH STIT ING FAC

ESTRITCH ERAERR BAG TOP BPOCKET BEA

CUT 1 PR POCKETING

UNDER POCKET BAG UNDER POCKET BAG CUT POCKETING CUT1 PR 1 PR POCKETING

ALIGNMENT NOTCH

POCKET BEARER CUT 1 PR SELF

" 13⁄8CM

TOP POCKE CUT 1 PR S


1 CM 1 CM 1 CM 1 CM

7 CM

1 CM

7 CM

1 CM

⁄8"

3

⁄"

13⁄8CM "

1 3CM 8

2 CM 3

⁄4"

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BACK PATCH POCKET BACK PATCHPANEL POCKET PANEL CUT 1 PR SELFSELF CUT 1 PR

FOLDLINE LINE FOLD 3 2 CM ⁄4"

13CM ⁄8"

13⁄CM 8" 14 ⁄2" 51CM

⁄8"

1 CM 3

⁄8"

1 CM 3

FOLDLINE

1 CM 3

⁄8"

1 5 ⁄2" 14 CM

1 CM

15 CM

• For the panel top of the patch pocket draw a horizontal rectangle 51⁄2in long by 11⁄2in wide. Divide it in half lengthways and draw in a dotted fold line. This will give a panel facing of 3⁄4in. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides. FOLDLINE

FOLDLINE

SELF

FOLDLINE

EATED PATCH POCKET

GRAIN LINE

step 15 Developing the panel top for the back inverted box-pleat patch pocket

2 CM

1 CM step 16 Developing the cargo-style bellows pocket

TOP TOP FACING FACING

3 13CM ⁄16"

3

13CM ⁄8"

6 CM

6 CM

23⁄8"

23⁄8"

CARGO POCKET FLAP CARGO POCKET FLAP CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BELLOWS SIDE

FOLD LINE

13CM ⁄8"

FOLD LINE FOLD LINE

23⁄8"

3 62CM ⁄8 "

6 CM

13⁄CM 8"

1 3CM ⁄8"

⁄8"

" CM 63⁄417

1 CM 3

⁄8"

2 CM

FOLD LINE 2 CM

1 CM 3

16 CM

BELLOWS BOTTOM

1 CM

⁄8"

⁄8" 3

GRAIN LINE

CUT 1 PR SELF

CARGO POCKET BAG

BELLOWS SIDE

FOLD LINE

• To develop the pocket flap, draw a rectangle 63⁄4in long and 43⁄4in wide. Divide the width in half 23⁄8in by 23⁄8in with a 23 CM dotted line the length of the pattern. This will be the fold line when constructed. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides.

3 2 CM ⁄4" FOLD FOLD LINE LINE 3 2 CM ⁄4"

63⁄417 " CM

1 CM

8 CM 17 8 CM step 2 CM 2 CM Developing the cargo pocket flap

BELLOWS SIDE BELLOWS SIDE

CUT CUT 11 PR PRSELF SELF

1 6 " 16⁄4CM

3 CM

FOLD LINE

2 CM 2 CM

2 3CM ⁄4" 2 3CM ⁄4"

23 CM 9"

BELLOWS BELLOWS BOTTOM BOTTOM

TOP FACING

81CM 3 ⁄8" GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

81CM 3 ⁄8"

CARGO POCKET POCKETBAG BAG CARGO

BELLOWS SIDE BELLOWS SIDE

2 3CM ⁄4" 2 3CM ⁄4"

FOLD LINE LINE FOLD

• The bellows sides and bottom are developed onto the pocket front. Start by drawing a vertical rectangle 9in long by 61⁄4in wide. • Along the top edge of this shape add a 13⁄16in facing strip. • To create the bellows sides, on each side of the pocket measure out 11⁄2in from the original top line and 11⁄2in from the bottom line and join these two points. Draw a fold line down the middle. • For the bottom bellows strip, draw a similar 11⁄2in rectangle at the bottom edge, with a center fold line. • To create the two cutaway corner shapes, draw a line at 45 degrees to each bottom corner and square out from this 3⁄4in in each direction. Draw three sides of a 11⁄2in square, cutting into the bellows strips. When sewn these shapes will create mitered corners when the bellows are folded. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides except the top of the bellows side panels.

3 CM

33CM 1 ⁄16"

FOLD LINE FOLD

FOLD LINE FOLD

1 CM

cargo pants 193


step 18 Developing the waistband facing

22.5 87⁄8" CM

4 CM

22.5 CM

22.5 CM

SIDE SEAM

CENTRE BACK

SIDE SEAM

POCKET OPENING

1 CM

BACK LEFT

BACK RIGHT

CUT 1 SELF

CUT 1 SELF

CUT 1 SELF

22.5 CM

POCKET OPENING

POCKET SECTION LEFT CUT 1

8" 1 ⁄CM 3

4 CM

22.5 CM

POCKET SECTION RIGHT CUT 1

SIDE SEAM OUTSEAM

4 CM

15.5 CM

FRONT RIGHT CUT 1 SELF

CENTRE BACK CENTER

1 CM

1 CM

15.5 CM

1 CM

FRONT LEFT

SIDE SEAM OUTSEAM

CF

1 CM

4 CM

4 CM

CENTRE / FLYEXTENTION EXTENTION CENTER FRONT RONT / FLY

15.5 CM

• To develop the waistband, create separate panel patterns 15⁄8in wide and the following in length: front left (61⁄8in), pocket section left (15⁄8in), back left (87⁄8in), back right (87⁄8in), pocket section right (15⁄8in), and front right including fly extension (77⁄8in). • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides to create the final patterns.

CENTRE FRONT / FLY EXTENTION

4.5 CM

GRAIN LINE

4.5 CM

15.5 CM

POCKET OPENING

1 CM

SIDE SEAM

SIDE SEAM

BACK FACING step 19 CUT 1 SELF Developing the waistband

1 3CM ⁄8"

15.5 61⁄8" CM

5 41CM ⁄8 "

CENTRE FRONT

22.5 87⁄8" CM

POCKET OPENING

45CM ⁄8 " 1

CENTRE BACK

15.5 61⁄8" CM

POCKET OPENING

3 ⁄4" CM 14.5

145⁄8"CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

POCKET OPENING

4 CM

CENTRE FRONT / FLY EXTENTION

CUT 1 SELF

13CM ⁄8"

1 CM 1 CM

3 ⁄8" 1 CM 3 CM 1 ⁄8"

CF

1 CM 3 ⁄8" 4 CM 15⁄8"

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

SIDE SEAM OUTSEAM

CENTRE BACK CENTER

BACK FACING

5 41CM ⁄8"

1

SIDE SEAM OUTSEAM

POCKET OPENING

CENTRE CENTER FRONT / FLY EXTENTION

This waistband is developed in two parts. The inside facing is one full piece while the outside is segmented into parts that match the pocket openings.

POCKET OPENING

• To develop the facing, on a separate piece of paper, draw a horizontal box 15⁄8in wide by 347⁄8in long (331⁄8in waist measurement + 13⁄4in fly extension), then notch the positions of the following for alignment­—pockets, outseams, and center back—by measuring them from the waistline on the front and back pant patterns. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides to create the final facing pattern.

FRONT LEFT

BACK LEFT

CUT 1 SELF

BACK RIGHT

CUT 1 SELF

FRONT RIGHT CUT 1 SELF

CUT 1 SELF

4 15CM ⁄8" 3 CM 1 ⁄8"

3 CM 8"

13⁄8CM "

15.5 61⁄8" CM

415CM ⁄8"

POCKET SECTION LEFT CUT 1

194 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

22.5 87⁄8" CM

22.5 87⁄8" CM

15CM ⁄8" 4 POCKET SECTION RIGHT CUT 1

15.5 61⁄8" CM

4.5 13⁄4CM "

⁄8CM "

3 1


4 CM

M

cargo pants 195


Shrinkage Shrinkage is not included in this adaptation of the jeans pattern. All raw cotton denim shrinks when washed. A shrink test should be carried out first. Cut a square yard, apply the washing technique relevant to the final product, and remeasure the square yard: This will give you the ratio by which the square has shrunk, which you can then apply to the pattern by increasing the width and length. Alternatively, make the jeans in their entirety and then apply the washing technique relevant to the style. Remeasure the jeans and adapt the pattern to accommodate the shrinkage ratio.

196 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

Carrot leg

Skinny leg

Straight leg

Bootcut leg

pattern Jeans

This pattern includes development of the following features: Lowered front waist and angled crotch curve Raised center back waist Back yoke Straight legs, bootcut legs, carrot legs, skinny legs Jeans pocket Coin pocket Back patch pocket Straight waistband


step 2 Developing the lowered front waist and angled crotch curve

HIP HIPLEVEL LINE HIP LINE

PLEAT PLEAT LINES LINES 5 4 1CM ⁄8"

N NEEW WCC FF CB

NEW

4 CM

HEM LINE HEMLINE

EL VE LIN HIPLE WHIP NEW NE LINE HIPLEVEL HIP

HIP LINE

KNEE LEVEL KNEE LINE

INSE IN IDAEMS EAM

EEAAMM ES DTS SIU O

SIDE SEAM

GRAIN LINE

step 3 Developing the raised center back waist

BACK MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

LINE SEAT LEVEL

SEAT LINE FRONT MASTER PLAN

2⁄4"CM

3

KNEE LINE

• From the crotch curve cut along the hip level toward the outseam. Open up the back crotch curve 3⁄4in and redraw the new position of the waist top.

HEM LINE HEMLINE

HEM LINE

jeans 197

M SIDE SEA

IINSEAM NSIDE SEAM

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

INSEI N AS MIDE SEA M INSID E SE AM

WAIST

1.5 CM HEMHEM LINELINE HEMLINE

INSIDE SEAM

KNEE KNEE LINE LEVEL

PLEAT LINES

3 CM

FRONT MASTER PLAN

BACK MASTER MASTER BACK PLAN PLAN MASTER PLAN

KNEE KNEE LEVELLINE KNEE LINE

NEW CF

HEM LINE HEM LINE HEMLINE

H

SEAT LEVEL LINE

GRAIN LINE

MM AA EE ES DTS S OIU M A E S SIDE

KNEEKNEE LINE KNEE LINE LEVEL

NE HIP LEVEL LINE HIP

SEAT LINE

SIDTS OU ES EA EAMM

FRONT MASTER FRONT PLAN MASTER PLAN

SEAT LEVEL SEAT LINE

WAIST

SIDTS OU E SEA EAMM

SEAT LEVEL LINE

9 1.5 CM ⁄16"

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

SEAT LINE

• Remove the 15⁄8in pleat volume by angling back the front rise. From the center front waist point measure in 13⁄16in and from this point measure down 9⁄16in. Redraw the new front crotch curve shape down to the crotch point.

SE E RI VK RC UA ETCB H E R S C I T N EO CK R CR T BA TRE CEN

HIPLEVEL LINE HIP

SIDE SEAM

GRAIN LINE INSIDE SEAM INSEAM

INSIDE SEAM

HIP LINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

N TR CE

CR EO N TR CE HF CR UO RN VT E RISE

E FRONT RISE

Start by selecting the basic men’s pant sloper, or by drafting the basic pant sloper according to the instructions on page 45. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the pant you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 49.

3 13⁄CM 16"

step 1 Developing the master plan


CENTER FRONT WAIST POINT 3.5 13⁄8" CM

step 4 Developing the front fly, jeans pocket, and leg silhouettes

5 ⁄8 " 41CM

7.5 CM 3"

HIPLEVEL LINE HIP

3.5 1 ⁄8" CM

SEAT LEVEL LINE

198 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

FRONT LEG

BOOT CUT LEG

SLIM LEG STRAIGHT LEG

GRAIN LINE

SLIM LEG LEG CUT LEG BOOT CUT

SLI SLIM M LE LEG G STRAIGHT LEG

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

SLIM LEG LEG

STRAIGHT LEG

BOO BOOT T CUT CUT LEG LEG

HEM LINE

BOOT CUT LEG

KNEE LINE

SIDE SEAM

FRONT MASTER PLAN

STRAIGHT LEG

SLIIM SL M LE LEG G STRAIGHT LEG

3 3 1CM ⁄16" 3 2 CM ⁄4"

CF C F

SEAT LINE

SLIM LEG STRAIGHT LEG

STRAIGHT LEG

2 CM 3 CM

BOOT CUT LEG

SLIM LEG

GRAIN LINE

INSIDE SEAM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front pant leg pattern using the desired leg silhouette.

3 CM 2 CM

2 CM

3.5 CM

HIP LINE

CUT 1 PR SELF

4 CM

CF

4 CM

F

C

7.5 CM

BOOT CUT LEG

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

SLIM LEG LEG STRAIGHT LEG

BOOTCUT BOOT CUTLEG LEG

3 2 CM ⁄4" 3 3 1CM ⁄16"

HEMLINE HEM LINE

LEG CUT LEG BOOT CUT

INSIDE SEAM INSEAM

KNEE KNEE LEVELLINE

SIDTS OU E SEA EAMM

FRONT MASTER PLAN

11 CM

3.5 CM

17 CM

FRONT LEG

CF

C

CUT 1 PR SELF

3

• To create the fly shape, measure in 13⁄8in from the center front waist point and from here measure down 63⁄4in to create a rectangular fly shape. At the bottom of this line measure 3⁄4in back up and make a mark; draw a curved line from this point back to the crotch curve. • From the outseam waist point measure back 43⁄8in and down 3in and create a rectangle. At the bottom left corner of the rectangle measure 15⁄8in along and 15⁄8in up and join the points to create a rounded opening. • The original outseam of the master plan is the outseam for the straight leg silhouette. To create the slim leg silhouette measure in 13⁄16in from both seams along the hemline and redraw the seams up to the seat level. • To create the bootcut silhouette measure out 3⁄4in from both seams along the hemline and redraw the seams up to the knee.

step 5 Front leg pattern

CF

C CF F

45⁄CM 1 8"

3 2 ⁄4"CM

3 17 6CM ⁄4"

11 " 43⁄8CM


"M 13 ⁄8C 5 0.8 ⁄16" CM

YOKE STYLE LINE " 0.8 ⁄16 CM

step 6 Developing the back yoke shape and leg silhouettes

VE CUR TCH O R C

5

HIP LINE HIP LEVEL

BACK LEG

3 31CM ⁄16"

8 31⁄CM 8"

1 CM 0.8 CM

BOOT CUT LEG

3 ⁄16" 3 1CM 3 2 CM ⁄4"

LEG BOOT CUTLEG BOOTCUT

STRAIG STRA IGHT HT LEG

SLIM LEG

LEG LEG IGHT IGHT STRA STRA SLIM LEG HEM LINE HEMLINE

3 2 CM ⁄4" 3 3 1CM ⁄16"

BOOTCUT CUTLEG LEG

KNEE KNEE LINE LEVEL

STRAIGHT LEG SLIM LEG

INSE IDAEM SEA M

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BACK MASTER PLAN

8 CM YOKE STYLE LINE

3 CM

0.8 CM HIP LINE

BACK LEG SEAM

3 CM

T WAIS

LINE

BACK YOKE CUT 1 PR SELF

SIDE

M E SE A

BACK MASTER PLAN

INSID

GRAIN LINE

EA SIDE S

M

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the back pant leg pattern using the desired leg silhouette. SEAT LINE

CUT 1 PR SELF

LEG CUTLEG BOOT BOOTCUT

SLIM LEG

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

LEG LEG IGHT IGHT STRA STRA SLIM LEG

BOOTCUT CUTLEG LEG

BOOT CUT LEG

SLIM LEG

STRAIGHT LEG

3 CM 2 CM

STRAIGHT LEG SLIM LEG HEM LINE

2 CM 3 CM

BOOT CUT LEG

KNEE LINE

STRAIG STRA HT LEG IGHT

step 7 Back leg pattern

AMM UTESSEEA S OID

SEAT LINE SEAT LEVEL

• From the waistline, measure 31⁄8in down the crotch curve and mark, and 13⁄16in down the outseam and mark; connect the points with a straight line. This is the yoke line. • Measuring along the waistline, remove 3⁄8in from the outseam, which is extra volume left by the front pleat. • Trace off the back yoke shape onto a separate piece of paper, cut through the dart legs, and close up to create the curved yoke shape. • To remove the remaining volume left by the dart leg, measure 5⁄16in in from the outseam along the waistline and reshape the outseam from this point. • The original outseam of the master plan is the outseam for the straight leg silhouette. To create the slim leg silhouette measure in 13⁄16in from both seams along the hemline and redraw the seams up to the seat level. • To create the bootcut silhouette measure out 3⁄4in from both seams along the hemline and redraw the seams up to the knee.

jeans 199


GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

BACK YOKE BACK YOKE CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 PR SELF

8 31CM ⁄8"

1 CM

3.5 CM

3.5 CM

BACK LEG YOKE

FLY EXTENSION CUT 1 SELF

1 CM

1

GRAIN LINE

1 CM

ALIGNMENT BACK LEGNOTCHES YOKE ALIGNMENT NOTCHES

133CM ⁄16"

IDE S OUST SEEAAM M

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the final back yoke pattern. Seam allowance is not added as many seam variations are possible in jeans construction. The two most commonly used are flat felled seams and lapped seams; the former usually has a seam allowance of 3⁄8in and the latter 3⁄16.

E INLEIN T LT ISIS W WAA

K CK BAC BA TRE TEENR C N E C

step 8 Back yoke pattern

3

1 CM

⁄8"

1 3⁄8"

⁄8"

18 CM

1 CM 3

13⁄CM 8"

3 CM 1 ⁄8"

step 9 Front fly facing pattern

FOL.D LINE

GRAIN LINE

FRONT

1 CM

63⁄4"

17 CM

FLYFLY FACING FACING

13⁄CM 8" 13 CM

⁄8"

FLY EXTENSION CUT 1 SELF

Front fly extension size The front fly extension is longer than the fly facing so that it will cover it, because multiple seams may cause irritation to the wearer.

FLY EXTENSION CUT 1 SELF

71⁄8"

ING LF R.S.U

200 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

⁄" 1 CM 38

3.5 CM

13⁄CM 8"

18 CM

1 CM

FOL.D LINE FOLD

1 CM

13CM ⁄8"

13CM ⁄8"

17 CM

⁄8"

1 CM 3

⁄8"

1 CM 3

CENTRE FRONT

GRAIN LINE

1 CM • On a separate piece of paper, draw a vertical box 71⁄8in long 1 CM by 23⁄4in wide. 3.5 CM • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line down the center, and label it fold. • When folded and placed along the front crotch curve the top edge of the fly extension will need to be modified to follow the angle of the waistline. Trace across and redraw. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides.

13 ⁄8"

3.5 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

3

1 CM

1 3⁄8"

⁄8"

step 10 Front fly extension pattern 13CM ⁄8"

1 1 CM

CUT 1 SELF R.S.U CUT 1 SELF R.S.U

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the fly shape developed in Step 4 onto a separate piece of paper and flip it over, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides to create the final fly facing.

CENTER CENTRE FRONT

GRAINLINE

3.5 CM

1 CM


43 ⁄8"CM 11

3 8" CM ⁄ 3.5 1

0.5 ⁄16" CM

3

7.5 3" CM

• Extend the pocket opening line ⁄16in above the waistline to allow for the width of the hand. From this point measure a further 13⁄8in toward the center front to create the pocket bag width. From here square down 91⁄2in and mark; then square back 61⁄4in to the outseam. • Develop the pocket opening facing and bearer depth by drawing a line 13⁄16in from and parallel with the opening line. • From the opening line on the outseam measure 13⁄16in down (the facing depth) and a further 23⁄4in and mark. Connect this point with the end of the pocket depth line using a descending curve.

GRAIN LINE

3

24 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

3.5 CM

11 CM 0.5 CM

1 249CM ⁄2 "

PO CK ET L

33⁄CM 1 16"

33⁄CM 1 16" PO 7.5 CM CK ET L INE

POCKET OPENING ALIGNMENT NOTCHES

step 11 Developing the front jeans pocket bag and bearer

73⁄CM 2 4"

3 CM

3 CM

INE

LINE HIPLEVEL HIP 7 CM

HIP LINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN

FRONT MASTER PLAN

16 CM

1 CM 16 6 ⁄4"

FACING ALIGNMENT NOTCH

FRONT MASTER PLAN

POCKET OPE ALIGNMENT N

POCKET OPENING ALIGNMENT NOTCHES

GRAIN LINE

7 CM

FRONT JEAN POCKET BEARER CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE

FRONT JEAN POCKET BAG FRONT JEAN POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 PR SELF POCKETING POCKETING

3 CM

OPENING ALIGNMENT NOTCH

FACING ALIGNMENT NOTCH

ALIGNMENT NOTCH

7.5 CM

POCKET OPENING ALIGNMENT NOTCHES POCKET GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FACING ALIGNMENT NOTCH FACING

11 CM 0.5 CM

POCKET OPENING ALIGNMENT NOTCHES

3.5 CM

• The jeans pocket bag is constructed in one piece. Trace off the pocket bag shape from the master plan mirroring it over using the left-hand side as the 3 CM PO CK ET L fold line. Remove the pocket opening INE 24 CM shape from the left side. • Trace off the final pocket bearer shape HIP LINE from the front pocket master plan.

OPENING ALIGNMENT NOTCH

FOLD LINE FOLD LINELINE GRAIN

step 12 Front jeans pocket bag and bearer patterns

FACING ALIGNMENT NOTCH FACING ALIGNMENT NOTCH

POCKET OPENING POCKET ALIGNMENT NOTCHES

16 CM

THE Coin pocket

POCKET OPENING ALIGNMENT POCKET OPENING NOTCH NOTCHES ALIGNMENT

PATTERN

POCKET OPENING ALIGNMENT NOTCHES

• Draw a rectangle 23⁄8in wide by 4in long. At one end, along the shorter side, mark two fold lines 3⁄8in apart. COIN POCKET CUT 1 SELF

236⁄8CM "

FOLD FOLD FOLD FOLD GRAINLINE

FACING ALIGNMENT NOTCH

FACING ALIGNMENT NOTCH

CUT 1 PR SELF POCKETING DEVELOPING

POCKET OPENING ALIGNMENT NOTCHES

GRAIN LINE

NOTCH

LINE GRAIN GRAINLINE

GRAINLINE

" 13⁄8CM 13 CM ⁄8"

10 4"CM

COIN POCKET CUT 1 SELF

jeans 201 FRONT JEAN POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR SELF POCKETING INE

7 CM

POCKET

3 CM

FRONT JEAN POCKET POCKET BEARER JEAN BEARER FRONT SELFSELF CUT CUT1 PR 1 PR

OPENING OPENING POCKET NOTCHES ALIGNMENT ALIGNMENT

7.5 CM

FOLD LINE

stepBAG 13 FRONT JEAN POCKET

POCKE ALIGN


step 14 Developing the back patch pocket bag 1 CM

7 " ⁄8 CM 5 15

HIP HIPLEVEL LINE 2⁄4"CM

3

ESSEEAAMM UT S OID

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

3 " ⁄4 2 CM

• From the center point of the yoke line measure out 3in each 2 CM side and from each of these points square downFACING 13⁄16in and mark. Draw a line between these two points; this is the top FOLD opening of the patch pocket. From the center point of the 7 opening, square down 5 ⁄8in and mark. • From this point measure up 3⁄4in and mark. Square out 21⁄2in to each side, and connect PATCH thesePOCKET points up to the top opening CUT 1 PR SELF line to give an angled pocket shape. • Connect the same points down to the center point on the bottom line. GRAIN LINE

16" 1 33⁄CM

RRISVEE BACCKU TRTECH NO CCER

3 " ⁄16 3 1CM

YOKE LINE CM 7.53" CM 7.53"

SEAT LEVEL LINE

⁄8"

BACK PATCH POCKET MASTER PLAN

⁄8"

1 CM

3 CM

YOKE LINE 7.5 CM 7.5 CM

3

3

1 CM

2 3CM ⁄4"

3 CM

FOLD

HIP LINE

SIDE SE

202 Chapter FOUR the patterns: PANTS

GRAIN LINE

AM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the patch 2 CM CM pocket bag pattern2 and add a 3⁄4in folded facing at the top and a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all other sides to create the final pattern. SEAT LINE BACK PATCH POCKET MASTER PLAN

FOLD FOLD

PATCH POCKET PATCH POCKET CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

ISE CK R E BA

FOLD

TR CEN

step 15 15 CM Back patch pocket bag pattern

23⁄CM 4"

FACING FACING

FOLD


19.5 75⁄8" CM

5 228CM ⁄8"

EXTENTION FLY EXTENSION

SIDE SEAM OUTSEAM

CENTRE BACK CENTER GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE 5 22 8 ⁄8"CM

Make all arrows with pink text into black arrows

CF

FOLD LINE

5 ⁄8" CM 719.5

13⁄8CM " 4 15⁄CM 8" 45⁄CM 1 8" 13⁄8CM "

3.5 CM 11⁄2"

5 4 1CM ⁄8" 3 1 CM ⁄8"

WAIST BAND WAISTBAND CUT 1 SELF

POCKET OPENING ALIGNMENT NOTCH

3 1 CM ⁄8" 5 4 1CM ⁄8"

POCKET OPENING ALIGNMENT NOTCH

• Draw a rectangle 31⁄4in wide by 34in long (317⁄8in waist measurement plus 5 ⁄8in ease plus 11⁄2in fly extension measurement) with the fly extension marked at the right-hand end. Draw a fold line down the center lengthways. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides. • Notch the center front, pocket openings, outseams, and center back.

SIDE SEAM OUTSEAM

POCKET OPENING ALIGNMENT NOTCH

step 16 Developing the waistband

jeans 203


CHAPTER FIVE

The Patterns: outerwear


pattern ANORAK

Start by selecting the basic men’s upper body sloper, or by drafting the basic sloper according to the instructions on page 40. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the jacket you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 48. 206 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

FRONT FRONT NOTCH PITCH POINT

WAISTLINE

HIP LEVEL HEMLINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

BACK MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

LEVEL CHEST LINE

SIDE SEAM

step 1 Developing the master plan

BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

CENTRE CENTER BACK

This pattern includes development of the following features: Adding volume to the front and back patterns Enlarging the neckline Creating a shaped and elasticated hemline Creating a dropped shoulder with seam moved toward the front Developing a center front patch pocket with mitered corners, zipper opening, and flap Enlarging the sleeve cap Creating a sleeve with elasticated cuffs Developing a hood with separate front peak


0⁄ .5" CM 3 16

0⁄ .5" CM 3 16

CM

⁄ " 3 16

03⁄1.65 "

CENTRE CENTER FRONT NECK POINT 3 2 ⁄4"CM

NEW NEW FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

23⁄4CM "

LINE CHEST LEVEL

1 ⁄8"CM 3.5

SIDE SEAM

SIDE SEAM

FRONT MASTER MASTER PLAN

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

BACK MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

3 ⁄8" 3.51CM

3

WAISTLINE

HEMLINE

CENTRE FRONT FRONT SHOULDER HIGH POINT NECK POINT SHOULDER

CENTRE BACK CENTER NECK POINT BACK BACK SHOULDER SHOULDER POINT TIP

hem

• Extend the center front, side seam, 3.5 CMcenter back lines down 43⁄8in and from the hemline and square across to FRONT create a new hemline. MASTER • PLAN To shape the hemline measure 13⁄16in up the side seam and blend back toward the center front and center back using a French curve. • To develop the side seam shaping, at the hemline measure 3⁄8in into the front body and connect this point back to the new underarm / side seam corner with a straight line. Repeat these steps for the back by measuring 3 ⁄8in into the back body.

CENTRE FRONT FRONT SHOULDER HIGH POINT NECK POINT SHOULDER

FRONT SHOULDER SHOULDER TIP POINT

NEW NEW BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT NEW NEW FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

CENTRE CENTER FRONT NECK POINT

CHEST LINE LEVEL

BACK MASTER PLAN

WAISTLINE

FRONT FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

SIDE SEAM

SIDE SEAM

5 CM

NEW NEW BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

2 CM

FRONT SHOULDER SHOULDER TIP POINT

BACK SHOULDER HIGH POINT NECK POINT SHOULDER

CENTRE FRONT NECK POINT

NEW BACK 2 CM PITCH step 3 POINT NEW Extending and shaping the FRONT PITCH and shaping the side seam POINT

3 "M 2⁄4C

OLD SIDE SEAM

FRONT SHOULDER POINT

23⁄4C "M

OLD SIDE SEAM

M

BACK SHOULDER SHOULDER TIP POINT

CENTRE BACK CENTER

0.5 CM

M 2C

CENTRE BACK CENTER NECK POINT

CENTRE FRONT SHOULDER NECK POINT

CENTRE FRONT

DER

2C

GRAIN LINE

0.5

CM

0.5 CM

• From the center front neck point measure down 3⁄4in and from the front high point shoulder measure in 3⁄16in; measure in 3⁄16in from the back high point shoulder. Using the basic upper body sloper as a template draw in the new front and back necklines. • From the front and back shoulder tips measure up 3⁄16in and out 3⁄4in over the armhole and find and mark the new shoulder tips. • Open up the side seam by adding in 3 ⁄4in between the front and back body panels and repositioning. • From the chest level square down 13⁄8in on each side and, starting from the underarm / side seam corner, redraw the new armhole shape using the basic upper body slopers as a template up to the new shoulder tips. Draw in the new notch positions.

SHOULDER BACK HIGH POINT NECK POINT SHOULDER

CENTRE BACK CENTER

step 2 Developing the enlarged neck, dropped shoulder, and lowered arm, and adding volume to the side seam

HEMLINE 11 CM 43⁄8"

3 1 CM ⁄8 "

3 CM 1 ⁄8"

11 43⁄8CM "

313⁄CM 16"

ANORAK 207


13⁄16"

SHO ULDE R SHSO EU ALMD BACK HIGH SEAM ER SHOULDER POINT NECK SHOULDER BACK POINT SHOULDER TIP POINT

FRONT SHOULDER HIGH POINT NECK POINT SHOULDER

FRONT SHOULDER TIP

13⁄16"

3"CM 1 ⁄16 13⁄16" 3

3 CM

step 4 Repositioning the shoulder seam

WAISTLINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

NEW SIDE SEAM

BACK MASTER PLAN

NEW SIDE SEAM

CHEST LINE LEVEL CENTRE BACK CENTER

• From the front high point shoulder measure 13⁄16in down the front neck curve and 13⁄16in down the armhole from the front shoulder tip and draw in the new shoulder seam. Cut and remove this shape from the front body panel. • To add the shape onto the back body panel, from the back high point shoulder and the back shoulder tip measure up 13⁄16in and connect these points with a straight line from the back high point shoulder, curving it down slightly to the new shoulder tip.

NEW HEMLINE

step 5 Adding volume to the front KCAB REDLUOHS

INAL ORIG LDER U SHO M SEA

R ULDE SHO AM SE

8" 4 1M5 ⁄C

ERCENTER TNEC KCAB FRONT KCEN NECK TPOINT NIOP

M ⁄8"4 15C

GRAINLINE

UNDERARM / SIDE SEAM CORNER

RETSAMASTER M KCAB FRONT NALP PLAN

GRAINLINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN RETSAM KCAB NALP

133⁄4"

MC319⁄2"

MC4"01

MC 04

SIDE SEAM

31C⁄2"9 M

MC4"01

153⁄4"

MC25⁄.26" 1

ENIL NIARG

MC 2"5

MC 53

208 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

KCAB FRONT REDLUOH S HIGH KCE N POINT SHOULDER TNIO P

ENIL NIARG

ENIL NIARG

• Trace off the KCENfront body panel onto ERTNEC TNIOP a new piece of paper. Volume will be KCAB KCEN 4 added byMCcutting and spreading the TNIOP pattern pieces open to redefine the shape. MC 4 • From the side seam square in 31⁄2in at two points and from the hemline draw TSAM KCAline B a 133⁄4inREvertical passing through NALP the points. Continue to measure in a further 4in and from the hem draw a 153⁄4in vertical line. • Measure 2in down the side seam from the underarm / side seam corner and from here draw an angled line to the top of the 153⁄4in vertical line. • Measure down a further 21⁄2in and connect this point with an angled line to the top of the 133⁄4in vertical line. • From the hemline cut up each line and out to the side seam, leaving the shape connected by a fraction of an inch. • Starting from the center front open each panel out 2in at the hem. • Redraw the new hemline with a gradual curve back toward the center front, removing the overhanging MC 5 panel corners. MC 5

M2C" 5

2" 5 MC

MC 5 MC 5.6


step 6 Front pattern and developing the front neck facing, patch pocket bag, and hem WIDTH • Trace off the front onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape. You will now develop the front neck facing and patch pocket on top of this pattern. • The front neck facing will strengthen the zipper insertion. From the front high point shoulders measure 15⁄8in down each shoulder seam and draw a curved line down toward the center front following the shape of the neckline. • From the center front neck point measure out 3⁄16in on both sides along the neckline. From these points create a rectangle 3⁄8in wide by 43⁄4in long; this will be cut later to allow the zipper to be sewn in.

• From the bottom of the rectangle measure down 15⁄8in along the center front and then square out 15⁄8in right and left; this is the width of your facing. Connect these points back up to meet the curved lines drawn previously and round off all the corners. • To develop the pocket bag measure 23⁄8in down from the bottom of the facing shape. From this point square out 61⁄4in left and right. Measure 125⁄8in down both sides to create a square. • Measure 13⁄16in up along the length of the hemline to create a channel to take the elastic for a gathered finish.

1 4 5C ⁄8"M 3 CM 1 ⁄8"

⁄8"M 4 15C

4 15CM ⁄8"

ZIPPER LENGHT LENGTH 3 12 4 ⁄4"CM

45CM 1 ⁄8 "

6 23CM ⁄8"

FRONT BODY CUT 1 SELF

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

16 ⁄4" 61CM

5 CM 3212 ⁄8 "

325CM 12 ⁄8 "

1661CM ⁄4" 3 1C3 M ⁄16"

"M

HEM STITCH LIIN NE FOR ELASTIIC CATED GATHERING

6 133 ⁄1C

ANORAK 209


step 7 Front neck facing pattern • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the neck facing pattern, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance on the neckline and shoulders only.

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FRONT NECK FACING CUT 1 SELF

step 8 Front hem FACING pattern

1C

M

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the hem facing pattern, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides.

1C

3 "M 1⁄8C

M

CUT 1 SELF

3 ⁄8" 1 CM

13 ⁄8C"

FRONT HEM FACING

GL

1 C3⁄M 8"

1 C3 ⁄8M "

210 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

GL

FRONT HEM FACING

3 " 1 ⁄8CM

1 CM

M

13⁄8"CM

1 C3 ⁄M 8"

1 CM

GRAIN LINE

FRONT NECK FACING CUT 1 SELF

CUT 1 SELF


step 9 Developing the pocket bag with mitered corners and zipper opening

POCKET TOP POCKET TOP 5 ⁄8" 12 32 CM 5"

POCKET MASTER PLAN POCKET MASTER

5

28 CM 11"

145CM ⁄8 "

FOLD FOLD 4 CM 5

1 ⁄8"

⁄8"

3

⁄ "

9 CM 1.5 16

145CM ⁄8 " POCKETBOTTOM BOTTOM POCKET

9 CM 1.5 ⁄16"

⁄16"

1.5 9 CM

1 CM

TOP FRONT

4 CM

13 CM

13 CM

TOP FRONT PATCH POCKET BAG CUTPOCKET 1 SELF

1 CM

ZIPPER OPENING

GL GL

POCKET TOP 32 CM

4 CM

CUT 1 SELF

step 10 Bottom and top pocket bag patterns BOTTOM FRONT PATCH POCKET BOTTOM FRONT CUT 1 SELF

POCKET MASTER

PLAN • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the bottom pocket bag pattern. 28 CM 28 CM • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the top pocket bag pattern.

POCKET BAG CUT 1 SELF

1.5 CM 4 CM

13CM

⁄"

31 CM 8

⁄"

3 1 CM 8

125⁄8" 32 CM

6161CM⁄4"

⁄"

31 CM 8

⁄"

⁄"

31 CM 8

FOLD LINE FOLD

3 1 CM 8

FOLD LINE FOLD

6161⁄CM 4"

GRAIN LINE

POCKET FLAP CUT 1 SELF POCKET FLAP CUT 1 SELF

• On a separate piece of paper, draw a horizontal box 125⁄8in long by 61⁄4in wide to create a rectangular-shaped pocket flap. • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line across the center, and label it fold. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides.

⁄8"

5 12 ⁄8" 32 CM

⁄"

31 CM 8

GRAINLINE

step 11 Pocket flap pattern

FOLD FOLD 1.5 CM

⁄8"

POCKET BOTTOM

13CM

1.5 CM

1 CM

4 CM

FOLD 4 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE

1 CM

4 CM

1.5 CM

TOP FRO CUT 1 SE

BOTTOM CUT 1 SE

PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

⁄8" 41CM

1 CM

⁄8 "

⁄8" 3

⁄8"

3

1 CM

28 11"CM

9 CM 1.5 ⁄16"

5 4 1CM ⁄8"

ZIPPEROPENING OPENING ZIPPER

3

• Trace off the 12 ⁄8in by 12 ⁄8in square from the front body, indicating the center grainline. • The zipper opening will be inserted along a panel seam, which is created by measuring down 15⁄8in from each top corner and squaring across. To create the zipper opening draw a rectangle 10in by 3⁄8in, centered on the panel seam. • To develop the mitered corners that will give the pocket a bellows effect, square out 3⁄8in from the bottom corners and connect to the top corners to give a new angled side. From the new angled side measure in 15⁄8in along the bottom line and mark, and from this point square down 15⁄8in and mark. Repeat on the other side. Join the lower points on each side with a straight line to create a new pocket bottom line. Name the old bottom line fold. Continue to measure 9⁄16in down the angled side and mark. Measure 9⁄16in out from the new pocket bottom line and mark. Join these two points back to the point you marked on the original pocket bottom line (now the fold line). Repeat on the other side.

5" 13 CM

13 CM 1 CM

5

1 CM

4 5CM 1 ⁄8 "

5

ANORAK 211


step 12 Adding volume to the back and creating the back neck facing • Trace off the back body panel onto a new piece of paper. Volume will be added by cutting and spreading the pattern pieces open to redefine the shape. • From the side seam square in 31⁄2in at two points and from the hemline draw a 133⁄4in vertical line passing through the points. Continue to measure in a further 4in and from the hem draw a 153⁄4in vertical line. • From the underarm / side seam corner measure 2in down the side seam and connect this point with an angled line to the top of the 153⁄4in vertical line. • Measure down a further 21⁄2in and connect this point with an angled line to the top of the 133⁄4in vertical line. • From the hemline cut up each line and out to the side seam, leaving the shape connected by a fraction of an inch.

• Starting from the center back open each panel out 2in at the hem. • Redraw the new hemline with a gradual curve back toward the center back, removing the panel corners that are overhanging. • To create the back neck facing, measure 15⁄8in down the shoulder seam from the back high point shoulder and mark, and 15⁄8in down the center back from the center back neck point and mark. Join these points with a curved line following the shape of the neckline.

CENTRE CENTER BACK NECK POINT

ORIG ORIG IN INAL SHOU AL SHO ULDE SEA LDER M R SEAM

BACK BACK BACK HIGH SHOULDER SHOULDER NECK POINT NECK CENTRE SHOULDER POINT BACK POINT NECK POINT

1 5C 4 ⁄8"M

4 CM SHO ULDE SEAM R

4 CM

5 ⁄8 " CM 41

BACK MASTER BACK MASTER PLAN PLAN PLAN

BACK MASTER BACK MASTER PLAN PLAN PLAN

10 CM

212 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

10 4"CM 9 CM

10 CM 4" 9 CM

21⁄2"CM 6.5

GRAIN LINE

6.5 CM

5 2"CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

5 CM

1 93CM ⁄2 "

SIDE SEAM

353CM 13 ⁄4"

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

10 CM

3 35 40CM CM 15 ⁄4"

40 CM

GRAIN LINE

UNDERARM / SIDE SEAM CORNER

91CM ⁄2" 3

CM 5 2"

5 CM5 2C"M

5 CM


step 13 Back pattern and hem FACING

CENTRE BACK CENTER

3 CM

31C 3 M ⁄16"

GRAIN LINE

CENTRE BACK

BACK BODY CUT 1 SELF

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BACK BODY CUT 1 SELF

• Trace off the back onto a separate piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance on the neckline and shoulders only. • Measure 13⁄16in up along the length of the hemline to create a channel to take the elastic for a gathered finish.

3 CM

HEM STITCH LINE FOR ELASTICATED GATHERING

16"M 3 13 ⁄C

M

1 CM

1C

1 CM

HEM STITCH LINE FOR ELAS ATED GATHERING CA STTIIC

1C

M

1C

M

1C 1 CM

1 CM

BACK HEM FACING

GL

M

CUT 1 SELF

BACK BODY CUT 1 SELF

⁄"

⁄"

3 1 CM 8

13CM 8

1C

M

3 CM

1 CM

BACK NECK FACING CUT 1 SELF

GL

• Trace off the back neck facing onto a separate piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance on the neckline and shoulders only.

⁄"

3

1 CM 8

GRAIN LINE

⁄"

3 CM 18

GRAIN LINE

CENTRE BACK

step 14 Back neck facing pattern

BACK NECK FACING CUT 1 SELF 3 CM

HEM STITCH LINE FOR ELASTICATED GATHERING

1C

1 CM

BACK HEM FACING

GL

M

CUT 1 SELF

step 15 Back hem FACING pattern

"

13C

1 CM BACK HEM FACING CUT 1 SELF

GL

GL

8"M 13 ⁄C

BACK HEM FACING

⁄8"

1 3CM

⁄8"M

M 8" 13 ⁄C

CUT 1 SELF

" 13C⁄8M

⁄8M "

13⁄8CM

1 3C

⁄8"M 13 C

• Trace off the back hem facing onto a separate piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides.

1 CM

ANORAK 213


BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

NEW BACK PITCH POINT

UNDET FRON RARM UNDEFRON RARM T SEAM

CENTRE LINE CENTER

LINE BACK LINE

K SEAM RM BAC DERA UNRM ERA UND BACK

Start this development by selecting the basic men’s sleeve sloper, or by drafting the basic sleeve sloper according to the instructions on page 42. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the shirt you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 48. For this design the sloper will be altered to reflect the dropped shoulder and lowered armhole.

UNDERARM SLEEVE POINT CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

LINE UNDERARM BICEPS LEVEL

ELBOW LINE

3 CM

HEMLINE 32 CM SLEEVE HEM

CROWN POINT

4" 23⁄CM

FRONT PITCH POINT

2⁄4"CM

3 2 CM ⁄4"

3

NEW NEW BACKBACK NOTCH PITCH POINT

UNDERARM POINT

32 CM SLEEVE HEM

214 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

1.75 11CM ⁄16"

LINE OLD UNDERARM BICEPS LEVEL UNDERARM LINE NEW BICEPS LEVEL

11 1.75 ⁄16" CM

3 31CM ⁄16"

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

UNDERARM FRONT SEAM

FOREARM LINE

CENTRE LINE

BACK LINE

M

• Open up the master plan along the center line by 3⁄4in and intersecting the biceps level. • From the top of the sleeve cap measure down 3⁄4in, the amount by which you dropped the shoulder on the upper body sloper. • From the center of the biceps level square down 11⁄16in, half ELBOW LINE the amount by which you dropped the armhole. Redraw the new biceps level position, extending it by 13⁄16in each side. • Using the basic sleeve sloper cap shape as a template, redraw the new sleeve cap, indicating the lowered notches. • Extend the sleeve hemline by 13⁄16in to each side and draw in the new underarm seams by connecting the points back up to each end of the new biceps level. • Extend the sleeve hemline by 13⁄16in to each side, recreating the opposite angle to the sleeve pitch, as the hem will be folded up. • When adapting any sleeve, check the amount of ease and adjust if necessary before copying off the final pattern.

3 3 1CM ⁄16"

UNDERARM LINE

33⁄CM 1 16"

step 17 Developing the sleeve master plan

NEW NEWFRONT FRONT PITCH POINT NOTCH

CUFF HEMLINE HEMLINE

⁄4" 2 3CM

33⁄CM 1 16"

BACK PITCH POINT

1.75 CM 3 CM

UNDERARM SLEEVE POINT CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL

FOREARM LINE

step 16 Sleeve master plan

UNDERARM BACK SEA

RARM T

TOP OF CROWN SLEEVE POINTCAP

SLEEVE CUT 1 PR


2 CM

NEW BACK PITCH POINT

step 18 Sleeve pattern 1.75 CM

NEW FRONT PITCH POINT

OLD UNDERARM LINE NEW UNDERARM LINE

1.75 CM

3 CM

GRAIN LINE

CUFF HEMLINE

SLEEVE CUT 1 PR SELF GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

3 CM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the new sleeve pattern. 3 CM

UNDERARM POINT

3 CM

UNDERARM FRONT SEAM

2 CM 2 CM

CUFF FACING GATHERING LINE FOLD

2 CM

ANORAK 215


D

7 12.5 4 ⁄8" CM

C

5" 13 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

INE IN NEL L K PA BAC

13⁄8"CM 25 97⁄8"CM

6.5 CM

HOOD MASTER PLAN

on page 50, trace off the hood side

ECK

7.5 CM

NT

ME AS UR EM E

25 CM

9 CM

HALF N

A

216 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

40 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

• Following the panel pattern.

CENTRE FRONT LINE

PEAK ALIGNMENT NOTCH instructions

1 CM

LI N NEL K PA BAC

E

GRAIN LINE

step 20 Hood side panel pattern

12 C

M

HOOD SIDE PANEL CUT 1 PR SELF

9 1C 3 ⁄2"M

CM 7.5 3"

HALF N EC KM EA SU RE M E

2 CM

PANEL ALIGNMENT NOTCH

CENTRE CENTER FRONT LINE

4123⁄4"C

M

1.5 ⁄16" CM 9

7.53"CM

CENTRE CENTER BACK LINE

C 3 CM

ENTRE ACK LINE

PEAK ALIGNMENT NOTCH

HOOD MASTER PLAN PLAN

B

12.5 CM

3 2 CM ⁄4"

PANEL ALIGNMENT NOTCH

NT

• Starting at the bottom right side of your paper mark point (A); square left 97⁄8in (the length of the combined neck measurement) and mark point (B). • From (A) square up 153⁄4in (half the head circumference) and mark point (C). Complete the rectangular box and mark point (D). • From (B) square up 3in (the neck height) and then square in 3in and label as center back line. • Taking half the front and back neck measurements added together (97⁄8in) use a French curve to draw the neck shape from (A) up to a finishing point on the center back line. • From (A) measure up 31⁄2in and then out 3⁄8in and draw in a curved line. • From (D) square down 5in and then across 9⁄16in and mark; and again from (D) square across 47⁄8in and then down 13⁄16in and mark. • From (C) square down 21⁄2in and then out 3⁄4in and mark. • Use these points to draw in your hood shape (determined by the design, head size, neck opening, and usage). • From the top of the hood opening, measure 43⁄4in down the front opening and draw in the peak alignment notch.

⁄2" 6.521CM

33⁄CM 1 16"

step 19 developing the hood

A

403CM 15 ⁄4"


HEAD HEIGHT CENTER BACK NECK POINT

MEASUREMENT FOR HEAD CIRCUMFERENCE

NECK HEIGHT

CENTER FRONT NECK POINT

CENTER FRONT NECK POINT

SHOULDER TIP

Taking measurements for the hood There are three measurements you need to create the pattern for the hood: 1. The front and back neck measurements, taken from the pattern—here they are 47⁄8in and 47⁄8in. If you are developing a hood with a center back panel remember to deduct the panel width from the final neck measurement as well as from the crown and front opening. 2. The front and back neck height, found by placing the front pattern on top of the back pattern and aligning them at the chest level, then measuring the distance between the front and back neck heights—here it is 3in. 3. The vertical circumference of the head, taken for the hood opening by measuring around the face of the model’s head, starting and finishing at the center front neck point—here it is 311⁄2in.

CB NECK POINT BACK PANEL

FRONT PANEL

NECK HEIGHT

CF NECK POINT

CHEST LEVEL

ANORAK 217


step 21 Developing the center back hood panel

1 718.5 ⁄4"

CM

3

8

1⁄" 3.5 CM

8

3

E

BACK PA BA NELCL K IN PANEL LI E N

Measurements for the hood panel The center hood panel is 31⁄8in wide at the neckline and 23⁄4in wide at the hood opening. To find the length, measure the back panel line on the hood master plan to create the center panel—here it is 201⁄2in. The shape of the panel follows the shape of the head, so it is narrower at the back of the neck, wider at the crown, and then narrower again at the front of the head—following a similar principle to the way the segment of an orange is shaped.

1⁄" 3.5 CM

HOOD FRONT HOOD FRONT

NOTCH NOTCH ⁄" 5.52 CM 8

2 ⁄ "CM 5.5 1

8

LINE LINE CENTER BACK BACK CENTRE GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

1

201⁄2"

5

218 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

8

5

8

BACKBACK PANEL LINE PANEL

HOOD PANEL HOOD

⁄" ⁄" 41 C M 4 1CM NECK EDGE NECK EDGE

LINE

52 CM

PANEL CUT 1 SELF CUT 1 SELF

• Draw a vertical grainline 201⁄2in long. At the top square out 13⁄8in on each side and label the line hood front. At the bottom measure out 15⁄8in on each side and draw a slightly curved line reflecting the shape of the center back neck on the upper body sloper; label as neck edge. • From the center of the hood front square down 71⁄4in and then square out 21⁄8in to each side: this is the widest point. Notch for alignment. • On both sides connect the hood front to the neck edge, passing through the central notch alignment line; this shape will become the final center back hood panel.

NOTCH

NOTCH


step 22 Developing the hood peak pattern • Repeat for the other half of the rectangle. • Draw the peak curve by connecting the left and right 3⁄4in marks with a curved line passing through the halfway point on the lower side of the rectangle.

• Start by drawing a rectangular box 31⁄2in wide by 9in long. Divide in half widthways at 41⁄2in. • From this center point on one side of the rectangle measure out 13⁄8in and mark; on the same side of the rectangle, measure 3⁄4in down along its width and mark. Join these points with a curved line.

PEAK ALIGNMENT NOTCH

PEAK ALIGNMENT NOTCH

PEAK ALIGNMENT NOTCH 31⁄8" 8 CM

PEAK ALIGNMENT NOTCH

133.5 ⁄8" CM

133.5 ⁄8" CM

8 CM31⁄8"

⁄4" 23⁄4"

7 CM

PEAK CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 STIFFING

GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE

7 CM23⁄4"

PEAK CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 STIFFING

3

HOH D OP OODOO PEENNING ING EDGE EDG E

2 CM

3 2 CM ⁄4"

GE G ED E ENIN EDG D OP ING HOO PEN

DO HOO

ANORAK 219


pattern Fitted denim jacket

Start by selecting the basic men’s upper body sloper, or by drafting the basic sloper according to the instructions on page 40. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the jacket you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 48. 220 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

FRONT NOTCH PITCH POINT

WAISTLINE WAIST LINE

HIP HEMLEVEL LINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

CENTRE CENTER FRONT FRONT

BACK MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CHEST LINE LEVEL

SIDE SEAM SEAM

step 1 Developing the master plan

BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

CENTRE CENTER BACK BACK

This pattern includes development of the following features: Creating front and side back panels Creating a sewn-on front placket Reducing the length of the body Creating a front yoke and combined front and back shoulder panel Developing side welted pockets Developing a front breast envelope pocket Developing a shaped convertible collar with hidden stand Creating a waistband with tabs Developing a casual two-piece sleeve with two-piece cuff


step 2 Developing the enlarged neck, reduced body length, front placket, and body panels

BACK MASTER PLAN

3 CM 2 ⁄4"

4 15CM ⁄8"

9 CM 3 ⁄2" 1

YOKE LINE 3 7 2CM ⁄4"

5.5 ⁄8" 21CM

FRONT PANEL LINE

SEAM SIDE SEAM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BACK PANEL LINE

12.5 47⁄8"CM

FRONT PANEL LINE

1 8 3CM ⁄8"

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

CHEST LINE LEVEL 1 CM 19 7 ⁄2"

47 ⁄2" 181CM

WAISTLINE

NEW HEMLINE 12.5 47⁄8"CM

1 8 3CM ⁄8"

1 19 7CM ⁄2"

5 5.5 41CM 21⁄CM 8" ⁄8"

3 72CM ⁄4"

OLD HEMLINE

CENTRE BACK NECK POINT POINT

FRONT SHOULDER SHOULDER TIP POINT

BACK BACK SHOULDER SHOULDER POINT TIP

4" 4.5 13⁄CM

FRONT SHOULDER FRONT HIGH POINT NECK SHOULDER POINT

⁄4"M 723C

2 7 3⁄C 4"M

⁄4" 7 2C3 M

2 3C 7 ⁄4"M

541⁄2"C 1

4"CM 10

M

3 ⁄16" 3 1CM

31CM ⁄16" 3

1451CM ⁄2"

FRONT MASTER MASTER PLAN

YOKE LINE

⁄4" 43CM 12

3 CM 2 ⁄4"

POCKET BAG

1763CM ⁄4"

14 51CM ⁄2"

3 3 1CM ⁄16"

SIDE SEAM SEAM

BACK MASTER PLAN

WELT WELT

GRAIN GRAINLINE LINE

CENTRE BACK CENTER BACK

CHEST LEVEL LINE

NEW HEMLINE HEMLINE

6 23CM ⁄8"

3 ⁄16" 31CM

3 62CM ⁄8"

WAISTLINE WAISTLINE

4 15CM ⁄8"

CENTRE FRONT FRONT CENTER

step 3 Developing the shoulder panel, side welted pocket, and breast envelope pocket • Measure 15⁄8in down the front high point shoulder and make a mark. Measure 23⁄4in down the armhole from the front shoulder tip and square across 4in into the front. Join this line back up to the mark you made on the neckline. • Measure 13⁄4in from the center back neck point along the neckline and make a mark. Measure 23⁄4in down the armhole from the back shoulder tip and square across 51⁄2in into the back. Join this line back up to the mark you made on the neckline. • From the center front measure in 13⁄16in along the yoke line to develop the breast envelope pocket. Continue to measure a further 43⁄4in for the pocket width, and divide it in half. At each end measure down 51⁄2in and join across the bottom to create a rectangle. • The side welted pocket is developed from the side seam into the front body. From the hemline square 13⁄16in up the side seam, then measure up a further 51⁄2in and create the welt shape by drawing a 51⁄2in by 3⁄4in rectangle. Continue to measure up 13⁄16in along the side seam for the height of the pocket bag, and make a mark. To develop the width of the pocket bag measure 47⁄8in along the hemline from the side seam and then square up 63⁄4in. Close the shape by joining this point to the mark on the side seam with an angled line.

CENTER CENTRE FRONT NECK POINT

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

BACK PITCH BACK POINT NOTCH FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

CENTRE BACK CENTER

• From the center front neck point measure down 3⁄4in, and draw in the new neckline using the basic upper body sloper as a template. • From the new center front neck point measure down 181⁄2in, and from this point square across to the center back to reduce the body length. • From the new center front neck point measure back 3⁄4in along the new neckline and mark, and measure out 3⁄4in and mark. Repeat this at the new hemline and connect these points with straight lines to create a rectangle. This is the 15⁄8in-wide placket. • To create the three front panel shapes first create the front yoke. From the front neckline measure 31⁄2in down the side of the placket and from this point square across to the back armhole and make a mark. • From the placket measure 21⁄8in along the yoke line you have just drawn and from this point square down to meet the new hemline. Continue to measure a further 23⁄4in along the yoke line and square down to the hemline again. These are the three front panels. • To create the back panel measure 71⁄2in from the center back along the hemline and mark; repeat at the chest level. Draw a vertical line through these points, at the chest level curving in toward the armhole mark made earlier.

32 CM 4"

12.5 47⁄8CM "

fitted denim jacket 221


step 4 Developing the breast envelope pocket parts

3 31CM ⁄16"

13⁄8CM "

13⁄8CM "

BREAST ENVELOPE ENVELOPE POCKET PLAN POCKET MASTER MASTERPLAN

4" 10 CM 9 CM 1.5 ⁄16"

CM 1.59⁄16 "

YOKE LINE 1 ⁄8" 4 CM 5

3 ⁄8" 81CM

3 CM 2 ⁄4"

CENTRE CENTER FRONT FRONT

3 1 CM ⁄8"

SIDE SEAM SEAM

" 263⁄8CM

2 ⁄8" 6 CM

PANEL LINE

3

PANEL LINE

• All the pocket parts are developed on top of each other and then traced off separately. The envelope breast pocket is stitched behind the front panels along the yoke. • First draw the rectangular opening. From the center of the top line of the pocket measure out 2in on each side. Measure down 9⁄16in at each end and join to create a 4in by 9⁄16in rectangle. • Next draw the pocket flap, which will be stitched into the yoke seam and sit over the welt. From each end of the top pocket line square down 13⁄16in and mark; from the center of the top line square down 15⁄8in and mark. Join the points at the sides to the central mark to create the angled pitch of the flap point. • To shape the angled envelope pocket bag square down 43⁄4in from the center of the top pocket line and from this point square out on each side to meet the side lines of the pocket rectangle. According to the shape desired, on each side draw an angled line up from a point along this line to the top corner. Finish by connecting these points down to the center line.

step 5 Front FOLDED placket pattern

step 6 Developing the final combined shoulder panel

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front placket shape developed in Step 2. Double over the rectangular shape and draw the fold line down the center.

• In this design the shoulder panels are constructed by joining the front and back shoulder panels developed in Step 3. Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front shoulder pattern from the front sloper, then align the front shoulder seam with the back shoulder seam and trace off the back shoulder pattern to create the final shoulder yoke pattern.

CUT 1 PR SELF

SLEEVE LINE

G ED CK K NE BAC

SHOULDER PANEL

SHOULDER YOKE CUT 1 PR SELF

SLEEVE LINE

E

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FOLD

NECK EDGE

NECK EDGE FRONT

GRAINLINE

SLEEVE LINE

NECK ED GE FRONT

GRAIN LINE

222 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

SLEEVE LINE

FRONT FOLDED PLACKETPLACKET CUT 1 PR SELF

SHOULDER LINE

GE ED CK ACK E N B


• Trace off the back body panel onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape. • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the side back body pattern.

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

SIDE BACK BODY CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE

step 7 Back and side BACK body panel patterns

SIDE BACK BODY SELF CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BACK BODY SELF CUT 1 SELF

GRAIN LINE

BACK BODY CUT 1 SELF

step 8 Front yoke BODY panel pattern • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front yoke pattern developed in Step 3, adding alignment notches for the shoulder panel.

NT

O

FR NE NE

LI

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FR

ON TN EC K

NE

LI

CK

FRONT YOKE YOKE BODY BODY PANEL PANEL FRONT CUT 1 1 PR PR SELF SELF CUT

fitted denim jacket 223


SIDE BOTTOM POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

1 CM

14 CM 1 CM

FOLD LINE

1 CM

1 CM

⁄4" 3 ⁄8" 3

2 CM

FOLD LINE

1 CM

1 CM

⁄ ⁄

⁄ 3 ⁄8 "

3 2 CM 4"

3 2 CM 4"

3 1 CM 8"

⁄8" 3

⁄8 " 3

⁄8 " 3

⁄8 " 3

1 CM

14 CM

SIDE BOTTOM POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

⁄8 "

GRAINLINE

63⁄4"

GRAIN LINE

3

17 CM

GRAIN LINE

1 CM

2 CM

⁄8"

13 CM

3 1 CM

⁄8 "

⁄8"

⁄8 "

1 CM

1 CM

3

⁄8"

⁄8"

1 CM 8"

1 CM

1 CM

12.5 CM SIDE TOP POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

1 CM

3

3

1 CM

47⁄8"

3

1 CM

2 CM

3 CM

3 CM 1 8"

3

3 CM

13⁄16"

1 CM

GRAINLINE

14 CM

1 CM

3 CM 1 8"

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 3CM 8"

SIDE BOTTOM POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

1 CM

SIDE TOP POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

1 CM1 CM

⁄8 "

1 CM

2 CM

13CM 8"

SIDE TOP POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

3

1 CM

FOLD LINE

51⁄2"

1 CM

3 CM

GRAIN LINE

2 CM

1 CM

1 CM

3 CM

GRAIN LINE

13 CM 8"

1 CM

1 CM

31 CM 8"

2 CM

2 CM

2 CM

14 CM 1 CM 3 CM

1 CM

1 CM

13⁄16"

12.5 CM

2 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM 2 3CM 8" SIDE WELT POCKET CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE

1 CM

14 CM

1 CM

1 CM

⁄8 "

3

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

GRAINLINE

SIDE TOP POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

GRAIN LINE

5 ⁄2"

SIDE WELT POCKET CUT 1 PR SELF

⁄8"

3

17 CM

1 CM

1

14 CM

1 CM

⁄8" ⁄4" 3

3

1 CM

14 CM

1 CM

14 CM

1 CM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off all the side welted pocket parts developed in Step 3. • Start with the welt shape, doubling the width to create a 51⁄2in by 11⁄2in rectangle. Mark the center fold line lengthways and add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides to create the final pattern. • The top pocket bag has the welt rectangle removed and the bottom pocket bag is a full shape. Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides to create the final patterns.

5 ⁄2" 1

2 CM

1 CM

SIDE BOTTOM POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

1 CM

1 CM

2 CM

1 CM

GRAIN LINE

⁄8 "

3

1 CM

1 CM

FOLD LINE

SIDE WELT SHAPE CUT 1 PR SELF

2 CM

2 CM

⁄8"

3

SIDE WELT POCKET CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM

2 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

step 9 Side welted pocket comPONENT PATTERNS

GRAIN LINE

14 CM 17 CM

step 10 Front body panel patterns GRAIN LINE

1 CM 1 CM 2 CM

3 CM

1 CM

1 CM

224 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

POCKET STITCH LINES

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

STITC ST ITCHHLIN ESES LIN

PO C

KET STICH

MIDDLE FRONT PANEL CUT 1 PR SELF

CENTRE FRONT PANEL

S

LINE

FRONT ATTACH TOTO PLACKET FRONT ATTACH PLACKET GRAIN LINE

CH

STIT

KET STICH

CENTER PANEL CENTREFRONT FRONT PANEL

PO C

CUT CUT11PR PRSELF SELF

CUT11PR PRSELF SELF CUT

MIDDLE FRONT PANEL CUT 1 PR SELF

SIDE PANEL SIDEFRONT FRONT PANEL

WELT WELTOPENING OPENING

SIDE FRONT PANEL CUT 1 PR SELF

WELT OPENING

SIDE FRONT PANEL CUT 1 PR SELF

WELT OPENING

GRAIN LINE

KET STICH

PO POCK CKET ET

KET

PO C

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE

POCKET STITCH LINES

POCKET STITCH LINES

ET CKET PO POCK ESES LIN TCHHLIN STI STITC

1 CM

12.5 CM

1 CM

POC

MIDDLE FRONT MIDDLE FRONTPANEL PANEL CUT PR SELF SELF CUT 1 PR

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off all the front body panel patterns developed in Step 3: the center front panel, the middle front panel, and the side front panel.


13CM 8"

13CM 8"

step 11 Front breast envelope pocket COMPONENT PATTERNS

3

1 CM 8"

⁄8 "

13CM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the final envelope pocket parts developed in Step 4. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides to create the final envelope pocket and flap patterns. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to the top and sides to create the final envelope pocket facing pattern.

BREAST ENVELOPE

BREAST ENVELOPE POCKET POCKET CUT 1 PR SELF

13CM 8"

13CM 8" M

3

1 CM

1C

⁄8"

3 8"

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM

GRAIN LINE

BREAST ENVELOPE POCKET FLAP CUT 2 PR SELF

1 CM

1 CM

BREAST ENVELOPE POCKE CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

3

3

1 CM

1 CM

⁄8 "

⁄8"

1 CM

1 CM

⁄8 "

⁄8 "

3

1 CM

1 CM

BREAST ENVELOPE POCKET CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE

BREAST ENVELOPE BREAST ENVELOPE POCKET FLAP CUT 2 PR SELF POCKET FLAP

1 CM

CUT 2 PR SELF

1 CM

1 CM GRAIN LINE

3

1 CM

⁄8"

3

3 1 CM 8" 1 CM

3 8"

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

GRAIN LINE

BREAST ENVELOPE POCKET FLAP CUT 2 PR SELF

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

BREAST ENVELOPE POCKET FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM

GRAIN LINE

1 CM

1 CM

⁄8"

3

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

3

3

⁄8"

⁄8"

BREAST ENVELOPE POCKET FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM

1 CM

⁄8 "

⁄8"

3

1 CM

1 CM

GRAIN LINE

BREAST ENVELOPE BREAST ENVELOPE POCKET FACING CUT 1 PR SELF POCKET FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE

3

fitted denim jacket 225

GRAIN LINE

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM


1 CM

SIDE SEAM

The waistband and tab Take the measurements of the hemline for the front and back body panels from the master plan in Step 2, including the placket width. The denim jacket in this design has a split waistband 15⁄8in in width, with a tab inserted at the side back panel seam. The tab is developed on top of the front waistband for proportion and then removed for the final pattern.

1 CM

1 CM

GRAIN LINE

4 CM 1 CM

3 CM 1 ⁄8 "

6 CM 23⁄8"

1 CM 1 CM

FRONT WAISTBAND FRONT WAISTBAND

FOLD FOLD

1 PRSELF SELF CUT CUT 1 PR

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

145⁄8CM "

145⁄8CM " " 13⁄8CM

3 1 CM ⁄8"

1 CM

BACK WAISTBAND CUT 1 SELF

1 CM

6 CM

CB

TAB PLACEMENT

1 CM

3 1 CM ⁄8"

1 CM

3

⁄8 "

8" 13⁄CM

3 1 CM ⁄8"

3 1

37 CM

⁄8" WAISTBAND TAB CUT 2 PR SELF

⁄8"

3

⁄8"

⁄8 "

1 CM

13⁄CM 8"

3

FOLD

CUT 1 PR SELF

3

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

3

1 CM

1

3 CM 8"

4 5CM 1 ⁄8 " FRONT WAISTBAND

3 1 CM ⁄8"

1 CM

3815" CM

13⁄8CM "

4 5CM 1 ⁄8 "

FOLD

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE

⁄8CM "

3 1 CM ⁄8"

CB

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

3 1 CM ⁄8"

SIDE SEAM

3815" CM

3 CM

3 1 CM ⁄8" 3 CM 1 ⁄8"

CM BACK PANEL LINE

1437 ⁄8" 5

3 1 CM ⁄8 "

38 CM

CB

1 CM

BACK WAISTBAND CUT 1 SELF

GRAIN LINE

1 CM

CB

226 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

WAISTBAND TAB

TAB PLACEMENT TAB PLACEMENT CUT 2 PR SELF

CENTRE FRONT CENTER FRONT

GRAIN LINE

13⁄8CM "

3 1 CM ⁄8 "

1 CM

133⁄16CM "

1 CM

3 1 CM ⁄8 "

1 CM

1 CM

13⁄8CM "

1 CM

37 CM

4 CM

1 CM

1 CM

FOLD

CENTRE FRONT

CUT 1 PR SELF

SIDE SEAM SIDE SEAM

FRONT WAISTBAND

LINE

6 CM

1 CM

CEMENT

BACK PANEL BACK PANEL LINE

3 CM

1 CM

• For the front waistband draw a rectangle 145⁄8in long by 31⁄4in wide (15⁄8in doubled for the folded band). Indicate the panel lines with notches for alignment. Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides to create the final pattern. • For the back waistband draw a rectangle 15in long by 31⁄4in wide (15⁄8in doubled for the folded band). Indicate the center back with an alignment notch at 71⁄2in (half the waistband length). Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides to create the final pattern. • For the waistband tab construct a rectangle 23⁄8in long by 13⁄16in wide. At one end measure back 3⁄8in at the sides and join these points to a center point to create an angled point. Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides to create the final pattern.

GRAIN LINE

CENTRE FRONT

BACK PANEL LINE

step 12 Developing the final waistband parts and tab


• Starting in the center of the piece of paper make a mark to indicate the bottom of the center back and label it (A). From (A) draw a 10in horizontal line and mark (B) at the end. • From (A) measure out 33⁄8in (the width of the half back neck) along the line and place a notch. Name it the shoulder notch. • From (A) square up 13⁄16in and mark (G); continue up 2in and mark (D). • From (D) square out 10in and mark (E) at the end. • To give the collar shape, measure up 3⁄8in from (B) and mark (F). Join this point back with a slightly curved line measuring 33⁄8in to (C). • From (E) square up 3⁄8in and out 3⁄8in and from these points run a straight line back down to (F) and back along to blend in with the top line toward (D). Then continue each of these lines up from the 3⁄8in mark until they intersect. This is the collar point. • Develop the hidden stand shape by drawing a curved line out from (G) down to meet (C). • Trace the master plan onto a separate piece of paper and cut out the stand. Divide the stand length into four equal parts C and draw vertical cut lines. • Remove the top collar shape from the development by tracing onto a separate piece of paper. Trace the cut lines across from the stand.

TOP COLLAR MASTER PLAN

Measuring half the neck from the master plan We will develop half the collar and stand before creating the full collar and stand. By taking measurements from the master plan, which is drawn in half, you will be measuring half of the neck measurement. • On the master plan in Step 2 measure the length of the back neck, in this case 33⁄8in, and the front neck from the shoulder tip down past the center front line to the point at which the placket finishes, in this case 63⁄4in. • Add these two measurements together to give half the neck measurement, in this case 10in.

NECK EDGE

⁄8" 1 CM

COLLAR POINT

E E

5 CM 2"

3 1 CM ⁄8"

3

D

TOP COLLAR COLLAR TOP MASTER PLAN PLAN MASTER

G STAND MASTER PLAN

3 31CM ⁄16"

F 13⁄8CM "

C A

CENTRE BACK NECK

25.5 10" CM TOP COLLAR MASTER PLAN

TOP COLLAR MASTER PLAN PLAN

STAND MASTER STAND MASTER PLAN PLAN

C

NECK EDGE NECK EDGE

fitted denim jacket 227

D

CM

A A

B

17 63⁄4CM "

8.5 33⁄8"CM

CENTRE CENTER BACK NECK NECK

CENTER BACK CENTRE NECK BACK NECK

CENTRE BACK NECK STAND MASTER PLAN

step 13 Developing the shaped convertible collar with hidden stand


REMOVE

NEW CENTRE BACK

CENTRE BACK NECK

0.9 CM 0.4 CM step 14 0.4 CM 0.4 C Adding shaping to the convertible collar and stand M

• Cut down the vertical lines on the top collar shape, leaving them attached at the bottom by a fraction of an inch. Starting from the center back open out each line by 3⁄16in, curving down the top collar. From the center back neck remove 3⁄8in, the width lost when closing up the stand.

REMOVE

3 ⁄16CM " 0.4

0.43⁄16 CM "

0.43⁄16C"M

CENTRE BACK NEW CENTER

CENTRE BACK NECK CENTER

3 0.9 ⁄8"CM

• Cut down the vertical lines on the stand shape, leaving them attached at the bottom by a fraction of an inch. Overlap the sectionsTOP along the top edge moving them by 1⁄8in toward the COLLAR MASTER PLAN center back; this will bring up the neckline.

TOP COLLAR MASTER MASTER PLAN

TRE BACK NECK CENTER CEN

" 0.31⁄8CM

0.31⁄CM 8"

0.31⁄8CM "

STAND MASTER PLAN

NECK EDGE

step 15 Collar stand pattern

0.3 CM

0.3 CM

CENTRE BACK NEC

K

0.3 CM

• Trace off the collar stand onto a new STANDpiece MASTER of paper and, PLAN following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides.

⁄8"

⁄8"

TOP COLLAR ALIGNMENT ALIGNMENT

ALIGNMENT

TOP COLLAR

TOP COLLAR TOP COLLAR ALIGNMENT

NECK EDGE

1 CM

GL

GL

M

1C

228 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

TOP COLLAR CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM

GRAIN LINE

1 CM

FRONT YOKE FRONT YOKE NOTCH NECK NECK NOTCH

FRONT YOKE

FRONT YOKE NOTCH NECK NECK NOTCH

13C

STAND CUT 1 PR SELF

COLLAR COLLAR STAND CUT 1 PR SELF

M" 13 C8

⁄8"M

3

3

1 CM

1 CM


TOP COLLAR ALIGNMENT

TOP COLLAR ALIGNMENT

1 CM

1 CM

⁄8CM " 31

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

"

13⁄8CM

"

1 3CM ⁄8"

M 1 3C⁄8"

3 1 ⁄8CM

3 1 CM ⁄8"

TOP COLLAR TOP COLLAR CUT 11PR CUT PRSELF SELF

FRONT YOKE NECK NOTCH

GL

FRONT YOKE NECK NOTCH

31

" ⁄8CM

• Trace off the top collar onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides.

M 1 3C⁄8"

M

1C

1C

M

step 16 COLLAR STAND CUT 1 PR SELF TOP Collar pattern

step 17 Developing the sleeve master plan to the yoke line and on the back master plan from the back shoulder tip to the back panel line. In this case the combined yoke measurement from the front yoke line to the back panel line is 105⁄8in and the remainder of the armhole measures 91⁄2in. Transfer these measurements to the sleeve by measuring down the front and back armhole of the sleeve from the shoulder tip and marking the seam panel alignment notches.

Casual two-piece sleeve The two-piece sleeve shown here is for a casual jacket that retains the sleeve cap shape of the basic sleeve sloper, unlike the tailored two-piece sleeve that has a padded sleeve cap. The starting point is the basic sleeve sloper from which two panels—the top sleeve and undersleeve—are created.

UNDERARM SLEEVE POINT CORNER

UNDERARM FRONT UNDER FRONT ARM SEAM SEAM

LINE FRONT LINE

CENTER CENTRE LINE ELBOW LINE LEVEL

AT BICEPS LEVEL

NEW HEMLINE 1 93CM ⁄2"

61 CM 24"

LINE BACK LINE

AT BICEPS LEVEL

UNDERARM SLEEVE POINT CORNER

LINE UNDERARM BICEPS LEVEL

1 ⁄2" 93CM

• Shorten the sleeve to allow for the addition of the cuff. From the sleeve hemline measure up 31⁄2in on each side and square across to create the new hemline. • To find the position at which to separate the top sleeve and undersleeve panels, measure the armhole on the front master plan created in Step 2 from the front shoulder tip

SEAM PANEL ALIGNMENT

SEAM PANEL ALIGNMENT

1 ⁄2" 93CM

For this two-piece sleeve we are going to separate the under- and top sleeve panels so that the seams align with the points at which the side back and front yoke seams meet the armhole.

5 8" 2710C⁄M

K SEAM RM BAC ERA RM UND ERA UNDK BAC

Start this development by selecting the basic men’s sleeve sloper, or by drafting the basic sleeve sloper according to the instructions on page 42. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the sleeve you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 48. The design illustrated has a two-piece sleeve.

OLD HEMLINE 325CM 12 ⁄8"

fitted denim jacket 229


27 CM SEAM

SLEEVE SLEEVE MASTER MASTER PLAN

SEAM PANEL

SEAM PANEL ALIGNMENT ALIGNMENT BODY ON ON BODY

PLAN

3 ⁄8" 1 CM

FRONT SEAM

FRONT UNDEUNDER RARMARM SEAM

LINE FRONT FRONT LINE

WVELLINE OLE LBLOBW

EW WEE NE N

1 1

A A

LINE

LINE CENTRE CENTER LINE

BICEPS LEVEL UNDERARM

BACK LINE BACKLINE

OLD ELBOW LEVEL LINE D ELBOW OLD D

133 ⁄16 C" M

UNDERARM FRONT SEAM

SEAM PANEL SEAM PANEL ALIGNMENT ALIGNMENT ONONBODY BODY

B B

NEW HEMLINE NEWHEMLINE

C C

9 CM

9 CM

9 CM

FRONT LINE

CENTRE LINE

• Divide the width of the new biceps level into four and mark. From these points square up to the same level as the shoulder tip and down to the sleeve hemline to divide the UNDERARM LINEwidthways. Label UNDERARM sleeve into four sections the new lines back POINT line, center line, and front line to recreate the frame of the original sleeve sloper. • On the back underarm seam, mark (A) where it intersects the elbow level and (B) where it intersects the new hemline. • On the front line, mark (C) where it intersects the new hemline and (D) where it intersects the elbow level. Mark (1) where the elbow level intersects the back line. The • ELBOW LINE square created by points (A), (B), (C), and (D) will now be pivoted counterclockwise from (1) on the elbow level by 13⁄16in, measured from the center line at the hem. Do this by copying the square onto a separate piece of paper to pivot and draw in the new position. • Square down from the back seam panel alignment notch. Trace off the triangular shape between the sleeve cap and the biceps level. Flip this shape over and position it so that theNEW back corner of the sleeve at biceps level aligns at the HEMLINE center line along the biceps level. Copy the shape over. Repeat from the front seam panel alignment notch.

BACK LINE

MENT

SEAM SEAM BACK ARM UNDER RARM BACK UNDE

step 18 PANEL ALIGNMENT Starting to develop the two-piece sleeve

OLD HEMLINE OLDHEMLINE

OLD HEMLINE 32 CM

step 19 Developing the top and undersleeve shapes SLEEVE

SEAM PANEL

C

NEW HEMLINE

13 CM

230 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

CM

31⁄2CM " 9

FRONT SEAM

FRONT UNDER UNDERA RMARM SEAM

E FOREARM SEAM SEAM 1.5 9CM ⁄16" 3 2 CM ⁄4"

CENTER LINE LINE CENTRE

5"

3 17 ⁄4" 32.4

OLD HEMLINE

UNDE UNDER SLEEV R SLE E FRONT EV SEAM

TOPSLEE TOP SLE EVE VE FRONT FOR SEA EAR M M

SEAM BACK VE SEAM BACKUNDERSLEE UNDER SLEEVE

TOP SLEEVE SLEEVE TOP SEAM BACK BACK

ELE LVIN LE

2 C⁄M

W OW BO EELLB

3 4"

SEAM

24 9 1⁄CM 2"

SEAM

UNDERARM FRONT SEAM

5 41CM ⁄8 "

3 CM

FRONT LINE

CENTRE LINE

BACK LINE

UNDERARM BACK SEAM

develop the top sleeve square in 31⁄2in from MASTERfront seamALIGNMENT ON BODY the new angled the front underarm PLAN seam until you intersect hemline and from this point draw a line up to connect with the front seam panel alignment notch. • To create the top sleeve back seam continue to measure UNDERARM LINE 5in along the angled hemline, which gives the hem facing. Using a curved line connect this point to the back seam panel alignment notch, passing through the elbow level. • To develop the undersleeve shape square in 15⁄8in from the back seam panel alignment notch and from this point draw down a curved line passing through the elbow level 3⁄4in in from the top sleeve back seam (measured along the elbow LINE hemline. level) connecting W the LBOto 1 A NEW E • From the front seam panel alignment notch measure in 1 CM OLD ELBOW LINE D 9 ⁄16in to ensure that the front and back underarm seams are aligned on the center line. (This method may differ depending on changes made to the basic sleeve sloper following any lowering of the armhole.) Using a curved line connect this point with the hemline, passing through the elbow level 3⁄4in in from the top sleeve front seam (measured B along the elbow level).

BACK ARM SEAM RARM UNDER UNDE BACK

SEAM PANEL ALIGNMENT • To ON BODY

" 2710C5⁄8M


step 21 Top sleeve pattern

step 22 Two-piece sleeve cuff PATTERN

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the final undersleeve pattern, adding in alignment notches.

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the final top sleeve pattern, adding in alignment notches.

• Construct a rectangle 101⁄4in long by 31⁄4in (19⁄16in doubled in width for a folded cuff). Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides to create the final pattern.

⁄8 " 13 CM

⁄8"

10261⁄CM 4"

13CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

⁄8 "

13CM

31 CM 8"

154⁄CM 8"

TWO-PIECE SLEEVE CUFF CUFF CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 PR SELF

154⁄CM 8" ⁄8"

1 ⁄8"

5 4 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE

GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE LINE GRAIN

step 20 Undersleeve pattern

FOLD FOLD

1 ⁄8"

5 4 CM

⁄8 "

31 CM

⁄8"

26 CM

101⁄4"

13 CM

13CM 8

TOP SLEEVE TOP SLEEVE CUT 1 PRSELF SELF CUT 1 PR

CUT 1 PR SELF

UNDERSLEEVE

UNDER SLEEVE CUT 1 PR SELF

UNDER SLEEVE CUT 1 PR SELF

⁄"

13CM

fitted denim jacket 231


pattern Trench Coat

This pattern includes development of the following features: Shaping the body panels, moving the side seam to the back Creating a double-breasted extension Extending the hemline Lowering the armhole Creating a center back vent Developing a storm flap and epaulet Developing front welted pockets Developing a shaped convertible collar with hidden stand and lapel Developing a tailored two-piece sleeve with cuff vent Developing a full body lining

232 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

Fitting the trench coat Traditionally, trench coats were produced as an outer garment to be worn over suit jackets or dress coats. Chest circumferences, neck openings, armholes, sleeve caps, and sleeve lengths were all made larger to accommodate the garment underneath. Modern interpretations combined with a more casual approach to dress no longer dictate that trench coats should be oversized. When developing this style, take into account the formality or informality of the garment you are designing, together with how it may be worn.


BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT FRONT

FRONT MASTER FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

CENTER CENTREFRONT FRONT

BACK MASTER BACK MASTER PLAN PLAN

SIDE SEAM SIDE SEAM

CENTRE BACK CENTER BACK

Start by selecting the basic men’s upper body sloper, or by drafting the basic sloper according to the instructions on page 40. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the coat you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions following the directions on page 48.

CHEST LEVEL CHEST LINE

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

step 1 Developing the master plan

FRONT NOTCH PITCH POINT

WAISTLINE WAISTLINE

HIP LEVEL HEMLINE

3" 7.5 CM NEW NEW BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT NEW NEW FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

CHEST LEVEL CHEST LINE

WAISTLINE WAISTLINE

CENTRE FRONT CENTER FRONT

FRONT MASTER FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BACK MASTER BACK MASTER PLAN PLAN

2.5 CM 1"

SIDE SEAM SIDE SEAM

• From the chest level square down 1in on each side and starting from the new underarm / side seam corner redraw the new armhole shape using the basic upper body slopers as a template. Transfer the back and front notches to their new positions on the lowered armhole. • Extend the side seam, center front, and center back lines down vertically from the existing hemline to the required length of the coat. • Square across from the center front to the center back at the new hemline. • To develop the double-breasted extension, square out 3in from the center front at the neckline. • Repeat at the hemline. • Connect the two points with a vertical line to create the double-breasted extension.

2.5 1" CM

CENTER BACK CENTRE BACK

step 2 Lowering the armhole, extending the hemline, and developing the double-breasted extension

OLDHEMLINE HEMLINE OLD

HEMLINE HEMLINE 7.5 3"CM

Trench Coat 233


step 3 Developing the hemline facing, back vent, and front welted pocket position

Developing the hemline facing, back vent, and front welted pocket position Most trench coat styles have a back vent incorporated into the design. The job of this vent is to allow freedom of movement around the leg and seat area. Sitting down in a closed garment will restrict body movement and feel uncomfortable. The length of your design will generally determine the length of the vent needed; the longer the coat or jacket, the longer the vent. The vent extension has a diagonal line at the top so that the seams, when pressed, are not as bulky as they would be if the vent was square. A diagonal seam with less bulk creates an optical illusion, drawing your eye away from this detail. Take time to look at other examples of vents as you do your research. You will find that some are topstitched along this diagonal seam and others are sewn internally.

• Add the hem allowance to the bottom of the pattern as a horizontal rectangle measuring 15⁄8in in width. • To develop the vent measure 2in up the center back from the old hemline, and from this point square out 23⁄8in. • From the bottom of the hemline allowance, square out 23⁄8in. Join the two points with a vertical line. • Now measure an additional 9⁄16in up the center back line and mark. • Draw a line from this point down to the top of the vent extension at its outside edge, creating a diagonal line at the top of the vent. • To develop the rectangular pocket opening, measure in 9in along the old hemline from the center front and then square up 13⁄16in and mark; this will be the bottom right-hand corner of the pocket opening. Create a rectangle 71⁄8in long by 3⁄4in wide at an angle of your choice. • Mark each corner of the pocket opening with a drill hole.

NEW NEW BACK BACK PITCH POINT NEW NOTCH NEW FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

3C 2 4"M

FRONT MASTER PLAN

⁄ "

9 1.5CM 16

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

POPC OK CK EETT

17 8 1C⁄8M "

OPPEEN NININ GG

WAISTLINE WAISTLINE

5CM 2"

CENTRE FRONT CENTER FRONT

FRONT MASTER PLAN

SIDE SEAM

CENTRE BACK CENTER BACK

BACK MASTER

PLAN BACK MASTER PLAN

SIDE SEAM

CHEST CHEST LEVELLINE

3CM 3

1 ⁄16"

OLD HEMLINE HEMLINE

234 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

4CM

6CM

15⁄8"

NEW NEWHEMLINE HEMLINE

FACING FACING

15⁄8"

4CM

23⁄8"

23CM 9"


step 4 Developing the shaping lines

Shaping the coat To create a fitted coat you can introduce shaping into the sloper by moving the side seam into the back panel. Once you have extended the front panel you can create two new style lines. Shaping is created by removing the internal volume between these lines. At the hemline you can add a little flare to the design by crossing the lines over, thus adding volume by extending the circumference of the hem.

NEW NEW BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

• From the side seam, measure 41⁄8in along the back armhole toward the back notch, and draw a vertical line down from this point to the hemline. • From the intersection of this line with the waistline, measure 13⁄8in toward the center back and 9⁄16in toward the side seam and mark both points. • Join these new points back up to the armhole with slightly curved lines. • Label the line that defines the new back panel shape back panel style line. • Label the line that defines the new front panel shape front panel style line. • Continue the back panel style line down in a graduated curve until it meets the vertical line you first drew. • At the hemline, measure out 23⁄4in from the vertical line you first drew toward the center back and mark. • Continue the front panel style line down in a graduated curve until it meets this new point.

NEW

NEW FRONT FRONT NOTCH PITCH POINT

CHEST LEVEL CHEST LINE

POPC OK CK EETT O OP PEENN ININ GG

CENTRE FRONT CENTER FRONT

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

SIDE SIDESEAM SEAM

41⁄8"

3 3.5CM 1 ⁄8"

9 1.5CM 16"

EXTENSION BACK BACK VENTVENT EXTENSION

OLD HEMLINE OLD HEMLINE

FRONT MASTER FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

FRONT PANEL STYLE LINE

WAISTLINE WAISTLINE

LINE BACK PANEL STYLE

CENTRE BACK CENTER BACK

1

0. 5C M

BACK MASTER BACK MASTER PLAN PLAN

HEMLINE HEMLINE

FOLD FOLD

FACING FACING

273⁄4CM "

Trench Coat 235


step 5 Developing the shaped convertible collar with hidden stand and lapel and positioning the front dart line

CM

E B

393.5⁄4C"

2.5

D

C

C 2.5 1

"M

HIGH POINT SHOULDER SHOULDER NECK POINT

C1M "

M

A

EE ININ KKLL

⁄8 "

13 CM

C C NNEE

Collar measurements and lapel shape To draft the lapel and shaped convertible collar with hidden stand for a pattern with a front neck measurement of 53⁄4in, excluding the double breast extension, and a back neck measurement of 33⁄4in, first locate the position on the pattern where you want your collar to break on the new front edge line of the body section. To work out the shape and size of the lapel and collar, consider the proportion of your design and the length of the silhouette. It is always a good idea to assess the shape of the lapel by folding the paper back on the roll line. Redraw and develop the shape until you are satisfied.

5 21. "

Break point and roll line The point at which the front will turn over to create a lapel is called the break point (BP) and the line that it turns on is the roll line. The lower down the front your BP is, the wider an opening you will have around the neck silhouette.

• Square left 1in and mark point (B). • Join points (B) and (C) with a dotted line. • From (B) square out 1in back toward the shoulder and mark point (D). • From (D) square back into the shoulder, curving the line slightly back toward the neckline and cutting off the high point shoulder. • Continue the straight line from (D) through (B), extending it to the width you would like to make the collar, and mark point (E). • At a right angle from (E) draw out the collar shape you require. • Mark a notch at the point where the top collar joins the neckline and at the point where it meets the shoulder line. • To position the line of the front dart, measure 13⁄4in from the original side seam along the front armhole toward the front notch. From here draw a straight line in toward the pocket, finishing one-quarter of the way up from the bottom of the pocket opening. This is the line of the dart.

NEW NEW BACK BACK PITCH NEW NOTCH POINT FRONT

3 CM 1 ⁄8 "

PITCH NEW POINT FRONT NOTCH

CHEST LEVEL LINE CHEST

13 ⁄4"

PLAN

FOLD FOLD FACING FACING

CENTRE FRONT CENTER FRONT

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

POPCO K CK EETTO O

P PEEN

NININ GG

SEAM ORIGINAL SIDE SEAM ORIGINAL SIDE

LINE FRONT PANEL STYLE LINE FRONT PANEL STYLE

LINE

OLD HEMLINE OLD HEMLINE

LINE L STYLE PANELE BACK EL STY BACK PAN

CENTRE BACK CENTER BACK

WAISTLINE WAISTLINE

HEMLINE HEMLINE

236 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

ROLL ROLLPOINT POINT

FRONT MASTER FRONT MASTER PLAN

BREAK POINT BREAK POINT

BACK VENT EXTENTION BACK VENT EXTENTION

• To give the front of your lapel some shape, from the neckline square out 3⁄8in and square up 3⁄8in. Find the new front neck point and join this point back to the neckline and down to the break point with slight curves to give the shaping for the lapel. • From the high point shoulder continue the shoulder seam out 1in and mark point (C). • From the break point on the front line draw a straight dotted line to (C). • Continue this line beyond (C) for 33⁄4in (the length of the back neck measurement) and mark point (A).

M 4.5 C

BACK MASTER BACK MASTER PLAN PLAN


step 6 Development of the front dart shaping

Rotating the pattern Creating and opening a dart on the front panel will allow you to introduce shaping that runs from under the arm toward the front pocket, giving the trench coat a closer fitted silhouette. This dart is achieved by opening and rotating, or pivoting, the pattern.

• Trace off the shape of the front panel from the master plan onto a separate piece of paper. • To open the dart line at the armhole, on another piece of paper trace around the front panel starting from the end of the dart line at the pocket opening, up to the top of the dart line at the armhole and then continuing in a clockwise direction until the point directly under the end of the dart on the hemline. • Make sure the two pieces of paper are aligned exactly, and at the pocket end of the dart line place a drill hole through both pieces of paper.

• With an awl holding the pieces of paper down at the same point, pivot the new pattern clockwise so that the top of the dart line moves a distance of 13⁄16in to the left. • Trace along the dart line again, creating the second side of the dart, and continue to trace the rest of the panel shape. • After pivoting, the hemline will be pitched lower toward the center back line. Blend the two lines together with a shallow curve. Once the dart is closed this will bring the hemline back up into a straight line.

step 7 Front PANEL pattern • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front panel pattern.

FRONT PANEL CUT 1 PR SELF

FRONT PANEL CUT 1 PR SELF

1 ⁄16" 3CM 3

LEVEL

FRONT PANEL CUT 1 PR SELF

3CM

K

DRILLHOLE

GRAINLINE

POC PO KCEKTET OOPPEE NIN N INGG

INE LINE HEML HEM OLD OLD

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE

OPE NING KET

DRILLHOLE DRILL HOLE

CENTRE BAC

TRE BACK

CECEN NTER BACK

WAISTLINE

POC

DAR

T LIN

E/ PO

LINE IST WAWA ISTLINE

CENTRE FRONT

T CKE

CHEST LINE CENTRE FRONT CENTER FRONT

CK KET PO/ CPO LIN LEIN/ E TT D DAARR

ET

CHEST CHEST LINE

OLD HEMLINE

FOLD FACING

OLD HEMLINE

OLD HEMLINE

FOLD FOLD FACING FACING

OLD HEMLINE

Trench Coat 237


step 8 Developing the shaped convertible collar with hidden stand

2.5 1" CM

CENTER BACK CENTRE BACK

The shaped convertible collar with hidden stand In this design the trench coat collar has a separate stand incorporated which allows the collar to turn over and sit flat around the back of the neck.

• Fold a piece of paper in half and, laying the fold on the center back of the collar on the master plan, trace off the shape of the collar (including the notches). Label the center back. This is the collar master plan and you will be developing this in half. • The next step is to create the stand shape. Measure 1in up the center back (the width of the collar stand). From this point draw a curved line that ends where the roll line intersects the neckline on the master plan. This ensures that the stand will not be seen when the collar is turned down. • Place a double notch along this new line.

COLLAR MASTER PLAN COLLAR DEVELOPMENT

STAND DEVELOPMENT

STAND MASTER PLAN

NECK NEEDCG KE EDL GIE NLEIN

SHOULDER SHOULDER NOTCH NOTCH

E

step 9 Collar stand pattern

COLLAR COLLAR ALIGNMENT ALIGNMENT NOTCH NOTCH

COLLAR STAND CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 FUSE

CENTRE BACK NECK

COLLAR STAND CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 FUSE

CENTER BACK NECK

COLLAR COLLAR ALIGNMENT ALIGNMENT NOTCH NOTCH

• Trace off the collar stand pattern onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape.

GRAIN LINE

GRAINLINE

NECK EDGE LINE

238 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

SHOULDER SHOULDER NOTCH NOTCH

SHOULDER SHOULDER NOTCH NOTCH

NECK EDGE LINE


step 10 Developing the collar using slash and spread

Slash and spread In order to sit flat across the shoulders, the outer edge of the collar needs to be wider than the inside edge. You can use the slash and spread method to increase the length of the outer edge of the collar.

COLLAR DEVELOPMENT

COLLAR COLLAR ALIGNMENT ALIGNMENT NOTCH NOTCH

COLLAR MASTER PLAN

OPEN

CENTER BACK

CENTRE BACK

OPEN

OUTE O R CENTRE BACK

UTEE RD GGEE O ED F OF

CENTER BACK

CENTER BACK CENTRE BACK

Slash and spread is a technique that allows you to introduce fullness or volume to an area of a pattern by cutting a line in the pattern and opening the two sides out at one end of the line only. Once you have introduced the volume, you can then trace off the new shape.

• Trace off the half collar shape without the stand from the collar development. • Measure across the length of the half collar and draw lines to divide it into five equal sections. • Cut down each line toward the stand, but do not cut right through to the edge. • Transfer the measurements obtained from your muslin to your paper pattern, and open out the lines on the pattern to the same distances as on the muslin. • Redraw the collar, creating a smooth curve at the outer edge. • You may find that the collar point is too square and you need to add some shaping according to the style of the design. Continuing the curve, measure out 3⁄4in from the edge of the collar and draw a line back to the center front neck point.

COLLAR POINT DEVELOPMENT

COLLAR POINT MASTER PLAN

O

E OPP EN N

COLLAR DEVELOPMENT

OPE OPE

COLLAR MASTER PLAN

N

N

OP

OP

EN

EN

CCOO LLLALRA R

COLLAR COLLAR POINT POINT

3 2C 4M"

SHAPING SHAPING

CENTER FRONT CENTRE FRONT NECKNECK POINT

POINT

Trench Coat 239


GRAIN LINE TOP COLLAR

TOP COLLAR CUT 1 PR SELF FUSE CUT PR1 SELF CUT 1 CUT 1 FUSE

• Trace off the half collar pattern and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape.

GRAINLINE

step 11 TOP Collar pattern

step 12 Developing the front facing shape

FRONT SHOULDER FRONT NECK POINTHIGH POINT

SHOULDER

M 13 C 8"

13C8M"

13CM 8"

COLLAR NOTCH COLLAR NOTCH

13 CM 8"

• Develop the front facing on the front panel pattern. • From the new front line measure in 33⁄4in along the chest level, and measure in 33⁄8in along the waistline, the old hemline, and the new hemline.

13 CM 8"

Front facing In this design make the front facing wider than the double-breasted extension so that the button and buttonhole are cut and sewn through the main fabric, giving them support and strength.

• From the high point shoulder measure 2in along the shoulder seam toward the armhole. • Draw a straight line connecting these points from the hemline up toward the shoulder seam, blending through the chest level to the marked point on the shoulder with a smooth curve.

GRAIN LIINE GRAINLINE

FACING

FRONT LINE FRONT LINE

3 CM ⁄8 " 38.5

CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 PRCUT FUSE1

FRONT FRONT FACING

FRONT FACING LINE FRONT FACING LINE

TKEOTP OE PN EN IN ING G

P KOEC

POC

MLINE HELINE OL OLDDHEM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front facing shape to create the final pattern, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides.

3 CM ⁄8" 38.5

CENTER FRONT CENTRE FRONT

LINE GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

OTNPTANPAN FF RR ON EL SE ST TYLLE LE LIY NE

ISTLINE WA WAISTLINE

CENTRE FRONT CENTER FRONT

step 13 Front facing pattern

3 CM 39.5 ⁄4"

PR SELF CUT 1 PR FUSE

CHEST LEVEL CHEST LINE

13CM 8"

52C "M

FOLD FOLD

240 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

13CM 8"

3 38.5CM ⁄8 "

1 3CM 8"

13CM 8"

FACING FACING

13 CM 8"

HEMLINE HEMLINE


GRAINLINE

step 14 Back PANEL pattern

PANEL

PR SELF

BACK BACK PANEL

CUT 1 PRCUT SELF 1

GRAIN LIINE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the back panel pattern.

FOLD FOLD

step 15 Developing the front welted pocket stand and bags

Pocket shape The pocket bag for this trench coat is not rectangular like most patch pockets but shaped like half a human kidney. The depth and width is determined by the opening you have drawn on your master plan and the internal space available to position the pocket within the design.

• To develop the shape for the welted pocket stand, which will be attached to the bottom stitch line during construction, square out 2in from the bottom stitch line at each end and connect the points. At the top end extend the line by 3⁄8in and connect this point back to the bottom stitch line at an angle. This will conceal the opening when sewn down.

⁄"

3

1C 8M

M

⁄16"

133⁄C16M "

1.5C

ENE H LI

TOP LINEST ITCH LINE CCUUTT LI1 N BOT E LINE KET TOM OPE STUIT NCIN PO KEG NDC T OPE ERH STIT NIN LCIN

⁄8 "

POC

TOP ST

GRAIN LINE

ITCH

G

LTHAS HWAELP LF TE FOL D FOLD SHAPE M

2"

POCKET BAG MASTER PLAN

M

M

9 16"

1.5C

5C

POCKET BAG MASTER PLAN

GRAINLINE

F WE HAL

1C

3

• Start by creating a separate master plan on a new piece of paper. Trace round the rectangular pocket opening shape, indicating the direction of the grainline next to it. • Label the two long sides of the rectanglar box top stitch line and the other bottom stitch line. The pocket and welt stand shapes are developed from these lines. • To develop the bag shape, square out 3⁄8in from the top stitch line at each end and connect the points. Extend this line 9⁄16in at each end. • Starting from a right angle at each end of this line, draw a half kidneylike shape that, once constructed, will hang below the pocket opening. • When drawing the pocket bag shape check that you do not extend it too far forward so that it interferes with the facing or button placements. This will now become your top pocket bag shape.

9

Trench Coat 241


GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

POCKET WELT CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 PR FUSE

LINE GRAINLINE

GRAIN

INE

E

STIT

TOP

TOP

STIT

CH

TOM UND SERTSIT TIT CH C HLINLE

CH

LIN

LIN

E

FOLD

FOLD

• The welt flap shape that you have just developed is only a half pattern. Trace it off and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern.

step 17 Top pocket bag pattern

POCKET WELT

CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 PR FUSE

step 16 Pocket welt pattern

BOT

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the pocket bag shape.

3

1 CM

⁄8"

TOP POCKET BAG

CUT 1 PR POCKETING

TOP POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

242 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

GRAIN LINE

GRAINLINE

ITCH NE LINE

ITCH LI

TOM ST

ER ST

UND

BOT

CH LI

ITCITH TOP ST

TOP ST

UNDER POCKET BAG

⁄8"

CUT 1 PR POCKETING

UNDER POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

1 3 CM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the top pocket bag shape to create the under pocket bag pattern; make sure you carry over the stitch lines. The under pocket bag is smaller than the top pocket bag. To create the under pocket bag pattern, measure up 3⁄8in from the understitch line and draw a parallel line; this is the new edge of the pattern.

LIN NE E

step 18 Under pocket bag pattern


step 19 Storm flap and epaulet master plan • This is the storm flap master plan onto which you will develop the style lines.

L NEE LIV TE SL HET

CCKK BABA R RE TCEENT N CE

CS HE

C

M

E

• Cut a piece of paper large enough to cover the front and back upper body panels. • Draw a horizontal line through the middle of the paper. • Place the front and back body panels together at the shoulder, as you would if you were sewing them together, and position the shoulders along the seam. • Trace round the front and back upper body from the chest level up, including the armhole.

KK EC EC NN

K

EC T NC ONT NE FFRRON

EL OLO MH H A ARRM

EA M RS LDRESEA LDE OU SSH HOU

K

C BA

BA C

K

K

CENTER FRONT CENTRE FRONT

Storm flap A design feature on this trench coat style is the classic storm flap that is associated with many outerwear garments. The flap is sewn down to the front chest and to the back, leaving the armhole open. Storm flaps are open to interpretation and can be designed in many different ways.

STORMFLAP FLAP STORM MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

CHEST CHEST LINE

LEVEL

step 20 Developing the storm flap and epaulet • To draft the epaulet draw a 51⁄2in line out from the shoulder seam, square down 2in toward the front chest level, and square back toward the armhole. Create the point at the end of the epaulet by measuring 3⁄4in back down both sides and then joining these two points to a central point at the tip. ⁄

E LINT STES CEH EL CH

3

.5

"9

CM

K

3 ⁄4

C DD OLL ACBKA FFO EEBR TR T N N CEE

M

13⁄16"

3C

V

LE

C

1

3 8C"M

M

31 C 8"

KK CC B BAA

M 13C8"

C 30.5 16"

M

POINT

HIGH ER SHOULD POINTER SHOULD NECK

G NIN EOCPKE G N CK NE PENIN

AM R SAEM

TTET ULELE E EPPAAU

LINE

H HO MM AARR

O

M 3 2C 4"

E E ULLDDER S HOU SHSO E LNE OLE LI

STORM FLAP DEVELOPMENT STORM FLAP DEVELOPMENT

9⁄"

M 8 257 C

51 ⁄2"14 CM

"M 52C 2 C"M 3

CENTRE FRONT CENTER FRONT

⁄4

2 CM

• To develop the storm flap as a half pattern with the epaulet protruding from the shoulder, start from the high point shoulder, measure in 3⁄16in along the shoulder seam, then square down 97⁄8in toward the chest level and center front. • From this point square across 31⁄2in to just below the chest level and mark. From the front corner of the underarm and side seam measure in 13⁄16in along the chest level and from here square up 3⁄4in and mark. • Connect these two points with a curve to complete the lower front edge of the storm flap. • To draft the side of the flap around the armhole, extend the shoulder seam out 3⁄4in. Next measure in 3⁄8in from the back armhole along the chest level and then square up 3⁄8in and mark. With a shallow curve, join this point to the end of the extended shoulder seam and the point at the outside edge of the front of the flap. • To shape the lower edge of the back of the storm flap first locate the position of the lower back point. To do this measure in 33⁄4in from the center back along the chest level and square down 13⁄16in and mark. • Then locate the apex of the curve on the center back by measuring 3⁄8in up the center back line from the chest level and mark. • Join this point to the lower back point with a curve, representing half of the curve across the center back. Draw a shallow curve from the lower back point to the point at the edge of the armhole curve.

⁄4"

3

3 CM 3

1 ⁄16"

9 CM

31 ⁄2"

CHEST LINE CHEST LEVEL

FRONT FRONT

Trench Coat 243


STORM FLAP CUT 1 PR SELF

• Trace off the storm flap onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape, indicating with notches the position of the epaulet.

step 22 Epaulet pattern

SHO

SHOULD ULD ER ER L

L

INE INE

INE ER LINE ULDDER L SHSOHOUL

ET ETLTE LU PAPUA N N EE IO IO OS OITSIT PP

5141⁄2CM " EPAULET CUTEPAULETTE 4 SELF CUT 4 SELF GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

2"5 CM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the pattern for the epaulet.

EPAUE P POS POLAEUTLETTE SITIO ITIO N N

CENTER BACK CENTRE BACK

STORM FLAP CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

step 21 Storm flap pattern

2 CM 3

⁄4"

step 23 Developing the two-piece tailored sleeve

Measurements required to develop the sleeve Measurements required to draft the sleeve: • Armhole 211⁄4in + 13⁄8in ease = 221⁄2in. (Take this measurement from the basic upper body sloper.) • Sleeve length to wrist = 271⁄2in. (Take this from the shoulder tip, running down the back of the elbow to the wrist; extra length can be added at this point to suit your design.) • Top of sleeve cap to elbow length = 161⁄8in. • Upper biceps circumference = 133⁄8in. (Take this measurement from round the upper arm; extra width “ease” can be added for movement.) • Cuff measurement = 125⁄8in. (This garment is taken from the basic tapered sloper. As an overgarment there is no need to reduce the cuff width.) • Sleeve cap height = 71⁄4in.

244 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

• Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of your sleeve or the arm length of your fit model. • Draw a 271⁄2in vertical line down the center and label it center line; label the top of this line (1) and the bottom (2). This is the length of the sleeve. • From (1) measure down 71⁄4in (the sleeve cap height, or one-third of the armhole measurement not including ease, to which you can allow tolerance of plus or minus 3⁄16in) and label point (3). • From (1) measure down 161⁄8in (the elbow length) and label point (4). • Divide the armhole measurement (221⁄2in) by 6 to give 33⁄4in and add 3⁄8in volume to give 41⁄8in. From (1) square out 41⁄8in to the left and to the right and label these points (5) and (6). • From (2) measure out 41⁄8in to the left and to the right and label these points (7) and (8). • Connect all points, (5), (6), (7), (8), to form a rectangle. • Divide the sleeve cap height (71⁄4in) by 3 to give 23⁄8in. From (6) measure down 23⁄8in, make a mark, and label it back notch. From the back notch square in 1in and mark point (A); this is the top point of the back seam on the undersleeve. • From (3) square out to the left to intersect the line from (5) to (7) and mark point (B), and square out to the right to intersect the line from (6) to (8) and mark point (C). This is the biceps level. • From (B) measure out 1in and mark point (D), and measure in 1in and mark point (E). From (C) measure in 3⁄8in and mark point (F), and measure out 3⁄8in and mark point (G).


3 26.1 ⁄8" CM

A 1" 2.5 CM

71⁄4" CM 18.5

FRONT

1 41 16CM ⁄8"

FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

7 27.25 ⁄8" CM

LINE BICEPS LEVEL UNDERARM

SLEEVE SLEEVE MASTER MASTER PLAN PATTERN

271⁄2"

⁄8 " 41CM

I

BOTTOM SLEEVE CUFF UNDERSLEEVE CUFF POINT POINT

1.5C

M

NEE SS

2

8 CUFF

HEML

INE

FOLD FACING

LD

D OL

FO

F

3 CM

Trench Coat 245

10 C

N

1 718 ⁄8"CM CU UFF FF HHEEMM LILIN

FOLD

M

1 514 ⁄2"CM

32 CM 4"

7

G

CENTER LINE CENTRE LINE

UNDE DERS LEE R SL VE EE FO VE RERE FO ARAR M SE AMAM M SE

M

C

TOP SLEEVE

3 1 CM ⁄8 "

LINE ELBOW ELBOWLEVEL

4

5

3

2⁄4CM "

TOP TOP SLEEV SLEEVEEFRONT FOREASEAM

2⁄4CM " 3

TOP SLEEVE CUFF POINT

L

K

H

RM SEAM

J

POINT

MM SEA SEA KK E BAC BAC LEEV EVE NT SLE UND FROERS 1 3CM ⁄8" 1 3CM ⁄8" TOP SLE TOP SLEEVE EVEBAC KKSEA BAC MM SEA

3

2.5 CM 1"

1" 2.5 CM

F

E

B

D D

BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH

GRAIN LINE

6

10.6 41⁄8CM "

CUT 1 PR SELF

1

10.6 41⁄8CM "

3 CM

5

• From (7) measure up 3⁄4in and from this point measure out 3 ⁄4in and mark point (L); this is the top sleeve cuff point. Measure in 3⁄4in and mark point (M); this is the undersleeve cuff point. • The cuff circumference is 125⁄8in. Divide this between the top and undersleeve so that the top sleeve cuff width is 71⁄8in and the undersleeve is 51⁄2in. This allows the top sleeve seam to fall toward the back of the arm, slightly out of view. • From (L) draw a line 71⁄8in long to intersect the line from (7) to (8) and mark point (N). From (M) draw a line 51⁄2in long to intersect the line from (7) to (8) also at point (N). These are the cuff hemlines. • Draw in the top sleeve front seam by drawing a blended line connecting the points from (L) through (J) to (D). • Draw in the undersleeve front seam by drawing a blended line connecting the points from (M) through (K) to (E). • Using a French curve, draw in the top sleeve cap starting at (D) with a concave curve through the front notch where you reverse the curve to a convex curve up to (1) and back down to the back notch with a similar convex curve. • Measure the length of this line and compare it to the measurement of the armhole on the front and back patterns. Here the length should be 145⁄8in. Adjust the curves until the line is the correct measurement. • Using a French curve, draw in the top of the undersleeve with convex curve starting at (E) up to (A). • Again, measure this line and adjust it until it is the same measurement as the armhole on the front and back patterns—in this case 81⁄4in. • Draw in the back seam of the top sleeve with a blended line from the back notch through points (G) to (I) and continue down to (N). • Draw in the back seam of the undersleeve with a blended line from (A) through (F) to (I) and also continue with this seam on the same line as the top sleeve down to (N). TOP SLEEVE FOREARM SEAM

• To establish the front notch on the armhole divide the sleeve cap height (71⁄4in) by 2 to give 35⁄8in, and subtract 3⁄4in to give 27⁄8in. This will ensure a rectangular shape to the sleeve cap instead of the square shape that would occur if the sleeve cap were just divided in half. From (B) measure up 27⁄8in, make a mark, and label it front notch. • From (4) square out to the left to intersect the line from (5) to (7) and mark point (H), and square out to the right to intersect the line from (6) to (8) and mark point (I). This is the elbow level. • From (H) measure out 3⁄8in and mark point (J), and measure in 15⁄8in and mark point (K).


step 24 1 6 5 10.6 CM 10.6 CM Top sleeve pattern, facing, and cuff vent

GRAIN LINE

2.5 CM

18.5 CM

BACK PITCH

TOP S TO LPESELVEE EVB EA BC AC KKSSE EA AMM

SELF

SLEEVE TOP TOP SLEEVE

FOREARM TOP T SEAMSEAM TOP SLE EVSLEEVE E FRON

CENTRE LINE

FO FO LD LD

FACING FA CING

D OLLD

FFO

M

E

D LD OL FFO

"

EMLIN

FFOOLLD D

3 31C ⁄16 M"

CUFF H CE MLI UFF H NE

140 C

FOREARM SEA

M

4 CM

UNDER SLEEVE

⁄16"M

9C 1.5

2 CM

2 CM

TOP SLEEVE FOREARM SEAM

1 CM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the final top sleeve pattern, adding in alignment notches. K H ELBOW LINE I J 4 • From the sleeve hemline square down 13⁄16in and draw a rectangular box. This is the sleeve facing, which will be folded up inside the sleeve. • Extend the length of the sleeve facing by 13⁄16in at the back seam to create a sleeve opening. • Measure up 4in along the back seam and create a rectangular box 13⁄16in in width. 9 • Measure up a further ⁄16in and join this point to the outer BOTTOM SLEEVE CUFF corner of the box, creating an angle and shape similar to the POINT M L 14 CM TOP SLEEVE center back vent. CUFF POINT 2 CM N 8 2 • The corner of the sleeve facing and opening can be finished 7 18 CM CUFF HE MLINES with a mitered seam once folded back and attached to the sleeve lining.

CUTCUT 1 PR 1 SELF PR

SEAM 1 CM 1 CM TOP SLEEVE BAC K SEAM

SLEEVE MASTER PATTERN

FRONT SLEEVE BACK

2.5 CM

2.5 CM

41 CM

POINT FRONT Adding PITCH the sleeve facing POINT It is important that you have already CM established 7.25your sleeve length before F B E UNDERARM LINE G adding Da sleeve facing to C the bottom of 3 your sleeve.

GRAINLINE

6.1 CM

A

3 3CM

1 ⁄16"

UNDER SLEEVE FRONT SEAM

UNDER SLEEVE FOREARM SEAM

M

A SEAM SE

UNDE

DE SL UNR

UNDERSLEEVE UNDER SLEEVE 1 PAIR SELF CUT CUT 1 PAIR SELF

K CK AC VEVEBBA EEE SL RE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the final undersleeve pattern, adding in alignment notches. • From the sleeve hemline square down 13⁄16in and draw a rectangular box to create the sleeve facing. • Extend the length of the sleeve facing by 13⁄16in at the back seam to create the other side of the sleeve opening. • Measure up 4in along the back seam to create a rectangular box 13⁄16in in width. • Measure up a further 9⁄16in and join this point to the outer corner of the box, creating an angle and shape similar to the center back vent. • The corner of the sleeve facing and opening can be finished with a mitered seam once folded back and attached to the sleeve lining.

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

step 25 Undersleeve pattern, facing, and cuff vent

M

⁄16" 313CM

246 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

ING FA FACICNG

1⁄ "

FFEHE CUH

3 16

CUFF E NNE MLI MLI

LD OLD FFO

MC 3

41"0 CM

D

OLLD FFO

C 9 1.5 16"


3 CM 0.5 16"

CAP BACK SHOULDER

TOP OF TIPBACK THE

step 26 Developing the top sleeve lining

FRONT TOP OF SHOULDER THE FRONT TIP

3 CM 0.5 16"

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

3 CM 0.5 16"

TOP SLEEVE LINING TOP SLEEVE LINING

PR LINING CUT 1CUT PR1 LINING

0.53 CM 16"

30.5 CM 16"

REMOVE REMOVE 1CM 3 ⁄8"

3 2C 4M "

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the top sleeve pattern onto a separate piece of paper. • Remove 3⁄8in from the lower edge of the sleeve, leaving a 3⁄4in facing. • From the back shoulder tip measure out 3⁄16in and up 3⁄16in and mark. • From the front shoulder tip measure out 3⁄16in and up 3⁄16in and mark. • Using the sleeve cap shape as a template, join these points at the cap with a curved line. • From the new shoulder tips redraw the lines down to blend in with the new sleeve hemline.

CROWN TOP OF POINT SLEEVE

TOP OF BACK THE BACK

SHOULDER TIP

⁄16"

0.5 3 CM

0.53 CM 16"

step 27 Developing the under sleeve lining

TOP OF FRONT THE FRONT

SHOULDER TIP

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

3 0.5 CM 16"

E

OV RE EMMOV R M 1C 3 ⁄8 "

E

PR LINING CUT 1CUT PR1LINING

UNDERSLEEVE LINING UNDER SLEEVE LINING

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the undersleeve pattern onto a separate piece of paper. • Remove 3⁄8in from the lower edge of the sleeve, leaving a 3⁄4in facing. • From the front shoulder tip measure out 3⁄16in and up 3⁄16in and mark. • From the back shoulder tip measure up 3⁄16in and then out 3 ⁄16in and mark. • Join these points along the underarm with a curved line. • From the new shoulder tips redraw the lines down to blend in with the new sleeve hem.

3 " 2CM 4

Trench Coat 247


CM 30.5 16"

BACK BACK SHOULDER SHOULDER POINT TIP

CM 3 16 " 0.5

CM 03.5 16"

step 28 Developing the front body lining

JOINJOIN TOTO FACING FACING

CUT 1 PR1LINING CUT PR LINING

FRONT LINING FRONT LINING

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off a copy of the front body panel without the facing. • Remove 1in from the lower edge of the hem allowance. • From the shoulder tip square out and up 3⁄16in, find the new shoulder tip, and blend back to the front facing line along the shoulder. • From the top of the front style line, measure 3⁄16in out into the armhole and continue this line and the style line up to a point and mark where they intersect. • Join this point with the new shoulder tip by drawing a curved line following the shape of the armhole.

HEMLINE HEMLINE

REMOVE REMOVE 2.5CM

REMOVE REMOVE 2.5CM 1"

1"

step 29 Developing the back neck facing

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace the left back pattern onto a separate piece of paper. Measure 2in down the center back and 2in down the shoulder seam from the high point shoulder. Connect these points with a curve following the shape of the neckline.

248 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

2" 5 CM

5 C2"M

FACING FACING

BACK LINING MASTER PLAN CENTER BACK

Here it is illustrated as a half pattern to be traced off before you make the adaptations for the ease in the lining.

BACK LINING MASTER PLAN

CHEST LINE CHEST LEVEL

CENTRE BACK

Back neck facing The back neck facing is added to give strength and to stabilize the collar. It is connected to the front facing at the shoulder and is cut from facing fabric and fused.

BACK BACK HIGH POINT SHOULDER SHOULDER POINT


CUT 1 FUSE

GRAIN LINE

BACK NECK FACING NECK FACING CUTBACK 1 SELF 1 SELF CUTCUT 1 FUSE

GRAINLINE

• Trace off the back neck facing onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape.

CENTER BACK CENTRE BACK

step 30 Back neck facing pattern

BACK

52C" M

5 CM 2"

1.5 9 CM 16" PLEAT

PLEAT

NEWNEW CENTER CENTREBACK BACK

step 31 Developing the left back body lining

30.5 CM 16"

FACING FACING

3 CM 0.5 16"

LEFT BACK

LEFT BACK LINING LINING MASTER PLAN MASTER

PLAN

3 CM 0.5 16"

UNDERARM UNDERARM POINT

CHEST LEVEL CHEST LINE

/ SIDE SEAM CORNER

GRAIN LINEGRAINLINE

CENTRE BACK BACK CENTER

• Using the tracing of the back pattern on which you drew the neck facing, create half of the back lining pleat to introduce ease. From the center back measure out 9⁄16in below the facing line and mark, and from the chest level measure out 9 ⁄16in and mark. Join these two points and then blend the line back to the original center back line at the waist with a slight curve. Notch the center back along this new line. • From the shoulder tip measure out 3⁄16in and up 3⁄16in and find the new shoulder tip. Draw a straight line back to the outer edge of the neck facing. • At the underarm / side seam corner square out 3⁄16in. Join this point back to the new shoulder tip using a curved line following the original armhole shape. • Because the vent on the left side of the back pattern is folded in when constructed, remove the vent shape from the lining together with a negative of the vent shape in the back panel lining itself. • Remove 1in from the lower edge of the hem allowance. This will leave enough fabric to allow for an overlap, or ease, in the lining at the hem.

BACK SHOULDER SHOULDER TIP POINT

REMOVE NEGATIVE OF SHAPE REMOVE NEGATIVE OFVENT VENT SHAPE

HEMLINE HEMLINE

REMOVE REMOVE 2.5 CM 1"

REMOVE 1" CM 2.5

REMOVE

REMOVEVENT VENT SHAPE REMOVE SHAPE

WAISTLINE WAISTLINE

Trench Coat 249


step 32 Developing the right back lining

step 33 Back lining patterns

• Trace off the right back panel pattern from the left back panel pattern you have just developed and reverse. • Add the negative vent shape back into the pattern to create a straight center back line. • As you are still working on a left back panel shape, you need to turn it over before adding the annotations for the right back lining.

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the back panel lining patterns.

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CENTER CENTRE BACK BACK

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CHEST LEVEL CHEST LINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

LINING MASTER PLAN

NEW CENTRE BACK NEW CENTER BACK

RIGHT LINING RIGHTBACK BACK MASTER PLAN

CENTER CENTRE BACK BACK NOTCH NOTCH

HEMLINE HEMLINE

HEMLINE HEMLINE

250 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

CUT 11 LINING CUT LINING

BACK LINING LEFT BACK LINING LEFT

CUT 11LINING CUT LINING

BACK LINING RIGHT BACK LINING RIGHT

WAISTLINE WAISTLINE

HEMLINE HEMLINE


Trench Coat 251


pattern Single-breasted Jacket

Start by selecting the basic men’s upper body sloper, or by drafting the basic sloper according to the instructions on page 40. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the shirt you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 48. 252 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

FRONT NOTCH

WAISTLINE

LINE HIP LEVEL

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

CENTRE FRONT CENTER FRONT

BACK MASTER MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CHEST LEVEL LINE

SIDE SEAM

step 1 Developing the master plan

BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

CENTRE CENTER BACK BACK

This pattern includes development of the following features: Shaping the body panels and creating a side panel Extending the front and shaping the breast with added volume Extending the hemline Creating a center back vent Moving the shoulder slope toward the back Creating a welted breast pocket Developing a patch pocket with flap Developing a roll collar with lapel Developing a tailored two-piece sleeve with cuff vent Developing taped internal seams with no lining


BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

BACK MASTER MASTER PLAN

GRAIN GRAINLINE LINE

CENTRE CENTER BACK BACK

• From the hemline square down 31⁄8in at the center front, side seam, and center back lines. • Join these three points with a straight horizontal line.

SIDE SEAM

CHEST LEVEL LINE

step 2 DevelopING the hemline

WAISTLINE

HEMLINE HEMLINE 3 ⁄8" 81CM

3 8" 81⁄CM

8 3CM ⁄8" 1

NEW HEMLINE HEMLINE

step 3 Developing the internal shaping

CENTRE CENTER BACK NECK POINT

3 0.5 ⁄16" CM

BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

BACK MASTER PLAN

FRONT MASTER MASTER PLAN PLAN

1.59⁄16 CM "

5 1.7 CM ⁄8"

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

10.5 41⁄8CM "

12.8 5"CM

1 1.4 ⁄2" CM

5 1.7 ⁄8" CM

12.8 5" CM

WAISTLINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CHEST LEVEL LINE

CENTRE CENTER BACK

• To create the front internal dart, at the center front chest, waist, and original hemlines square in 5in and mark. • From the chest level mark square down 41⁄8in, and from the hemline mark square up 5in; these two points are the ends of the dart. • From the waistline mark measure out 1⁄4in to each side, making the dart width 1⁄2in. • Connect all these points with curved lines. • For the center back shaping: from the center back, measure in 1⁄4in at the new hemline and the original hemline; at the waistline measure in 9⁄16in, and at the center back neck point measure in 3⁄16in. • From the chest level draw a curved line up to meet the new center back neck point and then down to join the new point on the waistline, then down farther to connect the points on the hemlines. • Taking volume from the side seam gives a fitted silhouette and will also help you to develop the side panel. From the side seam at the waistline measure out 5⁄8in in each direction and mark. Connect these two points with a curved line up to the underarm and down to the original hemline.

FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT UNDERARM /UNDERARM SIDE SEAM CORNER POINT

SIDE SEAM

When determining suit panel sizes it is important to do some market research, investigating similar garments and comparing measurements with the style you may be developing. Use your fit model or form to gain the correct proportions for the paneling as this will ultimately affect the balance of the jacket.

HEMLINE

12.8 5" CM

NEW HEMLINE 1 ⁄4" CM 0.7

Single-breasted Jacket 253


step 4 Developing the side panel • Start with the front style line: from the center back measure 63⁄4in along the new hemline toward the center front and mark; continue measuring 3⁄4in and mark, and a further 47⁄8in and mark. These points are the ends of the three new shaping lines. • From the new side seam measure 15⁄16in toward the front along the waistline and mark; from the underarm / side seam corner measure 3⁄8in along the armhole toward the front and mark; from the side seam measure 2in along the old hemline toward the front and mark. • Join the marks at the new and the old hemlines to the waistline mark with a straight line and continue up to the chest and front armhole with a graduated curve; this is the side front style line, which separates the new side panel from the front panel. • To create the back style lines, from the center back measure 61⁄4in along the waistline and mark, and then a further 13⁄16in and mark. • From the underarm / side seam corner measure 21⁄2in toward the center back and mark, and a further 3⁄4in and mark. • The back style lines start from a point on the back armhole below the notch; to find this measure 2in from the chest level up the center back and then square across to the back armhole and mark. • From this point draw the back style lines, intersecting the chest and waist at the marks you made earlier, crossing over each other 31⁄2in above the original hemline and continuing down to the new hem in a straight line.

Side panels On the front and back slopers you are going to create style lines that will separate the panel into front, side, and back, as in the classic three-piece suit. In the previous step you took away volume from the side seam back and front. To create the side panel you need to combine these to gather and redraw them as a single shape. Having removed volume at the side seam, you then need to remove additional volume from the back panel, to finish the fitted shape of the jacket. You do this between the new back and side panel.

BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

52" CM

NEW HEMLINE

2 3CM ⁄4"

47⁄8" CM 12.5

254 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

N LINE EPARATIO SIDE FRONT S

⁄ 73CM 2 ⁄4"

17 63⁄4"CM

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

3 18CM "

3.3 15⁄16"CM

SIDE SEAM

INE LIN NL ON TIO ATI ARA PAR EP SE CK S BACK SIDE BA SID

BACK SEPARATION LINE HEMLINE

1 ⁄2" 93CM

WAISTLINE 1661CM ⁄4"

21⁄2" 6.3CM

33⁄CM 1 16"

CHEST LEVEL LINE

CENTRE CENTER BACK

5 CM 2"

3 CM 2 ⁄4"

BACK MASTER PLAN


step 5 Developing the new shoulder slope and front hem styling

" 1 3C⁄8M

1 C3⁄M 8"

BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

BACK MASTER MASTER PLAN

SIDE SEAM

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

GRAIN GRAINLINE LINE

INE LIN NL ON TIO ATI ARA PAR EP SE KS CK AC BA IDE B S SID

BACK SEPARATION LINE

NE TION LI T SEPARA S SIDE FRON

FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

CHEST LEVEL LINE

WAISTLINE

FRONT SHOULDER POINT TIP

BACK SHOULDER TIP POINT

FRONT SHOULDER FRONT NECK HIGH POINT SHOULDER POINT

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

BACK SHOULDER BACK HIGH POINT NECK SHOULDER POINT

CENTRE BACK CENTER BACK

Shoulder slope Move the angle of the shoulder seam before you open up the front: This will prevent the shoulder seam from being seen from the front, giving a seamless silhouette.

• From the back shoulder tip measure 3⁄8in down the armhole and mark; from the front shoulder tip extend the armhole up 3 ⁄8in and mark. From these two new points draw in the new shoulder seams back up to the high point shoulders. • To add style shaping to the center front hem, measure 3⁄4in down from the hemline at the center front and connect back to the side seam with a smooth curve.

OLD HEMLINE HEMLINE

NEW HEMLINE HEMLINE

3 CM 2 ⁄4"

Single-breasted Jacket 255


step 6 Developing the front extension • Trace off the front panel onto a separate piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, reverse the shape to create the left-hand side panel, which will eventually also contain the breast pocket shape. • Extend out 1in horizontally from the center front neck point and at the hem; connect these points with a straight line to create the front extension.

Lapel shape Pitching back and opening the front breast shape will enable the straight sloper front to follow the contours of a male chest.

• From the chest level measure up 15⁄8in and square a line across; repeat four times.

2.5 CM 1"

CENTER CENTRE FRONT NECK POINT

step 7 Developing the front breast shaping

4 15CM ⁄8"

LINE CHEST LEVEL

4 15CM ⁄8" 4 15CM ⁄8"

CENTRE FRONT CENTER FRONT

4 15CM ⁄8"

WAISTLINE WAISTLINE

CENTRE CENTER FRONT FRONT

LINE CHEST LEVEL

WAISTLINE WAISTLINE

1" 2.5 CM

HEMLINE NEW HEMLINE

HEMLINE NEW HEMLINE

256 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear


step 8 Developing the welted breast and patch pockets

step 9 Adding in the volume on the front breast panel

• For the breast pocket placement, from the top of the waist dart measure 2in along the chest level toward the center front; this will be the bottom corner of the rectangular welt opening. • Measure 23⁄8in in the opposite direction and mark; from this point square up 11⁄16in; this is the opposite corner of the rectangle. • Join these points with an 43⁄8in straight line, square up 9⁄16in at each end, and draw a rectangular box. • The patch pocket runs off the front panel into the side panel and covers the waist dart; when plotting the pocket measurement do not include the dart width. • From the waist dart measure 3⁄4in along the waistline toward the center front, and from this point square down 9⁄16in and mark; this is the starting point for the pocket depth. • Measure down another 9⁄16in for the welt opening, then measure down a further 61⁄2in (the pocket depth). • The pocket width is 57⁄8in, which will run over onto the side panel. • Round off the bottom corners of the pocket.

• Cut along the horizontal lines you drew across the chest and neck from the center front and neck into the shoulder; open each 3⁄16in upward at the front, creating a wedge shape, adding in a total of 15⁄16in. • Tape against another piece paper and redraw the front panel, blending through the open steps.

3 ⁄16" 0.4 CM 3 ⁄16" 0.4 CM

3 0.4 CM ⁄16" 3 0.4 CM ⁄16" 3 0.4 CM ⁄16"

9 16 1.5

3 " 114C⁄8M

11 1.8 ⁄16"CM

52" CM

3 62CM ⁄8"

CENTRE FRONT CENTER FRONT

LINE CHEST LEVEL

WAISTLINE WAISTLINE

⁄ " CM

CENTRE FRONT FRONT CENTER

LINE CHEST LEVEL

HEMLINE NEW HEMLINE

3 ⁄4" WAISTLINE 2 CM 1.5 9CM ⁄16"

9 1.5 ⁄16" CM

16.5 61⁄2CM "

15 57⁄8"CM

7 15 5 ⁄8"CM

HEMLINE NEW HEMLINE

Single-breasted Jacket 257


Checking the shape It is always important to check the shape you have created by folding back the paper on the roll line to assess it; redraw and develop until you are satisfied. The sequence above is a method widely used to draft a basic tailored collar. Variations can be found in many patternmaking books available, old and new; choose the one that you prefer.

258 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

93C1⁄M 2" 5 ⁄8 " 41CM

CENTRE CENTER FRONT NECK POINT

M

12".5 C

B

A

D

2.5 CM 1" 3 0.5 ⁄16" CM

2.5 C 1M "

3 CM 1 ⁄8 "

C

FRONT FRONT SHOULDER HIGH POINT NECK SHOULDER POINT

ROLL LINE

FACING LINE

LINE CHEST LEVEL

BREAK POINT

9 CM

10 CM

WAISTLINE WAIST LINE

CENTRE FRONT

BREAK POINT POINT

CENTRE CENTER FRONT FRONT

• From the front high point shoulder measure out 1in and mark point (C). • You will run the roll line through point (C); from the waistline measure 43⁄4in up the front, mark and name as the break point. • Draw a straight line from here up through (C), continue for 31⁄2in and mark point (A). • From (A) square 1in back toward the shoulder and mark point (B). • Draw a line from (B) to (C); square out 1in from the top of this line and mark point (D). • From (B) extend the line out 13⁄4in and mark point (E). This is the width of the collar (23⁄4in) at the center back neck curve. • From (E), starting at a right angle, draw out the collar shape that you require, finishing the collar notch 15⁄8in in from the extended front. • To shape the front of the jacket lapel, measure in 3⁄8in from the center front neck point. From this point draw a graduated line back down the center front to give shape. • From (D) draw a line back toward the shoulder line, crossing it 3⁄16in back from the front high point shoulder, and blend in to the curved neck shape.

E

43⁄4CM " 12

Break point and roll line Locate on the pattern where you want your collar to break on the new front edge line of the body panel. Consider the proportion of your design and silhouette length. The point at which the front will turn over to create a lapel is called the break point (BP) and the line that it turns on is the roll line. The lower down the front your BP is, the wider an opening you will have around the neck silhouette.

41.3⁄54 "C

M

step 10 Developing the roll collar

9.5 CM


CM

CM

4 .5

2 .5

B

A

D

2.5 CM

0.5 CM

2.5 C

ROLL LINE

FACING LINE

LINE CHEST LEVEL

BREAK POINT POINT

12 CM

• From the collar measure back 15⁄8in along the shoulder seam; this is the width of the facing. CHEST LINE • From the jacket front measure in 31⁄2in along the waistline and mark, and measure in 33⁄4in along the hemline and mark. BREAK POINT • From the waistline measure 4in down the front edge of the jacket and continue down to the point you marked on the hemline with a deep curve; this is the lower front WAIST LINE jacket shaping. • From the hemline measure 15⁄8in up the side seam and from here square in 4in; from this point draw a graduated curve up to meet the point you marked on the waistline, continue up in a straight line to the chest level, and blend back to the shoulder with another curved line. CENTRE FRONT

104"CM

1 9 3CM ⁄2"

WAISTLINE WAIST LINE

CENTER CENTRE FRONT FRONT

CENTRE FRONT NECK POINT

4 CM

step 11 Developing the facing

1 CM

M

C

FRONT SHOULDER NECK POINT

14 5C ⁄8"M

9 CM

E

10 4" CM

4 15CM ⁄8"

⁄4"CM 9.35 3

LEFT CUT 1 SELF

Single-breasted Jacket 259

GRAIN LINE

CENTRE FRONT CENTER FRONT GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the left and right front panels. • Mark the breast pocket on the left side only, and the patch pocket position on both sides.

LEF CUT

CENTRE FRONT

RIGHT CUT 1 SELF SELF

RIGHT CUT 1 SELF

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

step 12 Final front pattern


step 13 Front facing pattern

step 15 Combining the side panel

FOLD FOLD

ALLOWANCE FACING

NEW HEMLINE

260 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

4 15⁄CM 8"

RNALTIINOEN ATAIO RP S SIIDDEEBABCAKCSKEPSAE

LINE

CLOSE CLOSE

• Trace off the closed side panel onto a separate piece of paper. • Match up the front panel at the waist and hemlines to the new side panel at the side front style line. • Transcribe across the position for the remainder of the welted opening for the patch pocket.

9 1.5 ⁄16"CM 9 1.5 ⁄16"CM

45CM 1 ⁄8"

FOLD FOLD

FACING ALLOWANCE NEW NEWHEMLINE HEMLINE

E LINE INN PAATRIOANTILO AR PE SES CK CK AA SIIDDEEBB S

CLOSE CLOSE

E N LINE S PTAIORNALTINIO SIIDDEEFR FORNOTNST RA AE EPS

SIDE SEAM SIDE SEAM

SIDE SEAM SIDE SEAM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the side panel onto a separate piece of paper. • Next you need to remove the internal volume by closing the dart shapes in the side seam. Cut down both sides of the side seam to the bottom of the shaping and out along the waistline, making sure to leave the shapes connected by a sliver of paper at the edges so that the side lengths do not change when manipulated. • Reposition by closing up the shape and tape together. • Measure 15⁄8in down on both sides at the hemline and square across to create a rectangular box; this is the hem allowance.

FRONT FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

step 14 Developing the side panel and hem ALLOWANCE

CENTER RE FRONT

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front facing pattern.


step 17 back pattern

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the back panel onto a separate piece of paper. • From the hemline at the center back and side seams square down 15⁄8in and square across to form a rectangle, extending it 15⁄8in past the center back; this is the hem allowance. • From the bottom of the hem allowance measure up 77⁄8in and then square back into the center back. From this point measure up 9⁄16in on the center back and draw an angled line back to the top corner of the vent shape. • The center back neck facing is 15⁄8in in width to match the front; measure 15⁄8in down from the center back neck point and 15⁄8in down the shoulder from the back high point shoulder and connect these two points with a curved line.

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the back panel pattern.

BACK PRSELF SELF CUT 11PR

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

step 16 Developing the center back vent and back neck facing

BACK BACK NECK HIGH POINT SHOULDER SHOULDER POINT

CENTER CENTRE BACK NECK POINT

4 15CM ⁄8 "

CENTRE CENTER BACK

45CM 1 ⁄8"

BACK MASTER PLAN

FOLD

SIDE SEAM

LINE CHEST LEVEL

WAISTLINE

⁄ " CM

9 1.5 16

FOLD

FACING ALLOWANCE 4 15CM ⁄8"

4 15CM ⁄8 "

• Trace off the back neck facing onto a separate piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape.

NEW HEMLINE

CENTER BACK CENTRE BACK GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

7 20 7CM ⁄8"

VENT

step 18 Back neck facing pattern

BACK NECK FACING BACK YOKE CUT 1 SELF CUT 1 SELF CUT1 1FUSE FUSE CUT

Single-breasted Jacket 261


8" 1 CM

" CM 1.516

3

9

step 19 Developing the welted breast pocket top and bottom bag

LIN EE UTTLIN CCU

" CM 1.516 9

5 ⁄16" 513 .5 CM

E CHE LIN ITCH ITLIN TO TOPPSTST LIENE CHLIN ITCH TIT OMSST TTM TO BOTBO GNING INE EN OP OP T ET E CK K C PO PO

1 CM

13 CM 8"

9 16 CM " 1.5

53CM ⁄8" 13.5

BREAST WELTED WELTED BREAST POCKET TOP POCKET TOP  BAG AND BOTTOM PLAN ANDMASTER BOTTOM BAG MASTER PLAN

15.5 " 61⁄8CM GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

• From the front left final pattern in Step 12, trace off the breast pocket opening onto a separate piece of paper so that you have a rectangle 43⁄8in long by 9⁄16in wide drawn at an angle to the grainline. • Extend the top stitch line by 9⁄16in to the right and 3⁄8in to the left, and extend the bottom stitch line by 9⁄16in to the left and 3 ⁄8in to the right. • Connecting these points on the left, draw a 53⁄8in vertical line down. Connecting the points on the right, draw a 61⁄8in vertical line down. Square across 53⁄8in at the bottom to connect these two lines (the width of the pocket bag).

13.5 " 53⁄8CM

step 20 Breast pocket bag patterns • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the pocket bag shape and add a 3⁄8in seam allowance above the top stitch line to create the final top pocket bag pattern. • Trace off the pocket bag shape again as far as the bottom stitch line, then add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on top of the stitch line to create the final bottom pocket bag pattern.

3 CM 1 8"

1 CM

1 CM

13 CM 8"

8" 1 CM 3

1 CM

1 CM

1 3CM 8"

262 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

TOP BREAST POCKET BAG CUT 1 POCKETING

GRAIN LINE

15.5 CM

GRAIN LINE

BOTTOM BREAST POCKET BAG CUT 1 POCKETING

BOTTOM BREAST POCKET BAG BOTTOM BREAST POCKET BAG CUT CUT1 POCKETING 1 POCKETING

TOP BREAST POCKET POCKET BAG TOP BREASTBAG CUT 1 POCKETING CUT 1 POCKETING


step 21 Developing the breast pocket welt • Mirror this parallelogram along the fold line. • Add a 9⁄16in seam allowance to both long sides of the shape and a 3⁄8in allowance to the shorter sides.

3 8" 1 CM

43 ⁄8"

⁄ "

9 CM 1.5 16

11 CM

LD D FOL FO

ELT ET W OCK ST P BREA SELF 1 E M E 2.5 C CUT NELIN LDLLID FO 1 FUS R FO ERE NT CUT 11 CM CENCET 43 ⁄8"

⁄ "

CM 1.9516

M

2.5 C

12.5" C

M

1"

BREAST POCKET WELT CUT 1 SELF CUT 1 FUSE

⁄ "

CM 9516 1.

FOLD

M C" 2.5 1

FOLD

1 3CM

⁄8"

M ⁄ "

C 1. 9 516

13CM

3 CM 1 8"

⁄8"

3 1 8CM "

5 CM ⁄8" 15

7

• From the front left pattern in Step 12, trace one long side of the breast pocket opening onto a separate piece of paper so that you have a line 43⁄8in long at the same angle as the breast pocket itself. This will become the center fold line. Copy the direction of the grainline across, too. • Parallel to the grainline, draw 1in lines up from both ends of the line and mark. Connect these marks to create a parallelogram.

1"

3 8" 1 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

Welts If your welted pocket is angled then the welt’s shape will need to reflect this. Welts can be the same size or larger than pocket openings and are doubled over so they have two layers of fabric, with a fusing layer in between for rigidity.

1⁄ "

33 CM 16

FACING FACING FOLD FOLD

step 22 Developing the final patch pocket

61⁄2"

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

16.5 CM

PATCH POCKET PATCH POCKET CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 PR SELF

• On a separate piece of paper draw a rectangular box 57⁄8in wide by 75⁄8in tall. • From the top measure 13⁄16in down each side and square across with a broken line, naming it fold; this will become the facing for the pocket bag. • Round off both bottom corners and add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to create the final pattern.

step 23 Developing the final patch pocket flap 1 3CM

⁄"

11.5 CM 2

⁄8 "

1 615.5 ⁄8CM "

1 CM 3 8"

4.5 CM

GRAIN LINE

13⁄4"

FOLD FOLD

FOLD FOLD PATCH POCKET FLAP PATCH POCKET FLAP CUT 2 PR SELF CUT 1 PR FUSE CUT 2 PR SELF CUT 1 PR FUSE

GRAINLINE

• On a separate piece of paper draw a rectangular box 61⁄8in wide by 21⁄4in tall. • From the top measure 1⁄2in down each side and square across with a broken line, naming it fold; this will be sewn in to the welt opening construction. • Round off both bottom corners and add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to create the final pattern.

Single-breasted Jacket 263


step 24 Developing The patch pocket piping • On separate piece of paper, draw a horizontal box 57⁄8in long by 3⁄4in wide to create a rectangular-shape for the piping. • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line down the center, and label it fold. • Add a 3⁄16in seam allowance to both long sides and a 3⁄8in seam allowance to each end to create the final pattern.

Piping The piping is sewn between the pocket flap as decoration to the opening. In this example it is only 3⁄16in wide.

13CM ⁄8"

PATCH POCKET POCKET PIPING PIPING SELF CUT 1 PR SELF

FOLD

GL

⁄4" 2 CM 3

13⁄CM 8"

7 15 5 ⁄8"CM

⁄ ⁄

3 0.5 16" CM 3 0.5 16" CM 3 0.5 16" CM

3 0.5 ⁄16"CM

step 25 Developing the two-piece tailored sleeve

Measurements required to develop the sleeve • Armhole 201⁄4in + 3⁄4in ease = 21in. (Take this measurement from the basic upper body sloper.) • Sleeve length to wrist = 251⁄4in. (Take this from the shoulder tip, running down the back of the elbow to the wrist; extra length can be added at this point to suit your design.) • Top of sleeve cap to elbow length = 133⁄4in. • Upper biceps circumference = 16in. (This measurement is taken round the upper arm; extra width “ease” can be added for movement.) • Cuff measurement = 113⁄4in. Remove 3 ⁄4in as 3⁄8in from each side to reduce the cuff width from the basic tapered sloper, which is 125⁄8in. • Sleeve cap height = 63⁄4in.

• Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of your sleeve or the arm length of your fit model. • Draw a 251⁄4in vertical line down the center and label it center line; label the top of this line (1) and the bottom (2). This is the length of the sleeve. • From (1) measure down 63⁄4in (the sleeve cap height, or onethird of the armhole measurement not including ease) and label point (3). • From (1) measure down 133⁄4in (the elbow length) and label point (4).

264 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

• Divide the armhole measurement (21in) by 6 to give 31⁄2in and add 3⁄8in ease to give 37⁄8in. From (1) square out 37⁄8in to the left and to the right and label these points (5) and (6). • From (2) measure out 37⁄8in to the left and to the right and label these points (7) and (8). • Connect all points (5), (6), (7), (8) to form a rectangle. • Divide the sleeve cap length (63⁄4in) by 3 to give 21⁄4in. From (6) measure down 21⁄4in, make a mark and label it back notch. From the back notch square in 1in and mark point (A); this is the top point of the back seam on the undersleeve. • From (3) square out to the left to intersect the line from (5) to (7) and mark point (B), and square out to the right to intersect the line from (6) to (8) and mark point (C). This is the biceps level. • From (B) measure out 1in and mark point (D), and measure in 1in and mark point (E). From (C) measure in 3⁄8in and mark point (F), and measure out 3⁄8in and mark point (G). • To establish the front notch on the armhole divide the sleeve cap height (63⁄4in) by 2 to give 33⁄8in, and subtract 7⁄8in to give 21⁄2in. This will ensure a rectangular shape to the sleeve cap instead of the square shape that would occur if the sleeve cap were just divided in half. From (B) measure up 21⁄2in, make a mark and label it front notch. • From (4) square out to the left to intersect the line from (5) to (7) and mark point (H), and square out to the right to intersect the line from (6) to (8) and mark point (I). This is the elbow level. • From (H) measure out 3⁄8in and mark point (J), and measure in 15⁄8in and mark point (K).


• From (7) measure up 3⁄4in and from this point measure out 3 ⁄4in and mark point (L); this is the top sleeve cuff point. Measure in 3⁄4in and mark point (M); this is the undersleeve cuff point. • The cuff circumference is 113⁄4in. Divide this between the top and undersleeve so that the top sleeve cuff width is 63⁄4in and the undersleeve is 5in. This allows the top sleeve seams to fall toward the back of the arm, slightly out of view. • From (L) draw a line 63⁄4in long to intersect the line from (7) to (8) and mark point (N). From (M) draw a line 5in long to intersect the line from (7) to (8), also at point (N). These are the cuff hemlines.

5

1

9.8 37⁄CM 8"

6

9.8 8" 37⁄CM

1 5.6 2 ⁄4"CM

A 2.5 CM 1"

17 63⁄4"CM 6.5 21⁄2"CM

SLEEVE MASTER PATTERN

251⁄4"

LINE ELBOW ELBOWLEVEL

4

⁄"

M

BOTTOM SLEEVE UNDERSLEEVE CUFF CUFF POINT POINT

5 13 " CM

⁄"

3 24CM

7

I

CENTRE CENTER LINE

UNDER SLEE VE FR FOON REAR T SE MAM SEAM

5 4 1CM ⁄8 "

3 1 CM ⁄8"

3 24CM

⁄"

L

3 24CM

TOP SLEEVE CUFF POINT

TOP SLEEVE CUFF POINT

K

H

TOP SLEEVE FRONT FOREARM SEAM SEAM

J

G

M SEAM K SEA BACK VE BAC LEEEVE ERSSLE UND FRONT 3 1 CM ⁄8 " 3 1 CM ⁄8 " TOP SLEEVE BAC K SEAM

3

2.5 CM 1"

2.5 CM 1"

F C LINE UNDERARM BICEPS LEVEL

E

B

D

35 133CM ⁄4"

FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

BACK NOTCH PITCH POINT

• Draw in the top sleeve front seam by drawing a blended line connecting the points from (L) through (J) to (D). • Draw in the undersleeve front seam by drawing a blended line connecting the points from (M) through (K) to (E). • Using a French curve, draw in the top sleeve cap starting at (D) with a concave curve through the front notch where you reverse the curve to a convex curve up to (1) and back down to the back notch with a similar convex curve. • Measure the length of this line and compare it to the measurement of the armhole on the front and back patterns. Adjust the curves until the line is the same length as the armhole. • Using a French curve, draw in the top of the undersleeve starting with a convex curve starting at (E) up to (A). • Again, measure this line and adjust it until it is the same measurement as the armhole on the front and back patterns. • Draw in the back seam of the top sleeve with a blended line from the back notch through points (G) to (I) and continue down to (N). • Draw in the back seam of the undersleeve with a blended line from (A) through (F) to (I) and also continue with this seam on the same line as the top sleeve down to (N).

N

17⁄4"CM 6 CUFF H EMLINE S 3

2

8

Single-breasted Jacket 265


• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the top sleeve onto a separate piece of paper. • From the bottom of the sleeve measure down 13⁄16in and draw a rectangular box to create the facing strip. • Extend the length of the cuff facing by 13⁄16in at the inner sleeve seam and square up 4in to create a rectangular box 13⁄16in in width. This is the cuff extension. • Measure a further 9⁄16in up the back seam and join this point to the outer corner of the box, creating an angle and shape similar to the center back vent. • The corner is then folded to create a mitered corner during construction.

• Trace off the undersleeve onto a separate piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, reverse it over. • From the bottom of the sleeve measure down 13⁄16in and draw a rectangular box to create the facing strip. Extend the length of the cuff facing by 13⁄16in at the inner sleeve seam. • On top of this extension square up 4in from the facing and create a rectangular box 13⁄16in in width. • Measure a further 9⁄16in up the back seam and join this point to the outer corner of your rectangular box, creating an angle and shape similar to the center back vent. • The corner is then folded to create a mitered corner during construction.

266 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

GRAIN LINE

FOLD

OLLDD F FO

31C⁄ M"

M 3 3 C 3 1C⁄16M"

3 CM

10 CM

FOLD 3 CM LD FOLD FO 16"M 13 ⁄C 3 CING AG G INF FA IN CFC U C FA F F F F UF CU 3 16

3 1C3⁄16M"

1 3 16"M 3 3 CM ⁄C

4 1"0 CM

4"0 CM 1

10 CM

FO OLLDD

FOLD

FOLD FO FOLD LD CUFF CU FFFA CICI FA NG CUFF FA CING NG

3 CM

3 1 3⁄16" 3 CM CM

CUT 1 PR SELF

1.5 CM 1⁄ .5 CM

9 16"

UNDER CUT 11PR SLEEVE CUT PRSELF SELF

1 C9⁄M 16" 1.5 C.5 M

UNDERSLEEVE UNDER SLEEVE

CUT 11PR CUT PRSELF SELF

TOP SLEEVE

TOP1SLEEVE TOP SLEEVE CUT PR SELF

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

step 27 Developing the final undersleeve pattern with cuff vent

GRAIN LINE

step 26 Developing the final top sleeve pattern with cuff vent


Single-breasted Jacket 267


pattern Double-breasted Jacket

This pattern includes development of the following features: Shaping the body panels and creating a side panel Creating a double-breasted extension and shaping the breast with added volume Extending the hemline Creating side vents Moving the shoulder slope toward the back Lowering the armhole Developing a welted breast pocket Developing jetted side pockets Developing a coin pocket Developing a shaped convertible collar with hidden stand and lapel Developing a tailored two-piece sleeve with cuff vent Developing a full body lining

268 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear


step 1 Developing the master plan

BACK PITCH BACK NOTCH POINT

Start by selecting the basic men’s upper body sloper, or by drafting the basic sloper according to the instructions on page 40. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the jacket you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 48.

CENTER FRONT CENTRE FRONT

FRONT MASTER FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

MASTER BACKBACK MASTER PLAN PLAN

SIDE SIDESEAM SEAM

CHEST LEVEL CHEST LINE

CENTER BACK CENTRE BACK

Creating the jacket sloper To create a suit jacket sloper from the basic sloper, you need to make some shape adaptations to the front, side, back, and shoulder areas of the pattern, building on the techniques learned in the single-breasted jacket development (pages 252–67).

FRONT FRONT NOTCH PITCH POINT

WAISTLINE WAISTLINE

HIP HIPLEVEL LINE

BACK MASTER PLAN

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

step 2 Developing the hemline

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

SEAM SIDE SEAM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CHEST LEVEL LINE

CENTRE BACK CENTER

• From the hemline square down 2in at the center front, side seam, and center back lines. • Join these three points to form the new hemline.

BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

WAISTLINE

HEMLINE 5 CM 2"

NEW HEMLINE

5 CM 2"

5 CM 2"

Double-breasted Jacket 269


BACK MASTER PLAN

FRONT MASTER PLAN

BACK PITCH POINT

CENTER CENTRE FRONT NECK POINT

" 1 3C⁄8M

1 3C ⁄8"M BACK MASTER PLAN

FRONT HIGH POINT SHOULDER

BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

9 1.5 16"CM

BACK P

5 2" CM

FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

FRONT PITCH

POINT step 3 Developing the new shoulder slope and front CHEST LINE double-breasted extension

CENTRE BACK NECK POINT

0.5 CM

FRONT SHOULDER POINT TIP

BACK BACK SHOULDER SHOULDER POINT TIP

CHEST LINE LEVEL

C

• From the back shoulder tip measure ⁄8in down the armhole and mark; from the front shoulder tip extend the armhole up 3 ⁄8in and mark. From these two new points draw in the new shoulder lines back up to the high point shoulders. • From the center front neck point measure down 9⁄16in and draw in the new neckline up to the front high point shoulder. • FromWAISTLINE the new center front neck point square out 2in; repeat this at the new hemline. Connect these two points to create the double-breasted extension.

CENTRE BACK 1.5 CM

OLDHEMLINE HEMLINE 5 CM

5 CM

NEW HEMLINE NEW HEMLINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN

1.5 CM

BACK MASTER PLAN

5 CM step 4 FRONT PITCH Lowering the armhole and developing the POINT internal shaping

CENTRE BACK CENTER

WAISTLINE

HEMLINE HEMLINE OLD HEMLINE NEW HEMLINE

0.53CM ⁄16"

NEW HEMLINE

270 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

BACK

NEW NEW FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

UNDERARM / UNDERARM SIDE SEAM CORNER POINT

4.5 CM

3 ⁄4CM " 2

SEAM SIDE SEAM

LINE CHEST LEVEL

1.59CM ⁄16"

GRAIN LINE

CENTRE FRONT

• From the underarm / side seam corner measure 3⁄4in down the side seam and using the front and back upper body slopers as a template redraw the armhole from this point, connecting it back up to the shoulder on either side. Draw in the new notches on the lowered armhole. • To shape the center back, measure in 3⁄16in at the new hemline, measure in 9⁄16in at the waistline, and measure in 3 ⁄16WAISTLINE in at the center back neck point. • Connect these points with straight lines to create the new center back line. SIDE SEAM

CENTRE BACK

CHEST LINE

NEW NEW BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

CENTRE BACK

BACK PITCH POINT

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BACK MASTER PLAN

1 CM

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

1 CM

CENTRE FRONT NECK POINT

CENTER CENTRE BACK NECK POINT

FRONT SHOULDER POINT

BACK SHOULDER POINT

3 0.5 16"CM

0.5 CM

NEW HEMLINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

WAISTLINE

HEMLINE 5 CM

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

SIDE SEAM SEAM

CENTRE CENTER BACK

GRAIN LINE

CENTRE FRONT

SIDE SEAM

CENTRE BACK

3

C


0.5 CM

step 5 Developing the side panel

4.5 4" 13⁄CM

WAISTLINE

1 3CM ⁄8"

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

1.59⁄CM 16"

NEW NEW UNDERARM UNDERARM POINT / SIDE SEAM CORNER

SEAM

BACK SIDE SEAM

⁄8CM " 1 3 CM ⁄8 "

BACK SIDE SEAM

13CM ⁄8"

1 19 ⁄2"CM 7

T SIDE FR FRON

CHEST LINE LEVEL

SIDE SEA SEAM M

3 4.51CM ⁄4"

13⁄CM 8" 4 5CM 1 ⁄8"

16.5 6 ⁄2" CM 1

OLD HEMLINE HEMLINE 1 83CM ⁄8"

1 18 7CM ⁄8"

5 CM 2"

SIDE SEAM SEAM SIDE

NEW HEMLINE

4 15CM ⁄8 " 4 15CM ⁄8" 4 15CM ⁄8 " 4 15CM ⁄8"

step 6 Developing the front lapel shaping

WAISTLINE

CENTRE CENTER FRONT FRONT

M SEAM T SIDE FR FRON

SBACKSIDE SIDESEAM SEAM BACK

BACK SIDE SEAM SEAM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

Lapel shape Pitching back and opening the front chest/lapel shape will enable the straight sloper front to follow the contours of a male chest.

415CM ⁄8 "

CHEST LINE LEVEL

K TER BACK CENTRE

CENTRE BACK 1.5 CM

0.5 CM

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

NEW NEW FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

3 1

• Taking volume from the side seam gives a fitted silhouette and will also help you to develop the side panel. From the original side seam at the waistline measure out 3⁄8in into the front and back bodyUNDERARM panels. POINT • Connect CHEST LINE these two points with straight lines up to the new 2 CM underarm / side seam corner and down to the point where the original side seam line intersects the old hemline. • For the front style line, from the original side seam measure 2in along the new hemline toward the front and mark, and measure 15⁄8in along the waistline toward the front and mark. At the new underarm / side seam corner square in 9⁄16in toward the front and mark. WAISTLINE • Join up the three points with straight lines. This is the front style line, which separates the new side panel from the front panel. • Having removed volume at the side seam, you then need to remove additional volume from the back panel, to finish the fitted shape of the jacket. You do this between the new back and side panels. HEMLINE • To create the back style lines, from the center back measure 61⁄NEW 2inHEMLINE along the waistline and mark, and continue to measure 3 ⁄8in and a further 3⁄8in and mark both points. • From the center back measure 71⁄2in along the chest level and mark, and measure a further 3⁄8in and mark. Measure in 71⁄8in along the original hemline and mark. • The back side seams start from a point on the back armhole below the notch; measure up 13⁄4in from the chest level on the center back and then square across to the back armhole and mark the point where the line intersects the armhole. • From this point, starting with a shallow curve, draw the back style lines, intersecting the points marked on the chest level, waistline, and original hemline, and continuing down to the new hemline.

NEW NEW BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

BACK MASTER PLAN

FRONT MASTER PLAN

SIDE SEAM

5 CM

NEW BACK PITCH POINT NEW FRONT PITCH POINT

CENTRE BACK CENTER

BACK MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE

.5 CM

CENTRE FRONT

E

CENTRE BACK NECK POINT

From the chest level measure up 15⁄8in and square a line across; repeat four times.

OLD HEMLINE HEMLINE

NEW HEMLINE

Double-breasted Jacket 271


step 7 Developing the welted breast pocket and side jetted pocket 4 CM

93 1C ⁄2"M

1.5 9CM ⁄16" 1.59CM ⁄16"

LEVEL CHEST LINE

WAISTLINE

⁄8" 8.533CM 47⁄8"CM 12.5

CENTRE CENTER FRONT FRONT

M AM EA SE ES IDE T SID FR FRON

BACK SIDE SEAM SEAM

BBACK SIDE SIDE SEAM SEAM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

5 CM 2"

K BACK TER BAC CENTRE

CENTRE FRONT

AM IDE SE

S FRONT

SBACK SIDE SEAM

BACK SIDE SEAM

GRAIN LINE

9 ⁄16"CM 1.5

31CM ⁄2" 9 9 1.5 ⁄16"CM

9 ⁄16"CM 1.5 9 1.5 ⁄16"CM

" 53⁄4CM 14.5

HEMLINE

HEMLINE NEW HEMLINE

⁄ " CM

3 0.4 16

⁄ " CM

3 0.4 16

step 8 Adding in the volume on the front lapel / chest panel, creating the center dart volume and front hem styling

⁄ " CM

3 0.4 16

⁄ " CM

3 0.4 16

UNDERARM /UNDERARM SIDE SEAM CORNER POINT

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

T M OU E SEA MOV

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

9 ⁄16" 1.5 CM

• From the master plan trace off the front panel only onto a separate piece of paper including all the development in Steps 6 and 7. • Cut along the horizontal lines you drew across the chest and neck from the center front and neck into the shoulder; open each 3⁄16in upward at the front, creating a wedge shape, adding in a total of 15⁄16in. • Tape against a new piece of paper and redraw the front panel blending through the open steps. • When the center dart is sewn up, this will reduce the length of the top of the jetted pocket. To add back this volume, square out 9⁄16in (the width of the dart) from the top of the pocket opening. From here blend a line back up into the front style line finishing at the armhole. • To add style shaping to the center front hem, measure down 3 ⁄4in from the hemline at the new front edge and connect back to the front style line with a smooth curve. • Cut another piece of paper and trace off a new front master plan.

⁄ " CM

3 0.4 16

FRONT SIDE SEAM

CENTRE BACK

4 CM

• For the breast pocket placement, from the center front 4 CM square in 33⁄8in along the chest level; this is the bottom corner of the rectangular welt opening. 4 CM • From this point, draw a line 31⁄2in long at an angle, ending 4 CM 9 ⁄16CHEST in above the chest level. Create a rectangle 9⁄16in wide by LINE 1 3 ⁄2in long. • A center dart is created to run down into the side jetted pocket to give shape to the lower chest. This pocket runs off the front panel into the front style line; when plotting the pocket measurement do not include the dart width, which will be added next. • From the center front measure in 47⁄8in along the chest level andWAISTLINE from here square down to the old hemline. Mark a point on this line 2in below the chest level; this is the top of the dart. • From the front side seam measure in 31⁄2in along the waistline and mark. Measure a further 9⁄16in and mark; this is the dart width. From these points draw two straight lines up to the dart top. HEMLINE • The pocket opening sits 9⁄16in below the waistline. Create 3 9 a rectangle NEW HEMLINE 5 ⁄4in long and ⁄16in wide; this is the pocket opening.

3 24CM "

272 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear


step 9 Developing the shaped convertible collar, coin pocket, and hem shaping

E

A

8"M 381 ⁄C

B

31

3 16

" 5C⁄8M 41

• The welted coin pocket is developed just above the jetted pocket running across the center dart. From the waistline square up 3⁄8in, then create a rectangle 9⁄16in wide by 23⁄8in long, with the measurement split between each side of the dart so that 3⁄4in is toward the center front and 15⁄8in toward the side seam. • At the center front hemline measure back 33⁄4in toward the side seam and mark; measure 85⁄8in up the center front. Use a French curve to give a smooth rounded edge to the bottom corner.

" ⁄M C

Break point and roll line Locate on the pattern the position where you want the collar to break on the new front edge line of the body panel. Consider the proportion of your design and silhouette length. The point at which the front turns over to create a lapel is called the break point (BP) and the line that it turns on is the roll line. The lower down the front your BP is, the wider an opening you will have around the neck silhouette.

C COLLAR NOTCH

2.5

C1M"

2.5 CM 1"

3M " 3C 1 ⁄16

33CM 1 ⁄16"

4.51 CM ⁄4"

CM 52"

3

13⁄CM 8"

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN ROLL LINE LINE CHEST LEVEL

32 CM 4"

3 1 CM ⁄8"

3 CM 17 6 ⁄4"

9 CM 1.5 16"

5 822 ⁄8" CM

1.5 9CM ⁄16"

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

BREAK POINT

14 5CM ⁄8"

• From the high point shoulder measure out 1in and mark point (C). • You will run your roll line through (C); from the waistline measure 63⁄4in up the front, mark, and label break point. • Draw a straight line from here up through (C), continue for 31⁄8in, and mark point (A). • From (A) square 1in back toward the shoulder and mark point (B). • Draw a line from (B) to (C). Square out 13⁄16in from the top of this line toward the shoulder and mark point (D). • From (B) extend the line out 15⁄8in and mark point (E). This is the width of the collar (23⁄4in) at the center back neck curve. • From (E), starting at a right angle, draw out the collar shape that you require, finishing the collar notch 23⁄8in in from the extended front. • To shape the front of the jacket lapel, measure in 3⁄8in from the center front neck point. From this point draw a graduated line back down the center front to give shape, and draw up 13⁄16in to create the collar point. Draw a line from the collar point back to the end of the collar notch. • From (D) draw a line back toward the shoulder line, crossing it 3⁄8in back from the high point shoulder, and blend in to the curved neck shape—find the angle by measuring in 13⁄4in from the collar notch and then up 13⁄16in until it connects to the neckline.

31 8C "M

D

HEMLINE NEW HEM HEMLINE NEW LINE 9.5 33CM ⁄4"

Checking the shape It is always important to check the shape you have created by folding back the paper on the roll line to assess it; redraw and develop until you are satisfied. The sequence above is a method widely used to draft a basic tailored collar. Variations can be found in many patternmaking books, old and new.

Double-breasted Jacket 273


M 4 C

FRONT FRONT LEFT LEFT CUT 1 CUT 1 SELF SELF

CENTRE FRONT FRONT CENTER

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE

FACING LINE

CENTRE FRONT

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front panel to create the final front right pattern, excluding the welted breast pocket and the collar development. • To trace off the left side final front pattern, reverse the master and copy the underside. Mark the breast pocket and omit the welted coin pocket.

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FRONT RIGHT FRONT CUT 1 SELF

12 CM

CENTRE FRONT FRONT CENTER

step 10 Front right and front left body patterns

12 CM

4 CM

4 CM

5 ⁄8M " 4 1C

step 11 Developing the front facing pattern FRONT FACING CUT 1 PR SELF SELF FRONT LEFT CUT 1 SELF

3 12 4CM ⁄4"

145CM ⁄8"

274 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

14 5CM ⁄8"

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CENTRE FRONT FRONT CENTER

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FACING LINE

CENTRE FRONT

GRAIN LINE

3 124CM ⁄4"

CENTRE FRONT

GRAIN LINE

• Develop the front facing using the front right panel pattern. • From the high point shoulder, measure FRONT RIGHT CUT 1shoulder SELF 15⁄8in back along the seam; this is the width of the facing. • From the jacket front, measure in 43⁄4in along the chest level and mark, and repeat at the waistline. • From the hemline, measure 15⁄8in up the side seam and from here square across toward the center front. • Draw a blended line joining these points from the shoulder seam through the chest and waistlines and continue straight down toward the line you drew at the hem until the two intersect 15⁄8in above the hemline. • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the final facing pattern.


3.5 CM 3.5 CM 3.5 CM

CB

step 12 Developing the shaped convertible collar and hidden stand COLLAR MASTER PLAN

• Remove the stand shape from the development by tracing onto a separate piece of paper; double it over to create the 2 CM full stand shape, indicating the vertical cut lines. • Cut down the vertical lines on the full stand shape, leaving 4 CM COLLAR them attached at the neckline by a fraction of an inch. ANGLE Overlap the sections along the top edge, moving them 1⁄8in toward the center back; this will bring the neckline up. • Trace off the half top collar shape onto a separate piece of paper. Cut down the vertical lines from the outer edge, leaving them attached at the bottom by a fraction of an inch. Starting from the center back, open out each line by 3⁄16in, curving the top collar down. • Remove 3⁄8in from the center back, which is the amount lost COLLAR MASTER by closing the stand up. PLAN 0.4 CM

0.4 CM

0.4 CM

CB REMOVE

0.9 CM

• Trace off the half collar development from Step 9 onto a 2 CM 2 CM separate piece of paper. 2 CM 3 NECK NEup • To develop half the concealed stand shape, measure ⁄L4Iin the center back from the neckline and mark; measure 15⁄8in in from the point at the angle of the front neck curve and mark. Connect these points with a curved line. • From the center back measure 3⁄4in along the neckline and 13⁄8in along the outer edge and mark, repeat twice; divide the collar into four sections by connecting these points to form cut lines through the collar shape.

3.51 ⁄ CM 3.5 1 ⁄ CM " " 1 ⁄ CM 3.5 " 3

3

8

3

8

8

CM 1 8

⁄0".3

⁄ " 3 CM 0. 18

8

CB CB

1

1

8

1

8

4 CM

8

COLLAR ANGLE

⁄ " CM 0.3

COLLAR COLLAR STAND STAND

0⁄ ".3 CM

0.4 CM

0.4 CM

LINE NECKL NECKINE

COLLAR MASTER PLAN

CB CB

REMOVE REMOVE

3

3

COLLAR MASTER 1 5⁄C 4 8" M PLAN

2 CM

CM

CM ⁄0.4 16" 3

⁄0. 16"4

CM ⁄0.9 8"

0.9 CM

0.4 CM

NECKLINE

3

CB REMOVE

2 CM

COLLAR ANGLE

0⁄16.4 " CM

CB

2 CM

2 CM

NECKLINE

1

⁄4"

3

⁄" CM 0.3

3.5 CM 3.5 CM 3.5 CM 3 2 CM 3 ⁄4" ⁄4" 2 CM 3 ⁄4" 2 CM NE 3 CKLINE 3 ⁄4" ⁄4"

3 2 CM ⁄4"

⁄"3 0. CM

CB

COLLAR MASTER PLAN

COLLAR MASTER PLAN COLLAR MASTER PLAN

STEP 12

COLLAR STAND

ALIGNMENT NOTCH

ALIGNMENT ALIGNMENT NOTCH

ALIGNMENT ALIGNMENT NOTCH

0.3 CM

0.3 CM

0.3 CM

STEP 12

CB NECKLINE

ALIGNMENT ALIGNMENT NOTCH

ALIGNMENT ALIGNMENT NOTCH

TOP COLLAR CUT 1 PR SELF

G

E

N

LI

N

AI

R

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the full stand pattern.

CB

0.3 CM

0.3 CM

0.3 CM

STAND • Trace off the top collar onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape. NECKLINE

0.3 CM

0.3 CM

0.3 CM

COLLAR

0.3 CM

0.3 CM

0.3 CM

step 13 collar and COLLAR stand patterns

ALIGNMENT NOTCH

TOP COLLAR CUT 1 PR SELF

E N LI N AI R G

COLLAR STAND CUT 1 PR SELF

E N LI IN RA G

Double-breasted Jacket 275


step 14 Developing the side panel and hem ALLOWANCE SIDE MASTER PLAN PLAN

BACK SIDE SEAM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the side panel from Step 5 onto a separate piece of paper. • Next you need to remove the internal volume by closing the dart in the side seam. Cut down both sides of the side seam to the bottom of the shaping and out along the waistline, making sure to leave the shapes connected by a sliver of paper at the edges so that the side lengths do not change when manipulated. • Reposition by closing up the shape and tape together to redraw the new side panel shape. • At the hemline measure 15⁄8in down on both sides and square across to create a rectangular box; this is the hem allowance.

SIDE M PLA

WAIST

CLOSE DART

CLOSE DART

WAISTLINE

1.5 CM

20 CM

FOLD

HEMLINE

4 15CM ⁄8 "

FACING ALLOWANCE

step 15 Developing the side vent

4 15CM ⁄8 "

FOL 4 CM

4 CM

Parts of the vent The vent development has two parts. One MASTER the is a side vent facing that sits SIDE under PLAN back body panel, attached to the side panel. The vent shape is doubled so that it can be folded back on itself to create a facing with a mitered top. The second part is a facing that is developed on the back panel and sits over the side vent: This is a single shape that acts as a facing when turned in.

BACK SIDE SIDE SEAM SEAM

SIDE CUT 1 PR SEL

SIDE SEAM

1.59CM ⁄16"

FOLD

77⁄8" 20 CM

FOLD 4 CM

FOLD FOLD

4 15CM ⁄8"

4 15CM ⁄8"

276 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

MASTER SIDE MASTER PLAN PLAN

WAISTLINE

CLOSE DART

CLOSE DART

WAISTLINE

• To add the side vent to the side panel, square out 15⁄8in from the back style line at the hemline and mark. Then measure out a further 15⁄8in and mark. Square up 15⁄8in (the hem allowance measurement) and mark, then a further 77⁄8in (the vent length) and square back into the back panel. • Measure 15⁄8in back along this line and square down to the mark on the hemline. • Extend the 15⁄8in facing line from the side panel across the vent. • At the top of the vent, measure up 9⁄16in on the outsideFOLD line HEMLINE and again on the back style line. Connect these two points FACING 4 CM back down to the top of the center line of the vent. This creates the mitered corner at the top of the vent.

4 CM

4 15CM ⁄8"


step 16 side pattern • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the side panel pattern.

SIDE SIDE SELF CUT CUT11PR PR

SELF

SIDE SEAM

STEP 15 CENTER BACK NECK POINT

M

WAISTLINE

145⁄8"C

GRAIN LINE

SIDE MASTER PLAN

FOLD FOLD

15⁄8" 4 CM

FOLD FOLD

CHEST LINE

step 17 Developing the back hem, vent, and back neck facing • From the master plan trace the back panel onto a separate piece of paper. • From the hemline measure down 15⁄8in on both sides and square across to form a rectangle; this is the hem allowance. • From the bottom of the hem allowance measure out a further 15⁄8in from the front style line, then square up 15⁄8in (the hem allowance measurement), then a further 77⁄8in (the vent length) and square back in to the side panel. From this point measure up 9⁄16in on the side seam and draw an angled line back to the top corner of the vent shape. • The back neck facing is 15⁄8in in width to match the front; measure 15⁄8in down from the center back neck point and 15⁄8in down the shoulder and connect these two points with a curved line following the shape of the neckline.

CENTRE BACK

CHEST LEVEL

CENTER BACK

FOLD

BACK MASTER PLAN MASTER BACK PLAN

WAISTLINEAA WAISTLINE 9 ⁄16" 1.5 CM

20 CM

77⁄8"

15⁄8" 4 CM

145⁄8CM "

ALLOWANCE FACING

⁄8" 4 1CM 5

Double-breasted Jacket 277


GRAIN LI

4C M

CENTRE BA

4 CM

STEP 16A

WAISTLINEAA

step 18 1.5 CM Back panel and back neck facing patterns BACK BACK CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 PR SELF

FOLD

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FACING NECK FACING BACK NECK BACK SELF 1 SELF CUT 1 CUT

GRAIN LINE

STEP 16B

GRAINLINE

CENTRE BACK

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the back20 CM BACK MASTER panel pattern. PLAN • Trace off the back neck facing onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on4 CM page 50, create 4 CM FACING the full pattern shape. 4 CM CHEST LINE

WAISTLINEAA

1.5 CM

20 CM

4 CM

FOLD FOLD

4 CM

FACING 4 CM

STEP 16B

4911⁄16.5"CM

step 19 Developing the breast pocket top and bottom bags

3 8" CM

9 16" 1.5 CM

1

LINE HNE ITCH TCLI STI TO TOPPST

NE LINE H LI TC CH TIIT M SST OOM TTTT BOBO PEINNGING ETOPOEN CKET PO POCK

1 CM

318CM "

⁄16"

TOP BREAST POCK CUT 1 POCKETING

12.5 47⁄8CM "

11.5 2" 41⁄CM

278 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

⁄ "

CM 1.5 9

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE

FACING NECK BACK • From the front left final pattern in Step 9, trace off the breast CUT 1 SELF pocket opening onto a separate piece of paper so that you have a rectangle 31⁄2in long by 9⁄16in wide drawn at an angle. • Extend the top stitch line by 9⁄16in to the right and 3⁄8in to the left, and extend the bottom stitch line by 9⁄16in to the left and 3 ⁄8in to the right. • Connecting these points on the left, draw a 47⁄8in vertical line down. Connecting the points on the right, draw a 53⁄4in vertical line down. Square across 41⁄2in at the bottom to connect these two lines (the width of the pocket bag).

E

NE CU CUTTLILIN

9

CM 1.516

3 CM ⁄4" 514.5


LINE STITCH CHPLINE ITTO TOP ST T LINE NE CU ITCH LI NE OMLIST CUT LINE BO ITCH G STTT OPENIN ET BOTTOM POCK ING EN OP POCKET

1 CM

1 CM

3

1.5 CM

1 CM

1 CM 8"

13CM 8"

3

1 CM

1 CM

8" 1 CM

TOP BREAST POCKET BAG TOP BREAST POCKET BAG CUT 1 POCKETING BAG 1 POCKETING POCKET CUT TOP BREAST

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

1.5 CM

step 21 DEVELOPING THE Breast pocket welt

⁄8

13CM"

• Mirror this parallelogram along the fold line. • Add a 9⁄16in seam allowance to both long sides of the shape and a 3⁄8in allowance to the shorter sides.

1.5 CM 9 16"

⁄2" 391CM

⁄8

13CM"

Welts If your welted pocket is angled, then the welt will need to reflect this. Welts can be the same size or larger than pocket openings and are doubled over so they have two layers of fabric, with a fusing layer in between for rigidity.

FOLD

CM 9 16 1.5 "

FOLD

2.5 CM

1"

GRAIN LINE

TER

CEN FOLDINLIENE LD L CE ORE FNT ⁄2" 39 1CM

21.5"

CM

SELF CUT 1 USE F CUT 1

2.51"

CM

91.516CM "

LD OLD FFO

⁄8"

BREAST POCKET BAG 1 POCKETING

B

CM 2.5 1"

13CM

1 CM

BREAST POCKET WELTWELT KET CUT 1 SELF T POC EA1SFUSE RCUT

⁄2" 391CM

CM 1.5 9 16 "

1 CM

31 CM 8"

• From the front left pattern in Step 9, trace one long side of the breast pocket opening onto a separate piece of paper so that you have a line 31⁄2in long at the same angle as the breast pocket itself. This will become the center fold line. Copy the direction of the grainline across, too. • Parallel to the grainline, draw 1in lines up from both ends of the line and mark. Connect these marks to create a parallelogram.

GRAIN LINE GRAIN LINE

1 CM

BOTTOM BREAST POCKET BAG CUT 1 POCKETING

CM

CUT 1 POCKETING

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE

2.5

11.5 CM

GRAIN LINE

11.5 CM

1.5 CM

2.5 CM

BOTTOM BREAST BREAST POCKET BAG BOTTOM POCKET BAG 1 POCKETING CUT BREAST BOTTOM POCKET BAG CUT 1 POCKETING

CUT 1 POCKETING

14.5 CM

1.5 CM

1 CM

3 CM 1 8"

14.5 CM

1 CM

2.5

CM

1.5 C

1 CM

1.5 CM

GRAIN LINE

11.5 CM

11.5 CM

1 CM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the pocket bag shape and add a 3⁄8in seam allowance above the top stitch line to create the final top pocket bag pattern. • Trace off the pocket bag shape again as far as the bottom stitch line, then add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to create the final bottom pocket bag pattern.

GRAIN LINE

M

step 20 Breast pocket bag patterns

Double-breasted Jacket 279


step 22 Developing the coin pocket top and bottom bag • Draw a rectangle 23⁄8in wide and 21⁄2in tall (the size of the coin pocket bag). Label the top edge as the bottom stitch line and add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides. This is the bottom coin pocket bag. • Draw another rectangle the same size and again label the top edge as the bottom stitch line.

• Square up 9⁄16in on both sides and connect these points to create a second rectangle. • Label the top edge of this rectangle as the top stitch line. Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides. This is the top coin pocket bag.

STEP 19C

STEP 19C STEP 19B

1 CM

1 CM

1.5 CM

3 1 CM " 1 8CM

1 CM 3 8"

⁄16"

91.5 CM 16"

1.59CM

STITCH LINE BOTTOM BOTTOM STITCH LINE

1 CM

6 CM

FOLD

2 CM

6.5 21⁄2CM "

6.5 21CM ⁄2"

1.5 CM

1 CM 6.5 2 ⁄2"

6.5 CM

1 CM

31 CM 8"

1 CM 3 8" 1 CM

⁄8"

13CM

⁄8" 263CM

31 CM 8"

1 CM

⁄8"

13CM

⁄8"

13CM

1 CM

263CM ⁄8"

31 CM 8"

31 CM 8"

STEP 19B

1 CM

STEP 19 A

⁄18"CM

step 23 DEVELOPING THE Coin pocket welt • On a separate piece of paper, draw a horizontal box 23⁄8in long and 11⁄2in wide to create a rectangular-shaped welt. • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line down the center, and label it fold. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to each end and a 9⁄16in seam allowance to each long side to create the final pocket welt pattern.

1 CM

⁄18"CM

23⁄86" CM

3

3

⁄16"

⁄16"

9 CM 1.5

1.5 9 CM

COIN POCKET WELT COIN POCKET WELT SELF CUT 11 CUT SELF CUT 1 FUSE CUT 1 FUSE

⁄4"

3

2 CM

FOLD FOLD

32 CM 4"

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

1 CM

BOTTOM COIN POCKET BAG CUT 1 POCKETING

GRAINLINEGRAIN LINE

1.5 CM

TOP COIN POCKET BAG CUT 1 POCKETING

TOP COIN POCKET BAG CUT 1 POCKETING

GRAINLINE

2 CM 6.5 ⁄2" 21CM

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE

FOLD

6.5 CM

BOT

2 CM

POCKET BAG CUT 1 POCKETING

1 CM

LINE STITCHLINE BOTTOM BOTTOM STITCH

COIN POCKET WELT CUT 1 SELF CUT 1 FUSE COIN POCKET BOTTOM BOTTOM COIN BAG CUT 1 POCKETING

2 CM

1 CM

STITCH LINE TOPTOP STITCH LINE

⁄8"

⁄8 "

1 CM 3 8"1.5 CM

11.5 3CMCM

31 CM 8"

1 CM 3

3 1 CM " 18CM

6 CM 23⁄86" CM

23⁄86"CM

31 CM 8"

STEP 19 A

1.5 CM

3

2 CM 4"

TOP CO CUT 1 P

FOLD FOLD

2 3CM 4"

6.5 CM

⁄16"

91.5 CM 16"

1.5 9 CM

3 1 CM 8"

6 CM

23⁄8"

3 1 CM 8"

1 CM

1 CM

280 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear


step 24 Developing the top and bottom side pocket bags • Square up 9⁄16in on both sides and connect these points to create a second rectangle. Label the top edge of this rectangle as the top stitch line. Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides. This is the top side pocket bag.

• Draw a rectangle 53⁄4in wide and 61⁄4in tall (the size of the coin pocket bag). Label the top edge as the bottom stitch line and add a 3⁄8in seam allowance to all sides. This is the bottom side pocket bag. • Draw another rectangle the same size and again label the top edge as the bottom stitch line.

STEP 20 A

STEP 20 C

1 CM 1 CM

8" 1 CM

1.5 CM

⁄8"

⁄8 "

13 CM

3

3

" CM 18

⁄16"

⁄8"

STITCH LINE

LINE STITCH TOPTOP STITCH

1.5 9 CM 13CM

13CM

LINE BOTTOM STITCH BOTTOM

⁄8 "

1 CM

3 ⁄4" CM 514.5

3

3

8" 1 CM

3 514.5 ⁄4"CM

13CM 8"

STEP 20 B

1 CM

14.5 CM

LINE

STITCH LINE BOTTOM BOTTOM STITCH

1.5 CM

⁄16"

9

LINE

1 CM 1 CM

1 CM

SIDE POCKET JET CUT 2 PR SELF

1.5 CM

GRAIN LINE

16 CM

61⁄4"

⁄8"

13CM 8"

16 CM

⁄8"

3 1 CM 8"

step 25 DEVELOPING THE Side pocket jet

3

1 CM 8"

⁄8"

3 CM ⁄4" 514.5

1 3 CM

3 CM 514.5 ⁄4"

31 CM 8"

1 CM

16 61CM ⁄4"

13 CM 8"

13CM

1 CM

1 CM

16 CM

GRAINLINE

61⁄4"

1 CM

14.5 CM

GRAINLINE

16 CM

61⁄4"

1 CM

1.5 CM

FOLD

CUT 1 PR POCKETING

1 CM

BOTTOM SIDE POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

16 CM

TOP SIDE

GRAIN LINE BAG SIDE POCKET TOP POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

GRAIN LINE

BOTTOM SIDE POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

14.5 CM

1.5 CM

STEP 20 B STEP 20 C

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1.5 CM

1 CM 1 CM

16 CM

1 CM

1 CM 1 CM

⁄"

3

53⁄ "

CM 18

14.5 CM4

1 CM

⁄8"

13CM

9 1.5 CM 16"

SIDE POCKET JET CUT 2 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FOLD FOLD

⁄16"

1.5 9 CM

⁄8 "

13CM

31 CM 8"

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE

16 CM

SIDE POCKET JET CUT 2 PR SELF

31 CM 8"

BOTTOM SIDE POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

14.5 CM

⁄8 "

3

BOTTOM STITCH LINE

TOP SIDE POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

1 CM

1

1 CM

BOTTOM STITCH LINE

16 CM

14.5 CM

• On a separate piece of paper, draw a horizontal box 5 ⁄2in long (the width of the side pocket opening) by 9⁄16in wide to create the side pocket jet. • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line down the center, and label it fold. • Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides to create the final side pocket jet pattern. TOP STITCH LINE

31 CM 8"

3 CM ⁄4" 514.5

⁄8"

1 CM

3

16 CM

1 CM

1 CM 1 CM

14.5 CM

1 CM

1C

3 CM 1

STEP 20 A

1 CM

1 1 CM

1 CM

Double-breasted Jacket 281


GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FRONT LINING

0.5 3CM ⁄16"

3 2 CM ⁄4"

CUT 1 PR LINING

UNDERARM / SIDE SEAM UNDERARM CORNER POINT

30.16 5"CM

0.53CM ⁄16"

step 26 Developing the front lining • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off a copy of the front body panel from Step 9. Remove the facing shape from the front; the remaining shape will become the front lining. • Next you need to add ease by increasing the armhole width to allow for movement. At the shoulder tip measure out 3 ⁄16in and mark, and up 3⁄16in and mark. Find the new shoulder tip, and draw a straight line back toward the front high point shoulder. • From the top of the front style line measure up 3⁄16in and mark, and out 3⁄16in and mark. Find the point and using a French curve draw a line 3⁄16in out from the original armhole back up to the new shoulder tip. • From the new point blend the front side seam down to meet the original hemline. • From the hemline extend the front style line and the front edge down by 3⁄4in and square across; this will create an overlap to allow movement when bending over in the garment. • Draw a fold line 3⁄8in up from the new hemline.

30.16 5"CM

SHOULDER POINT TIP

FRONT HIGH POINT SHOULDER

FOLD NEW HEML INE INE

282 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

⁄4CM "

3 2


HOULDER OINT HIGH POINT SHOULDER

3 ⁄4"CM 2

step 27 Developing the back lining

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

CENTER BACK BACK CENTRE

BACK LINING BACK LINING

CUT LINING CUT1 PR 1 PR LINING

8

CM 30.5 16"

FRONT

FRONT UNDERARM / SIDE UNDERARM SEAM CORNER POINT

CM 3 0.5 16"

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE

SIDE LINING SIDE LINING

CUT LINING CUT1 1PRPR LINING

CUT 1 PR LINING

PLEAT 31.5 CM

BACK LINING

INE

3 2 ⁄4"CM

CM

CUT 1 PR LINING

FRONT LINING

FOLD NEW HEML

UNDERARM UNDERARM / SIDE SEAM POINT CORNER

3 16CM " 0.5

0.5

2 CM

0.5

CM

30.5 16"CM

SHOULDER POINT

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off a copy of the side panel from Step 15. Remove the hem allowance and the 0.5 CM UNDERARM vent shape; the remaining shape will become the side lining. POINT • Next you need to add ease to the underarm shape to allow the lining to expand, giving increased movement to the armhole width. At the top of the front and back style lines measure up 3⁄16in and mark, and measure out 3⁄16in and mark. Find the new points (the front and back underarm / side seam corners), and using a French curve connect them up at a distance of 3⁄16in out from the original armhole. • From the underarm / side seam corner blend the style lines down to meet the original hemline. • From the hemline extend the back and front style lines down 2 CM FOLD 2 CM by 3⁄4in and square across; this will create an overlap to allow movement when bending over in the garment. • Draw a fold line 3⁄8in up from the new hemline. GRAIN LINE

0.5 CM

2 CM

0.53 ⁄CM 16"

CM

2 CM

NEW HE step 28MLINE Developing the side lining

0.5 CM

3

POINT

CENTRE BACK

FOLD

POINT

3 ⁄16" CM 0.5

FOLD FOLD

BACK UNDERARM / BACK SIDE SEAMUNDERARM CORNER

0.5 CM

NDERARM OINT

PLEAT PLEAT 12 ⁄ "CM 31.5

GRAIN LINE

FRONT LINING

2 CM

3 2 CM ⁄4"

0.5 CM

SHOULDER POINT

CUT 1 PR LINING

.5 CM

BACK SHOULDER SHOULDER TIP

03⁄1.65"

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off a copy of the back body panel from Step 17. Remove the hem allowance shape; the remaining shape will become the back lining. • You need to add ease to the center back to allow the lining to expand across the shoulderblades and also to increase the armhole to allow for movement. • Fold over the vent shape onto the pattern, trace around it, and then remove the vent and its negative shape from the back style line. • From the center back neck point measure out 3⁄4in and then square down 123⁄8in and square back in; this will become the pleat at the center back. • From the back shoulder tip measure out 3⁄16in and mark, and up 3⁄16in and mark. Find the new back shoulder tip and draw a straight line from here back toward the high point shoulder. • From the top of the back style line measure out 3⁄16in and mark. From this new point, and using a French curve, draw a line 3⁄16in out from the original armhole back up to the new shoulder tip. • From the new point blend the back style line down to meet the original hemline. • From the hemline extend the center back seam and the side vent seam down by 3⁄4in and square across; this will create an overlap to allow movement when bending over in the garment. • Draw a fold line 3⁄8in up from the new hemline.

0.5 CM

M

03⁄1.65"

CM

0.5 CM

2 CM

⁄4"

2 3CM

FOLD FOLD

⁄4"

2 3 CM

Double-breasted Jacket 283


step 29 Developing the two-piece tailored sleeve

Measurements required to develop the sleeve Measurements required to draft the tailored two-piece sleeve are as follows. • Armhole 207⁄8in + 15⁄8in ease = 221⁄2in. (Take this measurement from the basic upper body sloper.) • Sleeve length to wrist = 251⁄4in. (Taken from the shoulder tip, running down the back of the elbow to the wrist; extra length can be added at this point to suit your design.) • Top of sleeve cap to elbow length = 133⁄4in. • Upper biceps circumference = 16in. (This measurement is taken round the upper arm; extra width “ease” can be added for movement.) • Cuff measurement = 113⁄4in. Remove 3 ⁄8in from each side to reduce the cuff width from the basic tapered sloper, which is 125⁄8in. • Sleeve cap height = 7in.

• From (B) measure out 1in and mark point (D), and measure in 1in and mark point (E). From (C) measure in 3⁄8in and mark point (F), and measure out 3⁄8in and mark point (G). • To establish the front notch on the armhole divide the sleeve cap height (7in) by 2 to give 31⁄2in, and subtract 3⁄4in to give 23⁄4in. This will ensure a rectangular shape to the sleeve cap instead of the square shape that would occur if the sleeve cap were just divided in half. From (B) measure up 23⁄4in, make a mark and label it front notch. • From (4) square out to the left to intersect the line from (5) to (7) and mark point (H), and square out to the right to intersect the line from (6) to (8) and mark point (I). This is the elbow level. • From (H) measure out 3⁄8in and mark point (J), and measure in 15⁄8in and mark point (K).

5

1

10.5 41⁄8CM "

6

10.541CM ⁄8"

5.8 23⁄8"CM

251⁄4"

ELBOW LINE LEVEL 4

M

CENTRE LINE CENTER BOTTOM SLEEVE UNDERSLEEVE CUFF CUFF POINTPOINT 13 5" CM

⁄4CM "

3 2

7

I

41

5 CM 8"

UNDERS R SLE LEEEV VEEFR FOON RETAR SE MAM SEAM

TOP SLEEVE SLEEVE FRONT FOREARM SEAM SEAM

3 1 CM ⁄8 "

⁄4CM "

3 CM 2 ⁄4"

L

K

H

3 2

J

G

M SEAM K SEA BACK VE BAC LEEVE ERSSLEE UND FRONT 1 3CM ⁄8 " 1 3CM ⁄8 " TOP SLEEVE BAC K SEAM

2.5 CM 1"

2.5 CM 1"

3

SLEEVE MASTER PATTERN

TOP SLEEVE CUFF POINT

284 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

F LINE C UNDERARM BICEPS LEVEL

E

B

D

BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

2.5 CM 1"

17.6 CM 7" 3 6.9 2 ⁄4"CM

353CM ⁄4" 13

FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

TOP SLEEVE CUFF POINT

• Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of your sleeve or the arm length of your fit model. • Draw a 251⁄4in vertical line down the center and label it center line; label the top of this line (1) and the bottom (2). This is the length of the sleeve. • From (1) measure down 7in (the sleeve cap height, or onethird of the armhole measurement, not including ease) and label point (3). • From (1) measure down 133⁄4in (the elbow length) and label point (4). • Divide the armhole measurement (221⁄2in) by 6 to give 33⁄4in and add 3⁄8in volume to give 41⁄8in. From (1) square out 41⁄8in to the left and to the right and label these points (5) and (6). • From (2) measure out 41⁄8in to the left and to the right and label these points (7) and (8). • Connect points (5), (6), (7), (8) to form a rectangle. • Divide the sleeve cap height (7in) by 3 to give 23⁄8in. From (6) measure down 23⁄8in, make a mark and label it back notch. From the back notch square in 1in and mark point (A); this is the top point of the back seam on the undersleeve. • From (3) square out to the left to intersect the line from (5) to (7) and mark point (B), and square out to the right to intersect the line from (6) to (8) and mark point (C). This is the biceps level.

A

17 6 3⁄4"CM CUFF H EMLINES

N 2

8


• Measure the length of this line and compare it to the measurement of the armhole on the front and back patterns. Here the length should be 117⁄8in. Adjust the curves until the line is the correct measurement. • Using a French curve, draw in the top of the undersleeve with convex curve starting at (E) up to (A). • Again, measure this line and adjust it until it is the same measurement as the armhole on the front and back patterns—in this case 87⁄8in. • Draw in the back seam of the top sleeve with a blended line from the back notch through points (G) to (I) and continue down to (N). • Draw in the back seam of the undersleeve with a blended line from (A) through (F) to (I) and also continue with this seam on the same line as the top sleeve down to (N).

STEP 25 A

step 30 Developing the final top sleeve pattern with cuff vent

TOP TOPSLEEVE SLEEVE

CUT SELF CUT11PR PR SELF

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the top sleeve onto a separate piece of paper. • From the bottom of the sleeve measure down 13⁄16in and draw a rectangular box to create the facing strip. • Extend the length of the cuff facing by 13⁄16in at the back seam and square up 4in to create a rectangular box 13⁄16in in width. This is the cuff extension. • Measure a further 9⁄16in up the back seam and join this point to the outer corner of the box, creating an angle and shape similar to the center back vent. • The corner is folded to create a mitered corner during construction.

1.5 C9⁄M 16

FOLD FO LD CUFF CU FFFAFA CICI NGNG

31 3C ⁄16"M 3 3 1CM ⁄16"

3 CM 1 3⁄16"

CM

FO

FOLD LD

"

4" 10

• From (7) measure up 3⁄4in and from this point measure out 3 ⁄4in and mark point (L); this is the top sleeve cuff point. Measure in 3⁄4in and mark point (M); this is the undersleeve cuff point. • The cuff circumference is 113⁄4in. Divide this between the top and undersleeve so that the top sleeve cuff width is 63⁄4in and the undersleeve is 5in. This allows the top sleeve seams to fall toward the back of the arm, slightly out of view. • From (L) draw a line 63⁄4in long to intersect the line from (7) to (8) and mark point (N). From (M) draw a line 5in long to intersect the line from (7) to (8), also at point (N). These are the cuff hemlines. • Draw in the top sleeve front seam by drawing a blended line connecting the points from (L) through (J) to (D). • Draw in the undersleeve front seam by drawing a blended line connecting the points from (M) through (K) to (E). • Using a French curve, draw in the top sleeve cap starting at (D) with a concave curve through the front notch where you reverse the curve to a convex curve up to (1) and back down to the back notch with a similar convex curve.

Double-breasted Jacket 285


GRAIN LINE

step 31 Developing the final undersleeve pattern with cuff vent

286 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

CUT 1 1 PRPR SELF CUT SELF

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

CM

LD F FOOLD

LD FO FOLD

GG FA ACCININ FF CUFFF CU

⁄ "

1M 3C 3 16

3

3 CM

3 1C⁄16M"

NG

4" 10

FOLD CUFF FACI

3 CM

3 CM

1⁄ .5 CM

9 16"

10 CM

FOLD

1.5 CM

UNDER SLEEVE UNDERSLEEVE

CUT 1 PR SELF

TOP SLEEVE

• Trace off the undersleeve onto a separate piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, reverse it by turning it over. • From the bottom of the sleeve measure down 13⁄16in and draw a rectangular box to create the facing strip. • Extend the length of the cuff facing by 13⁄16in at the back seam and square up 4in to create a rectangular box 13⁄16in in width. This is the cuff extension. • Measure a further 9⁄16in up the back seam and join this point to the outer corner of your rectangular box, creating an angle and shape similar to the center back vent. • The corner is folded to create a mitered corner during construction.

133 ⁄16C" M


step 32 Developing the final two-piece sleeve lining patterns

BACK SHOULDER TIP 0.53 ⁄CM 16"

3 0.5 ⁄16"CM 0.5 CM

BACK SHOULDER POINT BACK SHOULDER POINT 0.5 CMTIP

30.5"CM 16

0.5 CM

CROWN POINT TOP OF CROWN SLEEVE CAP POINT

3 0.5 16"CM

0.5 CM

Matching the measurements Having enlarged the armhole of the body panel lining, we will now increase the sleeve cap so that the measurements match. At the cuff hem we will increase the length of the lining so that when the arm is raised the lining will not pull the outer sleeve.

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off a copy of the top sleeve from the sleeve master plan. • From the shoulder tip measure up 3⁄16in and mark, and from the front and back shoulder tips measure out 3⁄16in and mark, and measure up 3⁄16in and mark. Find the new points and connect these to new shoulder tip with a curved line. • From the new shoulder tips draw a line down to blend in with the cuff hem. • From the cuff hem measure down 3⁄4in and square across to increase the length of the lining. Draw a fold line 3⁄8in inside the new hemline. • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the undersleeve lining pattern. • At the top of the front and back shoulder tips measure up 3 ⁄16in and mark, and measure out 3⁄16in and mark; connect these points with a curved line. • From the new shoulder tips draw a line down to blend in with the cuff hem. • From the cuff hem measure down 3⁄4in and square across to increase the length of the lining. Draw a fold line 3⁄8in inside the new hemline.

30.5 16"CM

0.5 CM

0.5 CM

3 0.5 16"CM

3 0.5 ⁄16"CM 0.5 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

3 0.5 16"CM

FRONT SHOULDER POINT FRONT SHOULDER POINT TIP 0.5 CM

0.5 CM

3 0.5 16"CM

0.5 CM

2 CM 2 C3⁄M 4"

FOLD

FOLD

UNDER SLEEVE LINING LINING UNDERSLEEVE UNDER SLEEVE LINING CUT 1 PR LINING CUT 1 PR LINING

TOP SLEEVE LINING TOP SLEEVE LINING CUT 1 PR LINING CUT 1 PR LINING

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

0.53CM ⁄16"

FRONT SHOULDER TIP

2 CM 3 C 2 ⁄4" M

3 4" 2 CM ⁄

2 CM

FOLD FOLD

3 ⁄4CM 2 "

2 CM

Double-breasted Jacket 287


pattern Waxed Jacket

This pattern includes development of the following features: Adding volume to the side seam Enlarging the neckline Creating a sewn-on front placket Extending the hemline Creating side vents Developing a waist belt Dropping the shoulder Lowering the armhole Developing breast and front patch pockets with gussets and flaps Developing a back envelope pocket with side zipper Developing a shaped convertible collar with stand Developing raglan sleeves with elbow patches Developing a full body lining

288 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear


BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

step 1 Developing the master plan

FRONT NOTCH PITCH POINT

CENTRE CENTER FRONT FRONT

FRONT MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BACK MASTER PLAN

SIDE SEAM SEAM

Start by selecting the basic men’s upper body sloper, or by drafting the basic sloper according to the instructions on page 40. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the jacket you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 48.

CENTRE CENTER BACK

CHESTLEVEL LINE CHEST

WAISTLINE

13⁄8C "M

31 8C "M

03⁄1.56 C " M

3 CM 2 ⁄4"

NEW BACK NOTCH CHEST LEVEL LINE

3 24CM "

3 ⁄8" 3.5 1CM

NEW FRONT NOTCH 3 ⁄8" 3.5 1CM

HEMLINE 3 11 4CM ⁄8 "

113⁄8CM 4 " NEW HEMLINE

waxed jacket 289

CENTRE BACK

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

WAISTLINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BACK MASTER PLAN

NEW SIDE SEAM

NEW UNDERARM UNDERARM / SIDEPOINT SEAM CORNER

3 2 CM ⁄4"

• From the center front neck point measure down 3⁄4in and at the front high point shoulder measure in 3⁄16in; repeat at the back by measuring in 3⁄16in from the back high point shoulder. Using the basic upper body sloper as a template draw in the new front and back neck curves. • Open up the side seam by adding in 3⁄4in between the front and back body panels and repositioning. • From the front and back shoulder tips measure up 3⁄16in and out 3⁄8in over the armhole and make a mark. • From the chest level square down 13⁄8in on each side and, starting from the new underarm / side seam corner, redraw the new armhole shape using the basic upper body slopers as a template. Draw in the new notch positions on the lowered armhole. • To create the jacket length, extend the center front and center back lines down by 43⁄8in. Square across to create the new hemline and bring down the side seam line to meet it.

FRONT HIGH POINT SHOULDER CENTRE FRONT CENTER NECK POINT

3 CM 0.5 ⁄16"

CENTRE BACK CENTER

step 2 Developing the enlarged neck, dropped shoulder, lowered armhole, and extended hem length, and adding volume to the side seam

FRONT HIGH POINT SHOULDER

3 0.5 ⁄16"CM

HIP LEVEL HEMLINE


4123⁄ 4"C M

.53 3 C⁄4M "

3 ⁄4C" 93.5

M

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

WAISTLINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

PLACKET SHAPE SHARE

BACK MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

LINE CHEST LEVEL

63CM ⁄8" 2

1 3CM ⁄8"

3 1 CM ⁄8 "

NEW UNDERARM NEW / UNDERARM SIDE SEAM CORNER POINT

NEW SIDE SEAM

CENTRE FRONT

GRAIN LINE

NEW SIDE SEAM

ALIGNMENT ALIGNMENT NOTCHES NOTCH

NEW HEMLINE 3 62CM ⁄8 "

2 CM

CENTRE BACK

ALIGNMENT ALIGNMENT NOTCHES

9

• From the high point shoulder measure 1 ⁄8in down the back neck curve and 15⁄8in down the front neck curve and mark. • From the new underarm / side seam corner measure 33⁄4in 2 CM CHEST LINE and make a up the front armhole mark, and measure 3.5 CM 3.5 CM 33⁄4in up the back armhole and make a mark. • From these points draw straight lines up to the marks you NEW UNDERARM POINT made on the front and back neck curves. • From the back BACK neckMASTER curve measure 53FRONT ⁄8in down MASTER this line and PLAN 3 PLAN then square up ⁄8in. From the front neck measure 43⁄4in down the lineWAISTLINE and then square up 3⁄8in. • With a shallow curve, draw another line from the points on the back and front neck curves to the armholes, this time passing through the marks at 3⁄8in. • Trace off the shoulder shapes ready to transfer to the sleeve, adding front and back notches for alignment. HEMLINE • To create the sewn-on placket, square out 13⁄16in at the center front 11neck point and mark, and square in 13⁄16in and mark. 11 CM CM Repeat at the new hemline on the center front and mark. NEW HEMLINE Join these points to create the 23⁄8in placket shape.

4 15CM ⁄8"

3 ⁄8" 13.5 5CM

2 CM

5

BACK HIGH POINT SHOULDER

4 5CM 1 ⁄8 "

CENTRE FRONT NECK POINT

CENTRE BACK CENTER

1 CM

1 CM

0.5 CM

M

0.5 C

step 3 Creating the raglan shoulder shapes and front placket width 0.5 CM

step 4 Developing the placket stitch line, folded hem ALLOWANCE, side vent, and waist belt position

290 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

1 ⁄16" 33CM

FRONT FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

1" 2.5 CM 3 2 CM ⁄4"

⁄8 " 2597CM

4 ⁄8" 15CM4 ⁄8" 15CM

WAIST BELT

WAISTLINE

3 24CM "

SIDE SEAM

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

PLACKET STITCH LINE LINE

1 4 ⁄8" CM 10.5

1" 2.5 CM

13⁄8CM "

SIDE SEAM

5 CM

W

20 6.5 CM

3 CM

1.5 CM

HEM STITCH FACING STITCHLINE LINE FOLD HEMALLOWANCE FACING HEM

3 ⁄16" 3 1CM

4 5CM 1 ⁄8" 415CM ⁄8"

19 17

SIDE VENT FOLD

• Trace off onto a separate piece of paper the front body pattern from the previous step without the raglan shape. • To indicate the stitch line placement for the sewn-on placket draw a dotted line from the neckline to the hemline at a distance of 13⁄16in in from the center front. • To indicate the hem allowance stitch line draw a dotted line 13⁄16in above the hemline. • From the center front measure in 2in along the hem and then square down 13⁄16in; this is the starting point for the hem allowance. • Extend the hem allowance along to the side seam and square up. At this point measure out 15⁄8in plus a further 15⁄8in; this is the side vent width with a central fold line. • From the top of the hem allowance at the end of the side vent square up 97⁄8in and then square back to the side seam; this is the side vent length. • On top of the vent length measure up 3⁄4in; from this point draw a line back to the side vent fold line and then angle back up to meet the side seam at the same 3⁄4in height. • To develop the waist belt position measure up and down 1in on the side seam each side of the waistline; this is the belt width. From these points create a rectangle 2in wide by 41⁄2in long along the waistline. From the front of the rectangle, measure back 3⁄8in either side and draw two lines back down to the center to create the waist belt tip.

1 ⁄16" 33CM

1 ⁄16" 33CM 5 2" CM

3 CM

FOLD HEM FACING


step 5 Developing front patch pocket parts and positions • From this point create a rectangle 63⁄4in high by 71⁄2in wide; this is your pocket bag shape. Round off the bottom corners by measuring 13⁄16in up and in from each corner. • The lower pocket flap position sits 3⁄8in above the bag and is 3⁄16in wider on each side edge. Measure up 3⁄8in above the pocket bag and from this point create a rectangle 77⁄8in long and 21⁄2in wide sitting over the pocket bag.

Matching the measurements Having enlarged the armhole of the body panel lining, we will now increase the sleeve cap so that the measurements match. At the cuff hem we will increase the length of the lining so that when the arm is raised the lining will not pull the outer sleeve.

3 13CM ⁄16"

3 CM

FRONT FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

FRONT

3 ⁄8"CM 1 3.5

9 1.5 16"CM

5" CM 13 3 4 ⁄4"CM 12

21⁄8CM " 5.5

3 ⁄4" 9.53CM

WAISTLINE ⁄8" 2077CM " 21⁄2CM 6.5

71⁄2"CM 19 2"CM 5

3 ⁄4"CM 6 17

3 ⁄16" 3 1CM

1.5 9CM ⁄16"

1 16" 33⁄CM

1 ⁄16" 33CM

FOLD HEM ALLOWANCE FACING

3 CM

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

SIDE SEAM SEAM

CENTRE FRONT

PLACKET STITCH LINE

135"CM

2" 5 CM

SIDE VENT FOLD

1 CM

SIDE SEAM

MASTER • Trace off onto a separate piece of paper the front body PLAN pattern from the previous step. • To establish the position of the front breast patch pocket bag, measure 33⁄4in up from the waistline and 21⁄8in in from the center front and mark; this is the bottom right corner of your pocket bag. • From this point create a rectangle 5in high by 43⁄4in wide; this is the pocket bag shape. Round off the bottom corners. CM • The breast pocket flap position sits 3⁄8in10.5 above the bag and is 2.5 CM 3 WAIST 3 ⁄16in wider on each side. Measure up ⁄8BELT in above WAISTLINE the pocket 2.5 CM bag and from this point create 2 CM 5in long and 2in 2 CM a rectangle CM the bottom line of the 4 CM4 wide sitting over the pocket bag. From 9 rectangle measure up ⁄16in on each side and draw two lines back down to the center to create an envelope point to the 25 CM pocket flap. • To develop the lower waist pocket bag shape underneath the waistline, measure 9⁄16in up from the facing stitch line and 2in FACING STITCH LINE in from the center front and make a mark; this FOLD is the bottom 3 CM 3 CM HEM FACING 5 CM right corner of the pocket bag.

1 16" 33⁄CM

9 1.5 ⁄16"CM

4 CM 4 CM

step 6 Front pattern and developing the front facing

52" CM

step 7 Front facing pattern

FOLD

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE FRONT FACING FRONT FACING 1 SELF PR SELF CUTCUT 1 PR

GRAIN GRAINLINE LINE

FRONT CUT 1 PR SELF

FRONT FACING LINE PLACKET STITCH LINE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front facing, adding alignment notches and a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides to create the final pattern.

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front body pattern, annotating all the positions needed for pockets and belt. • Draw a vertical dotted line from the neckline to the hemline at a distance of 2in from the center front line; this will become the width of the facing pattern.

FOLD

52" CM

waxed jacket 291


step 8 Front breast patch pocket patterns with gusset edge of the bag shape that will be stitched down to the jacket body—in this case 141⁄8in. Draw the gusset as a long rectangular shape, 141⁄8in long by 13⁄16in wide, and add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides.

1 CM

1 CM

GRAIN LINE

3 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

BREAST POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM

36 CM

GRAIN LINE

FOLD FOLD

CUT 1 PR SELF

⁄8"

3

BREAST POCKET FLAP CUT 2 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE

BREAST POCKET FLAP CUT 2 PR SELF

GRAINLINE

BREAST POCKET GUSSET CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

⁄8 "

3

1 CM

3 CM

⁄8"

3

141⁄8"

1 CM

1 CM

36 CM

1 CM

1 CM 1 CM

2 CM 3 4"

FOLD FOLD

36 CM

⁄8"

⁄8"

3 8" 1 CM

BREAST POCKET BAG BREAST POCKET CUT 1 PR SELF BAG

36 CM

3

23CM 4"

1 CM

1 CM

3 CM

13CM 8"

1 CM

1 CM

3

2 CM

FOLD

FOLD

BREAST POCKET GUSSET CUT 1 PR SELF

36 CM

1 CM

2 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

1 CM

GRAIN LINE

1 CM

3 CM

1 CM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the breast pocket flap pattern; add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides. • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the breast pocket bag pattern, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance all around the outside edge and a 3⁄4in facing strip to the top opening edge, which will be folded into the bag. • The measurements to develop the gusset on the breast patch pocket bag are taken by measuring around the outside

⁄8"

3

3 1 CM ⁄8"

13⁄8"CM GUSSET

1 CM

1 PR SELF

3 ⁄8" 1 CM

GRAIN LINE

step 9 Front waist patch pocket patterns with gusset • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the waist pocket flap pattern, doubling it over along the length to make a folded pattern and adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides. • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the waist pocket bag pattern, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance all around the outside edge and a 13⁄16in facing strip to the top opening edge, which will be folded into the bag. 1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

⁄8"

FOLD

FOLD FOLD

⁄8"

6.5 21⁄CM 2"

WAIST GUSSET POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM

FOLD

1 CM

1 CM

21⁄2"

3 CM

⁄8"

1 CM

1 CM

3

GRAIN LINE

13CM 8"

191⁄2"

13⁄16"

1 CM

WAIST POCKET POCKET GUSSET WAIST CUT PR SELF 49.51CM CUT 1 PR

49.5 CM

49.5 CM

GUSSET

GRAINLINE

191⁄2"

13⁄16"

GRAIN LINE

13⁄8"CM

⁄8"

3

1 CM

1 CM

292 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

SELF

49.5 CM

⁄8"

3

WAIST POCKET GUSSET CUT 1 PR SELF

3 ⁄8" 1 CM

GRAIN LINE

49.5 CM

13⁄8"CM

3 CM

3 CM

1 CM

1 CM

⁄8"

3

3 CM

3 1 CM ⁄8"

1 CM

1 CM

3

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM 3 8"

49.5 CM

1 CM ⁄8"

GRAIN LINE

1 CM

⁄8 "

3

3 CM

FOLD

WAIST GUSSET POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR SELF

6.5 CM

1 CM

1 CM

WAIST POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR SELF

3 CM

1 CM

FOLD FOLD

6.5 2" 21⁄CM

1 CM

FOLD FOLD

3

6.5 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

1 CM

FOLD FOLD 1 CM

3 31CM ⁄16"

WAIST POCKET FLAP FLAP WAIST POCKET CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 PR SELF

21⁄2"

CM 133⁄16 "

3 8" 1 CM

6.5 CM 6.5 CM

3 8" 1 CM

GRAIN LINE

FOLD

6.5 CM

1 CM

GRAIN LINE

3 8" 1 CM

WAIST POCKET FLAP CUT 1 PR SELF

3 " 18 CM 3

• The measurements to develop the gusset on the breast patch pocket bag are taken by measuring around the outside edge of the bag shape that will be stitched down to the jacket body—in this case 191⁄2in. Draw the gusset as a long rectangular shape, 191⁄2in long by 13⁄16in wide, and add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides.

1 CM

6.5 CM

⁄8"

3

1 CM

1 CM

BREAST POCKET FLAP CUT 2 PR SELF

13⁄8"CM

36 CM

141⁄8"

⁄8"

3

13⁄16"

GRAIN LINE

GRAINLINE

GRAINLINE

1 CM

CUT 1 PRCUT SELF

1 CM

1 CM

BREAST POCKET GUSSET BREAST POCKET

3 CM

3 CM

13⁄16"


WAIST BELT CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE

67.5 265⁄8"CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

67.5 265⁄8"CM

• On a separate piece of paper, draw a horizontal box 43⁄4in wide by 265⁄8in long (the length of the center front) to create the rectangular-shaped placket. • Divide the box in half lengthways, draw a line down the center, and label it fold. Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides.

1C

1 CM

SEWN-ON PLACKET FRONT SEW ON PLACKET CUT 1 PR SELF

step 10 Front sewn-on placket pattern

1 CM

3

1 CM

⁄8" 1 CM

12 CM 43⁄4"

3 1 CM ⁄8"

3 CM 1 ⁄8 "

3 1 CM ⁄8 "

FOLD LINE FOLD 6 23CM ⁄8 "

63CM 2 ⁄8"

1C

1 CM

3 CM 1 ⁄8 "

3 ⁄4"CM 412

3 CM 1 ⁄8 "

step 11 Developing the back side vents, hem ALLOWANCE, and waist belt position

723CM ⁄4" 3 CM 2 ⁄4"

2 ⁄4" 73CM 1" 2.5 CM 1" 2.5 CM 3 2 CM ⁄4"

BACK BACK VENT VENT

7 ⁄8" 259CM

9 1.5 ⁄16"CM

CENTRE CENTER BACK BACK LINE LINE

WAISTLINE WAIST LINE

3 72CM ⁄4"

2 ⁄4" 73CM 1" 2.5 CM 1" 2.5 CM

9 1.5 ⁄16"CM

BACK MASTER PLAN

VENT BACK VENT

• Trace off the back body without the raglan shape onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape. • From the hemline corners square down 13⁄16in and square across to create the facing. • Repeat this above the hemline by squaring up 13⁄16in, and indicate the hem stitch line with a dotted line. • Extend the hem allowance line and the hemline out from the side seam at both ends by 15⁄8in; this is the vent width. • From each end of the extended hemline square up 97⁄8in and square back to the side seam; this is the vent length. • On the top of the vent length measure 3⁄4in up the side seam and from this point draw an angled line back down to the vent corner. • To develop the waist belt position square up 1in and down 1in each side of the waistline to establish the belt width. From these points create a rectangle by connecting the points across the back. • To position the belt loops, from the side seam on each side measure 23⁄4in along the waistline and draw two rectangles 9 ⁄16in wide by 23⁄4in long centered over the waistline.

7 9 ⁄8"CM 25

HEM ALLOWANCE STITCH LINE HEM FACING STITCH LINE HEMLINE

13CM ⁄16" 3

1⁄

4 5CM 8"

13CM ⁄16" 3

1⁄

4 5CM 8"

waxed jacket 293

1 CM

3 CM 1 ⁄8 "

1 CM

3 1 CM ⁄8"


GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

CENTER BACK LINELINE CENTRE BACK

BACK PANEL BACKBODY BODY PANEL CUT 11SELF CUT SELF

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the back body pattern without the side vents, which will be sewn on as part of the back envelope pocket bag, annotating all the positions for belt and loops. • Add the position of the back envelope pocket by measuring 97⁄8in up from the hemline on both sides and squaring across to create a rectangle 22in wide by 97⁄8in high.

WAISTLINE WAISTLINE

11" 28 CM

2811" CM BACKENVELOPE ENVELOPE POCKET BAG BAG BACK POCKET

7 9 ⁄8" CM 25

HEM FACING ALLOWANCE STITCHLINE LINE HEM STITCH

28 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

1 CM

GRAIN LINE TOP ENVELOPE 13⁄8 "CMFACING CUT 1 PR SELF

3

1 CM

1⁄ "CM

1 CM

3 8

3 CM

3 CM

1 ⁄ CM

3 8"

1 CM

1 CM

3

8

1 CM

CM⁄ "

1 CM

1 CM BACK ENVELOPE POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

1 CM

ZIPPER OPENING ⁄8 "

BACK SIDE VENT CUT 1 PR SELF

⁄8" 1 CM

FOLD

ZIPPER OPENING

GRAIN LINE 3

⁄8"

3

RAIN LINE

294 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

⁄8 "

3

1 CM

3

8

⁄" 1 CM

WAISTLINE

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM 1 CM

GRAIN LINE

CENTRE BACK LINE

3 8

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM⁄ "

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

NOTCH

UNDER ENVELOPE FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

3

8

1⁄ " CM

3 8

1 CM

2 CM

2 CM

• To create the waist belt trace off from Step 4 the front ends of the belt and from Step 11 the middle section, constructing a rectangle 2in wide by 311⁄2in long. Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides to create the final pattern.

WAIST BELTBELT WAIST CUT 1 PR SELF CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM

1 CM

step 14 Developing the waist belt pattern

31 CM 8"

2 CM 1

1 CM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the side vent pattern and add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides to create the final pattern.

1 CM"

1 CM

1 CM

step 13 BACK Side vent pattern

13⁄CM 8 "

1 3CM ⁄8 "

2 CM

8" 13⁄CM

H. ALLOWANCE HEM FACING

1 CM

EL

step 12 Back body PANEL pattern

NOTCH


1

1 CENTRE BACK LINE

1 CM

1 CM

⁄8"

⁄8"

3

GRAIN LINE

1 3CM 8"

3

NOTCH NOTCH

step 15 WAISTLINE Back envelope pocket bag pattern

BACK ENVELOPE

BACK ENVELOPE POCKET BAG POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

GRAIN LINE

28 CM

13CM 8"

NOTCH NOTCH

CUT 1 PR POCKETING

1 CM

BACK ENVELOPE POCKET BAG 25 CM • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the final back envelope 1 CM pocketHEMbag Step 12. Add a 3⁄8in FACING from STITCH LINE seam allowance on all sides. HEM FACING

1 CM

28 CM

GRAINLINE

BACK BODY PANEL CUT 1 SELF

NOTCH

NOTCH

1 CM

13CM 8"

NOTCH NOTCH

NOTCH NOTCH

⁄8"

13CM 8"

⁄8 "

3

1 CM

1 CM

3

GRAIN LINE

3 CM 2 ⁄4"

CENTRE BACK LINE

GRAIN LINE

7 20 7 ⁄8"CM

GRAIN LINE

1 3CM ⁄8 "

33CM 1 ⁄16"

13⁄8CM "

⁄4CM "

1 3CM ⁄8 "

1 CM

3 1 CM ⁄8"

3 1 CM ⁄8"

3 1 ⁄16" 3 CM

3 2 CM ⁄4"

3 CM

TOP ENVELOPE FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

TOP ENVELOPE FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

ZIPPER OPENING

ZIPPER OPENING

GRAIN LINE

⁄8"

3 CM 1 1CM ⁄8 "

1 CM

32

2 CM 1 3CM

1 CM 3 CM

1 CM

313CM ⁄16"

13⁄18CM "CM

2 3CM ⁄4"

1 CM

ZIPPER OPENING

ZIPPER OPENING

1 CM

2 CM

1 3CM ⁄8 "

1 CM

1 3CM ⁄8"

13⁄8CM "

3 CM 1 ⁄8"

1 CM

1 3CM ⁄8"

2 CM

TOP ENVELOPE FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM

13CM ⁄8 "

1 CM 1 CM

1 CM

2 CM

GRAIN LINE

2 CM

3 CM 1 ⁄8"

2 CM

FOLD

ZIPPER ZIPPER OPENING 1 CM

1 CMENVELOPE FACING UNDER CUT 1 PR SELF

FOLD FOLD

UNDER ENVELOPE FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

HEM FACING

1 CM

HEM FACING STITCH LINE

1 CM

OPENING

GRAINLINE

2 CM

1 CM

BACK ENVELOPE POCKET BAG

3 CM 1 ⁄8"

23⁄4CM "

1 CM

3

1 CM

1 CM

" 1⁄8CM

13⁄CM 8"

1 CM

1 CM

13⁄CM 8"

1 CM

25 CM

HEM FACING HEM FACING

1 CM

28 CM

28 CM

10 CM

4"

step 17 Top and under envelope pocket facing patterns

28 CM

28 CM

BACK ENVELOPE POCKET BAG BACK ENVELOPE POCKET BAG 25 CM

NOTCH

NOTCH

28 CM

HEM FACING STITCH LINE HEM FACING STITCH LINE

CUT 1 PR SELF

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the two parts of the back envelope facing patterns, and add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides on both patterns.

WAISTLINE

FOLD

25 CM

UNDER ENVELOPE FACING

WAISTLINE

3 CM

FOLD ENVELOPE POCKET MASTER PLAN 28 CM

• The facing for the pocket’s opening is constructed as a folding rectangle, 4in wide by 97⁄8in long. Divide in half lengthways, adding a fold line down the middle. • To divide again for the insertion of a 77⁄8in closed-end zipper, measure out 13⁄16in from each end of the fold line and square 1 CM across. Measure in 13⁄16in along this line from the bottom and mark and 3⁄4in from the top and mark. This is the opening for the zipper. • Create a stepped opening by drawing a rectangle 77⁄8in long by 3⁄8in wide, centered along the opening.

GRAIN LINE

CENTRE BACK LINE

BACK BODY PANEL CUT 1 SELF

CENTRE BACK LINE

7 9 ⁄8"CM 25

WAISTLINE

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

BACK BODY PANEL CUT 1 SELF BACK BODY PANEL CUT 1 SELF

BACK ENVELOPE POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR POCKETING

TOP ENVELOPE FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

UNDER ENVELOPE FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

BACK SIDE VENT CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM

2 CM

1 CM

1 CM

GRAIN LINE

FOLD

Envelope pocket The envelope, or poacher’s, pocket in this design has identical zipped openings on both the left- and right-hand sides so it can be used from either side of the 1 CM jacket.1 CMThe pocket openings have a folded 3 CM CM facing 3 with the zipper attached to the 1 CM under or 1 CM lining side of the opening.

1 CM

2 CM

20 CM

GRAIN LINE

1 CM

2 CM GRAIN LINE

ZIPPER OPENING

3 CM

13⁄16"

GRAIN LINE

1 CM

3 CM 1 CM

FOLD

ZIPPER OPENING

FOLD

waxed jacket 295

NG

GRAIN LINE

step 16 Developing the top and under envelope pocket facing with zipper opening

FOLD

ZIPPER OPENING

1 CM

1 CM

ZIPPER OPENING

1 CM

1 CM

10 CM

2 CM

NG

1 CM

1 CM 2 CM

GRAIN LINE

1 CM

ENVELOPE POCKET MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

1 CM

25 CM


step 18 Sleeve master plan

step 19 Developing the sleeve master plan

Start this development by selecting the basic men’s sleeve sloper, or by drafting the basic sleeve sloper according to the instructions on page 42. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the shirt you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 48.

• Draw round the basic sleeve sloper, opening it up along the center line by 3⁄8in. • From the shoulder tip measure down 3⁄8in, the amount by which you extended the shoulder on the body panel. • From the biceps level square down 9⁄16in, half of the amount by which you dropped the armhole; redraw the new biceps level position, extending it by 1in on each side. • Using the basic sleeve sloper as a template, redraw the new sleeve cap indicating the lowered notches. • To shape the sleeve hemline, measure 3⁄8in up each underarm seam and 9⁄16in in on each side and mark. • From these points draw in the new underarm seams, 1 CM connecting them back up to the extended biceps level. • From the new sleeve hemline square down 13⁄16in to create the facing shape, pitching out at each side to reflect the sleeve seams when folded.

TOP OF CROWN SLEEVE CAP

1 CM

POINT

SLEEVE CAP UNDERARM AT BICEPS POINT LEVEL

UNDERARM POINT

9 1.5 ⁄16" CM

LINE OLD BICEPS OLDELBOW LEVEL UNDERARMLINE NEW BICEPS NEW UNDERARMLINE LEVEL

FRONT NOTCH

1.59⁄CM 16" 1" 2.5 CM

UNDERARM FRONT SEAM

FOREARM LINE

296 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

1.5 CM

FACING

⁄8 " 1 CM 313CM ⁄16" 3

NEW SLEEVE HEMLINE

NEW SLEEVE NEW SLEEVEHEMLINE HEMLINE

FACING FACING

1 CM 3 CM

9 ⁄16" CM 1.5

32 CM SLEEVE HEM

1 CM 3 CM

1.5 ⁄16" CM

32 CM SLEEVE HEM

1.5 CM

ELBOW LINE ELBOWLEVEL

HEMLINE

9

BACK LINE

CENTRE LINE

M UNDERARM BACK SEA

ELBOW LINE

8" 13⁄CM

BACK NOTCH

UNDERARM LINE

1.5 CM

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

UNDERARM POINT

OLD UNDERARMLINE NEW UNDERARMLINE

2.5 CM

FRONT PITCH POINT

LINE ELBOWLEVEL ELBOW

1.5 CM

3 CM 1 ⁄8"

FRONTRARM UNDE UNDERARM FRONSEAM T SEAM

BACK PITCH POINT

CROWN POINT

LINE FOREARMLINE FOREARM

CENTER LINE CENTRELINE

BACK LINE BACKLINE

RM K SEA ERABAC UNDRM BACKERA UND

SEAM M

BICEPS LEVELLINE UNDERARM

2.5 CM

SLEEVE CAP UNDERARM AT BICEPS POINT LEVEL

GRAIN LINE

FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

POINT

2.5 CM 1"

BACK

BACK PITCH NOTCH

3 1⁄8"CM 3 13⁄CM 16"


23⁄4"

9 CM

31⁄2"

GRAIN LINE

• Construct a rectangle 7in long by 51⁄2in wide. Divide the shape into four quarters, each 31⁄2in by 23⁄4in. Using a French curve create an oval-shaped elbow patch.

ELBOW PATCH CUT 1 PR SELF GRAINLINE

3 1 ⁄2 "

9 CM

step 20 Developing the elbow patch pattern

7 CM

7 CM

23⁄4"

ELBOW PATCH CUT 1 PR SELF

31⁄2"

9 CM

9 CM

3 1 ⁄2 "

23⁄4"

7 CM

7 CM

23⁄4"

step 21 Developing the raglan panel sleeve • Before you can separate the sleeve for the raglan you need to establish the elbow patch position. Trace off the sleeve pattern from Step 19. From the center line along the elbow level measure 43⁄8in out into the back sleeve and mark. Align one side of the elbow patch pattern to this point and, using the pattern as a template, draw in the patch position. • Separate the sleeve into two halves, naming them front and back. • Trace off the back raglan shape from Step 3. Add to the sleeve cap by placing the shoulder tips together at the new shoulder tip and aligning the tips of the raglan to the sleeve cap lines. BACK SHOULDER

UNDER ARMLINE ALIGNMENT NOTCH

11 CM

ELBOW LINE

43⁄CM 8" 11

HEM FACING

ELBOW LINE

ELBOW ELBOWLEVEL LINE

H. ALLOWANCE HEM FACING

UNDER ARMLINE BACK SLEEVE MASTER PLAN ELBOW ELBOWLEVEL LINE

ELBOW LINE

HEM FACING HEM FACING

FRONT SLEEVE FRONT SLEEVE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN CENTRAL LINE CENTRAL LINE

ELBOW LINE

BICEPS LEVEL UNDER ARMLINE

BACK BACKSLEEVE SLEEVE MASTER PLAN MASTER PLAN

MASTER PLAN

SLEEVE SLEEVE MASTER MASTER PLAN PLAN

11 CM

BICEPS LEVEL UNDER ARMLINE

BACK SLEEVE UNDER ARMLINE

BICEPS LEVEL

FRONT SHOULDE

CENTRAL LINE

MASTER PLAN

FRONT SHOULDER

BACK SHOULDER

CENTRAL LINE

ALIGNMENT NOTCH SLEEVE

CENTRE LINE

E R

BACK BACK SHOULDER SHOULDER

UNDER ARMLINE

CENTER CENTRELINE LINE

CENTRE LINE

UNDER ARMLINE

• Trace off the front raglan shape from Step 3. Add to the sleeve cap by placing the shoulder tips together at the new shoulder tip and aligning the tips of the raglan to the sleeve cap lines. • It is important that the raglan sleeve panels have a fluid line. To do this, shape the shoulder tip and the points where the raglan shapes join the sleeve cap with shallow curves.

H. ALLWNCE HEM FACING

UNDER AR

FRONT S MASTER ELBOW LEVEL ELBOW LINE

ELBOW

H. ALLWNCE HEM FACING

HEM FACING

HEM FAC

waxed jacket 297


FRONT RAGLAN CUT 1 PR SELF

FRONT RAGLAN SLEEVE FRONT RAGLAN CUT 1 PR SELF

BACK RAGLAN SLEEVE CUT 1 PR SELF

BACK RAGLAN SLEEVE CUT 1 PR SELF

step 22 Raglan panel sleeve patterns

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front and back raglan panels as separate patterns.

step 23 Developing the shaped convertible collar with stand • On a new piece of paper draw a 95⁄8in horizontal line and mark the left end (A) and the right end (B). This is the neckline. • From (A) square up 15⁄8in and mark (G), and a further 31⁄8in and mark (D). This is the center back neck. • Finish drawing the rectangle by marking the top right corner (E) and connecting it down to (B). • To shape the stand, measure up 3⁄8in from (B) and mark (F). From (B) square in 25⁄8in and mark (C). Join to (F) with an angled line.

• From (E) square out 9⁄16in and draw an angled line down to (F). Measure a further 3⁄8in up to create the collar point. From the collar point draw a curved line back toward (D). • From (G) square across to the angled front edge, and from (C) square up to this horizontal line. Measure down 3⁄16in from where the line from (G) intersects the angled front edge and mark (H). Connect (H) back to the point above (C) with a slight curve. • Starting from (A) make three marks along the neckline at a distance of 13⁄4in apart, and square up from each mark to the top line of the rectangle to make three cut lines.

⁄8CM "

3 1

D

E

COLLAR MASTER PLAN

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

CENTRE BACK NECK CENTER

1 8 3CM ⁄8 "

9 CM 1.5 16"

3 0.5 ⁄16"CM H

G SHOULDER NOTCH

STAND MASTER PLAN

4 5CM 1 ⁄8"

F

A

3 1 ⁄4"CM 4.5

3 4.5 ⁄4"CM 1

3 4.5 1 ⁄4"CM

4.5 13⁄4CM " 5 24.5 9 ⁄8" CM

298 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear 0.9 CM

0.4 CM

0.4 CM

0.

3 CM 1 ⁄8"

C

NECK LINE NECKLINE

6.5 25⁄8"CM

B


MASTER PLAN

CENTRE FRONT

CENTRE FRON

CENTRE BACK NECK

STAND F MASTER PLAN 1 CM

SHOULDER NOTCH

REMOVE REMOVE

3 0.9 ⁄8"CM

0.4 CM 3 ⁄16CM " 0.4

" 0.4⁄16CM 3

0.5 CM H

• Cut down the vertical lines on the collar shape, leaving them F attached at the bottom by a fraction of an inch. Starting from C 1 CM the center back open out each line by 3⁄16in, curving down the B 6.5From CM collar. the center back remove 3⁄8in width, which is the amount lost by closing the stand up. • Cut down the vertical lines on the stand shape, leaving them attached at the bottom by a fraction of an inch. Overlap the tops by 1⁄8in toward the center back so that it brings up the neckline.

0.⁄416"CM 3

COLLAR MASTER PLAN

COLLAR MASTER PLAN

1 0.3⁄8"CM

E BACK NECK CENTRR CENTE

1 0.3 ⁄8"CM

1 "M 0.3⁄8C

STAND MASTER PLAN 0.3 CM

0.3 CM

CENTRE BACK NECK

0.4 CM

CENTRE BACK NECK CENTER

NECK LINE NECKLINE

0.3 CM STAND MASTER PLAN

NECK LINE

step 25 Collar stand and collar patterns • Trace off the collar pattern and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape.

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

• Trace off the collar stand and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape.

COLLAR CUT 1 PR SELF

SHOULDER NOTCHES

SHOULDER NOTCHES

COLLAR STAND CUT 1 PR SELF

GL GL

0.4 CM

PLAN

development by tracing • Remove the stand shape from the C NECK LINE onto a separate piece of paper, including the vertical B 4.5 CM 4.5 CM 6.5 CM NECK LINE cut lines. 24.5 CM A 4.5 CMthe collar shape 4.5 CMfrom the development 4.5 CM 4.5 CM • Remove by tracing 24.5 CM the cut lines onto a separate piece of paper. Trace across from the stand.

4 CM 4.5 CM

SHOULDER NOTCH

0.5 CM step 24 H STAND Separating and shaping the stand and collar MASTER G

CF

8 CM

waxed jacket 299


BA CU

0.5 CM

0.5 CM

0.5 CM

SHOULDER HIGH POINT NECK POINT SHOULDER

FRONT

POINT • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off a copy ofUNDERARM the POINT front body0.5from the pattern in Step 6. Remove the side vent, 0.5 CM CM placket shape, and hem allowance. LINING SLEEVE CUT1 PR LINING • Next you need to add ease by increasing the armhole width to allow for movement. From the underarm / side seam corner measure up 3⁄16in and mark, and out 3⁄16in and mark. Find the new underarm / side seam corner and draw a line, blending it back up to the high point shoulder. • To extend the length and give the lining an overlap at the hemline measure down 3⁄8in from the hemline and square across, labeling the line fold, and measure down a further 3 ⁄8in and square across, to give a 3⁄4in overlap. • From the new underarm / side seam corner blend the side seam down to meet the original hemline. GRAIN LINE

UNDERARM / SIDE SEAM UNDERARM CORNER POINT

0.5 3CM ⁄16" 2 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

FRONT LINING CUT1 PR LINING

2 CM

FOLD

2 CM

3 0.5 16"CM

0.5 CM

BACK UNDERARM

0.5 CM

step 26 Developing the front lining

3 2 CM ⁄4"

3 24CM "

FOLD

step 27 Developing the back lining

HIGH POINT SHOULDER SHOULDER NECK POINT

3 0.5 16"CM

UNDERARM / SIDE SEAM UNDERARM CORNER POINT

3 CM PLEAT 2 ⁄4" 3 CM PLEAT 2 ⁄4"

SHOULDER HIGH POINT NECK POINT SHOULDER

CENTRE BACK CENTER NECK POINT

3 0.5 ⁄16"CM

BACK LINING CUT1 PR LINING

0.5 3CM ⁄16"

GRAIN LINE

300 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

3 2 CM ⁄4"

FOLD

UNDERARM UNDERARM / SIDE SEAM POINT CORNER 3 0.5 ⁄16"CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off a copy of the half back body from Step 12. Before mirroring the shape over to create a full pattern, you need to add ease to the center back to allow the lining to expand across the shoulderblades and also to increase the armhole to allow for movement. • From the center back neck point measure out 3⁄4in and connect this point to the hemline; this will become the pleat at the center back neck. • Double over the shape to create the full pattern. Remove the side vent and its negative shape in the body of the lining itself. SHOULDER • On each side, from the underarm / NECK POINT side seam corner measure up 3⁄16in and out 3⁄16in and mark. Find the new corner and connect back up to the high point shoulder. • To extend the length and give the lining an overlap at the hemline UNDERARM POINT 3⁄8in from the hemline measure down and square across, labeling the line 0.5 CM fold, and measure down a further LINING 3 ⁄8in and square across,FRONT to give CUT1 PR LINING a 3⁄4in overlap. • From the new underarm corner blend the side seam down to meet the vent. 0.5 CM

ONT DERARM NT

UNDERARM POINT

3 24CM "


3 0.5 ⁄16"CM

FRONT SLEEVE FRONT CORNER AT UNDERARM BICEPS LEVEL POINT

3 0.5 16"CM

BACK SLEEVE BACK CORNER AT UNDERARM BICEPS LEVEL POINT

3 0.5 ⁄16"CM

Matching the measurements Having enlarged the armhole lining, we will now increase the sleeve cap so that the measurements match. At the cuff hem we will increase the length of the lining so that when the arm is raised the lining will not pull the outer sleeve.

0.5 3 ⁄16"CM

step 28 Developing the sleeve lining

3 0.5 16"CM

0.5 3CM ⁄16"

• Trace off a copy of the front and back sleeve patterns from step 21. Join the two separate patterns back together at the center line so you can make a full lining pattern. • From the front corner of the sleeve at biceps level measure out 3⁄16in and up 3⁄16in and mark, and from the back corner of the sleeve at biceps level measure out 3⁄16in and up 3⁄16in and mark; find the new sleeve corners and draw lines back up to the shoulder seam. • From the new front and back corner of the sleeve at biceps level blend the side seams down to meet the sleeve hemline. • From the sleeve hemline measure down 3⁄8in and square across and label the line fold, and measure down a further 3 ⁄8in and square across, to give a 3⁄4in overlap.

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

SLEEVE LINING CUT1 PR LINING

3 2 CM ⁄4"

FOLD

3 CM 2 ⁄4"

waxed jacket 301


pattern Parka

FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

WAISTLINE

Start by selecting the basic men’s upper body sloper, or by drafting the basic sloper according to the instructions on page 40. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the coat you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 48. 302 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

HEMLINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

BACK MASTER PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CHEST LINE LEVEL

SIDE SEAM

step 1 Developing the master plan

BACK BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

CENTRE BACK CENTER

This pattern includes development of the following features: Adding volume to the side seam, front, and back panels Enlarging the neckline Creating a grown-on placket Extending and shaping the hemline with a fishtail at the back and a drawstring channel Creating a drawstring channel at the waistline Lowering the armhole Developing front patch pockets with flaps Developing a two-piece casual sleeve Developing a collared hood with center zipper and fur panel Developing a full body lining


"M 1⁄ C

"M 2⁄ C M 0⁄.5" C

3 8

2⁄4CM "

3 CM 2 ⁄4" 3 CM 2 ⁄4"

4 15CM ⁄8" FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

NEW SIDE SEAM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

OLD SIDE SEAM

CENTRE BACK CENTER

WAISTLINE

82 321CM ⁄4"

OLD SIDE SEAM

NEW HEMLINE

33⁄CM 1 16"

10 CM 4"

12 CM 43⁄4"

52"CM

FRONT MASTER PLAN

UNDERARM LINE

14.5 CM

3 14.5 5 ⁄4" CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

SIDE SEAM

SIDE SEAM

CENTRE CENTER FRONT

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

104"CM 3 14.55CM ⁄4"

3 14.5 5 ⁄4" CM

14.5 CM

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

UNDERARM LINE BICEPS LEVEL

GRAIN LINE

14.5 CM

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

5 CM 2"

SIDE SEAM 10 CM

SIDE SEAM

BACK MASTER PLAN

3 3 1CM ⁄16" 3 CM 13⁄16"

UNDERARM / SIDE UNDERARM SEAM CORNER POINT

UNDERARM POINT

CENTER CENTRE FRONT NECK POINT

3

POINT TIP

UNDERARM LINE BICEPS LEVEL

HEMLINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front 5 CM body shape from the master plan onto a separate piece of paper. • From the center front at the hemline, measure in 53⁄4in (half the width of the panel) and mark. From the side seam measure in 53⁄4in along the waistline and from here square up 4in and mark. • From the underarm / side seam corner measure 2in up the armhole and from this point draw a line down to meet the mark made above and then a straight line down to the hemline. This is the cut line. • From the hemline cut up along the cut line to just under the armhole. • Keeping the center front vertical, open the cut line 2in at the hem to add in the volume. • Redraw the hemline.

CHEST LEVEL LINE

4 CM 15⁄8"

FRONT SHOULDER HIGH POINT POINT NECK SHOULDER

NEW NEW FRONT BACK BACK NEW PITCH NEW SHOULDER NOTCH POINT FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

CENTRE FRONT

step 3 Adding volume to the front to create the silhouette

BACK SHOULDER POINT TIP

CENTRE CENTER BACK NECK POINT

3 4 3 16

3

0.5 3CM ⁄16"

• From the center front neck point measure down 3⁄4in and from the front high point shoulder measure in 3⁄8in; repeat at the back by measuring in 3⁄8in from the back high point shoulder and 3⁄16in down the center back from the center back neck point. Using the basic upper body sloper as a template draw in the new necklines. • From the front and back shoulder tips measure up 3⁄16in and out 3⁄4in over the armhole and mark. • Open up the side seam by adding in 15⁄8in between the front and back body panels and repositioning. • From the underarm / side seam corner square down 15⁄8in and starting from this point draw in the new armhole, connecting back up to the new dropped shoulder seam, using the basic upper body sloper as a template. Draw in the new notch positions on the lowered armhole. • To extend the length, from the lowered neck measure 321⁄4in down the center front. Square across to create the new hemline and extend the side seam and the center back line. • To shape the new hemline measure down a further 13⁄16in at the center front and square across to the center back. • To develop the parka fishtail design at the center back, measure down a further 57⁄8in and square across to the side seam to create a rectangle. • Starting at the bottom of the extended rectangle at the center back measure up 43⁄4in and mark, and measure in 2in toward the side seam and mark. Join these points with an angled line 4in long. Using a French curve draw an arc from the 2in point up to the side seam and curve down toward the center front.

0⁄16 .5" C 23⁄4"CM M

3 CM 1 ⁄8 "

BACK SHOULDER HIGH POINT POINT NECK SHOULDER

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

step 2 Developing the enlarged neck, dropped shoulder, lowered armhole, and extended hemline, and shaping the hem length with volume added to the side seam

5 CM 5 2" CM

parka 303


step 4 Developing the front placket, front placket facing, and hemline facing

step 5 Developing the drawstring channel line and pocket position

• Develop the front placket on the pattern shape developed in the previous step. From the center front neck point square out 7⁄8in and square in 7⁄8in. Repeat at the hemline and connect the points with vertical lines to form the 13⁄4inwide placket. • From the new placket line at the center front neck point measure 23⁄8in in to the body, and repeat at the hemline; join with a vertical line. This will be the width of the facing pattern. • To develop the hemline facing measure up 15⁄8in from the hemline at the front facing width line and at the side seam; join these points with a line following the shape of the hem.

• From the underarm / side seam corner measure 75⁄8in down the side seam and mark, and a further 3⁄4in and mark. Square in to the front and create a rectangle 57⁄8in long and 3⁄4in wide; this will become the drawstring channel. • Developing the pocket flap and pocket bag shape on the master plan itself allows you to assess the proportions in relation to the body front. • Measure a further 31⁄2in down the side seam and mark; this is the top of the pocket flap positioned over the side seam. • From this point square in 87⁄8in and square out 13⁄8in. To develop the rectangle that will become the pocket flap shape, measure down 4in on both sides and connect these points with a straight line. • Make a mark halfway along the bottom line (5in); measure up 3⁄4in on each side and draw lines back to the center of the CENTRE FRONT bottom line to create an envelope NECK POINTpoint to the pocket flap. • The pocket bag sits 3⁄8in underneath the flap: first, measure 3 ⁄8in down the side seam and mark. • From this point square in 85⁄8in and square out 13⁄16in to create a line 97⁄8in long. FRONT MASTER • To develop the pocket bag shape square down 105⁄8in on PLAN each side and connect these points with a straight line.

8 CM

3 CM

2.25 CM

2 CM

FRONT MASTER PLAN 3 CM

FRON T HEM FAC ING 3 62CM ⁄8"

PLACKET DEVELPOMENT DEVELOPMENT

4 CM

22 CM

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

5 19.57CM ⁄8 "

DRAWSTR STRING ING FRON CHANEL NEL T HEM FAC 3 ING 2 CM ⁄4"

9 CM 3 1⁄2" 3 0.51CM ⁄8" 3 13⁄CM 16"

1 8 3CM ⁄8"

3 2 CM ⁄4"

15 5 7⁄8"CM 8" 13⁄CM 7 22. 8 ⁄8"5 CM

22 85⁄8"CM

3 13⁄CM 16"

5 2710 CM ⁄8"

41CM ⁄8" 5

4 CM

FRON T HEM FAC

ING

6 CM PLACKET DEVELPOMENT

304 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

CENTER CENTRE FRONT NECK POINT

1 CM

22 CM

27 CM

CENTRE FRONT

FACING DEPTH LINE

4 15CM ⁄8 "

15 CM 1 CM 22.5 CM

GRAIN LINE

9 CM 0.5 CM

DRAW STRING CHANEL

FRONT CUT 1 PR SELF

5 22 8 ⁄8"CM

FRON T HEM FACIN G

13⁄CM 8"

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

2 CM

FACING DEPTH LINE

CENTRE FRONT CENTER

FACING DEPTH LINE

19.5 CM

FACING DEPTH LINE

FRONT MASTER PLAN PLAN

CENTRE FRONT

CENTER FRONT NECK POINT

7 2.25 CM ⁄8"

23⁄8"

FRONT CUT 1 PR SEL


CENTRE FRONT NECK POINT

CENTRE FRONT NECK POINT

2.25 CM

6 CM

FRONT MASTER PLAN

19.5 CM

FACING DEPTH LINE

FACING DEPTH LINE

step 6 Front body pattern

FRONT CUT 1 PR SELF

CENTRE FRONT

FRONT MASTER PLAN

0.5 CM

3 CM

8 CM 2 CM

1 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CENTRE FRONT

DRAW STRING • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front CHAN EL 2 CM body pattern, indicating all the placement positions for the 15 CM 9 CMfront placket drawstring channel, pocket, and facing. 22.5 CM 1 CM

22 CM

3 CM

27 CM

4 CM

FRON T HEM FAC

ING

ING

1 CM

1 CM

6 CM

PLACKET DEVELPOMENT

GRAIN LINE

1 CM

⁄8" 3

1 CM

1 CM

⁄8"

3

FRONT PLACKET FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM

step 7 Front placket facing and hem facing patterns

1 CM

⁄8"

⁄8" 3 1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

⁄8"

3

3

1 CM

1 CM

3

⁄8"

1 CM

GL

GRAIN LINE

⁄8"

FRONT HEM FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM 1 CM

FRONT 3 " ⁄8

1 CM

⁄8"

3

SIDE SEAM

SIDE SEAM

FRONT

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the final front placket facing pattern and the front hem facing pattern, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides.

1 CM

3

⁄8"

3

1 CM

⁄8"

1 CM

3

3

⁄8"

1 CM

FRONT HEM FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

FRONT PLACKET FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

FRONT PLACKET FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

⁄8 "

⁄8"

3

1 CM 1 CM

⁄8 " 3

⁄8 "

1 CM

1 CM

3

3 1 CM 1 CM

1 CM 1 CM

FRONT

1 CM

FRONT HEM FACING CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE

SIDE SEAM

FRON T HEM FAC

22 CM

1 CM

1 CM 1 CM

parka 305


step 8 Adding back volume to create the silhouette

step 9 Developing the hemline facing and drawstring channel line

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the back body shape from the master plan onto a separate piece of paper. • From the center back at the hemline, measure in 53⁄4in (half the width of the panel). From the side seam measure in 53⁄4in along the waistline and from here square up 4in and mark. • From the underarm / side seam corner measure 2in up the armhole and from this point draw a line down to meet the mark made above and then a straight line down to the hemline. This is the cut line. • Keeping the center back vertical, open the cut line 23⁄8in at the hem to add in the volume. • Redraw the hemline.

BACK MASTER PLAN PLAN BACK MASTER PLAN

BACK MASTER PLAN BACK MASTER PLAN PLAN

BACK MASTER PLAN

• Develop the hemline facing on the pattern shape developed in the previous step. To develop the back hemline facing, measure up 15⁄8in from the hemline at the center back and at the side seam. Join these points with a line following the shape of the hem. • From the underarm / side seam corner measure 75⁄8in down the side seam and mark, and a further 3⁄4in and mark. From both points square across to the center back; this will become the drawstring channel.

BACK MASTER PLAN

BACK MASTER PLAN BACK MASTER PLAN

BACK MASTER PLAN PLAN

UNDERARM LINE

14.5 CM

2 CM

75⁄8"

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

2 CM

SIDE SEAM

UNDERARM POINT

GRAIN GRAIN LINE LINE

UNDERARM LINE

CENTRE BACK

14.5 CM

SIDE SEAM GRAINLINE GRAIN GRAIN LINE LINE

14.5 CM

5 CM

CENTRE CENTRE CENTER BACKBACK

53⁄4CM " 14.5

10 CM

CENTRE BACK

14.5 CM

10 CM 104"CM

GRAIN GRAIN LINE LINE GRAINLINE

CENTRE CENTRE BACKBACK CENTER

14.553CM ⁄4"

SIDE SIDE SEAMLINE SEAM GRAIN

UNDERARM POINT / SIDE SEAM 5 CM UNDERARM LINE UNDERARM CORNER POINT

UNDERARM LINE

UNDERARM LINE BICEPS LEVEL

GRAIN LINE AMSE AM SE DE SIDE SI

5 2"CM

UNDERARM LINE BICEPS LEVEL

2 CM

DRAWSTRING CHANEL 3 2 CM 2 CM ⁄4" CHANNEL TRING ING CHANEL DRAWSTR DRAWSTRING CHANEL DRAWS

3 2 ⁄4CM "

4 CM

14.5 4" 53⁄CM 14.5 CM

14.5 CM 14.5 53⁄4CM " 14.5 CM

14.5 CM

306 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

6 CM

4 CM

6 ⁄8" 23CM

4 CM 6 CM

G CIN FA EM1 5 H CM 4 ⁄ 8" ING C CK FA BA M HE K C BA

4 CM

CK BA

G CIN FA M HE

4 15CM ⁄8"


step 10 Back, back hem facing, and drawstring CHANNEL patternS • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the back pattern. Indicate the placement positions for the drawstring and hem facing. Indicate the position of the pocket by lining up this back pattern with the front from Step 5 at the side seam; trace the pocket position onto the back pattern with dotted lines. • Trace off the back hem facing onto a new piece of paper and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern 1 CM shape. Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides. • Align the front and back body patterns at the side seam and trace off the drawstring 1 CM channel and, following the instructions on page 50, create the full pattern shape. Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides.

GRAINLINE

GRAIN LINE

1 CM

BACK BACK CUT SELF CUT1 1PRPR SELF

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

DRA AW WSSTTRRIINNGGCCHHAANN NN ELEL

GRAIN LINE 1 CM

1 CM

DRAWSTRING CHANNEL CUT 1 SELF

B BA

13⁄CM 8" 13⁄CM 8"

DRAWSTRING CHANNEL

3

1 C⁄8M" 3 1 CM ⁄8 "

13⁄8CM "

DRAWSTRING CHANNEL CUT 1 SELF GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

DRAWSTRING CHANNEL CUT 1 SELF

13⁄8CM "

BA 3 C 1K⁄8CM " HE M

3 1 CM ⁄8 "

3 1 CM ⁄8 "

13⁄8CM "

BA CU CK H T 1 EM F SE LF ACIN G

BACK CUT 1 PR SELF

13⁄CM 8"

3 1 CM ⁄8"

"

1 3C ⁄8M

1 3C⁄8M "

BACK HEM FACING CUT 1 SELF

GRAIN GLLINE

3 1 CM ⁄8"

3 1

⁄8CM "

ACCK H K EHM EFMAC NG FIA CIN G

FA CIN G

parka 307


13CM

⁄8 "

⁄8"

1 CM

13 CM 1 CM

⁄8"

3

1 CM

GRAINLINE

1 CM

step 11 Front pocket flap and bag patterns

FRONT POCKET FLAP CUT 2 PR SELF

⁄8"

3

8 1 CM

⁄"

⁄"

13 CM 8 1 CM

3 CM

3 CM

FACING

133⁄16CM"

1 ⁄16"

3 3 CM

FACING FACING

FOLD

FOLD

FOLD

FOLD FOLD

FOLD

GRAINLINE

FRONT POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR SELF

GRAIN LINE GRAIN LINE

FRONT POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR SELF

FRONT POCKET BAG CUT 1 PR SELF

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

⁄8"

13 CM

⁄"

31 CM 8

⁄"

3 1 CM 8

1 CM

1 CM

⁄8"

3

1 CM

1 CM

1 CM

3 1 CM 8

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front pocket flap pattern and add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides. • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the front pocket bag pattern. Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on three sides and a 13⁄16in facing to the top.

⁄8"

13 CM

⁄8 "

1 CM

1 CM3 1 CM

1 CM

⁄"

3

⁄8"

1 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAIN LINE

FRONT POCKET FLAP CUT 2 PR SELF

1 CM 3

FRONT POCKET FLAP CUT 2 PR SELF

TOP OF CROWN SLEEVE POINTCAP

BACK

FRONT FRONT PITCH NOTCH POINT

BACK PITCH NOTCH POINT

NEW UNDERARM POINT 2.5 CM

AT BICEPS LEVEL

2C

E

4 CM

UNDERTARM FRON FRONT SEAM UNDE RARM SEAM

ELBOW LINE

LINE FOREARMFOREARM LINE

CENTER LINE CENTRE LINE

BACK LINEBACK LINE

Start this development by selecting the basic men’s sleeve sloper, or by drafting the basic sleeve sloper according to the instructions on page 42. Cut a large piece of drafting paper slightly longer than the length of the shirt you want to develop and transfer the shape of the sloper and all marks, labels, and instructions, following the directions on page 48. The design will be altered to reflect the dropped shoulder and the lowered armhole.

M M K SEA SEA

step 12 Sleeve master plan

CORNER UNDERARM POINT OF SLEEVE

LINE UNDERARM BICEPS LEVEL

BAC RM RM ERA UNDERA K UND BAC

UNDERARM CORNER POINT OF SLEEVE AT BICEPS LEVEL

HEMLINE 32 CM SLEEVE HEM

308 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear


23⁄CM 4" NEW BACK NOTCH

NEW FRONT NOTCH

NEW SLEEVE NEW CORNER AT UNDERARM BICEPS POINT LEVEL

2 CM ⁄4" 3

UNDERARM FRONT SEAM

FOREARM LINE

CENTRE LINE

BACK LINE

UNDERARM BACK SEA

3 2 CM ⁄4"

BICEPS LEVEL UNDERARM LINE

NEW SLEEVE CORNER AT UNDERARM BICEPS LEVEL POINT

23⁄4CM " 2.5 1" CM

FRONT PITCH POINT

• Open the sleeve up along the center line by 3⁄4in. • From the shoulder tip measure down 3⁄4in, the same amount UNDERARM LINE UNDERARM you dropped the shoulder on the upper body sloper. POINT • From the biceps level measure down 3⁄4in, half the amount by which you dropped the armhole; redraw the new biceps level position, extending it by 1in each side. • Using the basic sleeve sloper cap shape as a template, redraw the new sleeve cap, indicating the lowered notches. • Draw the new underarm seams down to the sleeve hemline. ELBOW LINE • From the sleeve hemline square down 15⁄8in to create the facing shape, pitching out at each side to reflect the underarm seams when folded.

M

UNDERARM POINT

3 2 ⁄4"CM

1" 2.5 CM

BACK

PITCH step 13 POINT Developing the sleeve

ELBOW LEVEL LINE

ELBOW LEVEL LINE

HEMLINE HEMLINE

⁄8" 145CM

4 5C 1 ⁄8"M

HEMLINE HEMLINE

FACING FACING

32 CM SLEEVE HEM

2 CM

NEW UNDERARM POINT

UNDERARM LINE

step 14 Sleeve pattern

NEW UNDERARM POINT

2 CM 2.5 CM

2 CM 2.5 CM ELBOW LINE

ELBOW LINE

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the final sleeve pattern.

SLEEVE CUT 1 PR PR SELF SELF

HEM STITCH STITCH LINE LINE HEMLINE

HEMLINE

FACING

4 CM

UNDERARM POINT

2 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

2 CM

4 CM

UNDERARM FRONT SEAM

CROWN POINT

FOLD FOLD

parka 309


step 15 Developing the collared hood • Starting at the bottom right side of your paper mark point (A) and draw a 97⁄8in horizontal line left (the length of the combined neck measurement) and mark point (B). • From (A) square up 153⁄4in (half the head circumference) and mark point (C). Complete the rectangle and mark point (F). • From (B) square up 21⁄2in (the neck height) and mark point (D). Square in 3⁄4in and mark; label this point center back neck. • From (D) measure up 4in and mark point (E). Square in 3⁄4in and mark. • Using a French curve draw in the neckline from (A) up to the center back line 3⁄4in in from (D). Measure 47⁄8in (the front neck measurement) along this line from (A) and mark the shoulder notch. • To shape the front opening, from (A) add on the front placket width, which is 13⁄4in. To do this, extend the neckline by 7⁄8in (half the placket width) and then square up 23⁄4in; from this point square back 13⁄4in and mark. • From (C) measure down 2in and then square out 2in and mark; this is the top of the front opening. Using a French curve, draw in the curved front opening from the mark you made at the top of the placket to the top of the front opening. • From the front opening draw the hood shape (determined by the design, head size, neck opening, and usage) back around to the mark 3⁄4in out from (E). • To enlarge the hood, draw a cut line at a slight angle from the shoulder tip through the hood down to finish just in front of the shoulder tip notch.

There are three measurements you need to create the pattern for the hood: 1. The front and back neck measurements, taken from the pattern—here they are 47⁄8in and 47⁄8in. If you are developing a hood with a center back panel, remember to deduct the panel width from the final neck measurement as well as from the crown and front opening. 2. The front and back neck height, found by placing the front pattern on top of the back pattern and aligning them at the chest level, then measuring the distance between the front and back neck heights—here it is 21⁄2in. 3. The vertical circumference of the head, taken for the hood opening by measuring around the face of the model’s head, starting and finishing at the center front neck point—here it is 311⁄2in.

F F

C

F

2" 5 CM

ENEN D OP & OP CUT AN

8.5 CM

E

23⁄4CM "

104"CM

3 2 CM ⁄4"

E E

HOOD MASTER PLAN

153⁄CM 4" 40

CENTRE FRONT LINE

CENTREFRONT CENTER FRONTLINE LINE

HOOD MASTER MASTER HOOD PLAN

GRAIN LINE

BACK

HOO D LI

NE

2"CM 5

GRAIN GRAINLINE LINE

B BA CK HO OO OD D LLIN INEE

C C

7 9 ⁄8"CM 25 NECKLINE

310 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

A A

CB

D

72 3⁄C 4" M

CF

B B

4.153 ⁄4C" M

NECNKELC INKE LINE SHOULDER NOTCH

CF

6.5 21⁄2CM "

CB

D D

B

A


CENTRE

E

4.5

NECK LINE

CM D

CF

6.5 CM

D

• Cut along the cut line from the top, leaving the shape • B 25 CM connected by a fraction of an inch. NECKLINE • Moving it clockwise, open the front by 33⁄8in, which will pitch down the center front. Redraw the top of the hood.

CB

step 16 Adding volume to the hood

CB

2 CM

10 CM

2 CM

E

7 CM

From the new front opening position measure out 1in and A mark. From this point square back Bto the top of the hood panel; then from the same point square back down to the bottom of the opening, finishing with a slight curve to meet the front placket. This creates a straight front for the addition of the fur panel.

C

E E

C1M " 2.5

CENTRE LINE CENTERFRONT FRONT LINE

HOOD MASTER MASTER HOOD PLAN PLAN

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

B BAACCKKH

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

CENTRE CENTERFRONT LINE FRONT LINE

HOO OO DD LI N LEINE

N LEIN E

B BAACCKKH HOO OO DD LI CENTRE FRONT LINE

HOOD MASTER MASTER HOOD PLAN PLAN

40 CM

E E

D D

A A

CF

B B

B B

A A

C

step 17 Developing the full hood, neck facing, zipper, and fur panel

EL

CM

REM RO EM VE OV ZE IPZ PIEP RCCE BACK HO OD L TNRT INE R E

N L PNAE PEA

83 1C ⁄8"M

23⁄4C "M

133⁄CM 16"

NEW FACING STRIP

CF

7 CM

4 15CM ⁄8"

7 23⁄CM 4"

R FU

N PA

EL

FU R PA NE L

2.5

CENTRE FRONT LINE

• Trace off the hood shape and, following the instructions on page 50, double it along the center back neck to create a mirrored shape. • To develop the facing shape, measure up 23⁄4in from the M and center back and join these neckline at the center front 8C points with a line following the shape of the neckline. HOOD • To remove the center back hood panel, in which the zipper M MASTER 2C is sandwiched, measure in 3⁄4in along the backPLAN hood line on both sides, finishing 13⁄16in from the new facing strip. • The fur panel is attached to the hood along the front opening and will need a separate pattern. Measure 31⁄8in back from the front opening and create a rectangular panel on both sides.

CENTER CENTRE BACK BACK

SHOULDER NOTCH

CF

SHOULDER NOTCH

72 3C ⁄4"M

7C

M

A

CF

GRAIN LINE

MASTER PLAN

CF C F

7 CM

CB

CB CB

CM D D

CF

C C

8.5 33⁄8"CM

5 CM

4.5

F F

C C

F F

5 CM

parka 311

A


HOOD CUT 1 SELF

SHOULDER NOTCH

1C

CUT 1 SELF

M

M

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

NECK FACING CUT 1 SELF

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the final hood pattern removing the center zipper panel. • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the neck facing pattern, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides.

7C

M 1 CM

CF

GRAIN LINE

GRAINLINE

NECK FACING

1 SELF NECK CUT FACING CUT 1 SELF

1C

7 CM

SHOULDER NOTCH

step 18 Hood and neck facing patternS

4C

3 CM

GRAIN LINE

CM

M

1C

1 CM

4 CM

CENTRE BACK

1C

1

GRAIN LINE

7 CM NEW FACING STRIP

GRAIN LINE

HOOD CUT 1 SELF

1 CM

NECK FACING CUT 1 SELF

HOOD HOOD CUT 1 SELF

M

7C

GRAIN LINE

8 CM

FO

13 C

⁄8" M

M" 13C8

GRAIN LINE

M 13 C8"

1

13C

⁄8"M

⁄8"M 13C

⁄ "M

13 C

⁄8 " M 1 CM

1 CM

31 C 8

8 CM

GRAIN LINE

M

⁄"

31 C8

NECK FACING CUT 1 SELF

M

1

1C

1C

M

M

1 CM

1C

CM

1 CM

1C

M

1

1C step 19 Centre BACK HOOD and fur panel patterns

CM

8 CM

⁄8"

1 CM ⁄8 "

M

3

1⁄8"CM

3

3

HOOD LINING CUT 1 LINING

1

3 1 ⁄8 "

8 CM

⁄8" 83 CM

INSERT INSERT ZIPPER ZIP

FOLD FOLD GRAIN LINE

GRAINLINE

HOODHOOD OPENING EDGE OPENING EDGE FUR CUT 1 PR FUR

FOLD FOLD

1 CM

CENTER CENTRE BACK BACKHOOD HOODPANEL PANEL

CUT 11 PR PR SELF SELF

FUR CUT 1 PR FUR

GL

FUR PANEL CUT 1 PR FUR

13⁄8CM "

1 3CM ⁄8"

4 CM

1 CM

⁄8"

3

1 CM

⁄8 " 1 ⁄8 " 5

13CM ⁄8"

13CM ⁄8 "

3 1 CM ⁄8"

312 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

13⁄CM 8"

13CM ⁄8"

13⁄CM 8"

1 3CM ⁄8"

3

M

1

13⁄CM 8"

1 CM

1C

1C

M 1C

15⁄8"

M

1 CM

⁄8"

3

4 CM

1 CM

• Construct the final center zipper panelCM 1 as a rectangle 15⁄8in wide by the length of the back hood line measured from Step 17, adding a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides. • Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the fur panel from one side of the hood from Step 17, doubling the shape along the front opening. Add a 3⁄8in seam allowance on all sides to create the final pattern.

M

1C


8C

REMOV

E ZI P OD L INE

M

BACK HO

2C

FU

R

PA NE L

M

3 CM

CF

1 CM

1 CM

GL

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off the hood lining pattern from Step 17 without the neck facing, center zipper, and fur panels.

1 CM

1 CM 4 CM

UNDER POINT

1 CM

SHOULDER SHOULDER TIP POINT

0.53⁄CM 16"

0.5 CM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off a copy of the UNDERARM UNDERARM / SIDE SEAM front body shape from UNDERARM POINT Step 6. Remove the facing shape from CORNER POINT the front. The remaining0.5shape will become the front lining. CM 0.5 ⁄CM " • Next, you need to add ease by increasing the armhole width BACK LINING LINING PR 1 CUT to allow for movement. From the shoulder tip measure out 3 ⁄16in and mark, and up 3⁄16in and mark. Find the new shoulder 1 CM tip, and from this point draw a line following the curve of the shoulder back to the front high point shoulder. FUR • From the underarm / side2 CM seam corner measure up 3⁄16in CUT 1 PR FUR 2 CM 8 CM and mark, and out 3⁄16in and mark. Find the new corner 2 CM ⁄" and draw a line 3⁄16in out from the original armhole back up to the new shoulder tip. HOOD OPENING EDGE FOLD FOLD GRAIN LINE • To extend the length and give the lining an overlap at the 1C waistline, cut it in half, and open it up by moving the panels M apart by 3⁄4in. 8 CM • From the new underarm / side seam corner blend the side 1 C to meet the original hemline. seam down M 16

FRONT FRONTLINING LINING CUT 11PR CUT PRLINING LINING

1 CM

⁄4CM "

3 2

4

SIDE SEAM

1C

M

3

GRAINLINE GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE

1 CM

3

3 0.5 ⁄16"CM

0.5 CM

step 21 Developing the front lining

FRONT FRONT HIGH POINT SHOULDER SHOULDER NECK POINT 1 CM

⁄ "CM 3 0.5 16

1.5 CM

SHOULDER POINT

CUT 1 PR SELF

PLEAT

0.5 CM

1 CM

BACK CENTRE SHOULDER 1 CM BACK NECK POINT NECK POINT

CENTRE BACK HOOD PANEL

1 CM

INSERT ZIP

4 CM

M

1 CM 1 CM

1 CM 1 CM

SHOULDER NOTCH

1C

TRE ACK

HOOD LINING HOOD LINING CUT 1 LINING CUT 1 LINING

step 20 Final hood lining pattern 7C M

CING STRIP

7 CM

CM

parka 313


⁄ "CM PLEAT PLEAT

SHOULDER SHOULDER TIP POINT

0.53CM ⁄16"

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off a copy of the back body from Step 9. • You will need to add ease to the center back to allow the lining to expand across the shoulder blades and also to increase the armhole to allow for movement. From the center back neck point measure out 9⁄16in and connect this point to the waistline; this will become the pleat. • From the back shoulder tip measure out 3⁄16in and mark, and up 3⁄16in and mark. Find the new shoulder tip and draw a line following the curve of the shoulder back to the back high point shoulder. • From the underam / side seam corner measure up 3⁄16in and mark, and out 3⁄16in and mark. Find the new underarm / side seam corner and draw a line 3⁄16in out from the original armhole back up to the new shoulder tip. • To extend the length and give the lining an overlap at the waistline, cut it in half and open it by moving up by moving the panels apart by 3⁄4in. • From the new underarm / side seam corner blend the side seam down to meet the original hemline.

3 0.5 16

⁄ "CM

UNDERARM / SIDE SEAM UNDERARM CORNER

0.5

POINT

UNDERARM POINT

0.53CM ⁄16"

0.5 CM

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

BACK LINING BACK LINING CUT 11PR CUT PRLINING LINING

3 2 CM ⁄4"

3 CM 2 ⁄4"

2 CM

⁄ "

3 0.5 ⁄16"CM

POINT

3 0.5 16

SLEEVE CORNER AT BICEPS UNDERARM LEVEL

⁄ "CM

TOP OF CROWN SLEEVE POINT CAP

0.53CM ⁄16"

POINT

SLEEVE LINING SLEEVE CUT 1 PR LINING LINING

0.5 CM

CUT 1 PR LINING

GRAIN LINE

0.5 CM

• Following the instructions on page 50, trace off a copy of the sleeve from Step 14. • From the shoulder tip measure up 3⁄16in and mark, and from the front and back corners of the sleeve at biceps level UNDERARM POINT measure out 3⁄16in and mark and up 3⁄16in and mark. Find the new corners0.5ofCMthe sleeve and connect the front, the cap, and the back with a curved line. FRONT LINING PR LINING CUT 1 back • From the new front and corners of the sleeve at biceps level draw a line down to blend in with the sleeve hemline. • From the sleeve hemline measure down 3⁄4in and square across to increase the length of the lining, pitching out at each side to reflect the underarm seams when folded. 2 CM

314 Chapter five the patterns: outerwear

2 CM

SLEEVE CORNER AT BICEPS LEVEL UNDERARM POINT

3 CM 0.5 ⁄16"

GRAIN LINE GRAINLINE

0.5 CM

Matching the measurements Having enlarged the armhole lining, we will now increase the sleeve cap so that the measurements match. At the sleeve hemline we will increase the length FRONT of the lining so that SHOULDER when the arm is NECK POINT raised the lining will not pull the outer sleeve. SHOULDER

3 0.5 16 CM

step 23 Developing the sleeve lining

PLEAT

2 CM

3 0.5 ⁄16"CM

step 22 Developing the back lining

CENTER CENTRE BACK BACK NECK NECK POINT POINT

9 1.5 16

BACK

BACK HIGH POINT SHOULDER SHOULDER NECK POINT

3 2 CM ⁄4"

⁄4CM "

3 2


parka 315


GLOSSARY Annotation Label or instruction added to a pattern to indicate grainline, piece name, season, cut ratio, internal features, and fabric used. Awl Wooden- or plastic-handled metal spike used to puncture small holes through pattern card, paper, or fabric. Back high point shoulder Point where the shoulder line and the back neckline meet. Back shoulder seam Line between the neck and armhole that rests along the shoulder on the final garment. Back shoulder tip Point where the shoulder line and the armhole line meet. Back underarm point Lowest point of the armhole, usually where it meets the top of the side seam line. Balance marks See notches. Bias grain Line taken across the fabric at a 45-degree angle to the weft and warp threads. Biceps level The largest circumference around the upper arm. On patterns, the line that runs across the width of the sleeve below the shaped cap; it is usually the widest circumference of the sleeve as it encapsulates the bicep muscle. Block Another name for “sloper.” Box pleat A pleat made by making two folds in a piece of fabric, their edges facing in different directions. Button stand A column of fabric at the front of a shirt or garment that holds buttons and buttonholes. CAD Computer-aided design. CAM Computer-aided manufacture. Center back (CB) Central line that vertically divides the back body into two halves. Center back neck Point at the top of the spinal column where the neck joins the body. Center back rise Line running between the waist and the center crotch point that divides the back lower torso into two halves. Center front (CF) Central line that vertically divides the front body into two halves. Center front neck point Point in the center of the ribcage where the front of the neck joins the body. Center front rise Line running between the waist and the center crotch point that divides the front lower torso into two halves. 316

Center line Line running down from the shoudler tip to the cuff hem that divides the front and back halves of the sleeve. Chest level The largest circumference of the chest horizontal to the floor. Collar point The lowest external edge of the collar shape when folded down on the garment neckline. Collar stand Rectangular band that is sewn to the neckline of a garment and lifts the collar. Crotch level Line where the lower torso ends and the legs begin. Crotch point Point where the front and back rises meet the inseam. Cuff guard Fabric band that encases the slit opening at the bottom of the sleeve through which the hand passes. Dart Stitched fold of fabric placed in a garment to fit it to the curves of the body. Dart point The end of the stitched fold of fabric. Dart leg The sides of the dart length. Dart line The central line between the dart legs. Digitizing Digitally tracing the outline of a pattern piece to render the shape as computer mapping data. Drafting paper Specialist paper or Manila card used to construct a pattern. Drill holes Holes punched through a pattern card to allow the positions of pockets, buttonholes, and design features to be marked on the fabric. Drop The difference between the chest and waist circumferences. Ease Measurement of space between the body and the garment added to the pattern to allow a proper fit. Elbow level Line that denotes the level of the elbow within the sleeve length. Facing Section of fabric used to finish the hems and openings of garments; also used to give support to an area of fabric. Fit model A model who is the size and shape of a fashion label’s typical customer; clothes are fitted to their body shape. Flare Volume added to a garment by pivoting or the insertion of a separate panel. Fold line Label attached to a drawn line with bent arrows at each end to indicate

a section of the pattern that needs replicating by folding the fabric over. Forearm line Line running down the front sleeve denoting the front aspect of the arm. French curve Flat drawing tool shaped in a graduating curve to give a template for drawing curves of the body. Front high point shoulder Point where the shoulder line and the back neck curve meet. Front neck curve The length of the area made by the front neck opening in a garment. Front shoulder seam Line that runs between the neck and armhole on a pattern; it rests along the shoulder of the body on the constructed garment. Front shoulder tip Point where the shoulder line and the armhole line meet. Front underarm point Lowest point of the armhole, usually where it meets the top of the side seam line. Fullness Extra volume to a pattern area in width, length, or both. Fuse Interfacing material with an adhesive side used to stiffen or support internal sections of a garment. Gathers Pulled together fabric, its length reduced to fit a smaller measurement. Grading Process of enlarging or reducing the dimensions of a pattern proportionally to create a larger or smaller pattern size. Grainline Direction of the warp and weft threads in a piece of fabric. Half back neck measurement Distance between the center back seam and the back shoulder seam. Half front neck measurement Distance between the center front seam and the front shoulder seam. Hemline Bottom edge of the garment body. Hem width Extended section of the garment body that is folded up to create a finished edge to the garment body. High point shoulder Point where the front and back shoulder seams meet the neckline. Also known as “shoulder neck point.” Hip level The largest circumference of the hips and buttocks horizontal to the floor.


Horizontal grain Direction of the weft threads that run horizontally across the fabric from selvage to selvage. Inseam The inner seam of the pant legs. Knee level Line of the knee on a pant leg pattern. Lapel Constructed fabric panel that connects the collar and front opening of a jacket or shirt and gives a finished appearance; also used for strength and support. Made-to-measure Describes a custom-made garment that is fitted to individual measurements. Marker Gridded paper onto which patterns are traced, for fabric to be cut out. Muslin Unbleached, raw cotton fabric used to test garment designs. Also the name of a sample garment made from muslin and used to test the fit and proportional balance of a design on the human body. Neckline Opening in a garment where the head passes through. Notches Small incisions made to indicate a position when aligning patterns, seams, hems, CF, and CB. Outseam Seam of the garment down the outside of a pant leg. Pivoting Rotation of a pattern from a fixed point. Placket Fabric band that encases a slit or opening at the neck or center front of a garment and holds a closer of buttons or zippers. Pleat Fold in fabric that when repeated creates volume in a design. Plotter Large-scale paper printer that plots digitized patterns. PR = pair of patterns. Raglan sleeve Sleeve that extends from under the arm toward the neckline. Roll line Folded line where the lapel turns over from the collar down to the center front opening. RSU = right side up. Seam allowance Extra volume added to the stitch line that allows seams to be sewn together.

Set-in sleeve Sleeve that is set or attached to a circular opening (armhole) that encases the arm around the shoulder down through the underarm pit. Shoulder notch Aligning notch on a collar to control fabric spread when inserting the collar; it is matched with the shoulder seams. Shoulder tip Point where the sleeve cap and the front and back shoulder seams meet. Slash and spread Patternmaking technique that involves cutting open a pattern to introduce or remove volume. Side seam Seam of garment that runs down the side of the body, coats, and pants. Sleeve cap (crown/head) Upper part of the sleeve that is sewn into the armhole. Sloper A basic pattern shape that represents an area of the body, usually the torso (upper body sloper), arms (sleeve sloper), or legs (pant sloper). Also known as “block.” Style line Seams that separate the pattern pieces of a design. Suppression Removal of fabric to introduce shape to the curves of the human body.

Upper body sloper (bodice sloper/ torso sloper) Basic pattern of the torso in a particular size that has no design features. Vent Vertical slit in the back or side back hem seams of coats or jackets that allows body movement when the garment is worn. Waistband Band of faced fabric attached to the top of pants to give finish and support or inserted in a jacket as a design feature to denote the waist level. Waistline Circumference around the torso of the body between the hips and the bottom of the rib cage. Warp Holding yarn that runs parallel to the edges of the loom. Weft Filling yarn woven across the loom, perpendicular to the holding yarn. Wristline The smallest circumference of the arm. Yoke Panel created in the top front or back area of a garment, coat, or jacket. Also applied to a panel across the top of pants.

Toile Another name for “muslin.” Tolerance The amount of movement in woven fabric structure. Top stitch Lock stitch that is placed along the edge of seams to secure them together. Torso The trunk of the human body between the shoulders and the crotch. Tuck Fold in fabric secured to seams; like pleats, tucks create volume. Two-piece sleeve Sleeve shape made of two pattern pieces that take the natural hanging shape of the arm. The upper part attaches to the sleeve cap / head of the armhole; the lower part attaches to the underarm section of the armhole. It is generally used in tailored suits and coats, and the sleeve is set high under the arm for mobility. Under collar Copy of the faced collar pattern that is reduced in size to enable the collar edge seam to turn under itself so that it is not visible. Underarm seam Vertical seams of a set-in sleeve that, when sewn together, create the cylindrical tube of the sleeve.

GLOSSARY 317


INDEX AccuMark software (Gerber) 68, 69, 70 activewear 11, 14, 58, 62 see also hooded sweatshirt; sweatpants Alcega, Juan de 8 anatomy see human anatomy annotation 38, 39, 51 anoraks 50–51, 57, 68; pattern 206–19 anthropometer 26 armholes 41, 42, 55, 59, 66; adjusting 81, 85, 90, 105, 127, 144, 233, 270, 289, 303 avatars see virtual avatars awl 18, 19 Balance 31, 61, 62 “Balmac” trench coat 7 band collar 62 baseball hemlines 117, 127 basting (loose stitching) 8 bellows pockets 193 belts see waist belts bespoke tailoring 21, 22, 59 bias grain 57 bib shirt 138–47 body growth 55 see also grading body mapping 24 see also 3-D body scanning technology bootcut silhouette 199 boundary lines 24, 36 box-pleat 192–93 branding 14, 20, 31, 68, 71 break point 273 breast pockets 106, 107, 118, 121, 221–22, 224, 225, 257, 262–63, 272, 278–79, 292 Browne, Thom 11, 12–13 button stand 162, 163, 190 C. P. Company 11 Cambridge boating collar 64 capes 8 cargo pants 186–95 cargo pockets 188, 193 cassocks 8 casual styles 14, 63, 67, 95, 97: jackets 67, 220–31; shirts 62, 104–15, 135 chinos 158–67 club collar 64 coat linings 66, 248, 249–50 coats 7, 8, 14, 232–51 coin pocket 201, 273, 280 collar shapes 62–63, 64 collar stands 62, 64, 108, 120, 132, 298–99; hidden 62, 227–28, 236, 238, 275; patterns 84, 122, 133, 228, 238, 240, 275, 299 collars 50, 63–64, 84, 108, 120, 122 132–33; convertible 62, 227–28, 236, 238–40, 273, 275, 298–99; mandarin 62, 142–43 see also neck sizes compasses 18 computer-aided design (CAD) 7, 68–70 computer-aided manufacture (CAM) 68 computer-aided patternmaking 14, 22, 68–69 concealed pockets 65, 121 convertible collars 62, 227–28, 236, 238–40, 273, 275, 298–99 coronal plane 24 Coutts, J. 10 cross grain see horizontal grain crotch level 45–47, 49, 61 see also dropped crotch crotch measurements 28, 33, 45, 58 cuff guards 67, 112, 113–14, 124–25, 146 cuff hemlines 111, 123, 136, 144, 245 cuff point 265, 285 cuff styles 67 cuff vents 246, 266, 285–86 cuffs 44, 113, 124, 145, 285–86; ribbed 86, 101, 174 318

Darts 105, 119, 127, 151, 188, 236–37, 253, 272 denim jacket 220–31 design development 36–39; and technology 14, 68–71 design development patterns 38 design drawings 20, 22 designer patterns 38 digital grading 70 digitizing patterns 69–70 double-breasted styles 233, 268–87 doublets 8 drafter’s pencils 18 draping 8, 20 drawstrings 174, 304, 306–7 dress forms 30, 49, 71 drill holes 51 drop 31 dropped crotch 159, 160, 169, 176, 187 dyeing 60 Ease 58, 59, 95; for knitted fabrics 78, 85; applied to linings 66, 249, 283, 300, 313, 314; applied to sleeves 43, 59, 95, 110, 135, 144, 214, 244, 264, 284; applied to pants 171 see also darts; pleating elasticated gathering 174, 209, 213 elbow patches 297 Engineered Garments 14 English neckline 63 envelope pockets 221–22, 224, 225, 295 epaulets 134, 243–44 eyelet punch see pattern drill Face, The 14 facings: cuff 266, 286; fly 153, 162, 179, 190, 191; front 240, 259, 260, 274, 276, 291; hem 66, 209, 213, 234, 260, 290, 304, 306; hood opening 100; neck 209, 210, 212, 213, 249, 261, 277, 278, 311, 312; placket 77, 83, 304, 305; pocket 93, 107, 121, 155–56, 165, 170, 295; sleeve 246; vent 276; waistband 194 fit models 31 fitting 61 fleece 78 flies 151, 153, 159, 162–63, 169, 179, 180, 188, 190, 198, 200; extension 154, 157, 166, 179, 184, 191, 200, 203 French curves 18, 19, 41 French-style neckline 63 funnel collar 63 Garsault, M. de 8 geometry curves 18, 19 GQ 14 grading 52–55, 70 grainlines 46, 49, 51, 57 gusseted pockets 65, 292 Haute couture 20 hemlines: baseball 117, 127; cuff 111, 123, 144, 245, 265, 285; elasticated 213; facings 234, 304, 306; shaping 75, 127, 140, 207, 233, 253, 255, 269, 271, 273, 303; sleeve 44, 78, 214, 229, 230, 246, 287; pant 46 hems 66 high-waisted pants 150–57 hip curves 18, 19 hooded sweatshirt 88–103 hoods 88, 98–100, 216–19, 310–13 horizontal grain 57 human anatomy 24–27 Illustrations see design drawings Improved Tailor’s Art, The (Jacksons) 10 industrialization 8 inside leg 28, 33, 45, 46, 47 Internet, the 68 Italian loose neckline 63

Jacket linings 66, 282–83, 287, 300–1, 313–14 jackets 8, 11, 61, 66; denim 220–31; double-breasted 62, 233, 268–87; single-breasted 63, 252–67 Jacksons, J. 10 jeans 196–203 jersey 78 jetted pockets 65, 272, 281 “KASANE” 8 Kawakubo, Rei 14 knitted fabrics 58, 59, 78, 84, 85 L’Art du Tailleur (Garsault) 8 landmark points 25–27, 70 lapels 236, 256, 271 lay planning 70 layering 8 Lemonnier, Elisa 10 Libro de Geometría Práctica y Traça (Alcega) 8 line 62 linings 66; coat 66, 248–50; hood 313; jackets 66, 282–83, 287, 300–1, 313–14; sleeve 66, 247, 291, 301, 314 long-sleeved shirt 104–15 long-sleeved collarless shirt 74–79 lumberjack shirt 116–25 Made-to-measure see bespoke mandarin collar 62, 142–43 Margiela, Martin 14 marker making 70 mass production 10, 22–23, 39 master plans 7, 37–38, 48–51, 74; for collars 227–28, 238–39, 275, 298–99; for coats/jackets 48, 206–8, 212, 220–21, 233–37, 252–55, 289–90, 302–4, 306; for epaulets 243; for flies 163; for hoods 99, 216, 310–11; for pants 150–1, 158, 168–69, 170, 171, 186–88, 197–99 for pockets 161, 164, 172, 178, 181, 191, 201–2, 211, 222, 241, 262, 278, 291, 295; for shirts/tops 74–76, 80–1, 89–93, 104–6, 116–19, 126–28, 138–39, 140; for shorts 176–77, 180; for sleeves 48, 77–78, 85–86, 94–97, 110–12, 123, 134–36, 143–44, 214, 229–30, 244–45, 264–65, 269–73, 284–85, 296–97, 308–9; for storm flaps 243; Maxima Poplin 7 measurement taking 7, 8, 21, 24–29, 40–1; armholes 41, 42; collars 236; hoods 98–100, 217–18, 310; inside leg 46, 47; neck 26, 41, 61, 62, 227; necklines 41, 120; pants 45–47 sleeves 42–44, 59, 94, 244, 264, 284; tools for 10, 18, 26–29; see also grading; size charts median plane 24 military styles 8, 11, 12 mirroring 37, 38, 50 Miyake, Issey 8, 14 modeling see draping moulage see draping muff pockets 93, 94 muslins 21, 30, 37, 38, 61, 62, 64 Neck sizes 32, 33, 62, 98, 120, 132, 227 necklines 41, 63–64 notched waistbands 156–57, 166, 171, 174 notcher 18 notches 38, 48, 51, 70, 156, 171, 174, 238, 246; alignment 91, 92, 156, 216, 218, 223, 226, 229, 231; collar 258, 273; shoulder 299, 310


Officer collar 64 Owens, Rick 14 Pant slopers 37, 45–47; creation of master plan from 49, 150, 168, 170, 176, 180, 186, 197; grading 54–55 pants: cargo pants 186–95; chinos 158–67; high-waisted 150–57; jeans 196–203; sweatpants 168–75; see also shorts; pant slopers parka 302–15 patch fly 180 patch pockets 65, 129–30, 192, 202, 209, 211, 257, 263–64, 291–92 pattern slopers (blocks) 7, 26, 36; adapting 56 see also pant slopers; sleeve slopers; upper body slopers patternmaking 20, 36–39; history of 8–14; use of computers in 14; tools/equipment for 18–19, 39; training in 7, 8, 10 pattern design systems (PDS) 70–1 pattern drill 18, 19 pattern hole punch 18 pattern hooks 18 pattern masters 18, 19 pattern tracing 50–1 see also under individual patterns pattern weights 18 patterns: bib shirt 138–47; anorak 206–19; cargo pants 186–95; chinos 158–67; denim jacket 220–31; digitizing 69–70; high-waisted pants 150–57; hooded sweatshirt 88–103; jeans 196–203; long-sleeved shirt 104–15; long-sleeved collarless shirt 74–79; lumberjack shirt 116–25; parka 302–15; polo shirt 80–7; safari shirt 126–37; shorts 176–85; sweatpants 168–175; trench coat 232–51; waxed jacket 288–301 Peter Pan collar 63 pins 18 piping 264 pivoting 38, 56, 237 plackets 76, 81, 121; concealed 65, 139; facings 77, 83, 305; grown-on 65, 106, 127; sewn-on 65, 117, 127, 131, 221, 222, 290, 293, 304 pleating 141–42, 159, 169, 170, 176, 197, 199 pocket bearer 162, 192, 201 pocket flaps 121 pocket stands 65 pocket welts 65, 151, 153, 154–55, 156, 160, 164–65, 170, 172, 181–82, 221, 224, 234, 241, 257, 263, 272, 274, 279, 280 pockets 65, 93, 241–42, 304, 308; bellows 193; breast 106, 107, 118, 121, 221–22, 224, 225, 257, 262–63, 272, 278–79, 292; cargo 180, 193; coat 234, 241–42; coin 201, 273, 280; concealed 65, 121; envelope 221–22, 224, 225, 295; gusseted 65, 292; jeans 201–2; jetted 65, 272, 281; muff 93, 94; pant 151–53, 154–55, 159, 160–62, 163–65, 169, 170, 172–73, 191–93 patch 65, 129-30, 192, 202, 209, 211, 257, 263–64,

291–92; shorts 178–79, 181–82; side 281; Poell, Carol Christian 14 polo shirt 80–87 posture 31, 61 Practical Guide for the Tailor’s Cutting-Room (Coutts) 10 Prêt-à-porter see ready-to-wear production-line processes 20–23 production patterns 39 proportion 62 Prostyle 22 QC (Quality Control) 23 Raeburn, Christopher 14 raglan shoulder shaping 290 raglan sleeves 89, 90–91, 94–97, 297–98 ready-to-wear 10, 14, 20, 22–23, 31, 52 ribbing 174 roll collar 62, 258, 273 see also convertible collars roll line 273 rulers 18, 19, 26 Safari shirt 126–37 sailor collar 62, 63 sample size 22 see also sizing systems samples 22, 38 scalpels 18 Science Completed in the Art of Cutting (Walker) 10 scissors 18, 19 seam allowances 18, 38, 50, 51, 60 seam ripper 18, 19 seams 18, 136 self-facing strips 155, 156, 165, 170, 181, 182 semibespoke 21, 22 set squares 18, 19, 26 set-in sleeve 67, 123–24 sewing 23 shaped pockets 241–42 shirts: long-sleeved 104–25, 138–47; short-sleeved 126-37 see also polo shirt shorts 176–85 shoulder slope 31, 61, 255, 270 shrink test 196 shrinkage 18, 60, 196 side pockets 281 silhouettes 7, 8, 10, 11, 20, 31, 62; fitted 119, 237, 253; leg 171, 187, 198–99 single-breasted styles 252–67 size charts 7, 10–11, 20, 24, 32–33; standardized 10–11, 22, 37 see also grading; measurement taking; sizing systems sizing systems 10–11, 52 see also grading; neck sizes; 3-D body scanning technology slash and spread 38, 56, 239 sleeve cap ease 43, 59, 95 sleeve caps 43, 66, 78, 291; adjusting 95, 111, 135, 287, 301; and knitted fabrics 85 sleeve slopers 37, 42–44; grading 54; creation of master plan from 48, 77, 85, 94, 110, 123, 134, 143, 214, 229, 244, 264, 269, 284, 296, 308 see also under individual patterns sleeve linings 66, 247, 291, 301, 314 sleeves 66–67, 296, 308–9; hemlines 44, 78; long 77–79, 89, 104, 110–15, 123–24, 143–45, 214–15, 229–31; raglan 89, 90–91, 94–97, 297–98; short 85–86, 126–37, 134–37; tailored 67, 244–47, 264–66, 284–87; two-piece 37, 67, 229–31, 284–87 see also sleeve slopers spandex 78 standardization of sizes 10–11, 22, 37

storm flap 243–44 straight collar 62 straight grain 57 suspenders 156 Suzuki, Daiki 14 sweatpants 168–75 Tailor’s chalk 18, 19, 26 tailored shorts 176–85 tailored sleeves 67, 244–47, 264–66, 284–87 tailoring 8, 10, 21; training in 10 see also bespoke tailoring Takada, Kenzo 14 tape measures 10, 18, 19, 26 Taylor’s Complete Guide or Comprehensive Analysis of Beauty and Elegance in Dress 8 technology: and design development 14, 68–71; and measurement taking 29, 30, 52, 68, 71; and textiles 11, 14 3-D body scanning technology 29, 30, 71 3-D flattening technology 70–71 Throup, Aitor, 14 tolerance 59 tools 18–19, 26, 39 top collars 108, 120, 122, 132–33, 229, 240 tracing wheel 18, 19 transverse horizontal planes 24 trench coats 7; pattern 232–51 trend research 22 turned-down collar 62, 63 turtleneck collar 63 two-piece sleeves 37, 67, 229–31, 244, 284–87 Undersleeves 229, 230–31, 246, 265–66, 285, 286 upper body slopers 20, 21, 36–37, 40–41; creation of master plans from 48, 74, 80, 89, 104, 116, 126, 138, 140, 206–8, 212, 220, 233, 252, 289, 302, 306; grading 53 Uomo Vogue 14 Van Beirendonck, Walter 14 vents 234, 249, 250, 261, 276–77, 283, 290, 293, 294 see also cuff vents virtual avatars 14, 71 volume, adding/removing 61, 207, 208, 212, 272, 289; to coats/jackets 209, 235, 253, 254, 257, 260, 271, 272, 276, 303, 306; hoods 311; to pants 170, 189; to sleeves 67, 96; see also pivoting; pleating; slash and spread Waist belts 290, 293, 294 waistband tab 226 waistbands 102, 184–85, 194, 203, 226; notched 156–57, 166, 171, 174; sizing 174 waistlines 45, 46, 48; and darts 47, 49, 105, 119, 127, 129, 154, 169, 171, 181, 253, 257, 260; high 150–57 Walker, W. 10 Watanabe, Junya 63 waxed jackets 288–301 welt stands 65, 221, 241 see also pocket welts welts see pocket welts WGSN 22 widespread cutaway collar 64 wingtip collar 64 wool see knitted fabrics Woolrich Woolen Mill 7 Yamamoto, Yohji 11, 14, 31 yokes: back 106, 107, 119, 121, 128, 187, 189, 199, 200; front 118, 121, 128, 221, 223, 229 Zippers 153, 211, 295, 311

index 319


FURTHER READING Aldrich, Winifred, Metric Pattern Cutting for Menswear, Blackwell, Oxford, (4th edition) 2006 Baudot, François, The Allure of Men, Assouline, New York/Paris, 2002 Blackman, Cally, One Hundred Years of Menswear, Laurence King, London, 2009 Boucher, François, The History of Costume in the West, Thames & Hudson, London, 1996 Chenoune, Farid, A History of Men’s Fashion, Flammarion, Paris, 1993 Cicolini, Alice, The New English Dandy, Thames & Hudson, London, 2007 Cooklin, Gerry, Pattern Grading for Men’s Clothes: The Technology of Sizing, John Wiley & Sons, 1992 Davies, Hywel, Modern Menswear, Laurence King, London, 2008 Gavenas, Mary Lisa, The Fairchild Encyclopedia of Menswear, Fairchild Publications, Inc, New York, 2008 Gieve, David W., Gieves & Hawkes: 1785–1985 The Story of a Tradition, Gieves & Hawkes, Portsmouth, 1985 Jobling, Paul, Man Appeal: Advertising, Modernism and Menswear, Berg, Oxford/New York, 2005
 Knowles, Lori A., The Practical Guide to Patternmaking for Fashion Designers: Menswear, Fairchild Books, New York, 2005 McNeil, Peter and Karaminas, Vicki (editors), The Men’s Fashion Reader, Berg, New York, 2009 Peacock, John, Men’s Fashion: The Complete Sourcebook, Thames & Hudson, London, 1996 Shoben, Martin and Hallett, Clive, Essential Shirt Work Book, LCFS Fashion Media, 2001 Waugh, Norah, The Cut of Men’s Clothes 1600–1900, Faber, London 1964/ Routledge 1987 Whife, A. A. and Brigland, A. S., The Modern Tailor, Outfitter and Clothier, Caxton, London, (4th edition) 1949 Whife, A. A., A First Course in Gentlemen’s Garment Cutting, Tailor & Cutter, London, 1952 Whife, A. A., Cutting from Block Patterns: Gentlemen’s Jackets, Waistcoats, Trousers, etc., Tailor & Cutter, London, 1960

PICTURE CREDITS Fashion illustrations at the beginning of each pattern are by Thom Davies. All other technical flats, diagrams, and illustrations are by Elisha Camilleri. All muslin photography is by Simon Pask Photography (model for the pants patterns: Stuart Dando). The author and publisher would like to thank the following individuals and institutions who provided images for use in this book. In all cases, every effort has been made to trace the copyright holders but should there be any errors or omissions, the publisher would be happy to insert corrections in any subsequent editions of the book. 2 © Alasdair McLellan, model: Roc Barbot at Models1, with thanks to Margaret Howell 6 Photo by Tim Barber www.woolrichwoolenmills.com www.wplavori.com 9 © WWD/Condé Nast/Corbis 10 l: © WWD/Condé Nast/Corbis; r: © WWD/Condé Nast/Corbis 11 l: © WWD/Condé Nast/Corbis; r: © WWD/Condé Nast/Corbis 12–13 © WWD/Condé Nast/Corbis 15 Engineered Garments SS12/model Jay Alaimo 18–19 Photography by Packshot.com 20 © Helen King/Corbis 21 John Lund/Paula Zacharias/Getty Images 23 © Qilai Shen/In Pictures/Corbis 25 Philip Dowell/Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images 27–29 Photography by Simon Pask, model: Raphael Sander for NEVS 30 Karina Lax 31 © WWD/Condé Nast/Corbis 39 b: © Helen King/Corbis 60 Gary Ombler/Dorling Kindersley/Getty Image 63 © WWD/Condé Nast/Corbis 70 Screenshots created in Gerber’s AccuMark Pattern Design System (PDS) software 71 t: Screenshots created in Browzwear 3D Design Software; b: Screen shots taken in [TC]²’s (Textile Clothing Corp) 3-D body scanning program. Thanks to Dr. Simeon Gill 73 © WWD/Condé Nast/Corbis (Issey Miyake Spring 2011) 148 © WWD/Condé Nast/Corbis (Junya Watanabe Man Fall 2012) 204 © Benoit Tessier/Reuters/Corbis (Issey Miyake Men Fall 2012) All other photography by the author and staff at the Department of Apparel, Manchester Metropolitan University.

320

Author’s acknowledgments Self-belief is a powerful creative tool: I am eternally grateful to Laurence King, Helen Evans, Anne Townley, Peter Jones, and Lizzie Ballantyne whose enthusiasm and patience have allowed the book to evolve and develop into its present form. Also to Nicole, Phoebe, and River for their continuing support, patience, and love throughout this process. Special thanks to Elisha Camilleri and Thom Davies for sharing my passion for fashion and for their invaluable technical and creative contributions throughout the project. I would like to thank all my colleagues and students past and present who have inspired the writing of this book through their invaluable comments and contributions. Many thanks to all the designers, fashion companies, and educational institutions who generously gave their time during the research of this book. Huge thanks to Dr. Simeon Gill for his guidance and expertise in developing the anthropometrical sizing profiles and procedures, and to the staff at Manchester Metropolitan University who have supported this project. Dedicated to the memory of my family who toiled in the cotton mills of Lancashire.

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