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2007 ANNUAL REPORT

IGNITING A GLOBAL VISION


p DR. GARY WAISSI

DEAN - SCHOOL OF GLOBAL MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

CONTENTS 1

DEAN’S MESSAGE

2

STRATEGIC PLAN

4

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

5

BUSINESS@SGML HIGHLIGHTS

6

DEAN’S ADVISORY COUNCIL

7

ALUMNI

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UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

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GRADUATE STUDENTS

12

GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT: LIFEPILOT

16

FACULTY ACCOLADES & PUBLICATIONS

18

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT: JERRY & VICKIE MOYES

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CENTER FOR RESPONSIBLE LEADERSHIP

21

2006 - 2007 FINANCIALS

22

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT: SALVATION ARMY

23

DONORS

24

STAFF & FACULTY RECOGNITION

25

FACULTY LISTINGS

http://sgml.asu.edu © Copyright 2007 Arizona Board of Regents


........................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................ ......................................................................................................................................................... ................................................................................................................................................... ................................................................................................................ ............................................................................................ ...................................................... T HE DEAN’S MESSAGE

You are looking at the inaugural annual report of the School of Global Management and Leadership (SGML). For SGML, 2006-2007 has been about “Igniting our Vision.” We began the year by revising the vision and mission statements to reflect the dynamic direction and future of the School. Our new vision is simple, far-reaching and ambitious:

By the year 2011, the School of Global Management and Leadership (SGML), Arizona State University, will become nationally recognized in globally oriented management education and research. With the efforts of, as well as support and collaboration from, all faculty, staff and the Dean’s Advisory Council, we completed a significant strategic planning effort during Fall 2006. The SGML Strategic Plan was adopted by faculty and staff in January 2007. We made this Plan a real, living document that unites us and gives us the road map of how to achieve our vision. We are placing great emphasis on the implementation of the Plan. You will have the opportunity to read more on the strategic planning effort and the Plan in this report. The School of Global Management and Leadership serves nearly 1,900 students from diverse ethnic, cultural and socio-economic backgrounds in metropolitan Phoenix, the nation’s fifth largest city. We play a significant role in helping Arizona State University implement a new model of American higher education, the “New American University.” Along these lines, our goal is to provide an unprecedented combination of academic excellence, broad access, and positively impact the economic, social, cultural and environmental health and well-being of the communities we serve. Our research is inspired by real world application and our students are the future leaders both here in Arizona and around the world. Throughout this inaugural annual report, you will learn of the impressive strides we have made over the course of the past year. Among others, we have significantly grown our Dean’s Advisory Council from 14 to 50 members. The council members include a who’s who listing of leaders from the business community. We launched a new undergraduate program—Leadership in International Management (BS LIM), received and approval for two new graduate programs—Master of Applied Leadership and Management (MALM) and Master of Accountancy and Applied Leadership (MAAL). We have increased our “Global Footprint” to include partnerships and collaborations with Tec de Monterrey in Mexico. In addition, we advanced discussions with universities in Canada, Brazil, China, Ireland and Finland. We also had an undergraduate student group visiting Prague, and a graduate student group visiting Budapest, Munich and Milan. Our graduates, at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, have taken what they have learned in our classrooms into the workforce to be major contributors to the economic vitality of the region. We also launched a new research center, the Center for Responsible Leadership (CRL). Finally, in the Fall 2006 we launched the BUSINESS@SGML magazine. In one year we have seen tremendous change and advancement. From new programs to a new research center to cutting-edge research, SGML is primed for explosive growth.

Gary R. Waissi

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EXCELLENCE. ACCESS. IMPACT.

SGML... p is committed to excel-

lence and innovation.

SCHOOL OF GLOBAL MANAGEM

p is committed to student

success in all aspects of academic and personal development.

SGML...

p values student

p pursues research and

engagement, experiential learning, ethnic and intellectual diversity, civic participation, globalthinking and engagement.

discovery that benefits the public good. p contributes to the

economic, social, and cultural vitality and healthy well-being of our community.

p is committed to respect

for self and others, ethics and integrity, and collaborative relationships with alumni, partners and stakeholders.

SGML... p seeks racial and ethnic

diversity in its student body, faculty and staff. p seeks to serve the needs

of minority, disadvantaged, disabled and non-traditional students.

p promotes continuing

and extended education, and encourages students, faculty and staff to be engaged with the greater Phoenix metropolitan region.

p offers unique programs

leading to professional degrees at the baccalaureate and post baccalaureate levels.

How SGML is playing a role in the global economy Community engagement? Check. International partnerships? Check. Global impact? Check. In just a short time, the Arizona

State University School of Global Management and Leadership has built a strong foundation and a future without bounds. Can SGML propel its Strategic Plan and define its own destiny in the process? Absolutely. It will not only succeed, the School will excel. How? The answer is simple: Leverage the capacity and professionalism currently in place to achieve SGML’s intrinsic goal—by 2011 SGML will become nationally-celebrated in globally-oriented management education and research. It is the most ambitious and calculated goal SGML has ever faced. And it is one in which unlimited efforts and expectations are in play. “There has been incredible progress toward achieving this goal and we expect to further raise our standing in globally-oriented management education and research to a position recognized as the best anywhere,” says SGML Dean Gary Waissi. “We are blazing an incredible path for the future. The future is now.”


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MENT & LEADERSHIP

how to get there The School of Global Management and Leadership will achieve excellence and national recognition through:

Excellent Scholarship

The Mission: By year 2011, the School of Global Management and Leadership will become nationally recognized in globally oriented management education and research. The Larger Context: Pursuing ASU’s goals for Excellence, Access, Impact, the members of SGML seek to gain national prominence for the distinctive nature and scholarly foundation of its endeavors and the success of its graduates.

Engaging SGML faculty in continuing professional development, encouraging continuous and wideranging influential intellectual contributions and sponsored research activities, and communicating these intellectual contributions effectively to academic peers and the community.

Outstanding Programs Offering students an exceptional learning experience that satisfies the needs of the students and the requirements of the global marketplace. Communicating the responsibilities of citizenship and setting high development standards and expectations for all SGML students.

Excellent Recruitment/ Retention

The SGML Strategic Plan outlines that by 2011: p

SGML WILL strengthen its research capacity, quality and performance to earn the school national recognition for its quality and innovation.

p

SGML WILL enhance its position through the development of degree programs and self-supporting executive educational endeavors focusing on quality and innovation.

p

SGML WILL create and sustain an organizational culture supporting and reinforcing high performance expectations consistent with those of aspirational peers to achieve excellence in recruitment and retention of faculty, staff and students.

p

SGML WILL communicate effectively through its established centers of excellence and engage in several strategic partnerships to strengthen the school, ASU, and the learning experience.

p

SGML WILL diversify sources of funding and increase fund-raising to be financially stable for the immediate and long-term goals and build and engage alumni networks.

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On each of these matters, SGML is allocating every possible resource to achieve its goal. “We have seen great progress on many of the initiatives identified in the Strategic Plan,” notes David Van Fleet, a co-author of the plan. “And the progress made has been in such a short period of time that it indicates the great things happening at SGML are worthy of such recognition.” Global partnerships, most notably with neighboring countries Mexico and Canada, have been profound. The creation of SGML Center for Productivity, Innovation and Quality is also significant, notes Van Fleet. The Strategic Plan is an on-going process, but one Dean Waissi knows will inevitably garner incalculable results. “We are on the cusp of true international impact,” he says. “The partnerships, programs and progress we have secured prove this brilliance. What we will do now is build upon this foundation.” Excellence. Access. Impact. For SGML, these are more than words, they are reality.

(Faculty, Staff, and Students): Creating an organizational culture that values performance excellence, maximizes the contributions of every member of SGML community, encourages and rewards high performance and continuous improvement, and values intellectual and cultural diversity in the learning environment.

Community Outreach/ Social Embeddedness and Communication Developing internal and external strategic partnerships that benefit the local, regional, and global economies and communicating accomplishments effectively to support our vision to be nationally recognized in global management education and research.

Development and Fundraising Undertaking aggressive, comprehensive fund-raising activities that complement tuition, programs, research, and entrepreneurial revenues to provide the resources necessary to propel SGML toward excellence.


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Supply & Demand SGML new Master’s programs serve huge market void The numbers simply speak for themselves. There are roughly 200,000 leadership positions in the Greater Phoenix economy. To continue to compete on a global scale, this number will double in two short decades. Standing up to the immense challenge of educating these global leaders is the ASU School of Global Management and Leadership (SGML). Already, SGML offers some of the most sought out global business degrees available—two key graduate and three undergraduate degrees. Beginning in Fall 2007, SGML began offering a Master’s of Accountancy and a Master’s of Applied Leadership and Management (MALM). Both are huge steps for SGML to reach its objective to gain national prominence in the global economy for its students, its faculty and the school’s leadership. It is the very essence of S-G-M-L. “The increasing number of individuals in leadership positions and the expanding demands on leaders creates a need for these programs,” reports Pierre Balthazard, director of SGML Graduate Programs. “The need is great and we are rising to the challenge.”

The Master’s of Applied Leadership and Management (MALM) Leadership, teamwork, communication and vision. These are key attributes global businesses covet today, and answering this call at SGML is the MALM. This 30-hour degree equips students with a core curriculum stressing real-world global applications, including sustainability, ethics, innovation, and organization performance are key to the program. This program develops management and leadership skills critical for employees to advance to mid- and upper-level management positions in a variety of disciplines (e.g., service industries, healthcare, defense, nonprofit, manufacturing, education, etc.) and functional areas (e.g., human resources, operations, sales, finance). Students accepted in the program have already been successful in their field of endeavor, discipline, or functional area and bring this perspective to the art of solving complex problems. Teaching approaches are dedicated to improving students’ critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Students enhance interpersonal abilities and develop communication and negotiating skills while assessing the current state of an organization and

learning to understand why it is that way, prescribe ways to improve it, and implement those changes successfully.

The Master’s of Accountancy This 30-hour Master’s of Accountancy Program offers a graduate degree opportunity in accountancy to students that DO NOT have undergraduate majors in accounting. It attracts students having undergraduate majors in other business fields such as finance or marketing as well as students from such diverse majors as history, art, or biology. Upon successful completion of the program, graduates meet the educational requirements for CPA certification in Arizona and most other states. Graduates from the Accountancy program will acquire the management and leadership skills necessary to advance to middle and upper level management positions in CPA firms, private industry and governmental organizations. More specifically, Master’s of Accountancy graduates develop the requisite skills to work as professional accountants in audit, tax, consulting, financial analysis, controllership, or treasury; while building the basis for advancement to senior level positions in management.

Programs @ SGML Undergraduate p B.S., Accountancy: Provides the

information necessary to evaluate the financial activities of complex organizations. p B.S., Global Business: Establishes

a foundation for understanding how enterprises operate in a global economy. p B.S., Leadership in International

Management: Offers an extensive international curriculum and an intense multicultural experience designed for students who desire the knowledge, skills, and techniques necessary to participate significantly in international business operations.

Graduate p Master of Accountancy: An innovative

30-hour program that focuses on both technical proficiency and professional values to give applicants the 21st-century skills needed for successful and rewarding careers. p Master of Applied Leadership and

Management (MALM): Students focus on the principles and practical skills necessary for effective organizational leadership, including teamwork, communication skills, visioning and change, global thinking, sustainability, ethics, technological innovation, and organizational performance.

CertificateS p Post-baccalaureate Certificate in

Accountancy: A flexible, 30-hour program designed for students with an undergraduate degree in any discipline, who are interested in seeking a career change to accounting. p Certificate in Professional Accountancy:

Designed for individuals who already have a bachelor’s degree in Accountancy and need additional coursework to meet the educational requirements for Certified Public Accountant (CPA) licensure in Arizona. p Leadership Certificate for Health Care

Professionals: A 20-hour program offered in partnership with Sun Health, Abrazo Health, and Banner Health.


BUSINESS@SGML

Aaron Matos 1995 SGML Graduate CEO, Jobing.com

Following the months after being featured on the cover of the Spring 2007 issue of BUSINESS@SGML, Jobing. com CEO and SGML alum Aaron Matos has been busy making deals and building the brand. Since the magazine was published, Jobing.com completed its eighth acquisition of an online employment network since the company’s founding in 2000. With the purchase

Robert Graham 2003 SGML Graduate CEO/President, RG Capital

Robert Graham and his Scottsdale-based firm, RG Capital, graced the cover on the debut issue of BUSINESS@SGML in Fall 2006. The reaction, reports Graham, has been extremely favorable and far-reaching. “Many of my colleagues as well as former classmates called to congratulate me,” says Graham. “The article has proven to add credibility to my businesses. I have used it as part of my PR kit. It was also exciting to be a part of the publication’s initial effort. I am truly proud of this honor.”

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of LocalCareers.com, Jobing.com now has a major presence in 17 major metro areas, which include Phoenix and Tucson. Matos says the purchase of the Milwaukee-based company continues to propel the company on a national scale. Over the past few years, Jobing.com has acquired Employcity.com, Rhinomite. com, Jobsummit.com and Careers Colorado. Today the company has more than 400 employees and about 150 of those are with the Phoenix office. Additionally, on two separate occasions, Jobing.com has been spotlighted by Inc. magazine’s list of fastest-growing companies. Locally, Jobing.com is in the initial phases of its 10-year, multi-million dollar naming rights agreement with the Phoenix Coyotes and Jobing.com Arena, where the NHL team plays professionally. “We will continue to make deals that are right for us and right for the local markets we serve,” says Matos. “We always apply sound management objectives to these decisions.” Deals that are right for the local markets and the application of sound management objectives – it’s enough to make Matos’ SGML professors proud.

There was also some other impact: Graham was invited to speak at the Haworth Business College at Western Michigan University as a result of the article. “Furthermore, there have been times when I have presented as a featured speaker that they wave the magazine with the cover while introducing me,” he adds. “The long and short of it is... credibility.” Graham notes his main impression of SGML over the past year can be summed up in one word: progress. “As a member of the Dean’s Advisory Council for SGML, I am personally witnessing the tremendous progress Dean Gary Waissi, faculty, and board members are making,” he says. “The new degree programs are progressive and leading edge. The SGML focus will offer students a very welldefined, competitive advantage in the global marketplace. Dr. Waissi and others have done a great job in enlisting support and help and the total buy-in by those who can make an impact.” Besides continuing his engagement with SGML, Graham says he continues to market the school whenever possible. “Every time I have a chance to tout the virtues of ASU’s SGML program, I encourage young and mature students to partake of a great program,” he adds.

HIGHLIGHTS & RE T ROS P E C T IVE

Linda Cook 2007 SGML Graduate COO, Chill Factor Clothing Company Since being featured on the pages of the inaugural Fall 2006 BUSINESS@ SGML magazine, things have only gotten better for SGML graduate Linda Cook. With her son, Kevin Pringles, and another ASU student, Cook runs Chill Factor Clothing Company (formerly known as Hydro Activewear), a company built around apparel for men, women and children with a kick: it cools. Seriously, all Chill Factor clothing (hats, neck coolers and soak bags) have cooling crystal technology built inside the lining, which when absorbed cools water and is transformed into a cooling gel—cooling the wearer through evaporation. Since last fall, the company has seen keen results. It has been featured not only in the local press (including The Arizona Republic, East Valley Tribune, The Business Journal, ABC 15, Channel 3), but nationally as well, landing key coverage with TV stations in North Carolina, Kentucky, Maryland and Wisconsin. The firm’s Web site, www.chillfactorclothing.com, continues to log orders from around the world from users, vendors and retailers eager to partake in Chill Factor Clothing Company’s unique product. For this ASU alumna, it’s another “cool” part of doing business.


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One-Two Punch Dean’s Advisory Council chairmen tackle leadership role Two leading business professionals have put their imprint on ASU’s SGML Dean’s Advisory Council (DAC) and in the process left huge and visionary results. The outgoing chairman, Paul Smiley, president and CEO of Sonoran Technology and Professional Services, a government contractor and consultant, handed the chair reins over to an equally successful leader, Rusty Swartz (pictured), chief operating officer for Scottsdale-based VIACK Corporation. Collectively, the one-two punch of these leaders portends a knockout future for SGML. Smiley, a former U.S. Air Force officer who served 25 years in the military, still remains active on the council after successfully completing his SGML chairman role. Swartz, the new chairman, has held senior executive positions with three Fortune 500 firms in his career and now plays an important role in the strategy and operations of SGML. “Over the last year, council members, along with faculty and staff, embarked on a significant strategic planning effort with a goal of setting a new direction and focus for the school,” says Swartz, noting the DAC was involved from the beginning with goal formulation, assignment of responsibilities, specification of priorities, timelines and checklists. In addition to developing the SGML Strategic 5-Year Plan, the DAC grew from 14 active members to 42 top business leaders from the greater Phoenix area. They are selected for their distinction and accomplishments in management and are private sector and public sector leaders in small and large firms in the United States and around the world, offering a wide variety of perspectives and experiences. Swartz will lead SGML’s DAC with an impressive array of diverse Valley leaders from some of Arizona’s leading corporations, including ING Investments, JP Morgan Chase, Prudential, The Plaza Companies, SRP, Scottsdale Healthcare and Jobing.com.

Dean’s Advisory Council Jeffrey Anderson Partner Ernst & Young LLP Joy Butler Policy Development Group Armando Bras Director, International Trade and Investment Division Arizona Department of Commerce Thomas Burris Solutions Partner Organization National Sales Manager Insight, Inc. Account Team Hewlett-Packard Company Ricardo Cortazar Broker/President Alvarez & Cortazar LLC JP Dahdah President Entrust Arizona Retirement Plan Administration Russell S. Dickey Legal Counsel Verco Manufacturing Executive Director Greater Arizona Christian Community Foundation

Gary Glandon Executive Vice President Chief People Officer Insight

Aaron Matos Chief Executive Officer/ Founder Jobing.com

Robert S. Graham, CFM President/CEO RG Capital

Shawn Maurer Executive Vice President Arizona Core Construction

Mark Haak, CFA Vice President, Portfolio Manager ING Investment Management Co. Kathy I. Haake Manager, Human Resources Salt River Project Lois Halverson Founder Jetstrip, Inc. Don Henninger Publisher The Business Journal Gilbert Jimenez Former Director (Ret.) Arizona Department of Commerce Don Keuth President Phoenix Community Alliance

Manny Molina President and CEO Molina Media Group Michael Morano Community Partner

Matt Salmon Director of Governmental Affairs Greenberg Traurig Member of U.S. House of Representatives (Ret.) Judy Schueler Chief Learning Officer Abrazo Health Care Tom Schoaf Mayor City of Litchfield Park

Lawrence Pike President The Chartwell Group, L.L.C.

Randy Smith Senior Vice President of Industry Solutions and Custom Training Group (Ret.) Universal Technical Institute, Inc. Peter Spier Vice President The Plaza Companies

Carol Poore President & CEO Body Positive, Inc.

Jim Stone Executive Director Swift Charities

William L. Putnam Rear Admiral, USN (Ret.) Senior Vice President USAA Phoenix Operations

Rusty Swartz (Advisory Council Chair) Chief Operating Officer Viack Corporation Marilyn Teplitz President MGT Associates, LLC

Laura Palmer-Noone Former President and CEO (Ret.) Univerity of Phoenix

David Doss President and CEO Arizona State Credit Union

Todd LaPorte Senior Vice President/ CFO Scottsdale Healthcare

Luis E. Ramirez Thomas, President Ramírez Advisors Inter-National, LLC

Carlos Emmermann Managing Partner Emmermann & Associates, LLC

Billy Malkovich Sr. VP, Sales and Operations Hatten Holdings

Armando Roman President Roman & Company CPA’s, P.C.

Susan Fickes Community Partner

Valerie Manning Former President and CEO (Ret.) Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce

Kathy Sacks President and CEO Sacks Public Relations

Barbara J. Tripp Senior Vice President Chase Bank Gil Valadez Managing Director Prudential Bill Vandenbosch Advisor to the President and CEO TriWest Healthcare Alliance

Sharon Welsh Vice President Aetna Global Benefits Candace Wiest President & CEO West Valley National Bank Bob Williams The Spur Group Glenn Williamson CEO & Founder Canada Arizona Business Council Tom Woods, Jr., CPA Woods & Dwyer, P.L.C. Stephen J. Zabilski Executive Director Society of St. Vincent de Paul Lois Zachary President Leadership Development Services EX-OFFICIO Gary Waissi Dean School of Global Management and Leadership Arizona State University Paul Smiley President Sonoran Technology & Professional Services Director, Academic Outreach School of Global Management & Leadership Kristin Donaldson Director, External Relations School of Global Management & Leadership


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The SGML undergraduate alumni chapter hosted a special leadership presentation by United Airlines Chairman, President and CEO Glenn Tilton in April. From L to R: SGML Dean Gary Waissi, Management Lecturer Kathy Anders, Undergraduate Alumni Chapter President Joy Butler, Assistant Professor of Strategic Management Louise Nemanich and Tilton.

The School of Global Management and Leadership features two dynamic alumni chapters that host numerous networking opportunities, leadership possibilities, and career advancement activities. This year, both the undergraduate and graduate alumni chapters helped host festivities for more than 300 alumni and friends in the West campus tent at the ASU Homecoming Block Party. In the fall, the undergraduate alumni chapter hosted an Alumni Leadership Discussion and reception that featured faculty research presentations for alumni, students and faculty. The spring signature event featured Glenn Tilton, chairman and CEO of United Airlines, speaking to more than 175 business leaders, alumni, faculty and students. After his presentation on leadership, Tilton was presented with an honorary membership to the ASU Alumni Association. The graduate alumni chapter hosted an alumni/student picnic at Steele Indian School Park and an MBA fall mixer. In June, more than 50 alumni and faculty participated in An Evening with Aaron Matos at the Jobing.com Arena. Matos ’95 B.S., Management, is the founder and CEO of the career and job search engine, Jobing.com. The evening featured insights shared by Matos, networking, door prizes and a tour of the Jobing.com Arena. Alumni who wish to get involved in the chapters should contact dan.turbyfill@asu.edu or call (602) 543-5201.

Mr. Roger Nelson ’01 B.S., Global Business and Marketing Glendale-West Maricopa Board of Realtors, Inc.

SECRETARY Mr. Sky Parker ’04 B.S., Global Business and International Studies New York Life Insurance Company & NYLife Securities

President

Mr. Manuel (Manny) Mireles, Jr. ’96 M.B.A. Semperian

President Elect/Treasurer Mr. Ron Pint ’02 B.S., Global Business and Financial Management, ’05 M.B.A. Cox Communications, Inc.

Secretary Ms. Eleanor Strickland ’00 M.B.A. TriWest Healthcare Alliance

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PRESIDENT

PRESIDENT ELECT

Stephen Martin,’00 BS, ’05 M.B.A., Served as president of the MBA Graduate Alumni Board this year. He is president of a promotional marketing firm.

Past President

Joy Butler, ’03 Global Business/ Financial Management, was honored as the first recipient of the School of Global Management and Leadership Distinguished Alumni award. She served as the first president of the school’s undergraduate alumni chapter. Butler currently works at a public relations/government relations firm, Policy Development Group, Inc., in Phoenix. Ms. Joy Butler ’03 B.S., Global Business and Financial Management Policy Development Group

MBA Graduate Alumni Chapter Board 06-07

Mr. Stephen Martin ’00 B.S., Global Business and Marketing ’05 M.B.A. SJM Promotions, LLC

SGML Undergraduate Alumni Chapter Board 06-07

Treasurer Members at large Ms. Barbara Barelka ’05 M.B.A. Centex Homes Mr. Pedro Galvan Chavez ’06 M.B.A. Honeywell Inc. Ms. Patricia Elder ’02 M.B.A. Susan G. Komen for the Cure Mr. Joe Ricciardi ’05 M.B.A. eTelecare Global Solutions Mr. Steven Stroblas ’04 M.B.A.

Mr. Randy Bradley ’96 B.S., Accountancy Catholic Healthcare West

MEMBERS AT LARGE Mr. Justin Blackburn ’04 B.S., Global Business and Information Systems Management IBM Corporation Mr. Richard Dirmantas ’05 B.S., Global Business and Human Resources Management Cavco Industries, Inc. Mr. Chris Martin ’01 B.S., Global Business and Marketing Verizon Wireless Mr. Frank R. Mead Jr. ’97 B.S., Marketing, ’00 J.D. Law Tiffany & Bosco PA


UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

SGML student winners in the global Best Strategy Invitational are: Champions of the 10-team “Industry 8” group representing “Killaz” were seniors Brandon Newcomb, Leadership and Management; Elizabeth Smith, Accounting; Chris Storm, Leadership and Management; and Abbie Vogel, Finance.

STUDENT PROFILE:

Winners of the 10-team “Industry 13” division representing “Devilsun, Inc.” were seniors Dustin Hendricks, Marketing; Felicia Kammer, Marketing; Kevin Osbeck, Accounting; and Jennifer Ramirez, Marketing.

Elizabeth Smith

“I talked to a lot of friends and family and they all told me the same thing—ASU had one of the best business degrees around.” – ELIZABETH SMITH SGML student Elizabeth Smith’s life experience runs the gamut from serving in Operation Enduring Freedom as an aerospace medical technician to being a mother of three to serving in the Arizona National Guard as a reservist. Somewhere in the midst of all this activity, Smith found a way to graduate from SGML in May 2007 with a B.S. in Accountancy. Currently, she is enrolled in the Certificate of Professional Accountancy program to complete her requirements for the CPA exam. Smith, born and raised in Maui, decided to join the military so she could see the world. “I enjoy the military and the idea of serving my country,” she says. “The military has opened the doors to many opportunities that I may not have had.” Smith came to Arizona after her husband passed away and the military sent her here on humanitarian orders so she could be close to her mother-in-law. “I visited Arizona often enough to know that the state is a beautiful one and knew that I would eventually live here,” she says. So how did Smith come to find ASU and SGML? Simple. She asked around, and all her research pointed

her to SGML. “I talked to a lot of friends and family and they all told me the same thing­—ASU had one of the best business degrees around,” Smith reports. “I was pretty much sold on applying to the West campus.” With her bachelor’s degree secured, and the pursuit of a postbaccalaureate certificate in accountancy well underway, Smith is confident of the future that lies ahead. “My commitment to education and to ASU and SGML is based on the incredible value it represents,” she says, adding, “The degree I have received from SGML stands above any accountancy degree offered elsewhere; it’s a global degree that acknowledges today’s international economy and business marketplace.” As far as the long-term goes, Smith says she will continue working in auditing and gain the knowledge and experience that will lead her to opening her own business someday. “My experience with the program has been wonderful,” she says. “The instructors that I have are truly the best there are. Their teaching technique not only kept me going on a classroom level, but their teaching also allowed me to see how it is applied to everyday situations.”

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Companies hiring SGML Grads APS AAA Arizona, Inc. Cavco Industries Inc Deloitte and Touche LLP General Dynamics Global Database Marketing J D Edwards & Company Jobing.com Karsten Manufacturing Corporation Lucent Technologies Foundation Medicis Pharmaceutical Corp Morgan Stanley Dean Witter Motorola Orbital Sciences Corporation Parker Hannifin Corporation Parker Madison Marketing Studio Pepsi America Inc. Pinnacle West Capital Corporation Poore Brothers Inc. Portland General Electric Pratt & Whitney PriceWaterhouseCooper, LLC Proctor & Gamble Manufacturing Raytheon Missle Systems Regenesis Biomedical RG Capital LLC Sacks Tierney P.A. Salomon Smith Barney Scottsdale Convention & Visitors Bureau Siebel Systems Incorporated Swift Transportation Company Telemundo Arizona The Dial Corporation USAA Insurance Co Vivendi Universal Entertainment LLP Volvo North America Corp Wadsworth Golf Construction Co Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.


Rise & Shine:

SGML students thrive in global business competition

Beta Gamma Sigma Inductees

Concept, strategy and success. These skills are engrained into the teaching methodology at the School of Global Management and Leadership from Day 1. And the good news is students are excelling at the concepts. This was evidenced at one of the highest levels when two teams representing the School took top honors in the Best Strategy Invitational, a global competition featuring 176 student teams from around the world. The two-week online competition tested each team’s ability to manage an athletic footwear company in head-to-head competition against companies run by their international peers. Just as in the real world, companies in the competition battled in a global market arena, selling branded and private-label athletic footwear in four geographical areas – North America, Latin America, Asia-Pacific and Europe-Africa. The annual competition is by invitation only and based on senior students’ semester-long in-class competitions. “Our strategy in the global competition was to stick to the plan that helped us win earlier in the semester,” says SGML senior team member Brandon Newcomb. “As we plugged along, we watched the other teams begin to flounder. We knew our strategy was solid, and in the end we stepped ahead of the other teams and took the game.” Students reported the competition helped broaden their knowledge about the business world and offered the opportunity to experience the challenges executives face when making decisions. The goal for each company’s management team was to craft and execute a competitive strategy that resulted in respected brand image, kept their company in contention for global market leadership and produced good financial performance as measured by earnings per share, return on equity investment, stock price appreciation, and credit rating. All companies began the competition on the same footing from a global perspective – with equal sales volume, global market shares, revenues, profits, costs, product quality, and performance and brand recognition. “These are bright students who successfully integrated material they learned in our classes and put that to work in valuable results-oriented decision-making,” says Kathleen Anders, an SGML lecturer whose topics of instruction include strategy formulation and implementation, benchmarking, competitive strength assessment, and strategy options for competing in international markets.

JUNIORS Bobby L. Boyd, Sr. Lane Paul Gibson Barbara G. Moehling Elizabeth Anne Secaur SENIORS Martine S. Dimang Candice N. Durham Paul R. Durio Adriana Gonzalez Dustin Alan Jackson Austin Phillip Kupper Allison Leigh Langford Leonard Phillip Muhammad Dijana Music Trudy Lee Paty Carlo D. Seara Jiri George Smerda Leslie Cinthya Soncco MASTER Khaled K. Hassan Todd Joseph Kazmirski Nicole Marie Marguerite Munson DOCTORAL Garurank Prasad Saxena FACULTY Dr. Laurel Ann Anderson Dr. Leanne Atwater Dr. Elizabeth Cabrera Dr. Mohan Gopalakrishnan Dr. Deborah McCabe Dr. Simona Mola Dr. Antonios Printezis Dr. Wei David Zhang

SGML Enrollment Numbers 5 years (Headcount)

FALL ENROLLMENT BY MAJOR

...... ............................................2002 ..................2003 ..................2004 ...................2005 .................2006 .................. Accountancy 261 287 306 321 362 Global Business 782 943 922 1039 1031 Management 1 - - - Marketing - - - - Leadership – Int’l. Mgmt. - - - - 21 ......Non-Degree .................................................2 ..................- ..................- ..................- ..................-............. TOTAL

1046

1230

1228

1360

1414

FALL ENROLLMENT BY GENDER AND LEVEL

...... ............................................2002 ..................2003 ..................2004 ...................2005 .................2006 ..................

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

UnderGrad Total

1,046 1,230 1,228 1,360 1,414

1,507 1,693 1,636 1,723 1,768

FTE

UnderGrad Total

Fall ‘06 Spring ‘07

1,043 1,073

Fall ‘05 Spring ‘06

1,026 1,023

Fall ‘04 Spring ‘05

980 941

1,128 1,181

1,119 1,092

1,092 1,019

Female Male

564 482

664 566

656 572

730 630

734 680

Fall ‘03 Spring ‘04

1,021 1,012

1,174 1,132

TOTAL

1046

1230

1228

1360

1414

Fall ‘02 Spring ‘03

841 885

993 1,022

............................................................................................................................................

FALL ENROLLMENT BY ETHNICITY AND LEVEL

...... ............................................2002 ..................2003 ..................2004 ...................2005 .................2006 .................. African American/Black Native American Asian/Pacific Islander Hispanic White Nonresident Aliens Ethnicity Unknown

44 22 65 182 675 32 26

52 27 68 224 785 36 38

59 27 70 219 785 27 41

69 25 90 273 834 18 51

84 25 99 289 850 25 42

1046

1230

1228

1360

1414

............................................................................................................................................ TOTAL

8

9

student credit hours

UnderGrad Total

Fall ‘06 Spring ‘07

12,520 12,876

Fall ‘05 Spring ‘06

12,321 12,267

13,419 13,104

Fall ‘04 Spring ‘05

11,758 11,286

13,102 12,225

Fall ‘03 Spring ‘04

12,245 12,145

14,087 13,576

Fall ‘02 Spring ‘03

10,083 10,622

11,913 12,260

13,532 14,172


GRADUATE STUDENTS

Soldier of Fortune USAF, SGML provide unique opportunity for this student

STUDENT PROFILE:

Scott Thomas

Talk about hands-on experience. Scott Thomas, currently on active duty with the U.S. Air Force, is a civil engineer/project manager who has been deployed to facilitate rebuilding efforts after Hurricane Katrina. Then he was deployed to Afghanistan where he was in charge of reconstruction for 500,000 Afghans in the Province of Laghman. Currently stationed at Luke Air Force Base in Glendale, Thomas directs construction projects while managing both military and civilian engineers. It’s just another day in the life of an SGML student. Thomas, who graduates in December of 2007 with an MBA, zeroed in on ASU’s SGML for its real-world, real-life experience as it relates to business. Following SGML’s “community engagement mantra,” Thomas is one of many students who plans to utilize his current-career mission with that of the SGML experience in a future endeavor. “My professional goals revolve around management and leading people,” he says. “With the completion of my MBA and the experience as an Air Force officer, I intend to transition into the private sector and work for an engineering/construction firm.” Specifically, Thomas plans to gain valuable technical experience from the private sector while not losing sight of what he calls a “passion for leading people.” He notes, “I hope to one day start my own company and, while it is far off, I desire to one day provide engineering expertise to Third World nations. My deployments through the Air Force have opened my eyes to being an engineer while serving others—I hope to again provide a similar service to those less fortunate.” As his experiences in the military have proven, hands-on truly has a different approach in the global economy. Thomas, like many other SGML students, recognizes the significance his instructors and their real-world knowledge of business applications, models and methodology have had upon his education. “The flexibility of SGML has been absolutely critical,” he says. “Having missed several semesters and having left early on several more due to deployments, SGML has been extremely supportive of my military commitment,” says Thomas, who comes to SGML via Portland, Oregon, where he attended Loyola and was commissioned into the U.S. Air Force. “SGML has provided me a critical stepping-stone for my future. The military has served me well. I hope to continue to help others help themselves.”

FALL ENROLLMENT BY MAJOR

...... ..........................................2002 ..................2003 ...................2004 ..................2005 ...................2006 ...............

Grad Programs Average Age: 29.12 Average Yrs. Work Experience: 6.9 Average Overall Gpa: 3.318 Average Jr/sr: Gpa: 3.33 Average Gmat: 504.52

Certificate – Accountancy Certidicate – Prof. Accy. MBA Non-Degree

158 3 294 6

178 8 271 6

169 19 213 7

152 42 166 3

151 38 161 4

TOTAL

461

463

408

363

354

.........................................................................................................................................

FALL ENROLLMENT BY GENDER AND LEVEL

...... ..........................................2002 ..................2003 ..................2004 ...................2005 ...................2006 ............... SGML Enrollment Numbers 5 years (Headcount) 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Grad

Total

461 463 408 363 354

1,507 1,693 1,636 1,723 1,768

Female

178

197

165

149

157

TOTAL

461

463

408

363

354

......Male ............................................283 ..................266 ..................243 ...................214 ..................197 ..............

FALL ENROLLMENT BY ETHNICITY AND LEVEL

...... ..........................................2002 ..................2003 ..................2004 ...................2005 ...................2006 ............... African American/Black Native American Asian/Pacific Islander Hispanic White Nonresident Aliens Ethnicity Unknown

8 - 22 24 338 34 35

6 4 25 35 341 21 31

6 4 31 37 293 12 25

9 3 27 28 260 11 25

9 2 19 31 227 9 57

TOTAL

461

463

408

363

354

.........................................................................................................................................


p

Companies hiring SGML Grads Alyeska Pipeline Service Company American Express DHL Worldwide Express Discover Hein Manufacturing Honeywell IBM Corporation Intel Corporation John F. Long Properties Johnson & Johnson Companies JPMorganChase Foundation KPMG Peat Marwick LLP Lockheed Martin Medtronic Incorporated Merck and Company Inc. Microchip Technology Incorporated National Scientific Corporation On Semiconductor Salt River Project Schlossadler International Wines Schuff Steel Company Scottsdale Healthcare System SKYMALL Inc. Sojourner Center Southwest Gas Corporation STMicroelectronics Inc The Gap Inc. The Orcutt/Winslow Partnership The Phoenix Suns The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation The UPS Foundation, Inc. Tiffany & Bosco PA Tosco Corporation TriWest Healthcare Alliance Worldcom Wireless

“The first thing that comes to mind when I think of SGML is opportunity.” – JANESE PAXTON

STUDENT PROFILE:

Janese Paxton

FTE

.... ........................Grad .................Total .............. Fall ‘06 Spring ‘07

84 108

Fall ‘05 Spring ‘06

92 70

Fall ‘04 Spring ‘05

112 79

Fall ‘03 Spring ‘04

154 119

Fall ‘02 Spring ‘03

153 136

1,128 1,181

1,119 1,092

1,092 1,019

1,174 1,132

993 1,022

student credit hours

.... .........................Grad .................Total ............. Fall ‘06 Spring ‘07

1,012 1,296

13,532 14,172

Fall ‘05 Spring ‘06

1,098 837

13,419 13,104

Fall ‘04 Spring ‘05

1,344 939

13,102 12,225

Fall ‘03 Spring ‘04

1,842 1,428

14,087 13,576

Fall ‘02 Spring ‘03

18,273 1,632

11,913 12,260

10

11

Janese Paxton, a senior global business student studying marketing at SGML, is honest about her ultimate career goal: She wants to be the next Martha Stewart with cross-media business dominance, combined with the modernized flair of Jennifer Lopez. Give Paxton kudos for dreaming big. That’s just what SGML students do: think big and think global. “The first thing that comes to mind when I think of SGML is opportunity,” says Paxton, who graduates in December of 2007. “I am fascinated by marketing, advertising, and, more specifically, the creativity and audience connection required for an ad to be great.” Like many SGML students, Paxton has taken full advantage of the worldwide network of connections afforded by a school like ASU. Over the summer, she spent five weeks interning for global tech powerhouse Avnet. As a marketing communication intern, Paxton’s summer was spent in Avnet’s Electronic Marketing headquarters in Poing, Germany, near Munich. “My experience with Avnet has been amazing, I fully believe it will enhance my ability to gain future career opportunities,” she says.

Georg Steinberger, vice president of communications for Avnet Electronics Marketing, says Paxton was given a full range of international marketing and communication experiences. He says lessons in internal communication and Web activities illustrated the connection between sound business and marketing strategy. “The global aspect is important,” Steinberger says. “As a company, we search for employees who are keen to understand the impact of globalization and who are willing to collect this experience abroad. Avnet drives diversity around the world and encourages global exchange. Any university that educates young people for global fitness does us a favor.” In true global fashion, SGML brings the efforts back full circle. “I have had a great experience in SGML,” says Paxton. “All my professors have been entertaining, enriching, and very encouraging toward personal development.” As for global engagement, score another well-earned victory for SGML and its keen attention to student success.


GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT

Budapest or Bust SGML students travel abroad for a true global lesson in business Dozens of SGML students have a new chapter to add to their, “What I Did On My Summer Vacation” journal as students made a sojourn across the world to visit Prague, Budapest, Munich and Milan all in the name of education. Dr. Gary Anders, a professor of economics, toured with undergrad students on a two-week excursion to Prague and Budapest. Anders says the destination was selected because both are members of the European Union, but still use their own currency, which made the trip affordable. Also, both countries are transitional economies undergoing major economic policies to promote privatization and encourage foreign investment. “The most surprising element of the trip was seeing how students who had little previous experience with European markets or urban living gained a greater awareness of both,” reports Anders. “It was enriching to watch.” While SGML students were visiting as tourists, they were also learning and earning credit hours for the journey. Students had required reading, select assignments, tests, and several writing, research and cultural-based projects to accomplish while abroad. For SGML undergrad student Tanja Stonitsch, meeting different people of varying cultures created a sense of self-awareness not found among innercultural peers. “Understanding where you come from and what you have been through helps to shape the kind of person you become,” Stonitsch says. “Learning about a country’s history is a foundation for understanding its people and its economy.” Dr. Laurie Anderson, an associate professor in marketing, accompanied her students to Budapest, Munich and Milan. Consistent with SGML’s mandate, the primary purpose of the course was to enable students to experience first-hand global issues as applied to organizations and management decision-making processes. “It’s about creativity and innovation in the greater EU,” Anderson says. “There are many contrasts in culture and economic strata that students witnessed, and in many instances, they were at the center of global economic reform.” Global issues including pollution, sustainability, economic transition and immigration were key for SGML students during the trips abroad. Anderson, who has guided numerous educational trips to Paris, Amsterdam, Rome and Florence, to name but a few, says there is a distinct advantage for the students who participate in these types of programs. “The experience of the students is real and significant,” she says. “It opens their eyes to the global economy and that is what the SGML is all about.”


SGML pioneers are leaders, not followers Today’s dynamic, global economy needs leaders. That’s why ASU’s School of Global Management and Leadership (SGML) holds a different worldview when it comes to business education. SGML offers specialized programs and opportunities that prepare students for leadership roles in the global marketplace. A global education is much more than having international campuses or exchange programs. It is also a curriculum that ensures all of its students will be able to succeed in a

a wealth of international information resources. Most importantly, a global education is one that enables students to understand the world through the eyes of others and teaches them how their actions can affect, and be affected by people throughout the world. Over the course of the last year, SGML signed memoranda of understanding with two global partners, Tec de Monterrey in Mexico and Thunderbird School of Global Management in Glendale. The MOU’s will offer students and faculty the chance to study in a global environment that offers a multicultural experience, which helps to provide the knowledge, skills and techniques necessary to successfully compete in international business and

“Students cannot have a complete and well-rounded business education in today’s world without a clear understanding of global business and international affairs.” – GARY WAISSI world marked by interdependence, diversity and rapid change. A global education is one that provides knowledge and understanding of culture, language, geography and global perspectives. A global education trains students to rapidly access and evaluate

the global economy. These MOU’s will provide the opportunities and the resources to make sure all of SGML students and faculty have opportunities to be involved in significant ways in global activities where everyone benefits from shared ideas and practices.

SGML’s agreement with Thunderbird will allow ASU undergraduate students in their final semester in Leadership in International Management to take nine credit hours in one of Thunderbird’s new master’s programs. The effort began in Fall 2007. “Students cannot have a complete and well-rounded business education in today’s world without a clear understanding of global business and international affairs,” says Gary Waissi, SGML dean. “The new program unites the strength of ASU’s global undergraduate program with Thunderbird’s reputation as the leading graduate school of global management to educate the next generation of international leaders. We are excited to make this certificate program available to ASU students.”

The Finnish Connection SGML partners with Finland When people think of Finland, they usually think of the aurora borealis, reindeer, the arts, and contemporary design and technology – particularly if they use a Nokia cellular phone. But Finland also is renowned for its knowledge-based economy, engineering, machinery and advancements in wireless technology. Finland, with a population of more than 5.2 million and 10 universities, is positioned well to be an exchange partner in education and technology with ASU and the state of Arizona. This year, ASU School of Global Management and Leadership’s Dean Gary Waissi and Anthony “Bud” Rock, vice president of Global Engagement for ASU, led a delegation comprised of ASU faculty to Finland as a step toward a multi-pronged relationship. ASU chose to explore a Finnish connection for several reasons. “Given the quality of the Finnish education system, several unique capabilities of Finland’s technology-based industry, and our relationship with Finland through Gary Waissi, we reached out to U.S. Ambassador Marilyn Ware to explore possible collaborative opportunities, such as student opportunities with Finnish universities and opportunities to engage Finnish corporations in economic cooperation with industries and SkySong,” Bud Rock said. During this exploratory visit, ASU was able to expand on the relationship established with the Embassy and to meet with universities, such as the Helsinki University of Technology, the Helsinki School of Economics and the Technical Research Centre of Finland and companies like NOKIA to determine areas of collaboration, particularly with the schools of engineering, education, design, well as continue to pursue student exchange opportunities.

12

13


................................................................................................................................... .................................................................................................................................................... ................................................................................................................................................................. ........................................................................................................................................................... ........................................................................................................................ .................................................................................................... .............................................................. S GML PARTNE RS W ITH LIFEPIL OT

p

Dr. Leanne Atwater:

Jailhouse Rock

In January 2006, the first LifePilot workshop took place at Buckeye Jail, which is part of the Maricopa County Jail System in Phoenix. Two highly successful entrepreneurs, Peter H. Thomas and Al Molina, joined forces to make this workshop possible. They donated their time to visit 15 inmates from the “Alpha” drug and alcohol rehab program in an effort to deliver the values-based messages of LifePilot in a four-hour workshop at the jail’s chapel. Since then, the LifePilot Prison Series has been held regularly at both the Buckeye and Durango Jail due to the generosity of ASU and Dr. Leanne Atwater’s willingness to donate her time to this cause. Atwater has become the official navigator for LifePilot, and without her this community outreach program would not exist today.

“Getting through to these inmates with our values-based approach to life, teaching them how to achieve success based on aligning their daily lives with their core values, and thereby developing a LifeManual, has been one of the most rewarding experiences in my life,” says Thomas. “We have taught this program to thousands of successful, and some of the wealthiest, business people across the globe and have made a positive impact on their lives; but if we have succeeded to keep even just one of these fifteen inmates from returning to jail, I will have gained ‘real’ significance in my life.”

Entrepreneurs are inspired by different things—for one, it may be a void in the marketplace, for others it may be developing a product that truly helps people. For Peter H. Thomas, FourSeasons developer and Century 21 real estate success story, his inspiration comes from both.

Entrepreneurs are inspired by different things—for one, it may be a void in the marketplace, for others it may be developing a product that truly helps people. For Peter H. Thomas, FourSeasons developer and Century 21 real estate success story, his inspiration comes from both. Thomas started LifePilot, a self-help and personal development program, after his son Todd committed suicide at age 36 due to mental disorders. Since that time, Thomas has been on a mission to help others around the world. For SGML, the partnership with the global entrepreneur extraordinaire couldn’t have worked out better. SGML, by mission, diligently seeks to partner with global businesses, schools and individuals with the goal of extending these partnerships and business relationships to lessons and educational opportunities for its scholars and students. When the to partner with Thomas, who is based in Canada, presented itself, SGML accepted. Goals of the agreement between SGML and LifePilot include “to honor the memory and fulfill the promise of Todd Thomas’s life” as well as to “provide a legacy vehicle for Peter H. Thomas and the LifePilot program to thrive, grow and evolve.” Importantly, the charter includes a pledge “to teach and inspire individuals to live life consistent with their values, and to make positive choices for a happy and productive life.” This is where the story gets intriguing and personal. In searching for a way to implement the mission of LifePilot, SGML found a non-traditional partner: the Maricopa County Jail System. Leanne Atwater, chair of the department of management in SGML, is a trained LifePilot Navigator—or instructor—who coordinates and teaches the program as a volunteer to inmates at the county jail. For two years, Atwater has presented workshops at the jail to more than 200 inmates, who voluntarily attend and use materials and programming developed by LifePilot. Atwater introduces inmates to a structured process of identifying their personal values, developing life goals that align with those values, and setting short-term objectives to help them achieve their goals. “It truly is making a difference in the lives of many people,” reports Atwater. “Simply, this program pulls people out of hopelessness and makes them recognize they are in charge of their destiny, their future. And that can be such a positive thing for many of these people who have lost all hope.”


Atwater says she was drawn instantly to the program and leaves each session knowing she has made an impact on the lives of people in need and with the spirit that “today is a good day.” Business executives, jet-set entrepreneurs and university students usually fill the registration lists for LifePilot workshops held throughout North America and internationally. Atwater’s jailhouse effort is the first of its kind for LifePilot. After their release from jail, workshop graduates can access LifePilot’s online program with tools and step-by-step exercises to complete their life plans at their own pace. Upon completion of LifeManualOnline.com, ASU will grant them

“Simply, this program pulls people out of hopelessness and makes them recognize they are in charge of their destiny, their future.” – LEANNE ATWATER three continuing education credit hours. SGML also provides supplies for the jail workshops, while LifePilot provides jail-workshop graduates free access to its LifeManual online program and training for Navigators. “I always hear, ‘LifePilot got me back into the correct way of thinking,’” says Atwater. “It is reducing the suffering that many, many people have.” Gary Waissi, dean of SGML, applauds Atwater’s volunteer efforts as an example of a valued component of a key ASU objective. “Embeddedness in the community— taking responsibility for the well-being of society—is a primary charter of ASU as a public university,” Waissi notes. “Improving the quality of life here in the West Valley and leading others to higher levels of fulfillment in their contribution to societal good—as Leanne’s commitment aspires to do—holds high priority in our responsible management of ASU’s public resources.”

‘08 Bachelor of Science Candidate

STUDENT PROFILE:

Lauren Wengraf

14

15

What makes SGML what it is today and what it will be in the future is not a complicated equation. It really is quite simple: the people. The above observation comes from SGML student Lauren Wengraf, a junior in the Global Business program. The people, she says, turn ideas into reality. While some business schools tout their “global engagement,” this business student takes great pride in the fact ASU’s SGML does much more than talk: it delivers. For instance, Wengraf recently participated in a summer abroad class in the Czech Republic, integrating herself in the culture, the people, and the business scene. “I realized that I can’t expect the world to come to me, but rather, I have to be willing to go to the world,” says Wengraf. “There is much I have yet to learn.” This is where SGML comes into to play. Besides offering Wengraf the opportunity to experience places like Prague and its Old World culture, students at SGML can study abroad in places such as Mexico, find internships offered by international companies with offices around the globe, and get a clear indication of what global business is all about. The reality is much different

p PETER H. THOMAS

FOUNDER & CHAIRMAN LIFEPILOT “WHEN YOUR VALUES ARE CLEAR, YOUR DECISIONS ARE EASY.”

from what is typically found in the pages of textbooks, inside lecture halls, and from Web browsing. “I know SGML will succeed in producing future global business leaders, and it is with pride that I can say that through this college and its numerous programs, I have met some of the most inspirational people of my life,” says Wengraf, a Phoenix native. “Some people ask me if I had a second chance, would I still attend SGML? I always laugh and tell them, ‘Of course!’ But, I don’t need a second chance to say that.” Wengraf is studying for a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Global Business with a concentration in Leadership and Management. She also serves as a Peer Leader for the School. “It is my hope that with further integration into the business sector and the area of management, I will be able to choose a career that not only utilizes my management degree, but also my knowledge of global business practices,” she says. The Deer Valley High School graduate earned the Presidential Scholarship from ASU. She adds that while she knew she wanted to study business, she looked for a program stressing the importance of conducting business internationally. That’s what led her to SGML.


................................................................................................................... .................................................................................................................................... ................................................................................................................................................. ........................................................................................................................................... ........................................................................................................ .................................................................................... .............................................. FACU LTY ACCOLADES & P UBLICATI O NS

Gary Anders “An Econometric Analysis of the Role of Knowledge in Economic Performance,” Journal of Technology Transfer, 2006. Editorial Board member – •

Journal of Gambling Studies

Jane Carey and Adegoke Oke Awarded $25,000 grant from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation to increase university-wide student engagement in entrepreneurship opportunities, March 2007.

Laurel Anderson

Lucy Chen

“Shopping by Proxy: Senior Citizens Adaptations to Necessary Role Shifts,” Journal of Customer Behavior, 2006.

“Trading volume reaction to the earnings reconciliation from IAS to U.S. GAAP,” Contemporary Accounting Research (forthcoming).

“Building Confidence in Creativity: MBA Students,” Marketing Education Review, 2006. Leanne Atwater “360 Degree Feedback To Managers: Does it Result in Changes in Employee Attitudes?” Group and Organizational Management, 2006. Selected to be a Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP). Associate Editor, Group and Organization Management Associate Editor, Group and Organization Management Editorial Board Member – • •

Military Psychology Leadership Quarterly

Joseph Bellizzi “Disciplining Top-performing Unethical Salespeople: Examining the Moderating Effects of Ethical Seriousness and Consequences,” Psychology and Marketing, 2006.

“Contributions of S Corporation Debased Debt to Charity: Opportunities, Problems and Policy Questions Abound With Double Dipping,” ATA Journal of Legal Tax Research, 2006. “Evaluating Cost Segregation Opportunities Before During and After the Usage of Qualifying Realty,” ATA Journal of Legal Tax Research, 2006. “Interest Free Loans to Shareholders: An Opportunity to Reduce Overall Tax Costs,” CPA Journal, 2006. “Evaluating Razavi-Type Fixed Rental Pool Arrangements: How Important Are Tax Consequences in Making the Investment Decision,” Taxes-The Tax Magazine, 2006. Cathy Finger Editorial Board member –

The International Journal of Accounting

Alan Goldman

Journal of Marketing Education •Journal of Business and Industrial Marketing •Journal of Business Research •Journal of Personal Selling and Sales Management

“High Toxicity Leadership: Borderline Personality Disorder and the Dysfunctional Organization,” Journal of Managerial Psychology, 2006.

Pierre Balthazard “Dysfunctional Culture, Dysfunctional Organizations: Capturing the Behavioral Norms that Form Organizational Culture and Drive Performance,” Journal of Managerial Psychology, 2006. Beth Cabrera “Opting Out and Opting in: Understanding the Complexities of Women’s Career Transitions,” Career Development International (forthcoming). Editor, Management Research.

“Analytical framework for the multi-item, economic order quantity model with permissible delay in payments and a budget constraint,” Production Planning and Control, 2007. “Target Costing at a Consumer Products Company,” Strategic Finance, 2007. “A lognormal approximation of activity duration in PERT using two time estimates,” Journal of Operational Research Society, 2006. Editorial Board member of Production Planning and Control

Bill Duncan

Editorial Board member •

Mohan Gopalakrishnan

“Company on the Couch,” Journal of Management Inquiry, 2007.

“Personality Disorders in Leaders: Implications of the DSM IV-TR in Assessing Dysfunctional Organizations,” Journal of Managerial Psychology, 2006. Editorial Board member –

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal Served as editor for the Journal of Managerial Psychology, a Special Edition on Dysfunctional Leadership and Organizations, published in November 2006. •

Gabriel Gonzalez “Tobacco CounterAdvertisements Aimed at Bicultural Mexican-American Youth: The Impact of Language and Theme,” Journal of Health Communication, 2006.

“The Corporate Strategies of Business Groups in the Wake of Competitive Shocks: Lessons from Argentina,” Management Research, 2006. “The Meaning of Difference: Beyond Cultural and Managerial Homogeneity Stereotypes of Latin America,” Management Research, 2006. Editorial Board Member -

Academy of Management Journal • Strategic Management Society • Journal of Management Research • Journal of Behavioral and Applied Management •

Jordan Lowe “The Influence of Outcome Knowledge on Judges and Jurors’ Evaluations of Auditor Decisions: A Review and Synthesis of Prior Research,” Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research, 2006. Editorial Board member -

Accounting Horizons Advances in Accounting • Behavioral Research in Accounting •

Phil Mizzi “The Harmonic Consistency Index for the Analytic Hierarchy Process,” European Journal of Operational Research, 2007. “No News is Good News? Press Coverage and Corporate Public Affairs Management,” Journal of Public Affairs, 2006.

Deborah McCabe “Perceived Service Quality and Shopping Motivations: A Dynamic Relationship,” Services Marketing Quarterly, 2007. “Shopping By Proxy: Senior Citizens’ Adaptation to Necessary Role Shifts,” Journal of Customer Behaviour, 2006. “Creating Meaning in Marketing Education: Contrasting Faculty, Practitioner, and Student Definitions of Meaning,” Journal of the Academy of Business Education, 2006.

Srimathy Mohan “Analytical Framework for the Multi-item, Economic Order Quantity Model with Permissible Delay in Payments and a Budget Constraint,” Production and Planning Control, 2007. “A Simulation Analysis to Reduce Shipping Area Congestion in A Pharmaceutical Distribution Center,” International Journal of Industrial Engineering, 2006. “A Lognormal Approximation Of Activity Duration in PERT Using Two Time Estimates,” Journal of Operational Research Society, 2006. Simona Mola

Luiz Mesquita “Horizontal and Vertical Relationships in Developing Economies: Implications for SMEs’ Access to Global Markets,” Academy of Management Journal “Buyer-Supplier and SupplierSupplier Alliances: Do They Reinforce or Undermine One Another?” Journal of Management Studies “Can Latin American Firms Compete?” Oxford University Press, October 2007. “Starting Over When the Bickering Never Ends: The Role of Trust Facilitators in Cluster Development,” Academy of Management Review, 2007. “Determinants of Firm Competitiveness in Latin American Emerging Economies: Evidence from Brazil’s AutoParts Industry,” International Journal of Operations Production Management, 2007.

“Is There Life After Loss of Analyst Coverage?” Social Science Research Network, March 15, 2007, quoted in the Financial Times (print edition, page 13; May 11, 2007) Louise Nemanich “Transformational Leadership in an Acquisition: A Field Study of Employees,” Leadership Quarterly, 2007. “Leadership and Organizational Learning: A Multiple Levels Perspective,” Leadership Quarterly, 2006.


Adegoke Oke and Mohan Gopalakrishnan “Managing Disruptions in Supply Chains: A Case Study of a Retail Supply Chain,” special issue of the International Journal of Production Economics, (forthcoming). Adegoke Oke “Innovation Types and Performance in Growing UK SMEs,” International Journal of Operations Production Management, 2007. “The Logistics Cost of Achieving Supply Chain Flexibility: An Analysis of the Downstream Logistics Operations of a South African FMCG Producer,” International Journal of Production Economics, 2007. “The Antecedents of Supply Chain Visibility: A Resource Based View,” Journal of Operations Management, 2007. Suzanne Peterson “Exploring the Role of Hope in Job Performance: Results from Four Studies,” Journal of Organizational Behavior (accepted). “Exploring Mechanisms in the Personality - Performance Relationship: Mediating Roles of Self-Management and Situational Constraints,” Journal of Personality (in press). “The Impact of Financial and Non-Financial Incentives on Business Unit Outcomes Over Time,” Journal of Applied Psychology, 2006. “Hope, Learning Goals, and Task Performance,” Personality and Individual Differences, 2006. Marilyn Prosch Editorial Board member –

The International Journal of Digital Accounting Research •Journal of Information Systems Member: Committee/Task Force on Privacy, American Institute of CPAs •

“Are Children and Parents Substitutes or Complements in the Family Labor Supply Decision in Bangladesh?” Journal of Developing Areas, 2007.

David Van Fleet

Fred Walumbwa

“The Impact of Local Taxes on Public School Performance: The Case of Pennsylvania,” Applied Economic Letters, 2006.

“Scientific Achievement and Editorial-Board Membership in the Management Discipline,” Academy of Management Learning and Education, 2007. “Dysfunctional Organization Culture: The Role of Leadership in Motivating Dysfunctional Work Behaviors,” Journal of Managerial Psychology, 2007.

“Leadership: Review, Synthesis, and Research Agenda,” in S. Fiske (Ed.), Annual Review of Psychology (Vol. 60), (forthcoming). Note: The Annual Review of Psychology is ranked #1 in impact factor among Psychology publications in the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Science and Social Science categories.

“M2 Velocity in the United States: The Evidence Since1991.” International Journal of Management, 2006. “The Adoption of Privatization Policy in Telecommunications: A Duration Analysis of Reverse Causality,” International Review of Economics and Business, 2006. “Market Work and Household Work as Deterrents to Schooling in Bangladesh,” World Development, 2006. Gillian Rice “Conceptualizing Inter-Attitudinal Conflict in Consumer Response to Foreign Brands,” Journal of International Consumer Marketing, 2007. “Pro-Environmental Behavior in Egypt: Is there a Role for Islamic Environmental Ethics?” Journal of Business Ethics, 2006. “Individual Values, Organizational Context, and Employee Creativity: Evidence from Egyptian Organizations,” Journal of Business Research, 2006. Editorial Board Member –

Journal of Teaching in International Business •Journal of Marketing Management •Global Business and Organizational Excellence •Journal of Global Marketing •Journal of International Consumer Marketing •Thunderbird International Business Review •

Janet Samuels “Target Costing at a Consumer Products Company,” Strategic Finance, 2007.

Shakil Quayes “Does Inflation Affect Stock Prices?” Applied Economic Letters, 2007. “Underpricing of Initial Public Offerings in Bangladesh,” Applied Financial Economics Letters, 2007. “Can Margin Borrowing Explain Rising Bankruptcy in the US?” Empirical Economics Letters, 2007.

16

17

Dan Swenson “A Template for Implementing Target Costing,” Journal of Cost Management, 2006.

“Internal Terrorists: The Terrorists Inside Organizations,” Journal of Managerial Psychology, 2007. “Increasing the Value of Teaching in the Academic Marketplace: The Creation of a Peer-Review Infrastructure for Teaching,” Academy of Management Learning and Education, 2006. “Accounting History in Today’s Business Schools,” Accounting Historian Notebook, 2006. “My Orange Is Bigger Than Your Apple: U. S. and Japanese Executive Compensation,” Journal of Behavioral and Applied Management, 2006. “The Journal of Management’s First 30 Years,” Journal of Management, 2006. Fellow of the Academy of Management Editor, Journal of Behavioral and Applied Management Don Vickrey “Insider Trading Disclosure, Information Asymmetry, and Differential Earnings Relevance as Indicated by Trading Volume,” Journal of Accounting and Finance Research, 2006. “Experimental Markets: An Information-Efficiency Research Agenda,” Journal of Theoretical Accounting Research, 2006. “Income Disclosure and the Ex Post-Ex Ante Dichotomy,” Journal of Theoretical Accounting Research, 2006. David Waldman

“Authentic Leadership: Leadership Through the Lens of Positive Psychology,” in P.A. Lonely, S. Harrington & N. Page (Eds.), The Handbook of Positive Psychology and Work, New York: Oxford University Press (forthcoming). “Family-friendly Employment Practices: Importance and Effects in China, India, and Kenya,’ In J. L. Cheng (Ed.), Advances in International Comparative Management, Greenwich, CT: JAI Press, (accepted). “Cultural Mythology and Leadership in Kenya,” in E.H. Kessler & D. J. Wong-MingJi (Eds.), Cultural Mythology and Leadership, Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishers (forthcoming). “Leadership, Individual Differences and Work Attitudes: A Cross-Culture Investigation,” Applied Psychology: An International Review, 2007. “Contingent Reward Transactional Leadership, Work Attitudes, and Organizational Citizenship Behavior: The Role of Procedural Justice Climate Perceptions and Strength,” Leadership Quarterly, 2007. “Destructive Leader Traits and the Neutralizing Influence of an Enriched Job,” Leadership Quarterly, 2007. “Family-friendly Programs, Organizational Commitment, and Work Withdrawal: The Role of Transformational Leadership,” Personnel Psychology, 2007. “Authentic Leadership: Moving HR Leaders to a Higher Level,” Research in Personnel and Human Resource Management, 2006.

“Cultural and Leadership Predictors of Corporate Social Responsibility Values of Top Management: A GLOBE Study of 15 Countries,” Journal of International Business Studies, 2006.

Editorial Board member -

“Components of Transformational Leadership and Corporate Social Responsibility,” Journal of Management Studies, 2006.

Wei David Zhang

“Leadership and Organizational Learning: A Multiple Levels Perspective,” Leadership Quarterly, 2006.

• •

Leadership Quarterly Journal of Management

“Technological progress, inefficiency, and productivity growth in the US securities industry, 1980-2000,” Journal of Business Research, 2006.


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The Right Way A simple turn of fate proves fortunate for Jerry and Vickie Moyes—and SGML

Right or left? The simple decision to turn right or left proved to be a vital for the destiny of Jerry and Vickie Moyes, the West Valley, Arizona State University, the state of Arizona—and the transportation industry.

When the couple arrived in Arizona more than 40 years ago, they were faced with a perplexing dilemma when they reached the intersection of Northern Avenue and I-17— turn right toward the East Valley and a sleepy town called Scottsdale or turn left toward and equally quiet rural region known as Glendale. Fortune would come into play and the couple would make a left turn toward a future in the West Valley. And it’s a destiny that has forever altered the fate of many. Jerry Moyes had little money, but big dreams. He wanted to start a trucking company and began with one truck and a vision. He saw a clear transportation connection between the West Coast, Mexico and the growing Southwest. Clearly, he saw opportunity. Over the years, hard work and determination would allow Moyes to build a trucking empire stretching across the U.S. Swift Transportation started as a company called Common Market in 1966, transporting imported steel from the ports of Los Angeles to Arizona and returning with Arizona cotton to Southern California. By the early 1980s, the company, now known as Swift Transportation, would evolve into a firm with $25 million in annual revenues. By 1990, Swift Transportation had grown to a $125 million carrier with more than 800 trucks. The company’s growth continued with the acquisition of more than a dozen carriers throughout the United States and now operates more than 16,000 trucks and generates more than $2.5 billion in revenue. Today, Swift is the largest truckload fleet in the U.S., primarily transporting retail and discount department store merchandise, manufactured goods, paper products, non-perishable and perishable food products, beverages and beverage containers and building materials. Jerry Moyes also owns and operates the NHL Phoenix Coyotes and is widely-known throughout the region as a supporter of numerous civic and social causes. Earlier this year, the Moyes were among an elite group recognized by ASU’s “Visionaries Celebration” for their “critical direction and financial support, visionary thinking, commitment to advancing higher education and works

symbolic of the great accomplishments of ASU’s West campus over the past 23 years.” The honorees were selected by the dean of each of the four colleges at the West campus and award coordinators noted the Moyes have “invested a lifetime of service to many important organizations.” Jerry Moyes, in his standard and humble persona, says he was surprised to earn the prestigious award. “Vickie and I were honored and excited to be considered for ASU’s Visionary Award,” he says simply. “It was flattering to be included with the other Visionary Award recipients.” The impact of people like the Moyes is truly far-reaching. “Visionaries help this campus work,” says SGML Dean Gary Waissi. “Those honored have lifted ASU to a higher level through their generosity and their focus on education and this community’s youth. We are grateful and better for the important role they have played in our success.” The Moyes support several students in the School of Global Management and Leadership each year with scholarships and relish the role in advancing the education experience for students. “I have always believed education not only gives students the formal training they need to be successful, but also creates networking opportunities and opens doors for them. By contributing to the West campus in this way, we are helping support the individual students, the campus and helping to build a strong community here in the West Valley.” As SGML continues to implement its strategic plan and mission, Moyes feels the unique educational opportunities offered at the West campus will continue to create future leaders for the global economy. Equally important, he adds, is for SGML to distinguish itself among a crowded field of business educational opportunities. “I would like to see SGML create its own niche,” says Moyes. “There is a big demand for individuals prepared to hit the ground running after receiving their degree. A specialized curriculum that combines traditional academics with practical leadership training experiences is a great model.”


Indeed, SGML is on track to fulfill this observation with unique degree and certificate programs specifically tailored for the demands of a global economy. In addition to the framework of SGML on a global scale, Moyes adds it is also important to recognize the growing influence the West Valley will have upon the region today and in the years to come. “Education is definitely an important part of the infrastructure and future growth in the West Valley,” he says. “It’s exciting to see this part of the Valley explode with opportunities. I would like to see the young people in the West Valley rise to the occasion and prepare themselves to take advantage of the opportunities that are presenting themselves right in their own back yard.”

“The ASU West campus and SGML is an important part of the West Valley infrastructure and plays a huge role in this mission.” – JERRY MOYES From his decades in business, Moyes knows that opportunity and success go handin-hand. But at the heart of it all is a solid education from a leading institution whose leadership, instructors and students all have the same mission in mind: excellence. “It’s critical for everyone to get a good education and just as important to capitalize on opportunities to gain practical work experience,” says Moyes. “With the tremendous growth here in the West Valley and all the opportunities available to us, we need to be able to prepare our young people to be skilled and productive leaders with vision. The ASU West campus and the SGML is an important part of the West Valley infrastructure and plays a huge role in this mission.” And to think Moyes, ASU and the entire region have been influenced by something as ubiquitous as a left or right turn. It just goes to show fate has a true destiny for everyone—including SGML.

Bank on It

Moyes Scholar relishes SGML experience

STUDENT PROFILE:

Clein Malicdem

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Clein Malicdem, a junior in accountancy at ASU’s West campus, is a full-time student, local accounting professional, father of three, and a first-generation collegian. He says simply, “My goal is to become a successful CPA and to make an impact at a company that is making a difference, locally and globally. I hope to expand my knowledge of accountancy and make a successful career out of it.” If that idealism isn’t enough, how about this aspiration: “I want to set an example for future students looking into the field of accountancy.” Such is the reality of SGML students. Malicdem, sporting a 3.5 GPA, is studying accounting and will graduate in 2009. As the bookkeeper at Phoenix-based Key Management Co., a property management company providing rental properties and property management services to the western communities of Greater Phoenix since 1981, Malicdem has always been interested in ASU’s West

p JERRY AND VICKIE MOYES

US SWIFT TRANSPORTATION OWNER OF THE PHOENIX COYOTES

campus and specifically, the School’s nationally recognized accountancy program. “My experience is going well,” reports the Chicago native. “I find there is a lot of knowledge within the professors and I look forward to learning more from them. My impression of SGML is they want you to succeed and that has made me more confident in succeeding here.” Malicdem is also a Moyes Scholar, a scholarship program funded by Vickie and Jerry Moyes, founder and CEO of one of the nation’s largest trucking empires, Swift Transportation. “I was fortunate to get chosen to receive the scholarship,” says the student humbly, noting he is his family’s first college student and is relishing his experience at SGML. “I feel pride within myself to be attending college,” he says. “From my family, I feel like they just want what is best for me. They’ve always pushed for a college education because they know it opens so many opportunities. They want me to be successful.” “Opportunities…successful.” Spoken words of true leader.


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The Leadership Map SGML Center for Responsible Leadership searches for the keys to leadership

Dr. Pierre Balthazard

Goals and objectives of the Center for Responsible Leadership include: p

To conduct leadership research and training that will promote responsible and ethical leadership at all hierarchical levels in private and public organizations

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To become one of the premier leadership research centers in the world

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To provide a compelling theme that will attract private investors

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To help mentor students interested in the study of leadership

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To provide a mechanism for social embeddedness through the development of community-based leaders

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To serve as an entity for the pursuit of external funding, largely interdisciplinary in nature, pertaining to leadership

Researchers at the Center for Responsible Leadership are making progress in the hugely provocative question of whether leaders are born or made. SGML researcher David Waldman is director of the Center for Responsible Leadership, approved by Arizona State University in early 2007. Waldman says the center is organized around the analysis of leader effectiveness, focusing on responsibility, integrity and the behaviors of those in leadership roles. What SGML researchers are trying to understand is what leadership is and how leadership processes occur in the brain. Next is the challenge to map ways to access and develop responsible leaders, says Waldman, a professor of management within SGML. One major project underway within the center is the “Leadership Neuroscience Project.” This innovative research study—recently featured in a lengthy article in The Wall Street Journal—is gaining international acclaim for SGML. The project is centered on understanding how the human brain supports leaders in thought, perception, decision-making, action and social processes. SGML is part of a growing base of research relative to knowledge-level study and analysis maintaining that management theories—emotional intelligence, emotional knowledge, and primal leadership models—are built on a foundation of neuroscience. “They posit that successful leadership occurs where heart and mind, feeling and thought meet,” reports Waldman. “This study of brain circuitry—and how it is used to interweave thought Dr. David Waldman and feeling—can chart the neural origin of leadership. What we are saying is there is an electrical imprint in the brain in which all leadership decisions are made.” Waldman and Pierre Balthazard, SGML director of graduate programs, are playing a leading role among national scholars in proving that by using pinpointed neuroscience measurements, key questions of leadership decision-making, good and bad, can be analyzed and studied for leadership characteristics. The logic is that by first determining the key leadership process points in the brain, leadership skills and attributes can further be woven into a larger curriculum and educational platform. Already, more than 50 business and community leaders have been studied using an extensive collection of psychometric scales targeting leadership behaviors and thought-baseline and functional-quantitative encephalographs. “The results are promising,” Waldman adds. This so-called “brain-mapping” is relatively new. Besides leadership, behaviors including AAD, ADHD, depression, sleep disorders, various addictions, and other medical issues could be addressed if the research pans out. “What is most promising,” says Waldman, “is perhaps we could use this realm of neuroscience brain-mapping with other proven areas of medicine and therapy to treat an array of medical conditions. That’s a real possibility here.” Balthazard says SGML has many things going in its favor in regards to research, including the brain-mapping study. SGML, he notes, has “arguably, the most important collection of leadership researchers and practitioners in the country. Through some of our newest research, we will be redefining the world of leadership development—this has already attracted interest internationally.”


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Program Fees $440,000

Operating Fees $285,770

Grants & Gifts $185,000

Program Expenses $440,000

Operating Expenses $349,684

Grants & Gifts Expenses $185,000

Salaries $7,237,492

Salaries $7,237,492

Sources: $8,148,262

Uses: $8,212,176

Fiscal year State Funding budget allocations to the School of Global Management and Leadership

Fiscal year State Funding expenses to support the School of Global Management and Leadership faculty, staff, students and operations.

Vested Interest –OR – Immediate Impact SGML continues to grow at a tremendous rate. With this energy comes excitement and an opportunity for you to make a significant impact now and in the future. Increasing numbers of successful students, faculty and alumni are impacting the world of business and commerce, locally, nationally and globally. We are proud of the work we do at SGML. We are also proud of our students, not only for their successes, but for the impact they are having in our community and around the globe. Accomplishing our mission continues to require substantial resources,

together with a continued commitment to efficiency, a focus on top priorities and a determination to work hard. Gifts from individuals, companies and organizations provide resources that are used to recruit and retain outstanding students and professors, provide stateof-the-art technology and facilities, and enrich student lives. Supporting SGML offers every member of the college’s collective family an opportunity to have an immediate impact on campus priorities supporting and enriching student life. With an investment of an unrestricted gift, the donor can address the most urgent needs of SGML and give the college the flexibility to help underwrite its most critical objectives.

An investment in the ASU School of Global Management and Leadership allows us to: p

Augment and strengthen scholarship and financial aid programs

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Expand and elevate our leadership and character building opportunities

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Provide global learning opportunities for our students and faculty

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Engage and retain the most talented faculty and staff

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Keep pace with advancements in technology

Help us continue to IGNITE OUR VISION and we’ll make a commitment to you. You’ll become a vital part of the SGML network, building an exciting new business education model with immediate impact and measurable results! See who made our Honor Roll on page 23. p

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Paying it Forward SGML Alumnus coordinates $100,000 Salvation Army project

According to SGML Alumnus Dan Grifford, this is the kind of story that most often happens somewhere else to someone else… something you read about in the paper, hear on the news, or have a friend mention to you. In reality, this story is real and it happened to people just like you who simply wanted to do something nice for others because, well, they could.

SGML students, faculty and leadership strive for community engagement. It is continually pushed for, focused on, and is something that happens all the time. Except most of the time, you probably don’t hear about it. Until now. Earlier this year, Grifford, an Arizona native and 2007 SGML graduate, learned the Glendale Corps of the Salvation Army needed a roof to replace a failing structure the group was operating out of at 61st and Northern avenues in the West Valley. The effort to organize and implement a construction plan would swell to involve 25 different companies and reap close to $100,000 in donated labor, materials and sweat—all to benefit the Salvation Army. Grifford was approached by Glendale City Councilmember Yvonne Knaack who, besides supporting the Glendale Kiwanis Club, is also a member of the Salvation Army advisory board. When she told Gifford of the $100,000 that was going to be expended, he couldn’t help but think: that money should be going to needy families, not to replace a roof.

“This is the type of project that you hear about on the news all the time, in other places. Never would I think that I would be apart of something like this” – DAN GRIFFORD “We were able to put together dozens of companies who donated labor, materials, food and overhead to get this job done for free—and actually raised more money than was needed, so we donated that as well,” says Grifford, vice president of Distinctive Services, a roofing contractor. “I can’t believe how many people and companies joined in on helping out. This is the type of project that you hear about on the news all the time, in other places. Never would I think that I would be apart of something like this. There were large companies and small companies who did their part, as well as silent contributors who were very willing to help while wishing not to be recognized at all. Many of the companies who helped out were direct competitors of mine, as well as huge manufacturer and supplier companies that were competitors as well.” Distinctive Services was started by Dan’s father in 2002, and he came on board not too long after graduating from high school in 2003. At that time, the company included father, son, and three employees. Since then, it has enjoyed more than 1,300 percent growth and currently has more than 40 employees and revenues exceeding $3 million annually. “We attribute our growth to the excellent relationships we have with our high-end custom home builders and the repeat business they have given us over the past few years,” says Grifford. “We have been making the rough


transition from the entrepreneurial stage to management stage of our company and it has definitely been a learning experience.” Grifford, born and raised in Arizona, says his first career objective is to help ensure that Distinctive Services is managed properly while maintaining growth—part of this is a tribute to his parents, perhaps akin to another ‘Pay it Forward’ mentality. “My parents have worked for a long time to make sure that my sisters and I are successful in life and I want nothing more for them than to be able to retire from the company soon and sit back and enjoy the ride,” he smiles. “I aspire to step back in the next couple years from a fully functioning company that is self-sufficient and well-respected around the industry. I believe very much in giving back to the community and would love to do much more in the future—as well as expand Distinctive Services, in other subsidiary industries around real estate and construction.” Grifford gives accolades to SGML, and notes: “Every time I learned something in class, I immediately began thinking of how to apply it in the real world and how I could use it at work and in life.” Fortunately for Grifford and the thousands affected by his generosity and passion, it is already working in the real world.

2007 Honor Roll INDIVIDUALS AND ESTATES GIFTS OF $5 - $4,999 Jesusita Amador `02 Gregory Andersen `99 Anita Armstrong `94 & Bruce Armstrong `99 Carol & Micah Aronson Tamara Baker `03 Brian Barwick `05 Dean Beery `96 Susan Bender `97 Jason Bernstein Justin Blackburn `04 Lisa Blizzard `98 Jeffrey Border `05 Kendy Bounds `05 Paula Bowser Randall Bradley `96 David Bramer `98 Janet Branciforte `75 Michelle Brooks `05 Staci Brown `99 & Jens Brown Andrew Burris `95 Kimberly Byrne `04 Marius Cailean `99 Denise Camacho `05 Edwviges Castillo `05 Bradley Cea `00 Patricia Cerna-Lent `04 James Chernek `04 William Clements `98 Becky Crockett Laurel Crull-Dowd `92 `97 & Colin Dowd Linda Cryer `87 & James Cryer `76 `98 Donovan Curley `97 Todd Curtis `98 Rebecca and John Dallmus `97 Allen Davis `93 Peggy Davis `97 Julie Defreitas Mary Drazek `77 `99 & Joseph Drazek Deene Eckles `99 Barbara Edwards `98 Marcia and William Else Jr. `95 Dennis Endres Donna Esposito `81 `90 & Robert Esposito Paula Fair `93 & Harry Fair Christopher Felzien `96 Bradley Fischer `05

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Suzanne Fitch `05 & Jason Fitch Jenna Flynn `98 `02 & Kevin Flynn `02 Aymeric Gisselbrecht `00 Brian Goclan `96 Rebecca Gomez `04 Aurea Gonzales `04 Katrina Gonzales `04 Jessica Gratz `05 Mary Greve `93 Michael Hake `04 Rhonda Hale `00 Gregory Hansen `03 Leanne Harrell Jennifer & Jeffrey Haynes `97 Dale Hensley Jean Hensley Marianna Heon `05 Enrique Hernandez `97 Shelle & John Herrera Jr. `97 Diane Hodge Jeneice Holt `01 Barbara Horner Bonnie Horvath `02 Jennifer & Robert House Deb & Phillip Jackson Sabica Jaddi Josephine Kativu `05 Hugh Kealer `98 Matthew Kelly `05 Beverly and Bryce Kerr `00 Steven Khouri `04 Juan Kingsbury Jr. `04 Carey Kirkman `04 James Klippel `96 Willie Knudson Victoria & Richard Lang `99 Judianne Lange `02 R. Allison Lara `98 Tara Larson `05 Andre Leclercq `04 Diana Lee `79 Suzanne Leung `04 Carla Lindsley `99 Joshua Lingenfelter `05 Gladys Lopez `03 & Steve Lopez Jr. Daniel Lusk `01 Vanni Marasigan `96 S. Sabrina & Robert Mast `95 Linda Mather `72 `80 & Richard Mather `94 Kathryn Maull-Bytnar `05 Robin McEntire `02 Lori McMillan `02

Wendy McVicker `03 Lisa Mendivil `02 Kim Metzgar-Schreiber `94 Daniel Miller `04 Erin Moffitt `02 Cameron Mohler `05 Kevin Mollet `05 Walter Morse `98 Peggy Murray Charlotte and Rion Needs `95 Louise and Gene Nemanich Robyn Nickle Phyllis Nielsen Mary Norman `98 Mark Oaks `02 Kathleen O’Connor-Masse `94 & Michael O’Connor-Masse Joseph Olney `00 Christian Olson `03 Kevin Osbeck Sarah Pearson `06 & Theodore Pearson `02 Elizabeth Peck `99 Douglas Pelton `05 Consuelo Perez `94 Librada Petray `96 & Dwayne Petray `99 Lothsoukol Phothisane `04 & Jonathan Moore Suzanne Powell-Newton `94 `97 & Lynn Newton Shannon Ramirez `96 & Robert Ramirez `94 `98 Patrick Rankin `01 Patricia & Alex Romero Jr. `02 Fanny Ruttinger `05 & A.C. Ruttinger Barbara Sais `02 Carla Sands `05 Deanna Sangster `04 Georgia Savaidis `04 Christine Schaefer `79 Bryan Schrock `05 Joseph Shepherd `03 Robert Slack `04 Robert Smith `93 Russell Smith `04 Eiei Soe `95 & Robert Htoon Tanya Stoikova `05 Kevin Straceski `02 Margaret Swafford `95 Ramey Sweis `04 Weiland Tarpley III `05 Dessislava Tchobanova `03 Amanda Tecca `03

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’07 B.S. GLOBAL BUSINESS

Shirley Thompson `05 Cheryl Toone `02 Stacey Turley `99 Zena Valles `00 Patricia Villarreal `05 & Jeffrey Villarreal Susan Vines `93 & Milton Vines James Vogel Maryse Waldron `03 Kelsi Walline `05 Christine Washington `04 Brenda & Paul Wengraf Daniel Westfall `05 Alison Westrich `96 Candace Wilson `03 Sherry Wind Jennifer Wingenroth `05 Ellen Woods `96 Dallas York `03 Linda Zamora `99 Izabela Zebrowski `04 Toni Zody `01 Gifts of $5,000 or more Patricia & Andy Delph `74 Mary Lou Fulton `74 & Ira Fulton `54 Vickie & Jerry Moyes Rita & Peter Thomas Diane & Gilbert Valadez Corporations, foundations, organizations and trusts GIFTS OF $5 - $4,999 Chevron USA Inc. Consular Corps of Arizona Foundation Oliver Exterminating Corporation The Plaza Companies Charles Schwab Corporation Foundation STMicroelectronics, Inc. GIFTS OF $5,000 OR MORE Arizona Community Foundation Arizona State Credit Union City of Phoenix Fulton Homes Sales Corporation Todd Thomas Foundation Fund USAA Foundation


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p SGML Staff Promotions and New Staff Mike Del Valle Student Support Coordinator Kristin Donaldson Director of External Relations

The Lowe Down Dr. Jordan Lowe honored for research efforts

Reginald Miles Student Recruitment and Retention Specialist Alex Moore Technology Support Analyst Associate, SGML IT Paul Smiley Director of Graduate Student Recruitment

SGML Staff Educational Achievements

Like all great professors, Jordan Lowe is able to relate real-world application into his classroom experience. His auditing and accounting acumen is so deep, in fact, that his work has been cited more than 200 times on a national stage. Lowe clearly is a leader in the industry, a face that students, fellow scholars and others immediately recognize. Lowe, who is a professor in the SGML accountancy department, is a prolific writer, scholar and educator. He had his keen efforts recognized this year when he was one of three ASU

relates to auditor legal liability. This research began with an examination of how jurors’ and judges’ knowledge of the eventual outcome of a case negatively biases their judgments of accountants in a court of law. Having substantiated the existence of these outcome effects, the next step was to apply different mitigation strategies to reduce its effects. In fact, this research was the first to provide evidence that outcome effects can be mitigated in an audit legal liability context. Lowe also researched auditor independence and examined potential

“I am honored to be given this prestigious award, I realize there are others in our college who are more deserving than me.” – JORDAN LOWE professors named as 2006-2007 West campus Faculty/Academic Professional Achievement Award winners. “I am honored to be given this prestigious award,” says Lowe, who has been at SGML since 2003. “I realize there are others in our college who are more deserving than me.” As an ASU alumnus, Jordan earned his Ph.D. from ASU’s School of Accountancy in 1992. His research includes hindsight and outcome effects, legal liability issues, and auditor independence issues. Lowe has published 25 reference papers since 2000 and has four empirically-based pieces of research appearing in 2007. The professor says his initial research examined the influence of outcome information on performance evaluation judgments, especially as it

independence implications for CPA firms providing consulting services for their audit clients. This was the first such research project in this arena. “This project was beneficial to the National Association of State Boards of Accounting as they stated that our research proved to be an excellent aid to the committee’s deliberations,” says the professor. “A few years later we applied the same research approach to a new area of auditor independence—internal audit outsourcing for external audit clients.” As for SGML, Lowe believes the school is on a strong course. “We have a bright, enthusiastic dean who sets the tone for the college,” Lowe says. “If we follow his vision and obtain adequate resources, we will distinguish ourselves in the business community, both regionally and nationally.”

Patti Crocker Technology Support Analyst Associate, SGML IT Received her M.Ed., Counseling-Human Relations, from Northern Arizona University Mike Del Valle Student Support Coordinator Received his M.Ed. from Northern Arizona University Alex Moore Technology Support Analyst Associate, SGML IT Received his B.S. in Global Business degree from SGML/ASU Susan Spillett Administrative Assistant, ECN/FIN/MKT Department Received her B.A., Elementary Ed., from Northern Arizona University

SGML NEW FACULTY Dr. Bruce Baldwin Professor Emeritus of Accounting, ASU Chair of Accounting Dr. Adegoke Oke Assistant Professor, Quantitative Business Analysis Dr. Louise Nemanich Assistant Professor, Strategic Management Dr. Gabriel Gonzalez Assistant Professor, Marketing Dr. Gillian Rice Lecturer, Marketing Dr. Shakil Quayes Assistant Professor, Economics Dr. Jianxin “Daniel” Chi Assistant Professor, Finance

SGML FACULTY PROMOTIONS Dr. Alan Goldman was promoted to Professor of Practice in June 2007


SGML FACULTY A+ PUBLICATION AWARDS

Dr. David Waldman Professor, Management Director, Center for Responsible Leadership Ph.D., Colorado State University

Dr. Srimathy Mohan and Dr. Mohan Gopalakrishnan

Associate Professor, Operations Management Ph.D., University of Alabama

“Cultural and Leadership Predictors of Corporate Social Responsibility Values of Top Management: A GLOBE study of 15 countries”, Journal of International Business Studies, 37: 823-837.

“A Lognormal Approximation of Activity Duration in PERT Using Two Time Estimates”, Journal of the Operational Research Society, 2007

FACULTY BEST PAPER AWARDS AT PROFESSIONAL CONFERENCES

Assistant Professor, Operations Management Ph.D., University of Montreal

Dr. Adegoke Oke Assistant Professor, Quantitative Business Analysis Ph.D., Cranfield School of Management, UK “Antecedents of Supply Chain Visibility in Retail Supply Chains: A Resource-based Theory Perspective”, Journal of Operations Management (In Press).

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY FACULTY AWARDS Dr. Jordan Lowe, Professor of Accounting, received the ASU Faculty and Academic Professional Achievement Award for Research for 2006-07 at the meeting of the Academic Assembly, May 9, 2007. Dr. Phil Mizzi, Associate Professor, Quantitative Business Analysis, received the MBA Alumni Outstanding Teacher Award.

In November 2006, Dr. Simona Mola’s paper, “Affiliated Mutual Funds and Analyst Optimism,” received the Best Paper Award in Institutional Finance from the Southern Finance Association.

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School Of Global Management And Leadership Dean’s Office

Graduate Programs

Dr. Gary Waissi Dean

Dr. Pierre Balthazard Director, Graduate Programs

Linda Mullins Executive Assistant to the Dean

Paul Smiley Director, Academic Outreach

Victoria Ryan Business Operations Manager

Doris Fagin Student Support Specialist, Associate

Kristin Donaldson Development Officer

Tena Skowronek Administrative Assistant

Randy Mullen Technology Support Analyst, Sr.

Department of Management

Patricia Crocker Technology Support Analyst, Associate Alex Moore Technology Support Analyst, Assistant Susan Hall Accountant Associate Undergraduate Global Business Programs Dr. Jane Carey Director, Undergraduate Programs & Assessment Ursula Scheren Academic Services Manager Laura Valadez Student Support Specialist Michael Del Valle Student Support Coordinator Nancy Gomez Administrative Assistant

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Dr. Leanne Atwater Chair and Professor of Management

Dr. Suzanne Peterson Assistant Professor, Management

Dr. Shakil Quayes Assistant Professor, Economics

Dr. Antonios Printezis Assistant Professor, OPM

Dr. Gillian Rice Lecturer, Marketing

Dr. David Van Fleet Professor, Management

Dr. David Zhang Assistant Professor, Finance

Dr. Fred Walumbwa Assistant Professor, Management Dr. David Waldman Professor of Management Director, Center for Responsible Leadership

Department of Accounting Dr. Bruce Baldwin Chair and Professor Emeritus Vernonica Mize Administative Assistant Dr. Lucy Chen Assistant Professor, Accounting

Department of Economics/ Finance/Marketing

Dr. Sally Chung Assistant Professor, Accounting

Dr. Joseph Bellizzi Chair and Professor of Marketing

John Dallmus Lecturer, Accounting

Susan Spillett Administative Assistant

Dr. William Duncan Associate Professor, Accounting

Dr. Laurel Anderson Associate Professor, Marketing

Dr. Cathy Finger Lecturer, Accounting

Dr. Jianxin “Daniel” Chi Assistant Professor, Finance

Dr. Jordan Lowe Professor, Accounting

Dr. Gabriel Gonzalez Assistant Professor, Marketing

Barbara Muller Sr. Lecturer, Accounting

Dr. Brian Macfie Lecturer, Finance

Dr. Marilyn Prosch Associate Professor, Accounting

Dr. Deborah Brown McCabe Assistant Professor, Marketing

Dr. Janet Samuels Assistant Professor, Accounting

Dr. Phil Mizzi Associate Professor, QBA

Dr. Dan Swenson Associate Professor, Accounting

Dr. Simona Mola Assistant Professor, Finance

Dr. Don Vickrey Professor, Accounting

Dr. Srimathy Mohan Assistant Professor, OPM

Dr. Adegoke Oke Assistant Professor, QBA

Dr. Robert Wood Lecturer, Accounting

Dr. Louise Nemanich Assistant Professor, Strategic Management

Dr. George Olander Lecturer, Finance

Joan Jankowski Administative Assistant Dr. Gary Anders Professor, International Business Dr. Kathy Anders Lecturer, Management Dr. Pierre Balthazard Associate Professor, ISM Dr. Elizabeth Cabrera Visiting Associate Professor, Management Dr. Jane Carey Associate Professor, ISM Dr. Alan Goldman Lecturer, Management Dr. Mohan Gopalakrishnan Associate Professor, OPM Dr. Luiz Mesquita Assistant Professor, Strategic Management


School of Global Management and Leadership Arizona State University 4701 West Thunderbird Road PO Box 37100 Phoenix, Arizona USA 85069-7100 602-543-6200 http://sgml.asu.edu

10/07 10M

SGML Annual Report 2007  

SGML Annual Report 2007

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