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ALL ROADS LEAD TO


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Friday

Registration 12:00 - 6:00 p.m. Century II Convention Hall

Graduate School Fair 4:00 - 6:00 p.m. Connecting Lobby Opening Ceremony 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. Keynote: Jessica Pettitt 7:30 - 8:30 p.m. Spoken Word Artist Mikey Apollo Mario Kart Tournament & Gaymes 8:30 - 10 p.m.

Saturday

Featured Voice: Robyn Ochs 8:10 - 9:40 a.m.

Wellness Yoga (Details p.63) Room 210C | 7:00 - 7:45 a.m. Workshop 1 8:00 - 8:45 Workshop 2 8:55 - 9:40

Keynote: Pidgeon Pagonis 10:00 - 11:00 a.m.

State of the Region 12:40 - 2:10 p.m.

Vendor Fair 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 - 11:30 a.m. Sunday Workshop 3 12:30 - 1:15 Workshop 4 1:25 -2:10

Featured Voice: Dr. Jon Paul Higgins 4:05 - 5:35 p.m.

State Caucuses 2:20 - 3:45 p.m. Workshop 5 3:55 -4:40 Workshop 6 4:50 - 5:35

Oversight Committee 4:00 - 7:00 p.m.

Keynote: Nyle DiMarco 7:30 - 8:30 p.m. Drag Show Hosted by: Penny Tration 8:30 - 11 :00 p.m.

Sunday

Workshop 7 8:00 - 8:45 Workshop 8 8:55 - 9:40

Featured Voice: Cody Charles 10 :00- 11:30 a.m.

Featured Voice: Sam Brinton 8:10 - 9:40 a.m.

Wellness Yoga (Details p.63) Room 210C | 7:00 - 7:45 a.m.

Workshop 9 9:50 -10:35 Workshop 10 10:45- 11:30

Keynote: janaya khan 12:00 - 1:00 p.m. Closing Ceremony 1:00 - 2:00 p.m.


5 INSTITUTE WELCOME

26 GENERAL INFO

6 ABOUT MBLGTACC

27 EMERGENCY AND CRISIS INFO

7 MBLGTACC YEARS

28 ACCESSIBILITY INFO

8 MBLGTACC HISTORY

30 SPEAKER AND ENTERTAINMENT BIOS

10 PLANNING COMMITTEE WELCOME

38 WORKSHOP SCHEDULE

12 ABOUT OUR THEME: BEYOND THE RAINBOW AND TO THE STARS 14 PLANNING COMMITTEE

40 ADVISOR PROGRAMMING 41 STATE OF THE REGION / OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE MEETING

19 SPONSORS

42 IDENTITY FORUMS AND STATE CAUCUSES

20 ABOUT WICHITA STATE UNIVERSITY

44 BREAKOUT SESSION DETAILS

21 GRAD SCHOOL AND VENDOR FAIR 22 CODE FOR INCLUSION 23 SESSION TRIGGER WARNING GUIDE 24 RESOURCES

83 GLOSSARY OF TERMS 87 HOTEL AND CONFERENCE CENTER MAPS

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SESSION 1 WORKSHOPS

48

SESSION 2 WORKSHOPS

52

SESSION 3 WORKSHOPS

56

SESSION 4 WORKSHOPS

60

SESSION 5 WORKSHOPS

64

SESSION 6 WORKSHOPS

68

SESSION 7 WORKSHOPS

72

SESSION 8 WORKSHOPS

75

SESSION 9 WORKSHOPS

78

SESSION 10 WORKSHOPS


CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT

EVOLVING THE CONFERENCE NAME, FIRST TIME IN 17 YRS MBLGTACC is changing its name and taking an important next step in intentionally recognizing and centering the needs of asexual students in our collective work. With input from students and staff, allies and asexual folx, and other stakeholders, we’re excited to announce that the full version of the MBLGTACC name is now officially the Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Asexual College Conference. Learn more at mblgtacc.org/name


WELCOME TO MBLGTACC 2019! On behalf of the Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity, we are proud to welcome you to the 2019 Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Asexual College Conference! Now in its 27th year, this weekend is a time for queer and trans+ students from across the Midwest—and the nation—to come together for a weekend of learning and coalition building. Thank you for making the choice to be in this space. Our meeting this weekend exists within a turbulent social and political environment, where we must continue fighting for our basic rights and freedoms. The attention of student activists and leaders is being pulled in numerous directions. Throughout the movement, individuals are facing depleted energy. We must take time to heal, which is why collaboration is important. As one takes time to heal, others in the movement continue the work. We must collaborate to achieve liberation. There’s a narrative about the current political landscape expressing concern about the erosion of what’s “normal.” But, we’re not interested in maintaining the status quo. We’re interested in flipping tables and rejecting the restrictions of societally enforced ideas of what is normal. Only by dismantling current oppressive systems and reimagining a society that prioritizes the needs and experiences of those held at the margins can we all truly be free. As part of our commitment to recentering, we have updated our conference name. Changing the conference name to include asexual and aromantic people is part of our continued efforts to recenter on identities and experiences often excluded from the dominant narrative. This is work we hope to model and strongly encourage in all who engage with our team and this conference. This weekend, we hope you take some time to learn about others and think about who should be centered in the movement. We hope you build connections to collaborate across campuses, and gain new skills to continue advocating for the community. And, we hope you find time to heal.

With pride, R.B. Brooks Justin Drwencke Director of Operations Executive Director 5


ABOUT MBLGTACC The Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Asexual College Conference (MBLGTACC) is an annual conference held to connect, educate, and empower LGBTQIA+ college students, faculty, and staff around the Midwest and beyond. It has attracted advocates and thought leaders including Angela Davis, Robyn Ochs, Janet Mock, Laverne Cox, Kate Bornstein, Faisal Alam, and LZ Granderson; and entertainers and artists including Jujubee, Margaret Cho, J Mase III, Chely Wright, and Loren Cameron. MISSION STATEMENT The mission of MBLGTACC is to educate queer and trans Midwest college students to empower and celebrate their identities, while enabling them to resist oppression and develop resiliency against personal and societal injustices.

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OUR PILLARS ADVOCACY TO PERSISTENTLY CHALLENGE THE NORMS OF SOCIETY; TO BE PART OF MAKING THE WORLD A SAFE PLACE FOR ALL.

COLLABORATION TO WORK JOINTLY WITH OTHERS. WE MUST LEARN TO EFFECTIVELY COLLABORATE TO ACHIEVE LIBERATION BECAUSE ALL OPPRESSIONS ARE CONNECTED.

RE-CENTERING TO CENTER THE VOICES OF THE MOST MARGINALIZED AMONG US.

HEALING TO MEND ONE’S MIND AND SPIRIT FROM THE DAMAGE ACCUMULATED DURING THE BATTLE FOR JUSTICE.


MBLGTACC YEARS

Iowa State University and Drake University

Earlham College (Indiana) Greetings from the 90’s...Wish You Were Here Queer Beloit College (Wisconsin) Building Queer Success in the Midwest University of Illinois at Chicago Across the Fruited Plain Saint Cloud State University (Minnesota) Making Waves Into the New Millennium Michigan State University Still Moving Forward Iowa State University Speak Up! Speak Out! University of South Dakota Painting the Rainbow: Celebrating Unity University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Voting for Change: Liberty and Justice For All University of Wisconsin-Madison

Get Real! Confronting Privilege, Provoking Dialogue

and Building New Foundations

Iowa State University The Butterfly Effect: Evolution to Revolution University of Missouri Kansas City Jazzin’ It Up Purdue University Introspection at the Crossroads University of Nebraska at Omaha All Roads Lead to Intersectionality

1993 First Annual MBLGCC 1994 Southern Illinois University at Carbondale 1995 Building Queer Success in the Midwest 1996 Indiana State University 1997 We’re Here! We’re Queer! We’re Fabulous! 1998 University of Wisconsin-Madison 1999 Moving Forward, Looking Back 2000 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 2001 Out and About: Breaking Silence, Boundaries, Labels 2002 The Ohio State University 2003 Loving With Pride 2004 Saint Cloud State University (Minnesota) 2005 Building The Bridge To Bring It All Together 2006 University of Minnesota-Twin Cities 2007 Alphabet Soup: No Matter The Letter We Stand 2008 Indiana University Bloomington Living Out Loud: Examining Our Past 2009 to Enhance Our Future 2010 University of Michigan-Ann Arbor 2011 Justice or Just Us? Achieving Liberty for All 2012 Michigan State University 2013 Mosaic: Putting the Pieces Together 2014 Illinois State University 2015 Narrating A New Normal 2016 DePaul, Loyola Chicago, and Northeastern Illinois Universities 2017 United in Solidarity 2018 Wichita State University 2019 Beyond the Rainbow and to the Stars 7


2006

2018

MBLGTACC HOST STATES

2000 2005 2007

1996 1999 2010

1993 2004 2012

2014

1995 1998 2001 2008 2015 2017

Has your school or state hosted MBLGTACC?

2002

2011 2013 1994 1997 2009 2016

2003

If you’re in our 13-state region, consider submitting a bid and presenting your proposal to the Oversight Committee next year for a chance to host in 2022.


WELCOME TO MBLGTACC 2019: BEYOND THE RAINBOW AND TO THE STARS! Dear attendees, Welcome to MBLGTACC 2019 and to Wichita, Kansas! We hope you’re ready for an exciting and empowering weekend. Our theme this year is Beyond the Rainbow and to the Stars, reflecting our desire to make this weekend more than just a wonderful queer journey. We want to shed light on how the problems the LGBTQIA+ community is facing right now are connected with problems other marginalized communities are facing. We also want to provide you with an opportunity to learn new skills that will help you more effectively reach the goals you have set for yourself. We hope that these skills will empower you to tackle whatever challenges lie ahead on your road to helping make this world a better place for all of us. We chose our four pillars (Advocacy, Collaboration, Healing, and Re-Centering) to emphasize some matters of central importance to the LGBTQIA+ community today. This is by no means an exhaustive list. We have selected one keynote speaker to represent each pillar. We also asked all of our workshop presenters to define the pillars for their workshops, which are included in your program. We did this so that you can more easily focus on what you want to get out of this weekend. Whether that’s a crash course in advocacy, a healing experience with self-care skills to take home, a little bit of everything, or anything in between, we want to make sure you get the most out of your time here in Wichita! Queerly and dearly, The MBLGTACC 2019 Team

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11 PHOTO BY DALE SMALL


BROWN VS. BOARD OF EDUCATION

JOHN BROWN PHOTO BY AUGUSTUS WASHINGTON CIRCA 1846-1847 STUDENTS AT DOCKUM DRUG STORE LUNCH COUNTER SIT -IN

For the first time in its 27 year history, MBLGTACC has made its way to the wide open plains of Kansas. Our theme, Beyond the Rainbow and to the Stars, ties together rich traditions in Kansas with continual goals of social justice and equal rights for all, regardless of gender and sexuality. Beyond the Rainbow is a nod to what comes to mind for most people when they think of Kansas –the starting point for Dorothy’s adventures in the Wizard of Oz. Of course, the rainbow also has special meaning for the LGBTQIA+ community. Moving Beyond the Rainbow suggests seeing connections between our diverse identities and various movements for social justice. Kansas is well known for wide open spaces, beautiful sunsets, and a sky full of stars. To the Stars refers to our state motto, “Ad Astra per Aspera,” meaning “To the Stars through Difficulties.” Our motto refers to the 12

pioneering spirit of Kansans, but for many of us this phrase also signifies the ongoing struggles for justice and equality in our state. Kansas has a proud but little known history of grassroots organizing and civil rights activism. From the efforts of John Brown and the abolitionists who fought to keep Kansas free from slavery during the 1850s to the 1954 landmark case of Brown v. Board of Education, which originated in a Topeka school and was named for student Linda Brown, Kansas has been a forerunner in fights for racial and gender justice. Our state had the first state run university allowing women to attend college alongside men. Wichita was the setting of the first lunch counter sit-in, staged by a youth chapter of NAACP in 1958 in a Dockum Drug Store.


AMELIA EARHART

LANGSTON HUGHES

SHARICE DAVIDS PHOTO BY THUNDER VALLEY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORP.

GILBERT BAKER

MELISSA ETHERIDGE PHOTO BY C FLANIGAN, FILMMAGIC

Wichita was also one of the first cities in the nation to pass a non-discrimination ordinance that prohibited discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in 1977 (though it quickly became a target of Anita Bryant’s crusade and was unfortunately short lived). Our pioneering spirit has had a profound impact throughout our nation – from aviation (Wichita as the Air Capital of the World, Amelia Earhart) to arts and culture (Gordon Parks, Langston Hughes, Melissa Etheridge, and William Burroughs) and the LGBTQIA+ civil rights movement (Kansan Gilbert Baker designed the rainbow flag), and it is this spirit we hope to inspire among attendees. The trailblazing spirit of Kansas continues today as grassroots organizers and outspoken political leaders push our state

GOV. LAURA KELLY SIGNING EXECUTIVE ORDER PROTECTING LGBT STATE WORKERS PHOTO BY JONATHAN SHORMAN, THE WICHITA EAGLE

toward equality. Our newly-elected Governor Laura Kelly made reinstating protections for LGBTQIA+ state workers her first official act. Kansans also just elected Sharice Davids as one of the first two Native American women to congress, and also our state’s first elected out LGBTQIA+ person in the U.S. House of Representatives. Our message throughout the conference will be one of aiming high and working together to meet those goals. We hope that attendees will be empowered by the stories they hear and the tools they develop to take this spirit of change back home to create more just, safe, and welcoming spaces in their lives. 13


STUDENT PLANNING COMMITTEE

SHE/HER

THEY/THEM

Claire Powell is an undergraduate at WSU studying sociology. She is the student leader for the Site Planning Committee as well as the Vice President for WSU’s Spectrum: LGBTQ & Allies. She hopes to have a positive contribution to her community while she serves on this committee.

Sandra Carlo is a junior studying Women’s Studies and Dance at Wichita State University. They are the Organizational Change Coordinator at Positve Directions Inc, a nonprofit organization in Wichita committed to the prevention of HIV transmission. They served as the student leader for the MBLGTACC 2019 Entertainment Committee. Gabrielle is a senior studying Spanish at Wichita State. She is the student leader of the MBLGTACC Curriculum & Scheduling Committee. She is also the President of the student group Feminists On Campus Uniting Students.

SHE/HER

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THEY/THEM

HE/HIM

Rexy Que is a senior at WSU studying Political Science and Statistics. They serve as Chair of the Steering Committee. They are passionate about using technology, data, and intersectional analyses to shape public policy, as well as empowering marginalized individuals to live their best lives. They are an Associate for the Community Engagement Institute’s Center for Organizational Development and Collaboration supporting state agencies with policy analysis and organizational development.

Aaron Mounts is from Cheney, Kansas and is currently a freshman at Wichita State University. He is double majoring in International Studies and Spanish. He is also a Senator in Student Government Association and is a participant in the Multicultural Student Mentorship Program.


PLANNING COMMITTEE ADVISORS

HE/HIM

SHE/HER

Aaron Coffey serves as the Assistant Dean for Graduate Enrollment Management and the Director of Graduate Admissions for the Graduate School. He’s passionate about viewing the whole person during the admission process and recognizing that everyone’s path to higher education is not the same. Aaron identifies as gay and, outside of work, enjoys movies, musicals, and The Legend of Zelda.

Dr. Jenny Pearson is Graduate Coordinator and Associate Professor in the Sociology Department at Wichita State University. She teaches courses on gender, sexuality, and education, and her research focuses on how school and family context shapes the well-being and educational success of LGBTQ youth. As a GLSEN Kansas board member and the faculty advisor for Wichita State’s LGBTQ student organization, Jenny is passionate about making sure that schools are safe and welcoming places for all students.

SHE/HER

Stacey Popejoy is an Associate Clinical Professor with the School of Social Work at Wichita State University. Additionally, Ms. Popejoy is the Director of the Batterer Intervention Program at Offender Victim Ministries in Newton, Kansas. Stacey has spent the past twenty years addressing the issues of domestic and sexual violence at the national, state, and local levels. Ms. Popejoy is currently faculty for the Kansas Governor’s Office, Kansas Academy for Victim Services. She has extensive training experience including training for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Kansas Attorney General’s Office, Kansas Parole Board, and many local community organizations. She is an advocate, ally, and instigator for social change. Ms. Popejoy has an MSW from the University of Kansas.

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OFFICE OF DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION

SHE/HER

SHE/HER

16

Alicia Sanchez is the Director of Diversity and Inclusion at Wichita State University. Alicia strives to promote an all-inclusive environment for all campus stakeholders. Prior to her appointment as director, she served as an Assistant Director in Wichita State’s Office of Undergraduate Admissions focusing on multicultural recruitment. Alicia obtained her master’s degree from Friends University and earned a bachelor’s degree from Wichita State University.

Danielle Johnson is the Assistant Director for the Office of Diversity and Inclusion at Wichita State University where she invites a shared learning experience for students, faculty, staff and the greater Wichita community. Danielle holds a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from WSU. Danielle and her spouse, Brandon Johnson, are busy with three kids Khairi, Aria, and Arin. When they’re not busy with family life, they are working to create positive changes and a more inclusive and equitable environment in the greater Wichita community.

HE/HIM

SHE/HER

Brad Thomison is the LGBTQ Coordinator for the Office of Diversity and Inclusion at Wichita State University. Brad earned his undergraduate degree in Music Education from WSU in 2009. Brad’s career adventure has included working as the Executive Director of a non-profit organization and international IT project management, which took him to numerous countries around Europe. His work in higher education started with the University Of Kansas Medical Center, and has culminated in his dream job at Wichita State University. He is also a proud partner, uncle, brother, and step-dad of two amazing kids who help remind him of what is most important in his life.

Jade Mursch is the Student Marketing Intern for the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. She supported the work of the MBLGTACC Steering Committee by creating most of the conference marketing materials and developing this program book. The committee is very grateful for her creativity and hard work!


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SPONSORS The MBLGTACC 2019 Planning Committee would like to thank the incredible organizations and people that have supported the conference through direct and in-kind donations. The conference would not have been possible without the level of support they have given the planning team over the past two years.

POLARIS SPONSOR - NORTHERN STAR

URSA MAJOR - THE BIG DIPPER

URSA MINOR - THE LITTLE DIPPER

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ABOUT OUR UNIVERSITY WICHITA STATE UNIVERSITY’S MISSION The mission of Wichita State University is to be an essential, educational, cultural, and economic driver for Kansas and the greater public good. Wichita State is a doctoral research university enrolling nearly 15,000 students and offering 59 undergraduate degree programs in more than 150 areas of study in seven undergraduate colleges. The Graduate School offers 45 master’s and 12 doctoral degrees that offer study in more than 100 areas. Wichita State’s Innovation Campus is an interconnected community of partnership buildings, laboratories, and mixed-use areas where students, faculty, staff, entrepreneurs, and businesses have access to the university’s vast resources and technology. For more information, follow us on Twitter @WichitaState and Facebook at www.facebook.com/wichita.state

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WSU LGBTQ HISTORY Wichita State University has a long history of LGBTQ student activism. The first LGBTQ student group at WSU, the Student Homophile Association, was officially recognized in 1976, though it already existed a few years prior. Between then and 2001, ten different student organizations focused on LGBTQ issues came and went, all with their own unique goals. In 2001, That Gay Group! was founded. That Gay Group! changed their name to Spectrum: LGBTQ & Allies in 2014, and that group is still going strong, hosting weekly meetings for students as well as other queer focused events throughout the year. The Richard D. Muma and Rick A Case Equality Scholarship was established in 2011 to support LGBTQ students (fun fact: the current recipient happens to be the student leader for this conference, Rexy Que!), and the Annual WSU Drag Show debuted that same year. In May 2015, we had our first Lavender Graduation to celebrate LGBTQ student achievement. In 2017, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, which had already been supporting LGBTQ students and raising awareness of LGBTQ issues for years, hired Brad Thomison as the full-time LGBTQ Coordinator (another fun fact: Brad was an important part of getting the Annual WSU Drag Show up and running as a student!). And in 2019, WSU brought MBLGTACC to Kansas for the first time in its 27 year history!


Grad School Fair

Exhibitor/Vendor Fair

FRIDAY | 4-6 P.M. Convention Hall

SATURDAY | 9 A.M.-5 P.M. SUNDAY | 8 - 11:30 A.M. Room 209 A

Learn about great opportunities to continue your education by meeting representatives from some of the best graduate schools in the region!

Visit our vendor fair to meet local and regional organizations whose support helped make this conference possible. You’ll also get a chance to meet a few of our keynote and featured speakers here!

LGBTQIA+ is who we are, and at Wichita State,

MA, MS, PhD+

is what we choose to become.

wichita.edu/graduate

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CODE FOR INCLUSION Everyone is responsible for their own behavior in this space. While we wish for everyone to be able to express themselves, explore, and learn in their own way, this code for inclusion sets an expectation that all attendees be considerate and careful of those around them. This policy has been created for the greater safety and access of all guests and attendees. Failure to adhere to these necessary guidelines could result in removal from the event at the Institute’s discretion. By attending the Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Asexual College Conference (MBLGTACC), you agree to the following Code for Inclusion:

*TRIGGER WARNING*

We have a zero-tolerance policy for harassment of any kind, including but not limited to: • stalking • offensive verbal comments • non-consensual photography or recording • bathroom policing

SEXUAL RESPONSIBILITY We encourage anyone engaging in sexual activity to do so safely and consensually. We encourage the use of condoms, dental dams, lubricant, or other forms of protection. While this is a sex-positive space, be courteous to those who do not wish to engage in sexual activity, or those who may be sexrepulsed. Inversely, do not shame or judge those who engage in sexual activity, including those who participate in kink communities. Your body, your choice.

• unwelcome physical attention

CONSENT

• intimidation

Consent should be received for any sexual and/ or physical contact. Consent is an unambiguous, enthusiastic, and voluntary agreement to move forward with a specific sexual request or act. Consent cannot be obtained from individuals who are asleep or who have a temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity, including as a result of drug or alcohol use. Consent is an affirmative act, not a lack of action; resistance from a person is not required to demonstrate lack of consent. Intoxication is not an excuse for failing to ask for or obtain consent. Consent is on-going and can be given and taken away at any time.

• physical or sexual assault • inappropriate physical contact

If you have any questions or concerns about this policy, please contact: R.B. Brooks, director of operations of the Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity at roze@sgdinstitute.org.

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Sexual assault is defined as performing any sexual act with or on a person who has not given, has denied, or is unable to give consent.


WORKSHOP TRIGGER WARNINGS GUIDE Workshop presenters were asked to identify potential trigger warnings for their respective sessions. The workshop detail pages beginning at page 44 of this book will show the icons for each identified trigger warning defined below.

TRIGGER WARNINGS Provide content and/or trigger warnings whenever possible. Allow others to name their triggers when they arise and determine how to move forward without causing additional harm or dismissing the incident.

CONSIDERATION FOR OTHERS Consider how your identities impact the space you are in. There are numerous intersections of identities present and it is vital to give room to those who are often denied the ability to take up space.

INCLUSIVE LANGUAGE Be mindful of your language. While we are all learning and you may not be aware of certain phrases that others may find offensive, be receptive to being informed by attendees, reflect when addressed, and adjust accordingly. This includes honoring people’s pronouns and names and avoiding ableist language (ex: “crazy,” “lame,” “crippled”).

SERVICE ANIMALS If you encounter someone with a service animal, you should NOT touch, offer food to, or interact with the animal in any way unless otherwise explicitly stated by the owner. Service animals can sometimes be identified by a vest or other article of clothing indicating they are assisting.

ACCESSIBILITY AWARENESS Please honor any accommodation or accessibility needs provided to attendees. Do not inhibit the assistance provided to and/or used by attendees such as ASL interpreters, reserved seating, service animals, or other types of services/equipment.

A

BI-PHOBIA OR HOMOPHOBIA: Actions, attitudes,

BH or systems with discriminatory impact based on actual or perceived sexual orientation.

C

CLASSISM: Actions, attitudes, or systems with discriminatory impact based on actual or perceived wealth or socioeconomic status.

E

EATING DISORDERS: Behavioral disorder defined by eating habits that negatively affect a person’s physical, mental, and/or emotional health.

F

FAT PHOBIA: Actions, attitudes, or systems with discriminatory impact based on actual or perceived obesity or status as overweight.

R

RACISM: Actions, attitudes, or systems with discriminatory impact based on actual or perceived race and/or ethnicity.

RV

S SV

NETIQUETTE Be sure to obtain permission before posting and/or tagging pictures of other attendees on social media. Avoid using bright or flashing lights whenever possible.

ALLERGIES & SCENT SENSITIVITY We ask attendees to use scent-free products or limit/ forego the excessive use of scented hygiene products while at the conference.

ABLEISM: Actions, attitudes, or systems with discriminatory impact based on actual or perceived difference of ability or disability.

SA

RELATIONSHIP VIOLENCE: Relationships where one person maintains power and control over another. Can include physical abuse, emotional abuse, sexual abuse and coercion, reproductive coercion, financial abuse, or digital abuse. SEXISM: Actions, attitudes, or systems with discriminatory impact based on actual or perceived sex or gender identity. SEXUAL VIOLENCE: An act in which a person sexually touches another person without that person’s consent or coerces or physically forces a person to engage in a sexual act against their will. SUBSTANCE ABUSE: Patterned use of a drug in which the user consumes the substance in amounts or with methods which are harmful to themselves or others.

T

TRANSPHOBIA: Actions, attitudes, or systems with discriminatory impact based on actual or perceived status as transgender.

X

XENOPHOBIA: Actions, attitudes, or systems with discriminatory impact based on actual or perceived nationality.

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RESOURCES HOTELS

TRANSPORTATION

HOST HOTEL HYATT REGENCY 225 W Douglas, Wichita, KS 67202 (316) 293-1234

DOWNTOWN WICHITA Q-LINE The Q-Line is Wichita’s FREE downtown trolley. Check out the Q-Line map included in your participant bag for routes and details.

DRURY PLAZA BROADVIEW 400 W Douglas, Wichita, KS 67202 (316) 262-5000 AMBASSADOR 104 South Broadway, Wichita, KS 67202 (316) 239-7100 HOTEL AT OLD TOWN 830 E 1st Street N, Wichita, KS 67202 (316) 267-4800 FAIRFIELD INN & SUITES 525 S Main St, Wichita, KS 67202 (316) 201-1400 WYNDHAM GARDEN INN DOWNTOWN 221 E Kellogg St, Wichita, KS 67202 (316) 269-2090 HOTEL AT WATERWALK 711 S Main St, Wichita, KS 67213 (316) 263-1061 VISITWICHITA.COM The conference planning team has worked closely with the Visit Wichita visitors bureau to help you make the most of your stay in our city. There is a dining guide in your participant bag, and additional information about local attractions. Please check out visitwichita.com for more information. 24

WICHITA TRANSIT BUS SYSTEM Visit wichitatransit.org to see maps and schedules. Most routes include free Wifi. Passes are available at the downtown transit center located at 214 S. Topeka, Wichita, KS 67202. BEST CABS, INC bestcabsinc.com (316) 838-2233 ABC TAXI goabctaxi.com (316) 264-4222 UBER AND LYFT Wichita participates in both Uber and Lyft.

PARKING The best parking options are at local hotels. The surface lots located south and east of the Hyatt Hotel and Conference Center are available for metered use. The parking garage south of the hotel and conference center near Kellogg (the elevated highway) is free. Additional parking options can be found at century2.org/Pages/Parking.aspx


Welcome to Wichita! Wichita State University is proud to host the 27th annual Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Asexual College Conference. We hope you enjoy the conference —and the city we call home.

wichita.edu Committed to

Our Work Our People Our Wichita Protein with purpose

Cargill Protein welcomes MBLGTACC to Wichita For more information about Cargill’s pride efforts, please contact Mike Kondrath at mike_kondrath@cargill.com


PHOTOGRAPHY POLICY The Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity (“the Institute”) or authorized licencees of the Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Asexual College Conference (“MBLGTACC”) will be photographing common spaces, keynotes, and entertainment during MBLGTACC weekend (“the Event”), and any onstage discussions thereafter. The goal of this photography is to share the best moments of the event with alumni, supporters, and other community members, to celebrate our community, and to enhance the visibility of the Institute and the Event in the Midwest and nationally.

GENERAL INFO SOCIAL MEDIA: @MBLGTACC Track our social media over the weekend for important updates and announcements! Facebook @mblgtacc Instagram @mblgtacc Twitter @mblgtacc Snapchat MBLGTACC

The Institute respects, protects, and centers the rights of students who do not consent to be photographed. To that end, MBLGTACC and the Institute:

Use #mblgtacc2019 and #mblgtacc to share your experience.

• Will offer intentional spaces where photography by attendees is welcome and encouraged; • Will offer wearable “do not photograph” markers for attendees; Red Lanyards for nametags • Will not share on its website or social media any photographs featuring attendees with “do not photograph” markers; • Will not tolerate non-consensual photography by attendees and guests; • Requires that all attendees and guests obtain permission before posting photos of others taken at the conference to social media; and • Requires that all attendees and guests obtain permission before tagging someone in a post at the conference on social media.

The registration and information desk is located near Grand Eagle Ballroom C in the Hyatt facing the Grand Eagle Ballroom Lobby. Please stop by if you have any questions or need assistance.

By attending the event, you acknowledge that the commissioned photos and recordings belong to the Institute, and you will not receive payment or any other compensation in connection with the pictures and recordings. You further release MBLGTACC and the Institute from any and all liability that may or could arise from the taking or use of the pictures. This policy has been created for the greater safety and access of all guests and attendees. If you have any questions or concerns about this policy, please contact Nick Pfost, director of marketing and communications of the Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity, at nick@sgdinstitute.org.

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REGISTRATION AND INFORMATION DESK

VOLUNTEERS If you have questions regarding volunteering, please visit our registration desk and someone will be able to assist you.

SMOKING POLICY Smoking and the use of other tobacco products or smoking instruments are prohibited indoors, at all times.


EMERGENCY AND CRISIS INFO EMERGENCY

CRISIS

CALL 911

24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (316) 660-7500 TTY: (800) 766-3777

An emergency is defined as a life-threatening situation and requires an immediate intervention or response. Examples of an emergency include, but are not limited to: • Fire • Suicidal/homicidal thoughts • Intent, or plans, or life-threatening behaviors • Immediate medical needs

NEAREST HOSPITAL

Via Christi St. Fancis 929 St. Francis, Wichita, KS 67214

NEAREST PHARMACY Walgreens

3333 E Central Ave, Wichita, KS 67208

CONFIDENTIAL RESOURCES Trevor Lifeline (24/7): 866.488.7386 Trans Lifeline: 877.565.8860

This line is available 24/7 and will connect you with immediate support from a crisis advisor and our local COMCARE Community Crisis Center. Title IX concerns: Dr. Natasha Stevens (316) 978 -5177 Use this line for questions, assistance, or to report misconduct. We encourage all survivors or witnesses to report misconduct both during or after the conference event weekend. Urgent Assistance: (316) 290-9659 Use this line to reach the 2019 Planning Committee Staff Leaders, and Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity staff. You can call or text the number below 24/7 during the conference. Please use this for crisis and emergency situations only. For general questions, please visit the information desk located at the west end of the Grand Eagle Ballroom Lobby.

FREE HIV TESTING FREE HIV Rapid testing is available in the Hyatt Chisolm Trail Room provided by Positive Directions. Know your status in 20 minutes! Hours: Saturday 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sunday 8 - 11:30 a.m.

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ACCESSIBILITY INFO If you have general questions or concerns about accessibility, please see the information below. If you have specific questions about accessibility, please visit the information desk on the west end of the Grand Eagle Ballroom lobby. AUDITORY ACCESSIBILITY There will be ASL interpreters for all plenary sessions. In addition to interpreter services, we will also be sending information to all presenters about how to make their presentations accessible. Personal audio devices will be available in Convention Hall near the entrance. MOBILITY ACCESSIBILITY All sessions will be held in the host hotel conference center. The facility is fully ADA compliant and has large spaces to accommodate the traffic peaks during session transitions. All sessions will be held in close proximity and adequate transition time will be allowed in the schedule. We ask all attendees who can use the stairs to do so—this will allow those who need to use elevators to do so with a minimum of disruptions, crowding, and wait-times.

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VISUAL ACCESSIBILITY We strongly encourage presenters to ensure their sessions are visually accessible to the fullest extent possible. SERVICE ANIMALS Service animals are welcome at MBLGTACC. The ADA defines a service animal as “any animal that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability.” Were the animal not readily apparent as a service animal, staff at the conference may ask the individual if the animal helps to mitigate a disability and what tasks has the animal been trained to perform. We may request appropriate documentation as required by the host hotel. A service animal may relieve itself in any of the green areas available on the hotel campus. Per venue policy, the only animals allowed on site will be service animals, as other animals may distract service animals from performing their duties. PROOF OF DISABILITY A doctor’s note or proof of disability is not required.


RESTROOMS Gender inclusive restrooms are located at the east end of the Grand Eagle Ballroom lobby. Per our code of inclusion, bathroom policing is not allowed. Therefore, we encourage participants to choose any restroom space that adequately fits their needs without regard to gender assigned spaces. Please note that buildings not being used for MBLGTACC may not have inclusive facilities. SENSORY ACCESSIBILITY We encourage all attendees to use scent-free products while at the conference. The Code of Inclusion for the weekend is located in the conference booklet (page 22) and includes sensory awareness information for all attendees to read and consider. QUIET ROOMS We will have mindfulness spaces available for those who need a moment to center themselves located in the Stimson and Santa Fe Trail Rooms on the first floor of the Hyatt.

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Real-world experience from campus leaders At Wichita State, students in every major have unmatched opportunities for applied learning and research. As an M.Ed. student, this means you have the option to apply your knowledge in professional settings through a series of eight-week practicums helping your build the practical skillset that employers are looking for. Classes are taught by full-time faculty or administrative professionals working in the field.

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KEYNOTE SPEAKER: HEALING

JESSICA PETTITT

FRIDAY, 7:30–8:30 P.M. CONVENTION HALL

www.goodenoughnow.com

Jessica Pettitt, M.Ed., CSP, pulls together her stand up comedy years with 15+ years of diversity trainings in a wide range of organizations to serve groups to move from abstract fears to actionable habits that lead teams to want to work together. With a sense of belonging and understanding, colleagues take more risks with their ideation, conserve precious resources through collaboration, and maintain real connections with clients over time. “Let’s face it, there are people and topics that at some point are just off limits. You just can’t do it or them right now. Even worse, often it is a difficult topic that you have to bring up with a difficult person. What if you could engage in these conversations with more confidence, humor, and ease? No matter the person or topic, you are your best tool for conversations that matter. Understanding your self and others as differently right gives you the tools to intentionally design teams, groups, and partnerships that can bring value to a single project or topic. We are all frustrating to someone, and at times even to ourselves. Once you know who and how you are, you can reclaim responsibility for these behavior response patterns and leave room for others to do the same. Before you know it, you are having better conversations and fuller relationships with those around you. I promise – it is that easy.”

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Check out page 71 for details on Jessica’s “I am... Safe Zone” train-the-trainer style workshop on Sunday morning!


KEYNOTE SPEAKER: RE-CENTERING

PIDGEON PAGONIS

SATURDAY | 10 - 11 A.M. CONVENTION HALL

www.pidgeonismy.name

Pidgeon (Chicago, IL) is an intersex activist, educator, and filmmaker. They are a leader in the intersex movement’s fight for bodily autonomy and justice. Their goal is to deconstruct the dangerous myths that lead to violations of intersex people’s human rights, including common, irreversible medical procedures performed without consent to make bodies conform to binary sex stereotypes. What is Intersex? Even though there are about as many intersex people as there are people with red hair, the term is not well understood. According to the Free & Equal Intersex Fact Sheet: Intersex people are born with sex characteristics that do not fit typical binary notions of male or female bodies. Intersex is an umbrella term used to describe a wide range of natural bodily variations. In some cases, intersex traits are visible at birth while in others, they are not apparent until puberty or may not be physically apparent at all.

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KEYNOTE SPEAKE: ADVOCACY

NYLE DIMARCO

SATURDAY | 7:30–8:30 P.M. CONVENTION HALL

www.nyledimarco.com

Nyle DiMarco is an actor, model and activist. He is a native New Yorker and was born into a large multigenerational Deaf family. He is an alumni of Gallaudet University, the only liberal arts university in the world for the Deaf, with a B.A. in mathematics. Nyle DiMarco has been breaking down barriers and winning over audiences since he burst onto the scene in 2014. As a fan favorite on cycle 22 of AMERICA’S NEXT TOP MODEL, DiMarco became the first Deaf contestant on the hit CW series. Shortly after winning the competition, he signed with Wilhelmina Models and recently walked for Giorgio Armani at Milan Fashion Week S/S17. He also went on to win ABC’s Dancing With The Stars, being the first Deaf winner. As a founder of Nyle DiMarco Foundation and an honorary spokesman for Language Equality and Acquisition for Deaf Kids, Nyle is passionate about language and literacy and advocacy within the Deaf Community. Nyle DiMarco is Deaf and uses American Sign Language. American Sign Language requires the use of facial expressions and body movements, his Deafness amplifies his natural talent. His Deafness is an asset and not a limitation, he is amicable and able to communicate easily.

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KEYNOTE SPEAKER: COLLABORATION

JANAYA KHAN

SUNDAY | 12 - 1 P.M. CONVENTION HALL

www.janayakhan.com

janaya khan is the co-founder of Black Lives Matter Canada and has become a leading voice in the global crusade demanding social transformation, justice, and equality. Known as future within the BLM movement, khan is a Black, queer, gender-nonconforming activist, staunch Afrofuturist, boxer, and social-justice educator. khan’s dedication and bold approach to social justice work has created opportunities to contribute to academic and frontline community dialogue engaging audiences on the global impacts of the Black Lives Matter movement. An accomplished lecturer and author, their writings have been featured in The Feminist Wire, The Root, Huffington Post Black Voices, and Al Jazeera. janaya currently resides in Los Angeles as the International Ambassador for the Black Lives Matter Network and Interim Campaign Director at Color Of Change. “Afrofuturism has a tendency to look back at history and the past, to situate itself in the present that is actually a future. It often focuses on a Black protagonist as the storyteller. The popular narratives that we see around Blackness and the way we come to understand ourselves are informed by stereotypes, anti-Black racism, misogyny, over-sexualizing, and a myriad of other things. If we focus on and empower the most marginalized people in a space or in a group or community, and if they have what they need, then everyone has what they need.”

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FEATURED SPEAKERS ROBYN OCHS SESSION 1 & 2 | SATURDAY, 8:10-9:40 A.M. | EAGLE DE Robyn Ochs is an educator, speaker, grassroots activist, and editor of Bi Women Quarterly and two anthologies: the 42-country collection Getting Bi: Voices of Bisexuals Around the World and RECOGNIZE: The Voices of Bisexual Men. Robyn will be presenting her workshop Beyond Binaries: Identity and Sexuality. How do we assign labels to our complicated experiences of sexuality? In this interactive program, we will explore the landscape of sexuality, conduct a thought-provoking anonymous survey of those present, and look together at the data. Where do we fall on various sexuality continua? How do we label? How old were we when we came to our identities and to our sexualities? How asexual/sexual are we? How well do our friends/family members understand us? This program will expand your perspective and change the way you think about labels.

DR. JON PAUL HIGGINS SESSION 5 & 6 | SATURDAY, 4:05 - 5:35 P.M. | EAGLE DE DoctorJonPaul is changing the way we discuss the issues queer/trans people face in the media. With over ten years of experience in education, social justice and grassroots movements, DoctorJonPaul is focused on using his voice and platform to bring attention to the issues that marginalized people face, specifically queer/trans people of color. Jon’s presentation will be Lead With All The Colors‌This presentation is one that is meant to not only encourage, but to inspire. Rooted in the foundations of what the flag has meant for our community since its creation, folks will garner a better understanding of where our community once was and where we are going.

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SAM BRINTON SESSION 7 & 8 | SUNDAY, 8:10 - 9:40 A.M. | EAGLE DE Sam Brinton is the head of advocacy and government affairs for The Trevor Project. Whether they are walking the halls of Congress to help educate the Hill on the differences in advanced nuclear reactors or belting out their favorite tunes with the Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington, D.C., it is hard to miss Sam Brinton’s passion for changing the world. Sam is an ardent activist against the dangerous and discredited practices of conversion therapy. Their work sometimes takes the form of trips to universities across the country to share their experiences and to educate on how to pass legislation banning the practice. They have spoken before the United Nations, Google Headquarters, and Congress, and have also been featured in interviews with TIME, MSNBC, Huffington Post, Washington Post, The Guardian, New York Daily News, and many others.

CODY CHARLES SESSION 9 & 10 | SUNDAY, 10:00 - 11:30 A.M. | EAGLE DE Cody Charles (he/they) is an engaging and passionate social justice educator who believes in having the critical and often difficult conversations in regards to leadership and social change. Cody believes that engaging the process of leadership cannot exist without being rooted in an understanding of power and privilege. Cody’s session will be Radical Truth-Telling: Where Every Critical Conversation Must Begin. We will explore the ways truth(s) play a role in our lives. What does it mean to be radically honest with ourselves? How many conversations do we enter where truth isn’t centered? Can liberation ever be reached if truth is absent? We will leverage and radically center truth to find efficient and effective ways to get to collective liberation.

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ENTERTAINMENT MIKEY C. APOLLO FRIDAY, 8:30–10:00 P.M. Room 203 Michaela Murry (Mikey C. Apollo) is a collection of curves, curse words, and curated poems. As an artist, much of Mikey’s work revolves around her experience as a Black woman & feminist. When she’s not updating her Facebook page or falling in love, you can find her planning a show for House of Renji, a creative platform and record label based out of her hometown Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

PENNY TRATION DRAG SHOW HOST SATURDAY, 8:30 - 11:00PM Convention Hall Penny Tration is a queen of the midwest, joining us from Cincinatti, OH. Penny was the Facebook fan choice to appear on Ru Paul’s Drag Race Season 5, being voted by fans of the show to participate in the season.

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A single focus on clinical social work education with an anti-racism lens Located in Northampton, Massachusetts, both our M.S.W. and Ph.D. programs follow our unique block structure, alternating concentrated periods of rigorous on-campus education with off-site training at leading clinical or research sites around the country. You’ll have double the time in the field than other programs, with the support of an on-site supervisor and a faculty field adviser. More experience. More supervision. More recognition.

M.S.W./Ph.D.

APPLICATION DEADLINES M.S.W. Early Decision: January 5 M.S.W. Regular Decision: February 21 Ph.D. Priority: February 1 Ph.D. Final: February 28

ssw.smith.edu sswadm@smith.edu

| Clinical Research Institute | Post-M.S.W. Professional Education | Certificates


ROOM SESSION 1

SATURDAY, 8:00–8:45 A.M.

SESSION 2

SESSION 3

SESSION 4

SATURDAY, 1:25-2:10 P.M.

STATE CAUCUSES SATURDAY, 2:20-3:45 P.M.

SATURDAY, 8:55–9:40 A.M.

SATURDAY, 12:30–1:15 P.M.

203

Femme and Fierce: Femme History, Identity, & Community

We’re Back, Butches: Butch History, Identity, & Community

It’s Okay Because We’re Gay: Combatting Misogyny in the Queer Community

A Guide to Discourse With Homophobes (How to talk to a**holes)

STATE CAUCUS: Nebraska

204

Gay and Greek

“I Needed to Tell My Story to Help Others Tell Theirs”

Judaism & Gender: Torah, Talmud, Tradition, and Transition

Queering Biology

STATE CAUCUS: Illinois

205

Queerness, Astrology, and Other Loose Ends My Grandma Swears are Signs of the End of the World

Queering Survival(ism)

Lessons Learned from Creating the First Gender and Sexuality Inclusive Summer Camp in Kansas

Cultivating Community: Queering, Healing, and Liberating the Body

STATE CAUCUS: Iowa

206

Unable To Do Without: Ableism in Activism

Polyamory: The Ins, Outs, Dos, & Don’ts

Let’s Get Back To Communicating- LGBT Communication 101

Greek & Queer - Lived Experiences of College Greek

STATE CAUCUS: North Dakota

207

Navigating Your Own Courageous Conversation

Validation--The Queer Journey

The LGBT World Traveler

P.S. I Love You (And You, and You)

STATE CAUCUS: South Dakota

ESAs in LGBT

GaySL: A Crash Course in LGBTQ Sign Language and Intersectionality

#DisBiPanSpecChat

Intersectionality and Solidarity

STATE CAUCUS: Ohio

208

STATE CAUCUS: Kentucky

209B

210A

Queer Grassroot Leadership: A Tempered Radical Approach

EAGLE Rhetorics of Bisexuality GH

Get Your Lives: Recruiting and Maintaining Membership in Student Orgs.

Beyond Berdache: An Introduction to Native American Two-Spirits

More Than Good Intentions: Talking Trans Language Politics

Toxic Masculinity

Celebrating Your Queer Black Zines 101 Identity

STATE CAUCUS: Missouri

STATE CAUCUS: Michigan

FEATURED VOICES EAGLE DE

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Robyn Ochs 8:10-9:40 A.M.

State of the Region 12:40-2:10 P.M.

STATE CAUCUS: Kansas See page 43 for more State Caucuses info.


SESSION 5

SESSION 7

SESSION 8

Discrimination Self Enrolling in K101: The Care: If, How, & When to Science of Kink and BDSM Respond

Whatever Happened to Lesbians?

A Colorful Reflection: Risk-Awareness and Discussing Past, Present, Consent in Sports, and Future Leaders in the Sex, Kink, and Life QTPOC Community

Fat & Queer: Loving Your Body & Exploring Your Identity

Beyond Bisexuality by Robyn Ochs

Developing Gender Inclusive Housing

The Revolution Begins in the Classroom

Neither Here Nor There: A Workshop on Antisemitism and Transphobia

No Walls Between Us: A Palestine Solidarity 101 for LGBTQ Folks

We’re Here, We’re Queer, and We Will Persevere

Erasure Among Us

Related Histories; Commonalities between Native and Trans Activist Movements

The Fight for Marriage Equality in Kansas & Easy Steps for YOU to Become an Activist

Consensual Non Monogamy and Your Sexual Health

Science: Friend or Foe to the Trans Community

How Earth Guides My Life and Relationships: Combining EcoConscious and LGBTQ+ Ideals

Name Affirmation On College Campuses: A Case Study

Rainbow Flags at the Department of Corrections: Experiences of LGBTQ Prisoners in Nebraska

GLSENing Across Kansas

Increasing Visibility: Lessons Learned in LGBT+ Advocacy

Get it Together: Inclusive LGBT+ Organizing Inside

A Modern Day Salem Witch Hunt & Vampires in America

Beautiful Meanings in Beautiful Things

Creating Queer Families

Using Science Fiction to Imagine Radical Queer Futures

Queer Presence in the Media; The Misrepresentation of Femme Lesbians

Qmmunity: Queering On Campus Housing

Evolution: When One Partner Transitions in a Same-Sex Relationship

Identity and You: Mental Awareness and Orientation

Accommodation 101: How to Make Programs and Events More Accessible

New Heteronormativity, a Gay-Straight Tipping Point and a New Model of Inclusion

Cultivating Your Values

Stand Up for Your Identity

Navigating Relative Privilege in LGBTQ+ Spaces

Best Practices for Implementing Ally Training

Designing a Safe Space Training on your Campus

SATURDAY, 3:55-4:40 P.M.

SESSION 6

SATURDAY, 4:50-5:35 P.M.

SUNDAY, 8:00-8:45 A.M.

SUNDAY, 8:55-9:40 A.M.

Born This Way?

SESSION 10

SUNDAY, 9:50-10:35 A.M.

SUNDAY, 10:45-11:30 A.M.

Jessica Pettitt: I am... Safe Zone

The Black Box : A Friends don’t let friends Burnout 101- Taking Care of Guided Discussion on covfefe: a toolkit for Yourself While Fighting for Defining Our Trans Black better social media Others Masculinity

Positive Polyamory

SESSION 9

Trans, Queer, and Broke

Exploring Relationship Satisfaction for LGB Couples

ACE 450: Beyond Asexuality 101 for Ace Folks

Healing When Face Masks Aren’t Enough: Moving Forward as a LGBTQ+ Trauma Survivor

Dysphoria: Who Stole My Queerness?

Mapping Queer Identity

The Health Impacts of Stigma and the Need for TransgenderAffirmative Care

FEATURED VOICES Dr. Jon Paul Higgins 4:05-5:35 P.M.

Sam Brinton 8:10-9:40 A.M.

Cody Charles 10-11:30 A.M.

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Advisor Programming Advisor programming is designed for individuals who advise, supervise, or support LGBTQ student programs. This

Advisor’s Social Friday, February 15 | Harvest Kitchen|Bar 7 p.m. Come, mingle, and relax with colleagues from across the midwest! Cash bar is available. Available Resource: Advisor’s Lounge and Workroom Grand Eagle Ballroom AB presentation details, or just chat with some colleagues? The Advisor’s Lounge is provided as a space to relax and work. Outside of the programming detailed below, the space will be open and accessible for advisors to use. Advisor Session “Retention: Expanding visibility for Non-Traditional and Minority Students” Grand Eagle Ballroom AB Saturday, February 16 | 8 - 8:50 a.m. Presented by: Jed Shepherd (He/Him/They/Them) Wichita State University, TRIO/EOC (Educational Opportunity Center) Program Specialist Grand Eagle Ballroom AB Saturday, February 16 | 9 - 9:50 a.m. Presented by the Consortium of Higher Education LGBT Resource Professionals The Consortium of Higher Education LGBT Resource Professionals is the professional association that and services. Come meet your region reps for the Midwest and Great Lakes regions, learn more about the association, and how to get involved.

Encouraged Participation: State of the Region Grand Eagle Ballroom DE Saturday, February 16 | 12:40 - 2:10 p.m. Advisors Roundtable: Challenges and Successes Grand Eagle Ballroom AB Saturday, February 16 | 2:20 - 3:45 p.m. Presented by: Sean Olmstead, University of Missouri - Columbia KJ Freudigmann, University of Missouri - Kansas City Jessi Hitchins, University of Nebraska, Omaha your campus you want to work through with some colleagues? Is there a successful program that you want to share (okay maybe brag) with other advisors? dialogue with other advisors and individuals working in LGBT programs and services. Encouraged Attendance “Featured Voice 4 - Dr. Jon Paul” Grand Eagle Ballroom DE 4:05 - 5:35 p.m. Special thanks to those individuals who assisted developing advisor programming: R.B. Brooks, University of Minnesota, Duluth Mark Chung Kwan Fan, University of Michigan Jessi Hitchins, University of Nebraska at Omaha Sean OImstead, University of Missouri - Columbia KJ Freudigmann, University of Missouri - Kansas City Brad Thomison, Wichita State University


STATE OF THE REGION PANEL SATURDAY | 12:40 - 2:10 p.m. | Grand Eagle DE Join the Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity as members of its leadership highlight some of the major issues facing queer and trans+ individuals in the Midwest. Through sharing of the leadership’s own various experiences, discussion of the current social and political climate, and engaging with attendees’ own perspectives, this session aims to educate, motivate, and empower.

OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE MEETING SATURDAY | 4 - 7 p.m. | Grand Eagle C The Oversight Committee comprises two (2) representatives from each Midwest state: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. Since the Committee’s conception in 2007, the group has evolved in its methods of ensuring the continuity of the conference. It is through this Committee that the Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity was conceived.

Throughout the last 12 years, this entity has evolved in scope, purpose and prevalence in ensuring the continuity of the conference. This year, the primary focus for the Oversight Committee will be to select the host for MBLGTACC 2021. We encourage anyone interested in playing a vital role in the continued growth and integrity of MBLGTACC to run as a state representative of your state caucus.

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IDENTITY FORUMS Identity forums are safe spaces for people of a particular identity group. They are places for small, marginalized and/or invisible groups within the broad spectrum of LGBTQIA+ identities to come together to talk about issues of importance or concern and to support each other. These forums are intended for individuals who personally claim the identity named. All the identity forums will have a facilitator.

Ace (Asexual Spectrum)

Saturday 8:00 - 8:45 a.m. Room 210 C

Sunday 8:00 - 8:45 a.m. Room 210 B

Disability

Saturday 3:55 - 4:40 p.m. Room 210 B

Sunday 8:55 - 9:40 a.m. Room 210 C

Gay

Saturday 4:50 - 5:35 p.m. Room 210 B

Sunday 10:45 - 11:30 a.m. Room 210 B

Lesbian

Saturday 3:55 - 4:40 p.m. Room 210 C

Sunday 9:50 - 10:35 a.m. Room 210 C

Bi, Pan, Polysexual

Saturday 8:55 - 9:40 a.m. Room 210 B

Sunday 8:55 - 9:40 a.m. Room 210 B

Non-Binary

Saturday 12:30 - 1:15 p.m. Room 210 B

Sunday 8:00 - 8:45 a.m. Room 210 C

Polyamorous

Saturday 12:30 - 1:15 p.m. Room 210 C

Sunday 10:45 - 11:30 a.m. Room 210 C

QPOC - Queer People of Color

Saturday 1:25 - 2:10 p.m. Room 210 C

Sunday 9:50 - 10:35 a.m. Room 210 B

Questioning

Saturday 8:55 - 9:40 a.m. Room 210 C

Saturday 4:50 - 5:35 p.m. Room 210 C

Trans

Saturday 8:00 - 8:45 a.m. Room 210 B

Saturday 1:25 - 2:10 p.m. Room 210 B

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STATE CAUCUSES SATURDAY | 2:20 - 3:45 p.m. 206 210 B Eagle C

207

203

Eagle GH 205 204

Eagle DE

210 A

These sessions provide individuals within a particular state to connect and network to determine opportunities for synergizing efforts for equity and social justice specific to their area of the region. These sessions should be facilitated by representatives elected at the previous year’s conference if possible. If representatives are not present, determine among those attending the caucus how to facilitate the discussion. We ask that your caucus designate someone to take notes during your discussion to be sent with your two (2) representatives to the Oversight Committee meeting. State Caucuses do not have to follow a strict format, but we encourage attendees to consider these options for maximizing time spent in this session:

210 C

208

209 B

• Share current issues impacting your state and what ways you can mobilize to affect change. • Highlight recent happenings at your home institutions. What’s working? What obstacles are you facing? What ways can your neighboring institutions support you?

State Representatives At the conclusion of your State Caucus, your two (2) state representatives are asked to attend the annual Oversight Committee meeting. If your elected representatives are not present at this year’s conference, you are welcome to determine new representatives to fill their spots.

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1

SATURDAY | 8:10 - 9:40 A.M. Featured Speaker

SESSION

ROBYN OCHS EAGLE DE

SESSION 1 1

R BH

Saturday | 8:00 - 8:45 a.m.

Femme and Fierce: Femme History, Identity, & Community Presented by Stefani Vargas, Northern Michigan University

T

As an identity, femme is not homogenous but it is a thrilling mix of expression and experience. Femme is an exploration of gender identity, which can be a safe haven, a political statement, a way of life, and often is all of the above. The session will delve into the history of femme identity, how femmes have been (and continue to be) erased, who can identify as femme, and how femme identity has evolved to the present day. Join us as we celebrate femme identity while learning more about our beautiful community and ourselves. TW: Femmephobia

2

Gay and Greek

F R S

A BH C S T

203

204

Presented by Anna Puterbaugh and Isaiah Cline, Southern Methodist University A discussion-based lecture featuring a member of National Panhellenic Greek Council and Multicultural Greek Council about what it’s like to be a part of the lgbt+ community while involved in a sorority or fraternity. Starting with personal experiences from the two presenters, we invite members of any greek organization to participate in the lecture. Then we’ll answer questions about stereotypes, homophobia, and transphobia associated with greek life in college, as well as battle some misconceptions the lgbt+ community might have about sorority and fraternity life.

TRIGGER WARNING DESCRIPTIONS ON PAGE 23


SESSION 1 3

H BH

Saturday | 8:00 - 8:45 a.m.

Queerness, Astrology, and Other Loose Ends My Grandma Swears are Signs of the End of the World: How the Mystic Cultivates Spirituality in LGBTQ+ Spaces

205

Presented by Sandra Carlo, Wichita State University Turns out your seventh grade lab partner wasn’t wrong when he told you your horoscope was “gay”, astrology and queerness have been intrinsically linked long before your initial interest was belittled. In a world where LGBTQ+ identities are typically shunned from mainstream spirituality - astrology, tarot, crystals and other New Age practices indisputably provide solace and community for those seeking it. By examining the overlapping history of studying star movements and sexuality we can understand the scope of the queer community’s fascination with its modern-day manifestation. Although it has historically been practiced by marginalized communities, whitewashing of the mystic and appropriation of indigenous magic grows increasingly as practice becomes more socially acceptable. In this session learn how to use alternative spirituality for personal and community healing, incorporate its tools into your advocacy, perform active re-centering back to occult roots, and build communal collaboration within sacred spaces.

4

Unable To Do Without: Ableism in Activism

A

Presented by JAC Stringer

A C E R SV SA

206

More and more, people recognize that trans and queer identities, and their oppression are multi-faceted and complex. Our communities’ activism is diversifying but the growth of a movement does not entirely depend on the success of its members. Every uprising sees its most marginalized fall to the bottom with the phrase, “We’ll come back for you,” and it always has a greater influence than what is easily seen. Such is the impact of ableism on trans and queer communities, historically and today. This workshop addresses the role ableism plays within the trans and queer movements, its impact on their members, and its involvement in what we consider progress.

5

Navigating Your Own Courageous Conversation

A

Presented by Adam Carr, Kansas State University

207

“A courageous conversation engages those who won’t talk, sustains the conversation when it gets uncomfortable or diverted, and deepens the conversation to the point where authentic understanding and meaningful actions occur.” This workshop will be a space to explore this framework and understand how you could use this style of communication at home, on your college campus, or any place when engaging in difficult conversations around issues that matter to you. We will use a small lecture-style teaching and group/pair sharing for this workshop. Note taking & group participation is highly encouraged.

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SESSION 1

Saturday | 8:00 - 8:45 a.m.

6

ESAs in LGBT

H

Presented by Beck Nelson, St. Catherine University

208

RV

There has been a rise in the need for emotional support animals in many colleges, and they do make a difference. Join us in learning about them. This workshop will look at what an emotional support animal (ESA) is, including the difference between ESA’s, therapy animals, and service animals are. We will also go over where an ESA is allowed to be, what the legislation around them is, and how to get one. We will also cover major colleges’ ESA policies.

7

Queering Grassroot Leadership: A Tempered Radical Approach

R

Presented by Robby Specht, Western Illinois University’s LGBT*QA

210A

A

Grassroots leadership has taken root on college campuses. Student leaders, administrators, and faculty alike have begun using this leadership style and taken focus on the needs of those around them. Student leaders, just like grassroots leaders, take in the concerns of their kin. Challenges arise when student leaders must balance the needs of their communities while falling suit to their institutions expectations. This session examines how you, as a student leader, can use your status, relationships, and institutional knowledge to make beneficial change. This session will provide concepts and insights behind grassroots leadership, higher education structure, and how to navigate institution politics and policies to best fit your community’s needs. During the end of the session time will be provided so that attendees can brainstorm ways to incorporate the grassroots leadership lens into the movements they are currently a part of.

8

Rhetorics of Bisexuality

Eagle GH

A A BH C R RV S SV T

Presented by Carolyn Marie Fugit, Wichita State University Over the past 20 years, tremendous strides in gay rights brought forth both legal and social change for gay, lesbian, and transgender people. Gay marriage, gay adoption, gay and lesbian families, gays in the military, transgender service members, trans folk and bathroom bills, trans ID rights: all of these are built on binary assumptions of gay vs. straight, male vs. female, cisgender vs. transgender. What about bisexual families, pansexual marriage, queer non-binary individuals using public restrooms? The rhetoric of national LGBT groups leaves out the B, causing monosexism to enter common discourse. How do we change the language to be inclusive of non-monosexual identities? How do we recognize the unique health and social issues facing bisexual people? How can we fund services for bisexual, pansexual, queer, and other nonmonosexual identities? This interactive workshop explores the ways in which monosexism harms bi individuals, discusses the problem, and works through the change needed. TW: Bullying

Identity Forums: Trans 210 B | Ace Room 210 C 46

TRIGGER WARNING DESCRIPTIONS ON PAGE 23


SESSION 1

FEATURED ADVISOR SESSION Saturday | 8:00 - 8:45 a.m.

C

Barriers Facing Minority and Non-Traditional Higher Education Students

C

Presented by Jed Shepherd, Wichita State University TRIO/EOC

EAGLE AB

This workshop will include a presentation and a discussion. Specifically, about situations people are currently dealing with. There are three major factors which effect students’ ability to succeed in higher education. Which are income level, being a minority, and first generation/knowledge level. These can be huge issues for any student, but it tends to have a larger impact on non-traditional students. I want to outline the specific issues these things can cause and ways to possibly counteract retention issues. Primarily, making current resources more visible. This is important to me because of my work with TRIO/EOC (Educational Opportunity Centers). As well as being a first-generation, minority student who has dealt with a lot of these issues first hand.

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HEIGHTS Become a Member Free Webinars & Conference Calls Networking with 500+ Members Members Only Constituency Groups Regional & National Meetings

lgbtcampus.org

We are a member-based organization working towards the liberation of LGBTQ people in higher education. We support individuals who work on campuses to educate and support people of diverse sexual orientations and gender identities, as well as advocate for more inclusive policies and practices through an intersectional and racial justice framework.

At Airbus we are committed to a culture of inclusion and diversity that fosters respect and opportunity for all our people. We value the unique perspectives of all our employees. It’s how the greatest ideas take flight and how Airbus is driving the aerospace industry to reach new heights. #EmbraceDiversity airbus.com

d2 Airbus Diversity Ad 8.5x11.indd 1

@lgbtcampus

7/25/18 12:09 PM

47


2

SESSION

SATURDAY | 8:55 - 9:40 A.M.

SESSION 2 1

A SV

Saturday | 8:55 - 9:40 a.m.

We're Back, Butches: Butch History, Identity, and Community

203

Presented by Erica Krause,Northern Michigan University

T

Bull dagger, tough kid, drag king, stone, boi, tomboy, butch; no matter what we call ourselves, our community has existed from the beginning. From the bar scene of the 40s and 50s, to the resurgence of the 80s and 90s, to today the term butch has ebbed and waned in popularity and even in “acceptability” to the LGBTQ community. This session aims to explore the history of butch identity, and identities that hold similar definitions, beginning in the 1940s and coming to present day. After providing historical context, the session will delve into the community as it stands today seeking to answer questions such as- What does being butch mean? Who can be butch? Do you have to call yourself a butch to be considered butch? Why is identifying as butch still important? After discussing these important questions, the session will turn dispelling myths about butch identity and conclude with time for questions and community building.

2

“I needed to tell my story to help others tell theirs”: Using storytelling as a reclamation of space and self

R

204

Presented by Jakki Mattson, Kansas State University Spending the past two years collecting narratives of queer individuals in the Midwest, including dozens of college-aged queer students, it was clear the importance story telling plays in our everyday lives. Storytelling is something we do naturally as humans through general conversation or through insightful, deep dialogue. But individuals who have worked with me, and myself included, stunt and limit their narrative when it comes to describing pivotal moments of our lives. This could be for a plethora of reasons, which I will elaborate on within this workshop, but through this method, we can lay claim to and reclaim our narratives in our own ways. This workshop will provide insight into the power telling one’s story has, through presenting my own experiences in this way, and to provide skills, resources, and examples for others to tell their own stories as a way to reclaim themselves and the spaces they occupy. TW: Self Harm

TRIGGER WARNING DESCRIPTIONS ON PAGE 23


SESSION 2

Saturday | 8:55 - 9:40 a.m.

3

Queering Survival(ism)

A

Presented by Kana Skay, University of Nebraska at Omaha

A C R RV SV SA T X

Dominant representations and dialogues concerning “survival” are focused on continuity of fundamentalist white men through heterosexual propagation within the prepper movements. But this disregards the experience of trans and queer people, who are familiar with the hardships in surviving a harsh and unforgiving world. In this workshop, we take a critical look at the concept of “survival” and survivalisms while considering the material realities of trans and queer people, particularly those of color, who inhabit inhospitable environments and what it means to “survive” as a queer and trans person in unknown futures. Ultimately, survival is about the future. Who gets to have and be a part of the future? Whose past, whose histories will be remembered and kept?

4

Polyamory: The Ins, Outs, Dos, & Don'ts

A

Presented by Brianne Bury and Morgan Wigle, Augsburg University

BH S T

205

206

A beginners guide to building a healthy polyamorous relationship format with multiple partners, with special focus on how to compromise and communicate effectively. In doing so we cover the various attraction types as well as consent within a relationship in order to discuss various polyamory models. We will discuss the difference between wants and needs in a relationship and how to break down your insecurities in order to address them with a partner and best come to a compromise. Trigger warnings refer to specific examples of requests I’ve received in relationships that we will break down to find the root of the issue and differentiate between a red flag and an insecurity that can be overcome.

5

Validation--The Queer Journey

H

Presented by Annie Titus, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

207

The queer path to validation is a messy and bumpy ride. Not only do we deal with our internal fears of coming out, or living queer life, but we deal with the external resistance from our friends, family, and community as well. Along the way, we seek affirmation, but this can be a profoundly depressing and exhausting experience. Developing healthy strategies is necessary for our wellbeing, including constructing a safe-space for ourselves, an intrinsic place where we intelligently determine what is adaptive for us. In this casual, but emotionally-intense conversation, I will share from my own 50 plus year queer journey of what has worked for me, and what hasn’t, of being candid with myself, getting beyond the bondages self- and other-imposed, as well as recognizing the opportunities when I can be transparent and open, thereby letting my guard down.

49


SESSION 2 6

C

Saturday | 8:55 - 9:40 a.m.

GaySL: A Crash Course in LGBTQ Sign Language and Intersectionality

208

Presented by Hayden Kristal

A

“GaySL: A Crash Course in LGBTQ Sign Language and Intersectionality” is a highly-interactive and hilarious workshop led by Deaf queer activist and stand up comedian Hayden Kristal that teaches its participants LGBTQ-related American Sign Language signs while also fostering a broader group discussion about horizontal marginalization, intersectionality, and what it means to be intersectionally accessible. Participants are encouraged (but not required) to sign along, and any and all levels of experience with American Sign Language and the Deaf community are welcome and encouraged to attend! ** An ASL interpreter will be present at this session in order to help facilitate conversation. **

7

Beyond Berdache: An Introduction to Native American Two-Spirits

R

Presented by Brent Kennedy, The Wichita Two-Spirit Society

BH

The term “Two-Spirit” is becoming more recognizable in popular discourse, as a result its meaning both to and outside Native cultures and identities continues to be affected by non-Native ideas of gender and sexuality. This workshop is an introduction to the concept of two-spirit, a brief summary of the history of the people it references, where the term and its cultural participants are now, and how it can be best used to perpetuate cultural sensitivity and inclusiveness in discussions of a broader LGBTQ community. It should be noted; this presentation will not be a comprehensive guide to all Native interpretations and uses of the term. It is an overview of where the idea originated, why it was changed, and how it differs from other descriptions of gender and sexuality.

8

Toxic Masculinity

A

Presented by Brianne Bury and Morgan Wigle, Augsburg University

BH RV S SV T

EAGLE GH

First, we will provide working definitions for Masculinity, Toxic Masculinity, Violence, and Femininity. We will then detail how masculinity becomes toxic and violent. We will then elaborate on the Triad of Men’s Violence as detailed by Michael Kaufman. These include violence against self, other men, and women. Next, we will detail some transmasculine identities, and discuss how people who are masculine presenting are expected to act in hypermasculine ways in order to be taken seriously in their gender identity. Then, we will offer up a real-life experience from a Latinx gay man. Lastly, we will present discussion questions in order to facilitate dialogue.

Identity Forums: Bi, Pan, Polysexual 210 B | Questioning Room 210 C 50

210A

TRIGGER WARNING DESCRIPTIONS ON PAGE 23


A Legacy of Access, Opportunity and Success Kansas State University has long maintained a demonstrable commitment to diversity and inclusion. Since 1863, as the nation’s first operational land-grant university, K-State has heralded “full educational privileges” with open enrollment to all students regardless of gender, race or creed. From the very beginning, our commitment to access, opportunity and success has remained unchanged. K-State strives to be an institution of higher learning that values and champions the contributions, interests and narratives of diverse cultural and social groups. We prepare our students for global citizenry through an increased depth of understanding and critical examination of issues and topics along the diversity continuum. No matter your field of expertise or professional goals, K-State offers an unbeatable combination of opportunity and support. K-State has been recognized at the national level for our diversity and inclusion efforts. We also have a long history of offering institutional awards for diversity. National Awards 2014-Present — Insight Into Diversity Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award 2016-Present — Big XII Most Outstanding Black Student Union (12 of the last 13 years) 2017 — Campus Pride Best of The Best Top 25 LGBTQ Friendly Colleges and Universities 2017 — College Choice 50 Best Colleges for LGBTQ Students 2017 — Advocate Magazine Top 10 Trans-supportive Colleges in the U.S. 2017 — 8th Annual Compete Sports Diversity Award (Petey Awards) 2018 — Insight Into Diversity Inspiring Programs in STEM Award 2018 — Business Insider Top 20 Best College Towns 2018 — No. 2 in Livability’s Top 100 Best Places to Live Institutional Awards 1978-Present — Commerce Bank Presidential Diversity Award for Faculty and Staff 1996-Present — Commerce Bank Presidential Diversity Award for Students 2003-Present — University Outstanding Department or Unit Award for Enhancing Diversity

Upcoming Leadership Opportunities Dean, College of Veterinary Medicine Dean, College of Agriculture and Director, Kansas State Research and Extension Dean and CEO, Kansas State Polytechnic Dean and CEO, K-State Olathe Vice President for Student Life/Dean of Students Associate Provost for Institutional Research

Learn more about careers at K-State. k-state.edu/careers


3

SATURDAY | 12:40 - 2:10 P.M.

STATE OF THE REGION PANEL

SESSION

EAGLE DE SESSION 3 1

A A BH R S T

Saturday | 12:30 - 1:15 p.m.

It's Okay Because We're Gay: Combatting Misogyny in the Queer Community

203

Presented by Kimberly Awiszio, Northeast Queer College Collective “Misogyny happens all around us and it has been taught to us by society, politics, and the world at large, and shows up in both clear instances as well as microaggressions. We need to work on combating these issues from the inside out. Shades of misogyny can be found in every aspect of our community. Gay and trans men separate themselves from straight and cis men, assuming it’s okay to touch women simply “because they’re gay.” This same concept is common among queer women - particularly in the form of internalized misogyny. Transmisogyny unfolds in spaces claiming to be “made for women,” that nevertheless exclude trans women, and we continue to see queer women represented in the media in ways that are solely based on cliches and stereotypes. In this workshop, we’ll discuss various ways to spot possible problematic behaviors, challenge your peers on them, and make appropriate changes.”

2

C BH

Judaism & Gender: Torah, Talmud, Tradition, and Transition

204

Presented by S. Isaac Holloway-Dowd Come explore the 6 genders listed in the Talmud. We will talk about how transgender Jews fit into their shuls and the gifts they bring to their communities. I will share my personal experiences, as well as resources with you for further information and exploration. If there is time, we will have a group discussion and Q and A session. Please, also join me for Erev Shabbat service on Friday night. * There will be a digital flier available for those unfamiliar with Judaism, as well as a list of resources.


SESSION 3 3

A

Saturday | 12:30 - 1:15 p.m.

Lessons Learned from Creating the First Gender and Sexuality Inclusive Summer Camp in Kansas

205

Presented by Will Rapp, Dave Roy, and Elanor Ferris, Sunflower Camp Board of Directors A small group of dedicated individuals came together in 2017 to begin the process for creating a place for queer youth to have a summer camp experience where they would feel comfortable and affirmed. From those initial efforts, the first gender and sexuality inclusive summer camp in Kansas was born. Named for the state’s official flower, this camp helped the teen campers grow new friendships and blossom into more confident individuals through connecting to other teens and mentors in the LGBTQIA+ community. Although deemed a great success for the participants the first year, the success did not come without a few challenges along the way. This session will explore the challenges, solutions and celebrations that was first annual Camp Sunflower. 4

Let’s Get Back To Communicating-LGBT Communication 101

A

Presented by Erica Krause, Northern Michigan University

RV

Let’s talk communication. In today’s society it is harder to communicate in person than it used to be. As LGBT individuals it can be even harder. There are conversations that we have never heard before that need to be said. How do we deal with talking about things we have never had to talk about before? Start with this 101 about basic communication skills tied in with the LGBT community. We will touch on topics such as talking about sex, communicating about other partners, effective listening skills, interviewing as a queer person, and much more. Being queer means talking about queer things. This is the perfect space to learn HOW to do it. TW: Bullying

5

The LGBT World Traveler

A

Presented by Riley, Transphere

206

207

Are you interested in traveling the world? Whether you are looking for the safest places to travel as a LGBT person or have questions about how to bring your hormone replacement therapy (HRT) along in your suitcase, this workshop will answer your questions. Riley has traveled to 15 different countries in the past two years and has learned a few tips and tricks along the way. There will be a short presentation followed by a discussion and time for sharing from participants.

53


SESSION 3

Saturday | 12:30 - 1:15 p.m.

6

#DisBiPanSpecChat

R

Presented by Eryn Star, Albion College

A BH

208

This workshop focuses on disabled multiple gender attracted people’s experiences with the intersection of ableism and bi/pan spectrum phobia in queer spaces and disability spaces. It will address how desexualization and hypersexualization impacts the way queer spaces and disability spaces view us. From there, this workshop will reflect on how our experiences disrupt the notions of the “normal person” and the “isolated identity” often held up in disabled and queer communities. There will then be an open discussion for attendees to share experiences. Attendees will have a deep understanding of the oppression we face and learn ways in which queer spaces and disability spaces can actively work towards our full inclusion. TW: Acephobia

7

More Than Good Intentions: Talking Trans Language Politics

A

Presented by JAC Stringer

210 A

R S T

As the trans community gains recognition, the language used to discuss trans issues and identities is growing, changing, and getting really complicated. Our community has always been composed of a score of intersecting identities, but only now is it nearing safe enough to show. The visible diversity mixed with a complex history has made trans language politics an increasingly heated issue. This workshop discusses the language of the trans community and how historic systems of oppression such as male privilege, heteronormative cissexism, and transmisogyny are newly influencing the current climate.

8

Celebrating Your Queer Black Identity

R

Presented by Ose Arheghan, Trans Student Organizational Resources

Eagle GH

This workshop will provide a space in the conference for queer Black folx to share space, build community, and recharge in a space with those who share their identities. Come enjoy music, conversation, and coalition building that will hopefully continue on after the MBLGTACC weekend ends. This workshop is designed specifically for queer Black folx in the hopes that we can provide a space to decompress from anti-blackness in the queer community, and form relationships between universities and states so participants have new people in their networks to call on for activism efforts and continued support.

Identity Forums: Non-Binary 210 B | Polyamorous Room 210 C 54

TRIGGER WARNING DESCRIPTIONS ON PAGE 23


Success doesn’t come with a study guide. You’ll never get a cheat sheet to guide you through your career’s challenges, but navigating them will be much easier with support and direction from the more than 3,500 young professionals of YPW.

The real learning starts after graduation.

Visit YPWichita.org to learn more.


4

SESSION

SATURDAY | 1:25 - 2:10 P.M.

SESSION 4 1

A BH R S T X

Saturday | 1:25 - 2:10 p.m.

A guide to discourse with homophobes (how to talk to a**holes) Presented by Austin Schopper, Emporia State University In order to best combat bigotry, communication tools must be a part of interactions with those who are difficult to deal with. By learning about people who espouse bigoted ideology, as well as the best means for communicating in a productive manner, we can make progress. This workshop is aimed at those who are involved in activism, as well as those who engage in conversation with bigoted individuals on a personal level and want to increase the productivity of conversations and reduce negative interactions.

2

Queering Biology

A

Presented by Sam Sharpe, Kansas State University

A BH C F R S T

203

204

I believe that our queer, trans, and intersex community deserves to understand ourselves and our identities as a fundamental, natural, and valid component of human biological diversity. This workshop will bring together principles of evolutionary biology, human development, and gender studies scholarship to present a holistic and accessible view of biological sex, gender, and self-identification. The goal of this workshop is to equip attendees to utilize biology as a source of empowerment for, rather than invalidation of, queer, transgender, and intersex individuals. I will conclude the workshop with a reflection on how my own positionality and life experience motivates this work, and provide time for questions, feedback, and the opportunity for audience members to share personal stories.

TRIGGER WARNING DESCRIPTIONS ON PAGE 23


SESSION 4

Saturday | 1:25 - 2:10 p.m.

3

Cultivating Community: Queering, Healing, and Liberating the Body

H

Presented by Matti Martin, Wichita State University

205

C R S SV

Utilizing improv games from Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed and the Hope Is Vital project, this workshop will attempt to create a safe dialogue and space to understand the ways our queer bodies are impacted and marginalized by the intersections of classism, racism, and cisheterosexism. This dialogue will be group-led through active storytelling and improvisation as a means to liberate and heal our bodies from oppressive systems and our resistance/existence within them. This workshop will contain extended periods of physical contact and there may be moments in which former traumas may be brought up.

4

Greek & Queer - Lived Experiences of College Greek Life

A

Presented by Sarah Myose, Wichita State University

BH S T

5

A BH R RV S SV T

206

Millions of college students today join a fraternity or sorority across the United States, but have you ever wondered if Greek life could ever become an LGBTQ+ friendly space? This workshop will discuss the lived experiences of various members within the Greek community and the next steps in creating a more inclusive collegiate environment for all students. Breaking down stereotypes and preconceived notions about Greek life, we will dive deeper into the lived experiences of LGBTQ+ identifying individuals. Whether Greek or non-Greek, these lessons and experiences of members will illuminate the reality of collegiate spaces and the culture we can create through intentional efforts and advocacy. P.S. I Love You (And You, and You): Exploring Non-Monogamy Inside the LGTBQ+ Community

207

Presented by Stefani Vargas, Northern Michigan University Let’s dive into non-monogamy and the infinite ways LGBTQ+ people can experience love. Living in a society that not only values but expects heterosexual monogamy can create a challenging environment for those who live outside ideas of what a relationship “should” look like. We will discuss both the joys and challenges that stem from breaking societal norms of what romantic and platonic relationships can be. This session will provide practical tools for non-monogamy, models of healthy relationships, and will end with time for facilitated discussion and sharing.

57


SESSION 4 6

C A BH C R S SV T

7

C

Saturday | 1:25 - 2:10 p.m.

Intersectionality and Solidarity: Recognizing the Connectedness of Oppressions and Uniting for Total Liberation

208

Presented by Brendon McCampbell, Western Plains Animal Refuge and Tricia Woolbright, Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture In this workshop, we will focus on the concept of intersectionality and the importance of solidarity through an informational presentation and a group discussion. Intersectionality is the recognition that all forms of oppression are interconnected, including sexism, racism, homophobia, biphobia, transphobia, and speciesism. Solidarity is the answer to this interconnected web of oppression unity founded upon the concept that only through such unity can we achieve mutual liberation. The goal of this workshop is to help individuals recognize how oppressions are connected and explore ways in which we can work together to end these oppressions. Get Your Lives: Recruiting and Maintaining Membership in Student Orgs

210 A

Presented by Tyler Bradley, Montana State University Billings This ain’t RuPaul’s Best Friend Student Org. Students come and go every semester. Learn how to make sure you’re regularly bringing in new members, acclimating them to the group, and cultivating future leaders. Make sure your recruits know they should shantay and stay. Find out why some people may be sashaying away. Learn how one college group grew its membership 400% over the course of one year. We’ll look at engagement theories, group development, outreach methods, organization structure, election processes, and leadership development in how they support organizational growth.

8

Zines 101

A

Presented by Elise Wantling, UMKC The first portion of the workshop will be devoted to going over a brief history of zines and their relevance to the LGBTQ community. We will look at different examples of zines by different creators and discuss different ways of publishing zines. We will explore the different genres and uses of zines historically. Then we will have a chance to learn how to make a mini zine that participants can take home. Some basic art supplies will be provided but participants are encouraged to bring their own as well (ex: stickers, markers, etc).

Identity Forums: Trans 210 B | QPOC - Queer People of Color Room 210 C 58

TRIGGER WARNING DESCRIPTIONS ON PAGE 23


LGBTQ+ COLLEGE EXPERIENCES SURVEY At the 2013 MBLGTACC, over 1000 conference attendees took part in the firstever LGBTQ college experiences survey. Analysis of that data, in addition to other research efforts, informed ways college administrators and educators can better support LGBTQ+ students.

This year, a team of queer and trans researchers from the University of Iowa is launching the next round of that survey here at MBLGTACC 2019! Your participation will contribute to a further understanding of ways that LGBTQ+ students experience college and how their institutions can best support them.

You can take the survey online at https://tinyurl.com/2019lgbtqsuccess Questions? Email us at linley-research@uiowa.edu.

1. Pitcher, Camacho, Renn, & Woodford (2017), Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, doi: 10.1037/dhe0000048 2. Woodford, Joslin, Pitcher, & Renn (2017), Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work, doi: 10.1080/15313204.2016.1263817 3. Kulick, Wernick, Woodford, & Renn (2017), Journal of Homosexuality, doi: 10.1080/00918369.2016.1242333

4. Nicolazzo, Pitcher, Renn, & Woodford (2017), International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, doi: 10.1080/09518398.2016.1254300 5. Linley, Nguyen, Brazelton, Becker, Renn, & Woodford (2016), College Teaching, doi: 10.1080/87567555.2015.1078275 6. Linley, Renn, & Woodford (2018), Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, doi: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.2017018836 7. Nguyen, Brazelton, Renn, & Woodford (2018), Community College Journal of Research and Practice, doi: 10.1080/10668926.2018.1444522


5

SATURDAY | 4:05 - 5:35 p.m. Featured Speaker

SESSION

DR. JON PAUL HIGGINS EAGLE DE SESSION 5 1

A A BH C F R S T X

Saturday | 3:55 - 4:40 p.m.

Discrimination Self Care: If, How, & When to Respond Presented by Ari Leigh, On Servant’s Wings Were you ever in situations that left you feel icky or unheard? Wondered if what left you feeling miserable was actually discrimination? This workshop will provide tools to identify when discrimination has occurred, and explore the different ways that we can respond to it. Recognizing that every person and situation is unique, our discussion presumes that everyone has the right to set their own boundaries the in activist work of discrimination response. Our goal is to offer tools, conversation, and space to help you decide which ways of responding to discrimination will best suit your individual needs and goals.

2

Beyond Bisexuality 101

A

Presented by Robyn Ochs

BH

203

204

The Williams Institute estimates that approximately half of the adult LGB population identifies as bisexual, and a new CDC study found that among 9th-12-graders in the U.S., 8% identify as bisexual (as compared with 2.4% as lesbian or gay). And yet bi+ (bi, pan, fluid, etc.) individuals remain invisible and marginalized, and many deny that we even exist. In this interactive program, we will explore the experience of people who embrace non-binary sexualities, look at some of the challenges to recognizing and understanding these sexualities, and leave with tools to respond to and resist. No matter how you identify, come to this engaging and interactive program if you could use some tools for challenging ignorance, bi+-hostility and bi+-erasure.


SESSION 5

Saturday | 3:55 - 4:40 p.m.

3

Erasure Among Us

A

Presented by Bri Hyatt, Cole Weaver, Cora O’Brien, and Kelli Rajala, Northern Michigan University

BH SV T

If there’s anything we can all agree on, it’s that queer representation is important, right? Whether it’s just seeing someone in person, seeing them in media, or even seeing them in history; queer representation matters. So why is it that such a large part of our community gets erased? In an open panel discussion, we’ll be chatting about the erasure of non-monosexualities* and genders from not just media and history, but also from our own community. How does the queer community participate in the erasure and misunderstanding of the sexualities outside of Lesbian and Gay? How can we, as a community, better ourselves by accepting and supporting all aspects of the LGBTQIA+ identities? *non-monosexualities are those that do not equal one: such as bi, pan, ace, demi, etc. to name a few.

4

Name Affirmation on College Campuses: A Case Study

A

Presented by Ennis Weller and Kai Faulk, Unity at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

T

205

206

Kai and Ennis have been working since May 2018 to develop comprehensive name affirmation policies at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. We will be speaking about how far we’ve come: the allies we’ve found in our administration, the minor changes we’ve seen so far, and our goals for the near future. One of our biggest lessons is how to advocate for other trans, nonbinary, and gender non-conforming students to administrators in a way they can understand. After we review our timeline and our process, we’d like to spend time answering questions, discussing how our strategies may translate to strategies for larger or more progressive campuses, and brainstorming with attendees about enacting similar change in their schools. (Presenter has scent-triggered migraines, if you wear scented products please sit toward the rear of the room)

5

A BH R S T

Beautiful Meanings in Beautiful Things: A Crash Course on Queer Writers and Their Works

207

Presented by Aubrey Owens, Northern Michigan University Throughout history, queer writers have expressed, either implicitly or explicitly, different aspects of their queer identity within their works. Despite this, mainstream academia has often ignored or erased the presence of queerness in these writers works, resulting in the complete erasure of the writers’ identity as queer. This workshop will tour numerous queer writers throughout British and American literary history whose novels, short stories, poetry, plays, or memoirs/autobiographies contain implicit or explicit queer themes and have made a significant impact in literary history. The session will also touch on some of the specific and reoccurring themes and ideas present in these works and how they are relevant to queer identity. Some of the writers discussed will include William Shakespeare, Walt Whitman, Virginia Woolf, Audre Lorde, and many more.

61


SESSION 5

Saturday | 3:55 - 4:40 p.m.

6

Identity and You: Mental Awareness and Orientation

H

Presented by William Lewandowski, Minnesota State University Moorhead

208

Often times members of the LGBTQ+ community deal with mental health conditions. Consequentially, many feel they need choose to focus on their queer identities or their mental health, but we don’t need to pick because there are ways we can be a proud LGBT individuals while taking care of our mental health. This workshop allows attendees to find helpful ways to cope and help themselves individually, both with their identity and their mental health by a small lecture and discussion and a hands-on art project. 7

Best Practices for implementing Ally Training

A

Presented by Emily Stier and Jason Roth, UW-Platteville

209 B

This workshop will cover key themes when creating and hosting an LGBTQ+ Ally training. When using the term Ally Training, we mean a training covers basic gender and sexuality training and is mainly aimed towards an audience who has little to no education about the LGBTQ+ community. We will provide participants of this workshop a framework for training implementation that considers audience type, education levels, teaching structure, support, and resources. These suggestions come from our experience in facilitation, however we welcome and will hold space for others’ best practices to be shared.

8

C

Friends don’t let friends covfefe: a toolkit for better social media

210 A

Presented by Nick Pfost, MPP and Michelle Walters, Midwest Institute for Sexuality and Gender Diversity Whether you’re starting up your organization’s social media or want to kick it up a notch, it’s important to be grounded in why you’re there and plan for how you can best harness its potential. In this session, you’ll be guided through how professional organizations use and manage social media on a day-to-day basis to enhance their visibility and engagement. You’ll learn about humanizing social media, and you’ll discuss real-life examples of social media successes and failures from small organizations all the way to the White House. And you’ll leave with a toolkit of key tips and tricks for creating campaigns; drafting, timing, and publishing engaging content; and integrating social into your overall marketing strategy.

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TRIGGER WARNING DESCRIPTIONS ON PAGE 23


SESSION 5 8

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Saturday | 3:55 - 4:40 p.m.

Positive Polyamory

Eagle GH

Presented by Audrey and Bret Neumann, Carroll University Polyamory representation in media is lacking. Often the portrayal of polyamorous relationships is unhealthy and damaging to the people in it. This portrayal influences the public’s view of polyamory. This is not true. When polyamory is done right it can be quite rewarding and enriching like any relationship. Examples of healthy polyamorous relationships and the basics of polyamory e.g. how to bring it up with your SO, how to talk about your partners without confusing people or demeaning any of your relationships, are rarely discussed or addressed and it’s time we do.

Identity Forums: Disability 210 B | Lesbian Room 210 C

WELLNESS YOGA SATURDAY | 7 - 7:45 A.M.

SUNDAY | 7 - 7:45 A.M.

This morning wellness time will help you get your day started on the right path. Led by student instructors from WSU’s campus activities, these sessions welcome both novice and experienced yogis. Some floor mats will be provided. Please feel free to bring your own, or a towel to lay on the carpet. Comfortable, flexible clothing is encouraged!

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6

SESSION

SATURDAY | 4:50 - 5:35 P.M.

SESSION 6 1

A RV SV

Saturday | 4:50 - 5:35 p.m.

Enrolling in K101: The Science of Kink and BDSM

203

Presented by Jake Oster and Sam Brinton Want to nerd out to the fantastic science of kink and BDSM? Now is your chance! In this class we explore Newton’s Laws and impact play, compare pups to Punnett, the physics of flogging, and much more! With an interactive and entertaining presentation and plenty of education, we will make it one of the best college courses you have ever taken! An open discussion around the intersections of kink and science will help us round out a session of nerdy naughtiness.

2

Developing Gender Inclusive Housing

A

Presented by Phoenix Schroeder and Chally Miller, University of Kansas

T

3

A C R S SV T X

204

This workshop will be focused on the issue of developing gender inclusive housing (GIH). We will encourage attendees to ask questions during the presentation and discussion for the last portion of the session. We will present on our experiences in the GIH community as an RA and resident, the continuing improvement of the community, and steps that have been taken to obtain resident feedback in the development of GIH. We will also discuss how others can advocate for similar programs on their own campuses. The audience will be broken into groups based on interest areas related to GIH and they will discuss ways of working for change in our own communities before coming together as a large group to finish the discussion. Related Histories: Commonalities between Native and Trans Activist Movements Presented by JAC Stringer The history of our communities have an impact on who we are today. We carry the pains and joys from those who came before us in our bodies, in our experiences, and in our identities. This is the foundation of historical trauma and it appears in all oppressed communities. The Native activist movement and the trans activist movement are full of commonalities including cultural, institutional, and medicalized violence, segregation, and normalization. This workshop is a space to hold, discuss, and understand how historical trauma takes shape within and around our communities and how we can continue to heal and grow.

TRIGGER WARNING DESCRIPTIONS ON PAGE 23

205


SESSION 6 4

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Saturday | 4:50 - 5:35 p.m.

Rainbow Flags at the Department of Corrections: Experiences of LGBTQ Prisoners in Nebraska

206

Presented by Elena Salisbury, Nebraska Department of Correctional Services LGBTQ people are incarcerated at a much higher rate than their heterosexual peers, and yet there has been minimal research conducted with this population. This presentation will focus on the intersection between LGBTQ identity and the prison industrial complex and criminal legal system as a whole. Using data from 12 in-depth interviews conducted with incarcerated individuals throughout the state of Nebraska, it aims to answer the question “what impact does self-identifying as LGBTQ have on an incarcerated individual’s experience?” Themes that emerged from the research include sexual relationships in prison, trauma, mental health, solitary confinement, and the struggle to end the stigma surrounding LGBTQ identity in prison. Following the presentation there will be an open discussion/Q & A about ways to educate others, advocate, and fight for effective policy change that can empower and protect our LGBTQ siblings behind bars.

5

Creating Queer Families

A

Presented by Samantha Carwyn, GLSEN Omaha

207

BH C

Attendees will identify their idea of family and what they hope to do to create a family of their own. I will be sharing about my journey and the different ways I’ve been a mom over the last ten years. I will share about being a single mom, part of a two-mom household, the child I lost, being a foster mom, and my journey towards becoming an adoptive mom. Attendees are invited to ask questions throughout. I’ll provide practical considerations to make when choosing a donor, creating a family with a same-gender partner, and adopting through foster care.

6

Accommodation 101: How to Make Programs and Events More Accessible

A

Presented by Connor Terry, Oklahoma State University

208

On college campuses nationwide, participation in student organization programs and events have become a staple feature of the average college student experience. These programs, however, are sometimes inaccessible or difficult to navigate by students needing special accommodations due to improper planning or lack of sufficient considerations. During this presentation attendees will learn and discuss a variety of topics related to accessible programming, ranging from room set-up to social media advertisements. In addition, attendees will reflect on accessibility barriers within their own organization and create solutions to mitigate or remove those barriers altogether for future programs.

65


SESSION 6

Saturday | 4:50 - 5:35 p.m.

7

Designing a Safe Space Training on Your Campus

A

Presented by Wes Heath and Ethan Brown, Louisiana State University

209 B

In this workshop we will discuss effective and affective best practices for developing and coordinating professional and educational programs, activities, and events of particular significance to the LGBTQ+ college student experience that make campus environments safe and affirming for all sexual orientations, gender identities and expressions. This will be accomplished in both lecture and discussion format focusing on the work of the LGBTQ+ Project at Louisiana State University (LSU), specifically the Safe Space Campaign. Since its re/invigoration in 2017, the Safe Space Campaign at LSU has trained over 500 faculty, staff, students, and community members in the Baton Rouge area alone; identifying and educating individuals who will affirm and support all people regardless of sexual orientation and gender identity/expression. 8

Burnout 101- Taking care of yourself while fighting for others

H

Presented by Megan Goins, University of Kansas

210 A

BH

You are never “too young” or “too inexperienced” to experience burnout. The more we learn about burnout and how to fight it, the longer we can continue to fight for what matters to us. This workshop provides a space for participants to learn about the signs of burnout and what to do about it. We will be taking a look at how to truly take care of yourself instead of just providing lip service to the idea of “Self-Care”. This workshop focuses on the unique burnout that comes with being an advocate for and member of the LGBTQ+ community and how to find a personal balance while advocating for yourself and those around you. This workshop is a space for participants to learn as well as share their own personal experiences with burnout.

9

Born This Way?

A

Presented by Caedyn Krahling, Iowa State University

BH R T X

So often to justify our existence as LGBT+ people we tell others that we were “born this way,” but is that really true? This session will give a historical and cross-cultural overview of sex, gender, and sexuality to dismantle this common refrain and show how it can be harmful. Participants will be then led in a guided discussion on how their identities have been shaped by choice and other forces, how to respond to anti-LGBT sentiment, and how they can create choice-affirming communities.

Identity Forums: Gay 210 B | Questioning Room 210 C 66

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Choose between thesis and nonthesis options.

Get hands-on research experience and develop your own research interests and projects.

Gain a social justice perspective

| wichita.edu/sociology |

and develop insights about the effects of social structures on individuals and communities.

Tap into the networking,

teaching, research and nonprofit employment opportunities found in the Wichita metro area.

Visit wichita.edu/sociology Phone (316) 978-3280 Graduate Teaching Assistantships are available and include a monthly stipend and partial tuition waiver of up to 75 percent. The priority deadline for GTA applications is March 1; however, applications will be considered until all positions are filled.


7 SESSION

SUNDAY | 8:10 - 9:40 a.m. Featured Speaker

SAM BRINTON EAGLE DE

SESSION 7

SUNDAY | 8:00 - 8:45 a.m.

1

Whatever Happened to Lesbians?

A

Presented by Stephanie Skora, Brave Space Alliance

BH R S T

203

It’s often said that “lesbian” is a dying identity: non-heterosexual women have started identifying in other ways, and we lesbians have had a troubling history with the trans community. In many ways, it seems like we’ve lost queer politics in lesbian spaces. A journey through history and the roots of the divide between the lesbian and trans community, this lecture seeks to debunk the notion that transness and lesbianness are at odds, and explore the radical potentialities of new lesbian spaces! “Whatever Happened to Lesbians?” is a journey through the often-unexamined genderqueer parts of lesbian history, explored through a trans dyke lens. Starting with the birth of radical lesbianism in the 60s, and exploring the history of lesbian politics, gender diversity, and genderqueerness within lesbian spaces, this lecture seeks to re-center transness in lesbian history.

2

The Revolution Begins in the Classroom

A

Presented by Laddie Arnold, Johns Hopkins University

204

In the current political climate, it is more important than ever that we protect our kids from oppression and empower them to dismantle our society’s most harmful structures, such as white supremacy, patriarchy and capitalism. This is a introductory workshop geared towards anyone seeking a career as a K-12 teacher and will explore some of the different options for becoming one, with a particular focus on alternative certification programs. The fight begins in the classroom and it might just begin in yours.

TRIGGER WARNING DESCRIPTIONS ON PAGE 23


SESSION 7 3

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SUNDAY | 8:00 - 8:45 a.m.

The Fight for Marriage Equality in Kansas & Easy Steps for YOU to Become an Activist

205

Presented by Dr. Kerry Wilks, Wichita State University In 2014, Kerry Wilks and Donna DiTrani tried to get a marriage license in the Wichita, KS after the October 6th ruling in the 10th District Court that should have made marriage equality legal in the Kansas. They were denied and found themselves in the middle of a media storm. Join Dr. Wilks as she shares her personal journey during this difficult time (the suit was not resolved until more than one year after the Obergefel). What really happened? What surprises came up during the lawsuit? How does this impact our fight for LGBTQ+ rights today? In addition to the details of marriage equality and a brief overview of the fight for equality in Kansas in general, similar to that of many Midwest states, Dr. Wilks will also address how best to engage in current activist activities for those wanting to impact change.

4

GLSENing Across Kansas

A

Presented by Daniel English and Liz Hamor, GLSEN Kansas

BH T

206

GLSEN Kansas is a local chapter of a national organization that promotes inclusive environments for all K-12 students, regardless of sexual orientation and/or gender identity. GLSEN Kansas began effecting change in the greater Wichita area four years ago, and their success has generated a demand for services in the rest of the Sunflower State. This session will give attendees a better understanding of effective advocacy for LGBTQ+ youth, ranging from direct counsel on behalf of individual students to large-scale policy development.

5

Using Science Fiction to Imagine Radical Queer Futures

A

Presented by Lee Cygan, University of Minnesota Duluth

207

Queer: The final frontier. To imagine what none have dared to dream before. This presentation will highlight different science-fiction texts and how they can be analyzed through queer theory to represent the futures that we yearn for and how to achieve them. The utopian, interspecies alliances, and more will all be looked at critically through a queer lens. This workshop is perfect for anyone who is interested in speculative fiction (science-fiction or fantasy) and/or in queer theory. (Beginners in either are welcome!)

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SESSION 7 6

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SUNDAY | 8:00 - 8:45 a.m.

New Heteronormativity, a Gay-Straight Tipping Point and a New Model of Inclusion: Innovative Suicide Prevention in Higher Education in the United States.

208

Presented by Scott Ellis, Newcastle University The evolving gay-straight paradigm in universities signifies a new model of inclusion, focusing on the placement of heterosexuality and masculinity. This research considers sexual scripts theory and the interpersonal theory of suicide as guides. Using the research question “How is suicide ideation and attempt amongst gay male university students influenced by gay-straight alliances and preventive services led by straight men?” I explore these concepts: How do shifting concepts of masculinity impact suicide risk? Can gay-straight alliances be effective as suicide prevention tools in Higher Education Institutions? The work considers how predominant heteronormative social structures have been reappropriated by students. The nature of this project means individual lived experiences and concepts of masculinity and social structures can be considered collectively in suicide prevention strategies. The presentation includes research findings and an opportunity to discuss future innovation in suicide prevention strategies that consider emerging understanding of heteronormative constructs.

7

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The Black Box : A Guided Discussion on Defining Our Trans Black Masculinity Presented by Alecxander Z Jackson, Northern Michigan University

As black and trans people we face specific challenges when it comes to defining our masculinity. Often building community can be difficult especially when living in isolated and predominately white space in the Midwest. As we grow into our masculinity it can be all too easy to take on the toxic traits model in society, this workshop will allow us to come together to discuss the ways in which our masculinity and blackness intersect, how we can ensure that our masculinity is healthy, and ways in which we can navigate our experiences. This session will be a guided discussion where we can share our experiences and heal from collective trauma while building community.

8

Trans, Queer, and Broke

H

Presented by JAC Stringer

C R S SA

210 A

Eagle GH

Financial marginalization, or what the real world calls “being broke,” applies to a disproportionate number of trans and queer people, especially youth. Society teaches a narrow view of poverty that keeps us from recognizing the experience in ourselves or feeling able to ask for help. As a result, we are left wondering why we feel insecure, anxious, scared, and/or depressed about money. There is an unseen impact when groceries are too expensive or you feel guilty buying something for self-care like make-up, binders, or clothes. Money limits our access to community, leaves us vulnerable to unhealthy relationships, and can trap us in unsafe environments. And, the idea of “going without” is romanticized, sending mixed messages about what it truly means. This discussion group is a space to share how it feels to cope with a lack of money, validate our experiences, and gain support.

70 Identity Forums: ACE 210 B | Non-Binary Room 210 C


I AM... SAFE ZONE

Sunday | 8:00 - 11:30 a.m. | 209 B Join opening keynote speaker Jessica Pettitt for her three part series “I Am... Safe Zone” train-the-trainer style workshop that will help you develop and enhance your campus LGBTQ “Safe Zone” or ally training. This series will include time to debrief the concerns you may have with your current curriculum projects on broadening the scope of what a “safe space” is and why even the term may be challenging or challenged. Part 1: Sticks & Stones LGBT 101 JESSICA PETTITT What better way to learn about sexual identities than to list out social norms, stereotypes, media images, rumors, jokes, and slang! This is a safe space for any and all kinds of interactive discussions regarding Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Heterosexual identities. Learning Outcomes: - To articulate their own stereotypes, derogatory terms, and other assumptions for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and heterosexual people; - To identify others’ stereotypes, derogatory terms, and other assumptions for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and heterosexual people; and - To recognize the U.S. cultural need for binaries when examining sexual identities. Part 2: Gender This! Sex, gender, and sexual orientation become conflated and these misunderstandings are related to sexism, heterosexism, and other forms of oppression. This course contains the clearest model ever. Making changes starts here! Learning Outcomes: - To define sexual identity, gender identity and sex; - To recognize the difference between sex, sexual identity and gender identity; and - To describe how sexism and heterosexism are perpetuated by the conflation of sexual identity, gender identity, and sex. Part 3: Messages I Learned Doing Social Justice work is a simple concept, but it isn’t easy. While moving forward, we must also trace from where we have come from and what we have learned. This activity is primarily a silent self-reflection journey through one’s past to better inform our futures. Learning Outcomes: - Identify messages you learned about one key identity that made you who you are; - Identify messages you learned about at least two groups to which you are not a member; - Identify an event where you actively or passively supported oppression; - Connect the functions of internalized and externalized oppression with one’s own identities and experiences; and - Participate in an authentic conversation regarding emotions, anxieties, and realities of doing social justice work.

WWW.GOODENOUGHNOW.COM

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8

SUNDAY | 8:55 - 9:40 A.M.

SESSION 8

SESSION

1

A

SUNDAY | 8:55 - 9:40 a.m.

A Colorful Reflection: Discussing past, present and future leaders in the QTPOC community

203

Presented by Alan Toussaint, Metro Wellness and Community Centers Can you name one important queer person of color that has shaped the LGBTQ+ community? This workshop will look at important leaders of color from the past, present and future. The workshop will include popular people like Audre Lorde to Laverne Cox and other individuals, like James Baldwin and Alvin Ailey. We will also have a small portion of time for attendees to discuss their own leaders in their communities and why they’re important. Every person in this workshop will have a list of resources to find QTPOC leaders and historical information at their disposal. 2

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Neither Here Nor There: A Workshop on Antisemitism and Transphobia

204

Presented by Stephanie Skora, Brave Space Alliance From the Middle Ages, to the Holocaust, to the streets of the United States today, antisemitism and transphobia have a long, complicated, and intertwined history. This workshop, which seeks to be the first-ever workshop at MBLGTACC to explore antisemitism in depth, uses the similarities between, and co-constitutive nature of, antisemitism and transphobia to create queer and trans activist spaces that are prepared to fight against and dismantle antisemitism alongside other oppressions that are generally thought of as more central to queer and trans experiences. TW: Antisemitism

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SESSION 8

SUNDAY | 8:55 - 9:40 a.m.

3

Consensual Non Monogamy and Your Sexual Health

A

Presented by Daemon Donigan, Charles Drew Health Center

BH T

205

In the LGBTQ+ community, relationships do not always follow the traditional model of monogamy. Due to preconceived assumptions of relationship statuses and sexual orientations by care providers and public health professionals, people who are consensually non-monogamous are often overlooked when it comes to STI and Sexual Health Outreach. With the freedoms found and expressed by the upcoming generations, and the older generations shedding inhibitions, more people are exploring Consensual Non-Monogamy than ever before. However, the shame and stigma associated with open relationships and other forms of Consensual Non-Monogamy, along with assumptions and misconceptions by health professionals, have prevented many people from getting the sexual education and healthcare they deserve. In this presentation we will discuss current trends in STIs, methods of transmission, symptoms, risk reduction and finding medical providers that are safe and informed.

4

Increasing Visibility: Lessons Learned in LGBT+ Advocacy

A

Presented by Christina New, Kendra Murphy, and Cody Averett, University of Memphis

206

Just over two years ago, students at the University of Memphis began to more strongly advocate for increased supports and visibility for LGBT+ students. A great deal of growth has been made in this time; however, many hurdles still exist. During this workshop, we will share some of our lessons learned. These include learning how to balance the creation of a safe, private space while also creating visibility through advocacy, managing public perception of our organization, and navigating university hierarchy. We will discuss the most powerful moments we have had in the past two years, as well as the areas in which we are still struggling, such as creating workable project timelines and increasing diversity of identities within our organization. Presenters will share perspectives from their various roles within the university and will lead a question and answer session where additional information of interest can be shared with our audience. 5

Queer Presence in the Media; The Misrepresentation of Femme Lesbians

A

Presented by Sadie Cordova, Edgewood College

207

An interest in grading queer media with femme characters sparked when I noticed the trend that media with femme queer characters was always about coming out, hooking up and that’s about it. I started to wonder if this is how all femme queer characters were represented or if I was just watching the wrong things. I decided to create a grading scale for these media forms to assess the degree to which they portray harmful stereotypes and applied it to 14 shows and 6 movies. I then compared my findings to queer youtube couples assessing the difference in which queer characters are being represented in comparison to real life queer folk. The findings were shocking, enraging, and empowering and I would love to share them with you. This workshop will be lectured style and intends to spread awareness of this misrepresentation and empower others to advocate for more accurate representation.

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SESSION 8

SUNDAY | 8:55 - 9:40 a.m.

6

Cultivating Your Values

H

Presented by Nancy Loosle, Wichita State University

208

What are values? What are your values? We often hear the word values but do not often stop to think about what our values are and how they influence the choices we make in our everyday life. Our values play a vital role in developing our sense of self and can change over time as we change. This session will help participants identify and explore their values, understand the role they play in guiding who we are and how they influence the choices we make. 7

Exploring Relationship Satisfaction for LGB Couples

A

Presented by Jaidelynn Rogers, Souther Illinois University Carbondale

210 A

The purpose of this workshop is to discuss relationship satisfaction in LGB couples, and how relationship satisfaction may be affected by minority stress. Areas of focus include coming out, navigating public outness, affirmative social support, internalized homophobia, and discrimination. This workshop will include both discussion and skills-building components. A few questions that will be addressed in this workshop include: What is minority stress and how does it affect LGB couples? In what ways do the individual components of minority stress affect relationship satisfaction? What is relationship satisfaction, and what are ways that we can increase it? Additionally, some basic communication and de-escalation skills will be demonstrated. Attendees do not need a partner to participate. 8

H E

Dysphoria: Who Stole My Queerness? Presented by Sam Ginkel, Ripon College Queer Straight Alliance

This program is intended to help anyone cope with both body and gender dysphoria in a positive way by creating works of art as a collective group. In this workshop attendees will discuss dysphoria, how we view it, and how it affects us. Attendees will then create a piece of art or literature (poem, short story, drawing, skit, etc) about the discussion and their personal experiences. Afterwards, there will be time for an ‘open mic’ to share parts of the newly created works. All are welcomed, and no one will be pressured into sharing their pieces. (please bring your own paper and writing utensils)

Identity Forums: Bi, Pan, Polysexual 210 B | Disability Room 210 C 74

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9

SUNDAY | 10 - 11:30 a.m.

SESSION

Featured Speaker

CODY CHARLES EAGLE DE

SESSION 9 1

A A BH F R RV S SV T

2

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SUNDAY | 9:50 - 10:35 a.m.

Risk-Awareness and Consent in Sports, Sex, Kink, and Life

203

Presented by Ari Leigh, On Servant’s Wings Have you ever been afraid that your desires are too dangerous? The things we do with our bodies involve risks. Consent is what happens when one or more people choose to take a risk, whether on the field, on the street, or in the bedroom. This workshop provides tools to help you identify what draws you to an activity, identify its risks, and what you can do to make those activities as safe as possible. This will empower participants to actively give and seek consent in their day to day lives. We will do this by exploring riskaware frameworks, fostering conversation and navigating scenarios. Because risk-awareness benefits everyone, this workshop is open to all MBLGTACC attendees, regardless of age and experience. No Walls Between Us: A Palestine Solidarity 101 for LGBTQ Folks

204

Presented by Stephanie Skora, Brave Space Alliance The movement for justice in Palestine is currently reaching a pivotal point worldwide, and queer and trans people have a vital role to play! Whether advocating for change in our communities, working to quash Islamophobia or anti-Arab racism, or working on the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions movement, non-Palestinian queer and trans accomplices can make a huge impact in the push for Palestinian liberation. This lecture makes the case for broad queer and trans solidarity with Palestinians from a variety of social justice and historical perspectives, and introduces attendees to the ins and outs of Palestine solidarity organizing. TW: Colonialism, Apartheid


SESSION 9

SUNDAY | 9:50 - 10:35 a.m.

3

Science: Friend or Foe to the Trans Community

A

Presented by Nathan Stucky, Spectrum KU

205

T

This workshop is designed to alter the negatives views the LGBTQIA+ community has of science from years of listening to individuals with a rudimentary knowledge of the field use it to bash the transgender community and their identities. This goal is to be achieved by providing examples in nature and current research that validates the transgender experience. This workshop is largely discussion based and sensitive topics such as arguments against trans identities and trans healthcare will likely be discussed. It’s my hope that with this workshop we can persist and inspire a new era of queer scientists.

4

Get it Together: Inclusive LGBT+ Organizing Inside Higher Education

C A BH C F R T

206

Presented by Stefani Vargas, Northern Michigan University Creating an LGBT+ organization can be an uphill battle. Often times, no matter the size of the campus, organizing falls onto student organizations and their leaders. Creating an organizational structure, which allows student leaders to help the larger community without subjecting themselves to burnout, can be a hard balance to strike and this workshop will provide tools for structuring an organization that benefits all. In addition, we will address how to work with faculty and staff in order to gain access to systematic support from an institution that may be underserving LGBTQ community. Whether you’re starting a new organization or overhauling an existing group, this session allows time to focus on both short and long-term goals and how the organization fits into campus culture.

5

Qmmunity: Queering On Campus Housing

A

Presented by Josie Johnson and Justin Savage, IUPUI

207

Gendered on-campus housing continues to be an issue on many campuses throughout the Midwest. Learn about an on-campus queer residential based learning community (RBLC) at IUPUI from two queer resident assistants. Follow as we detail the journey and benefits to creating a queer housing option. Learn about how we were able to advocate for the founding and the continuing needs of the community, named Qmmunity. Join us to discuss the needed advocacy in an area not often discussed, but that affects many students on every campus. This session will give attendees the tools to begin a conversation with housing professionals on their own campus.

76

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SESSION 9

SUNDAY | 9:50 - 10:35 a.m.

6

Stand up for your identity

A

Presented by Kyla Devilbiss, Iowa State University

208

This presentation will include a powerpoint and videos followed with a group discussion about different sexualities. We will talk about how it is important and empowering to educate others rather than just letting them assume what you identify is because it is “easier for them to understand.” We will go over commonly confused sexualities, like bisexual and pansexual, and ways to approach a correcting conversation with someone. If time permits, I will include an art activity of creating flags expressing identity. 7

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ACE 450: Beyond Asexuality 101 for Ace Folks

210 A

Presented by Dani Kallis, University of Wisconsin - La Crosse We will be having a discussion based workshop where we as asexual folks will be taking a deep dive into intersectionality within the asexual identity and how our experiences as ace folks has been shaped by the world we live in. We will go into 3 different discussion topics: the intersection of asexuality and race, the intersection of asexuality and differing abilities, and the intersection of asexuality and romantic identity. Bring your experiences and openness to having conversation about how your asexuality shows up in your life.

8

Mapping Queer Identities

A

Presented by Allison Waters and Leah Squires, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

BH T

Visualization is often a tool used to communicate ideas and patterns that emerge from data. As policy students, we rely primarily on data about people to frame governance models that shape neighborhoods, organizations and companies, countries, and even global identities. Visualization is also a powerful tool for self-understanding. The purpose of this workshop will be to explore how visualization can help us understand the many dimensions of queerness and queer identities, both as individuals and as a nation.

Eagle GH

We will consider how we each live queerness individually through the creation of a visual “map” of each person’s identities and experiences. These maps will be created by workshop participants, using whatever vocabulary and visualization techniques feel most suitable to them. We will also evaluate how queer communities across the country experience their identities by examining more traditional maps that reveal Census data and U.S. policies.

Identity Forums: QPOC - Queer People of Color 210 B | Lesbian Room 210 C 77


10

SESSION

SUNDAY | 10:45 - 11:30 A.M.

SESSION 8 SUNDAY | 10:45 - 11:30 a.m. 1

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Fat & Queer: Loving Your Body & Exploring Your Identity Presented by Stefani Vargas, Northern Michigan University Exploring body positivity and the intersection of LGBT+ and fat identities, this workshop will discuss the history of the fat acceptance movement, fatphobia, and how fat bodies fit into the LGBT+ community. We will share tools for loving ourselves, and our fat bodies, regardless of what mainstream culture defines as “normal” and work to dispel common misconceptions about fatness. The session will conclude with time for sharing stories and asking questions in order to promote healing from the damage that comes from living in a society that devalues fat bodies. Everyone is welcome to attend; however, this workshop centers on fat-identified members of the community.

2

We’re Here, We’re Queer, and We Will Persevere

A

Presented by Leia Milton, Concordia College - Moorhead

A BH

203

Many members of both the I-generation and millennial generation are becoming increasingly frustrated with the events that are going on in our world today. This session will focus on using that frustration to create a positive impact in multiple ways, including awareness, local, national, and political routes to make change. Join us as we discuss a brief history of LGBTQIA+ activism, current efforts and ways to get involved with them, as well as guidance for creating your own projects and movements to better society.

TRIGGER WARNING DESCRIPTIONS ON PAGE 23

204


SESSION 10 3

C

SUNDAY | 10:45 - 11:30 a.m.

How Earth Guides My Life and Relationships: Combining Eco-Conscious and LGBTQ+ Ideals

205

Presented by Abbey Strausbaugh, University of Findlay UNITED The purpose of this workshop is to inform attendees about human effects on the natural environment, sustainable practices, environmentalism in social work, and Earth-based faith, as well as to open a dialogue about how the LGBTQ+ community can help facilitate change towards a greener future. Special emphasis will be placed on the issue of having a healthy relationship with the Earth, among humans and other living things. The workshop will close with the opportunity to participate in an eco-friendly craft, to be enjoyed as it is or to be planted for a future burst of life and color! 4

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BH R S T

A Modern Day Salem Witch Hunt & Vampires in America Presented by Joseph Galbreath, Ripon College

A discussion of the stigma and uneducated rhetoric surrounding HIV, and what we can do to educate primarily ourselves (and hopefully others), followed by a presentation on using literature as a coping mechanism for trauma, specifically HIV. We’ll be looking at the pros and cons of using a trauma narrative vs a trauma metaphor. The trauma narratives reviewed are Angels in America by Tony Kushner and Rent by Jonathan Larson. The trauma metaphors reviewed are Harry Potter by J. K. Rowling and American Horror Story: Hotel by Brad Falchuk and Ryan Murphy.

5

Evolution: When One Partner Transitions in a Same-Sex Relationship

A

Presented by Cole Milton, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

BH S T

206

207

The purpose of this workshop is to discuss possible implications that arise when one partner in a same-sex relationship transitions. Areas of focus include changes in identity for individual partners and the relationship unit (including sexual orientation and gender identity), negotiation of those changes, and possible shifts in power and privilege within and outside the relationship. This workshop will follow a discussion format, so participants can address topics as they arise, but focus questions may include: How does the transition impact the relationship’s stability? What does the transition mean for each individual’s sense of their sexual orientation? If the relationship changes from same-sex to more heteronormative-presenting, does the couple’s power/privilege and social currency change? How might the couple navigate communicating changes to family, friends, and others who recognized them as a same-sex couple prior to transition? How might shifts in the relationship impact treatment delivery from service providers?

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SESSION 10 6

SUNDAY | 10:45 - 11:30 a.m.

Navigating Relative Privilege in LGBTQ+ Spaces

208

C

Presented by Jamie L Wooley-Snider B.A., Wichita State University

BH C R S

Developed with an intersectional theoretical framework (Crenshaw, 1989; Hill-Collins, 1990), this interactive workshop challenges participants to identify their relative privilege in society. Participants are also challenged to identify what forms of relative privilege are present within the queer community based on gender, sex, race, class, and sexual orientation. Relative privilege in queer spaces and the implications of these social locations for community members will be discussed. This activity seeks to help participants identify ways in which privilege can be mobilized for the benefit of all community members and emphasizes how identifying relative privilege is essential in promoting equality for all persons.

T X

7

A RV SV

8

A RV S T

Healing when face masks aren’t enough: moving forward as a LGBTQ+ trauma survivor

210 A

Presented by Chally Miller and Zyrie Berry-Hendricks, University of Kansas Sexual violence disproportionately affects queer individuals and communities, as a lack of adequate education, prevention, and advocacy measures has lead to a pattern of erasure and victimization. This, combined with the stigma of silence and intersectional violence makes the conversation about sexual violence imperative. This workshop is intended to discuss how to exist with the experience as a queer person - namely, how to support others, provide resources, plans, and tips for realistic and attainable trauma care and active bystanding, with a heavy focus on intersectionality and identity. A combination of an engaging powerpoint, large group discussion, and action planning, we emphasize that there is no pressure to reveal stories, intending only to focus on healing and moving forward. Presented by two peer educators and volunteer advocates from the University of Kansas, we take a trauma-informed perspective on prevention, education, and healing. The Health Impacts of Stigma and the Need for Transgender-Affirmative Care

Eagle GH

Presented by Chloe Goldbach, Southern Illinois University Transgender people face stigma and discrimination in many societal contexts. This creates very real health impacts for many transgender people, highlighting the need for transgender-affirmative care. This workshop will start with a brief overview of terminology pertaining to the transgender community. The first focus will be on identifying areas where transgender individuals are subject to stereotypes, stigma, and bias, leading to misconceptions in a variety of areas including in how we view transgender individuals, terminology (sexual orientation vs gender identity), gender dysphoria, and the process of gender transition. The rest of the workshop will focus on some of the health impacts that transgender people may face due to these misconceptions, which are often related to lack of access to affirmative care or receiving the wrong care altogether.

80 Identity Forums: Gay 210 B | Polyamorous Room 210 C


MOST MEMORABLE QUOTES Write your most memorable quotes from the conference below:

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GLOSSARY OF TERMS By no means is this glossary to be considered a comprehensive or inviolable list of words commonly related to the LGBTQIA+ communities within the United States. Please keep in mind all of these identities exist on spectrums so this is not an exhaustive list or explanation of all possible identities. All terms used to describe identities are subject to varying interpretation by those who claim the identity, and no identity or definition should be imposed on another person. ABLEISM

BIGENDER

Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people who are perceived to have or actually have mental, emotional, and/or physical disabilities. Appears both systemically and interpersonally.

Describes a person who identifying having two sides to their gender.

AGEISM Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people on the basis of their perceived or actual age. Appears both systemically and interpersonally. ALLY Describes a person who does not identify as a particular marginalized identity but who actively works to support those who hold that identity and works against the oppression of that identity group.

BISEXUAL Describes a person who experiences sexual attraction to persons of varying genders. BIROMANTIC Describes a person who experiences romantic attraction to persons of varying genders. AFAB / AMAB Stands for “assigned female at birth” and “assigned male at birth” respectively. Other variations of this abbreviation may substitute the initial A for a D (designated) and/or add a preceding C for coercively. CISGENDER

AROMANTIC

Describes a person whose gender aligns with the sex they were assigned at birth.

Describes a person who does not experience romantic attraction or who experiences a varying degree of romantic attraction. “Aro” is another term used to describe an aromantic person.

CISSEXISM

ASEXUAL Describes a person who does not experience sexual attraction or who experiences a varying degree of sexual attraction. “Ace” is another term used to describe an asexual person.

Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people on the basis of incongruence with one’s assigned sex at birth. Appears both systemically and interpersonally.

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CLASSISM

GAY

Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people on the basis of perceived or actual lower socio-economic status. Appears both systemically and interpersonally.

Describes a person whose sexual and/or romantic orientation is primarily toward those of the same or similar gender. This term has also been used/interpreted as an umbrella term for those within the LGBTQIA+ community.

COLORISM

GENDER BINARY / BINARY GENDERS

Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people within the same racial group on the basis of skin color and other external traits. Appears both systemically and interpersonally.

Describes the Western system of categorizing people as one of two genders (male/man, female/woman) which are defined as corresponding to a person’s anatomy.

DISCRIMINATION Describes the prejudicial treatment of an individual based on their perceived or actual membership of a specific identity. Involves behaviors towards groups such as excluding or restricting members of one group from opportunities or resources that are available to another group. DRAG Describes exaggerated, theatrical, or performative gender presentation. Doing drag does not necessarily have anything to do with one’s gender or how one experiences sexual and/ or romantic attraction.

GENDER EXPRESSION / PRESENTATION Describes how one externally expresses gender, including but not limited to dress, mannerisms, and behaviors. GENDER IDENTITY Describes one’s own internal sense/ interpretation of their gender. This may or may not correspond to one’s gender expression or assigned sex. GENDER NON-CONFORMING (GNC) Describes those whose gender expression exists outside the gender binary. NON-BINARY

FAITHISM Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people on the basis of their perceived or actual faith and/or religious affiliation. Appears both systemically and interpersonally. FEMME Describes an identity or presentation that leans toward what is typically defined as feminine. This term is not necessarily interchangeable with “woman,” “girl,” or “female.”

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Describes a gender that exists outside the gender binary. GENDERFLUID Describes a gender that entails movement and shifting on the gender spectrum. Not necessarily within the gender binary, but can be.


GENDERQUEER

INCLUSIVE LANGUAGE

Describes a variety of genders that fall outside the gender binary. It can also be used as a synonym for non-binary, but not necessarily so.

Describes the use of specific and purposeful language in order to avoid imposing limitations or assumptions on groups or individuals.

HETERONORMATIVITY

INTERSEX

Describes the assumption that all people are or should be heterosexual and conform to the normative gender roles of masculine men and feminine women.

Describes a person who is born with sex characteristics (including genitals, gonads, and chromosome patterns) that do not fit typical binary notions of male or female bodies.

HETEROSEXISM

LESBIAN

Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination or exclusion of people who are perceived to be or are actually queer. Appears both systemically and interpersonally.

Describes a feminine-aligned person whose primary sexual and/or romantic orientation is toward people of the same or similar gender.

HETEROSEXUAL

Stands for the various identities within the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Queer, Intersex, Asexual, + more communities.

Describes a person who experiences sexual attraction to persons of the “opposite” gender within the constructs of the gender binary. HETEROROMANTIC Describes a person whose primary romantic orientation is toward the “opposite” gender within the constructs of the gender binary. HOMOPHOBIA Describes the system of interpersonal oppression that perpetuates the discrimination or exclusion of those who are perceived to be or are actually queer.

LGBT, LGBTQ, LGBTQIA+

MASC Describes an identity or presentation that leans toward what is typically defined as masculine. This term is not necessarily interchangeable with “man,” “boy,” or “male.” MISOGYNY Describes the interpersonal system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of femininity and femininealigned people.

HOMOSEXUAL Describes a person who experiences sexual attraction to persons of the same or similar gender. Can carry negative connotations, but not necessarily so.

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PANSEXUAL

RACISM

Describes a person who experiences sexual attraction to persons regardless of gender.

Describes the system of oppression that perpetuates the discrimination and exclusion of people who are perceived to be or are actually people of color. Appears both systemically and interpersonally.

PANROMANTIC Describes a person who experiences romantic attraction to persons regardless of gender. POLYSEXUAL Describes a person who experiences sexual attraction to many, but not necessarily all, genders.

SAFE SPACE An ideal setting in which people within the LGBTQIA+ communities and/or those of other marginalized identities feel free to be their authentic selves. Inhabitants intentionally reject harmful social norms and expectations, and act and speak inclusively.

POLYROMANTIC Describes a person who experiences romantic attraction to many, but not necessarily all, genders.

The assignment and classification of people based on their physical anatomy at birth.

POLYAMORY

SEXISM

Describes the practice of having more than one relationship at a time with the consent of everyone involved. Not to be confused with polygamy.

Describes the system of oppression that

QTPOC Stands for the various identities within the “Queer and/or Trans Person/People of Color� communities. QUEER Describes identities, expressions, and/or sexualities that reject or contrast normative gender and sexual conventions and expectations. Has historically had negative connotations, but many within the LGBTQIA+ community have reclaimed it for themselves.

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SEX


Hyatt Regency Hotel First Floor

STAIRS TO CENTURY II PROMENADE LEVEL MEETING ROOMS

SANTA FE & STIMSON TRAIL Quiet Space

FOYER

ELEVATOR

MEADE TERRACE EXTERIOR

CHISHOLM TRAIL FREE HIV TESTING

PLANNING TEAM Headquarters

BALLROOM AB

GRAND EAGLE BALLROOM DE Featured Voice Speakers State of the Region Address

BALLROOM C Open Workspace Oversight Commi�ee

Informa�on Desk Extended Registra�on Lacta�on Room

RESTROOM

BALLROOM GH

RESTROOM

Grand Eagle Ballroom

FOYER

FOYER

Advisor Sessions

HYATT/CII PARKING GARAGE

BALLROOM F SGD Headquarters

BALLROOM FOYER

TO HYATT LOBBY

CONFERENCE ENTRY

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Convention Hall First Floor Open to Connecting Lobby below

Century II 2nd Floor Breakout Rooms

ELEVATOR ROOM 203

ROOM 204

Stairs to Conven�on Hall RESTROOMS

VENDOR FAIR ROOM 209 A

ROOM 205 ROOM 206

ROOM 209 B

ROOM 207

ROOM 210 A

ROOM 208

IDENTITY FORUMS ROOM 210 B

STAIRS

ELEVATOR

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CHARGING STATION

IDENTITY FORUMS ROOM 210 C

Wellness Yoga 7 a.m. Saturday & Sunday


ENTRANCE

E

M W

W

S

TICKET OFFICE

S C

S W

M

STAGE

M

C W

M

W

E

E S

MEETING ROOMS

S

S CONNECTING LOBBY

E

S

Stairs connecting to 2nd Floor

S

ENTRANCE

Concessions Stand

W

M

S C

IN-USE FOR NON-MBLGTACC EVENTS CENTURY II OFFICE TICKET OFFICE

DRESSING ROOMS

W

E

S

CONVENTION HALL

W

Century II Conven�on Hall

M

S

C

M

S

S

C

IN-USE FOR NON-MBLGTACC EVENTS

S

MAIN ENTRY

ELEVATOR

BOB BROWN EXPO HALL

500-CAR PARKING GARAGE

E COURTYARD

HYATT HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER

Elevator to Hyatt

S

STAIRS

2nd Floor Mee�ng Rooms

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NOTES

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“The most difficult thing is the decision to act. The rest is merely tenacity. The fears are paper tigers. You can do anything you decide to do. You can act to change and control your life and the procedure. The process is its own reward.� Amelia Earhart

MBLGTACC 2019 Program Guide  

The 2019 Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Asexual College Conference. February 15-17, 2019 in Wichita, Kansas.

MBLGTACC 2019 Program Guide  

The 2019 Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Asexual College Conference. February 15-17, 2019 in Wichita, Kansas.

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