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Table of Contents Page 3….........................................................................................................................Welcome from MBLGTACC 2016’s Conference Chair Page 4……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………About Our Conference Page 5………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………..Thank You to Our Sponsors Page 6-7…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…….Etiquette for Inclusion Page 8-11…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….Vocabulary for the Weekend Page 12………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..Parking & Walking Map Page 13……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………Map of Stewart Center (Main Conference Venue) Page 14………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….General Schedule Page 15……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………..Advisor Schedule Page 16…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..….Keynote 1: Jessica Pettitt Page 17………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….………Entertainment: “An Evening with Todrick [Hall]” Page 18-21……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….……..Workshop 1 Sessions Page 22-25…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….………..Workshop 2 Sessions Page 26-30……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..……….Workshop 3 Sessions Page 31……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…….State & Regional Caucuses Page 32……………………………………………………………………………………….…………..Oversight Committee & National Incorporated Board Meeting Page 33-36……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….………………Workshop 4 Sessions Page 37……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..ID Forums Page 38……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..Film Screening: “Matt Shepard is a Friend of Mine” Page 39………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………Keynote 2: Judy Shepard Page 40……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..Entertainment: Drag Show & Dance Page 41-44……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….Workshop 5 Sessions Page 45…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…………..Keynote 3: Ret. Bishop Gene Robinson Page 46-49………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………....Sponsor Advertisements Page 50-54…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...Letters of Support


A Welcome from MBLGTACC 2016’s Conference Coordinator

Hello, everybody! Welcome to MBLGTACC 2016 at Purdue University! We are enthused to welcome you to campus on this fine weekend. Many of us have happy histories with MBLGTACC and many are just starting their MBLGTACC journeys; wherever you’re coming from, we hope MBLGTACC 2016 at Purdue University will come to be home for you. This conference is one of the most affirming and celebratory events I’ve attended, and I hope you feel supported and comfortable at MBLGTACC 2016. I’ve attended MBLGTACC for the past four years, and every time I travel back to Purdue, I am exhausted and impassioned to be an agent of change for the Purdue and wider West Lafayette community. I have no doubt that MBLGTACC 2016 at Purdue University will be an unforgettable experience for you, too--whether you learn more about yourself or your many identities, meet a kindred spirit or future significant other, have a blast at our drag show, or forge a movement of your own! We invite each and every one of you to challenge by choice and learn from each other this weekend. Be sure to participate in some self-care, too; self-care is integral as you process through the many topics explored during conference weekend. You should definitely take the resources in this guide (and within the MBLGTACC 2016’s Guidebook) into account! The resources can help tremendously when considering where to park, finding quiet spaces and gathering spaces, accessing emergency resources, and deciding which workshops to attend. And if you have any questions or concerns while you’re on campus, please visit our Help Desk, STEW 107. We wish you well for conference weekend, and we welcome you home to MBLGTACC 2016 at Purdue University. Haley Pierce Conference Coordinator & Director of Strategy MBLGTACC 2016 at Purdue University #ShareYourCrossroads #MBLGTACC2016

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About MBLGTACC The Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference is the largest student-led diversity conference in the nation, educating over 2000 students, staff, faculty, and community members about a variety of LGBTQ topics. In past years, conference planning teams have sought a variety of world-renowned and insightful keynote speakers--from Laverne Cox and Janet Mock to Margaret Cho and Larry Kramer. Speakers spanned across age groups, economic classes, identities, ethnicities and races, faiths, languages, cultures, and lived experiences. Keynote speakers have converged upon topics of activism, student leadership, health and wellness, oppression, and self-actualization. Our keynote speakers--Jess Pettitt, Judy Shepard, and ret. Bishop Gene Robinson--will inspire you to make change in your own community.

Your Impact Your presence at MBLGTACC 2016 causes a ripple effect--policymakers, Indiana residents, and businesses take note. More than that, it’s an indelible moment in Purdue’s history. For conference weekend and beyond, this space serves as a place of hope for Boilermakers, Indiana residents, and out-of-state attendees dealing with the circumstances surrounding the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA). You, by your mere presence at MBLGTACC, stand with us in solidarity. You educate, share your narrative, and serve as an engaged and thoughtful advocate. #standINsolidarity

Our Theme In MBLGTACC’s 24th year, we want to engage you in the mission of this conference: to create an inclusive and empowering space that allows each and every attendee a chance to explore the crossroads of our individual identities, but also the crossroads within the community, the LGBTQQIAATSP+ movement, and 21 st century America. We want to welcome you to Purdue University, a thriving institution that cultivates active student leadership and inspires conversations across boundaries. The theme “Introspection at the Crossroads” brings together Indiana’s state slogan (“the Crossroads of America”) and this conference’s mission: to provide community for Midwestern students, staff, faculty, and community members.

The leadership team in all its glory (plus a few helpful volunteers)!

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Etiquette for Inclusion MBLGTACC provides an opportunity for people to come together for a few days to learn and grow through knowledge and experiences of others. The conference is attended by people from all over the country and from many walks of life. One of the primary aims of MBLGTACC is to promote a safe environment where everyone feels affirmed and supported to be themselves. Only when people feel safe and supported will they be able to participate in the marketplace of ideas and to have the conversation that are vital for improving our communities. The LGBTQQIAATSP+ community prides itself in being inclusive. Let us strive for greater inclusivity than ever before and set an example for all communities that work toward education and social justice. Please realize and respect that the experiences, realities, or perspectives of others may differ from your own. Practice active listening, refrain from making assumptions, leave room for multiple narratives and multiple solutions and most importantly, approach the weekend with an open mind. The conference has the potential to be a life-changing experience. We encourage you to reexamine, conceptualize your own perspectives and identities and to rethink the boxes and barriers of our world as you understand them. Preferred Gender Pronouns We encourage attendees to use inclusive language. For example, if someone prefers gender-neutral pronouns, respect their wishes and use those pronouns when referring to them. If you are unsure about someone’s pronoun preference, simply ask. If you make a mistake, correct yourself and apologize. For most individuals, it is not a big deal if you slip up unintentionally. Also, diverse pronoun usage may be new and confusing for some so be patient; this is a conference centered in learning. Gender-Neutral Bathrooms Gender-neutral restrooms are available at Purdue University. Respect that the gender-neutral restrooms are for the use of anyone, no matter their sex, gender, or gender identity. Gendered restrooms are also available. If you encounter issues with restroom facilities during your conference stay, please notify a volunteer immediately. Netiquette We encourage all attendees to connect, make new friends and consensually exchange information for contact after the conference. However, please be cognizant of social media and photography. This is a safe space for all and some attendees may not be comfortable with being tagged in photos or other posts online. Please get permission for someone before including them in public media. Service Animals Service animals are welcomed on Purdue’s campus. When you encounter someone using a service assistance or guide dog, it is expected you do not bet, offer food to, or interact with the animal in anyway. The safety of the owner may depend on the dog’s ability to focus. You are supporting the independence provided by the service animal by not distracting them. Disabilities Be respectful of people with disabilities, and forgo using the words retard(ed), cripple, gimp, downy, special-ed, lame, crazy, etc. in a derogatory way. Words like these have been used to bully and oppress individuals with differing abilities for many decades. Please consider the implications of your words and do not use these words casually. 6


In addition, be respectful of people with mental, hearing, sight or other invisible disabilities and/or disorders. For example, if someone doesn’t respond to you, they may not be ignoring you; they may not be able to hear you. Calmly gain their attention, be patient, and find a means of communication. Be courteous to those of us with limited accessibility. Don’t block ramps, unnecessarily use accessible restrooms stalls/accessible seating, or be inconsiderate of people with mobility restrictions. Please be willing and prepared to move chairs to make room for people using wheelchairs. Ask and wait for a response before helping someone who may appear to be in need of help. What seems helpful may be disrespectful or even unhelpful. Allergies and Scent Sensitivity to Smoking To promote a scent-safe environment for those of us with allergies or sensitivities, we ask that you use scent-free products or limit/forgo excessive usage of perfumes, lotions, scented hair products, etc. while at the conference. Additionally, some people may have food allergies that are very severe, so be aware when eating food in workshops or public areas. Try to keep it contained and don’t leave food lying around. Smoking Smoking is prohibited on the West Lafayette Campus, except in designated smoking areas. The law is enforced by Purdue Police and is meant to provide indoor comfort for all individuals. If you do smoke, please go outside to a designated smoking area and be mindful to those downwind of you. Sexual Responsibility We encourage conference attendees who engage in sexual activity to be safe and responsible. We encourage the use of condoms, dental dams, water or silicone-based lube, or other forms of protections. Condoms will be available in multiple locations throughout the weekend! Sexual assault is defined as performing a sexual act with or on a person who has not given, denied, or is unable to give consent. If consent from all parties is given, we encourage them to be safe and use protection to prevent HIV/AIDS, STI/STDs and/or pregnancy. If you are sexually assaulted, contact the Lafayette Crisis Center at 765-742-0244. The Lafayette Crisis Center has a 24 hour crisis response line for the Lafayette/West Lafayette area.

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Vocabulary for the Weekend We fully acknowledge that this glossary of terms may not speak for the experience, realities, or perspectives of all individuals. We have tried to be as inclusive as possible while simultaneously striving to be as descriptive and useful as possible to those this conference serves. We recognize that it is impossible to capture the full range of experiences within our community, and we encourage you to explore each of these terms in greater depth. Ally: A person whose attitudes and behaviors challenge heterosexism, homophobia, and transphobia. Most commonly used to refer to someone who is not LGBT but shows support for LGBT people and promotes equality in a variety of ways. However, anyone can be an ally. Aromantic: One who lacks a romantic orientation or is incapable of feeling romantic attraction. Aromatics can still have a sexual orientation (e.g. “aromantic bisexual” or “aromantic heterosexual”. Asexual: An individual who does not experience sexual attraction. Individuals may still be emotionally, physicals, romantically, and/or spiritually attracted to others. Asexual individuals may still have an LGBTQ+ romantic orientation. Bigender: Refers to those who have masculine and feminine sides to their personality. It should not be confused with the term two-spirit, which is specifically a term used by Native Americans. Bisexual: An individual who acknowledges their potential to be attracted, romantically and/or sexually, to people of more than one sex or gender, not necessarily at the same time, not necessarily in the same way, and not necessarily to the same degree. “Bisexual invisibility/erasure’ refers to the tendency for some people for some people to forget about those who are attracted to more than one gender. Butch: An identity or presentation that leans towards masculinity. Butch can be used as an adjective, a verb, or a noun. Although historically associated with a masculine queer/lesbian woman, it’s used to describe a distinct gender identity and/or expression, and does not necessarily imply that one identifies as a woman. CAFAB and CAMAB: Acronym meaning “Coercively assigned Female/Male at birth. No one, whether cis- or trans, has a choice in the sex or gender to which they are assigned when they are born, which is why it is said to be coercive. In the rare cases in which it is necessary to refer to the birth-assigned sex of a trans person, this is the way to do it. Cisgender: A term used to describe a person whose gender identity aligns with those typically associated with the sex assigned to them at birth. Cross-Dressing: Someone who wears clothes of another gender/sex. Drag: The performance of one or multiple genders theatrically. Femme: An identity or presentation that leans towards femininity. Femme can be used as an adjective, a verb, or a noun. Although historically associated with feminine queer/lesbian woman, it’s used to describe a distinct gender identity and/or expression, and does not necessarily imply that one identifies as a woman. Gay: A person who is emotionally, romantically or sexually attracted to members of the same gender.

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Gender Binary: A system of viewing gender as consisting solely of two categories which are biologically based and unchangeable, and in which no other possibilities for gender or anatomy are believed to exist. This system is oppressive to anyone who defies their birth assignment, but particularly those who are gender-variant individuals and those who do not fit neatly into one of those two categories. Gender Expression: External appearance of one's gender identity, usually expressed through behavior, clothing, haircut or voice, and which may or may not conform to socially defined behaviors and characteristics typically associated with being either masculine or feminine. Gender Identity: One’s innermost concept of self as male, female, a blend of both or neither. Gender Non-Conforming: A broad term referring to people who do not behave in a way that conforms to the traditional expectations of their gender, or whose gender expression does not fit neatly into a category. Gender Fluid: A dynamic mix of gender presentations within one person. This term indicates a movement throughout gender identities and/or presentations. Genderqueer: A catchall term denoting or relating to a person who does not subscribe to conventional gender distinctions but identifies with neither, both, or a combination of masculine and feminine gender presentations. . Hate Crime: The act of intimidation, harassment, physical force, or threat of physical force directed against any person or their property, motivated either in whole or in part of hostility toward their actual or perceived age, disability, gender identity, ethnicity, race, religious/spiritual belief, sex, sexual orientation, etc. Heterosexism: The assumption that all people are heterosexual and that heterosexuality is superior or more desirable than other identities. It is also the stigmatization, denial, and/ or denigration of anything non-heterosexual. Homonormative/Homonormativity: The assimilation of heteronormative ideals and constructs such as monogamy, procreation, normative family social roles, and binary gender roles, into LGBTQIA culture and identities. Some assert that homonormativity fragments LGBTQIA communities into hierarchies of worthiness: those that mimic heteronormative standards of gender identity are deemed most worthy, which can be problematic and harmful to those who do not fit those standards. Inclusive Language: The use of non-identiy specific language to avoid imposing limitation or assumptions onto others. For example, saying “you all” instead of “you guys” in order to not impose assumptions regarding person’s gender identity. Intersex: A general term used for a variety of condition in which a person is born with reproductive or sexual anatomy that doesn’t seem to fit the typical definitions of female or male. Lesbian: A female identified individual who is emotionally, romantically or sexually attracted to other women. LGBTQIAATSP: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Questioning, Asexual, Aromantic, Agender, Ally, Two-Spirit, Polysexual, Pansexual community. This acronym, though longer than most, is still not inclusive of all identities. Monosexual/Multisexual: Umbrella term used for orientations directed towards one gender (monosexual) or multiple genders (multisexual) 9


Passing: A term typically used by transgender people to mean that they are seen as the gender with which they selfidentify. This term is controversial for some, as it insinuates that all transgender or trans individuals must look like cis individuals or must be aligned with cis beauty standards. This term is also used by non-heterosexual people to mean that they are seen as or assumed to be heterosexual. Pansexual/Omnisexual: “Pan” means “all”. Individuals who identify under this spectrum are emotionally, physically, romantically, sexually, and/or spiritually attracted to all gender identities/expressions, including those outside the gender binary. Some have come to regard this term as being attracted to people, regardless of gender identity or expression. Polysexual people are attracted to “many”, but not necessarily all genders. Polyamory: Having more than one intimate (sexual and/or romantic) relationship at a time with the knowledge and consent of everyone involved. It is different from both swinging (which emphasizes sex with others as merely recreational) and polysexuality (which is attraction towards multiple genders and/or sexes). People who identify as polyamorous typically reject the view that sexual and relational exclusivity are necessary for deep, committed, long-term, loving relationships. Queer: This term serves as a general term for identities, presentations, and sexual orientations that reject conventions and expectations. This term also serves as a catchall for many different segments of the community; essentially, queer is what you make it. The word queer is still used as a hateful slur, so be cognizant of the impact of this term and its use during conference weekend. QPOC: This acronym refers to “Queer People of Color” or a “Queer Person of Color”. Romantic Orientation: A person’s enduring emotional, physical, romantic, and/or spiritual—but not necessarily sexual— attraction to others. Sometimes this orientation is referred to as an affectional orientation. Same Gender Loving/SGL: A term sometimes used by members of the African American/Black community to express a not-exclusively heterosexual sexual orientation without relying on terms and symbols of European descent. The term emerged in the early 1990s with the intention of offering African American/Black women who love women and African American/Black men who love men a voice, a way of identifying. This identity resonated with and complemented the uniqueness of African American/Black culture in life. Sexual Orientation: A person’s enduring emotional, physical, romantic, sexual, and/or spiritual attraction to others. Gender identity and sexual orientation are not the same. Trans people can also be heterosexual, gay, lesbian, pansexual, queer, etc., just like anyone else. Stealth: Going stealth means for a trans person to live completely as their gender identity and to “pass” in the public sphere as their gender. This may include when a trans person does not disclose their trans status to others. This can be done for numerous reasons, including safety, or merely because the person doesn’t feel others have the right to know. Trans: This is an umbrella term that refers to all of the identities within the gender identity spectrum including (but not limited to): transgender, genderqueer, genderfluid, non-binary, genderfuck, genderless, agender, non-gendered, third gender, two-spirit, bigender, and trans man and trans woman. Transgender: An umbrella term for people whose gender identity differs from the sex or gender they were assigned at birth, for those whose gender expressions differs from what is culturally expected of them. The term transgender is not indicative of sexual orientation, hormonal makeup, physical anatomy, or how one is perceived in daily life. Transman/Transwoman: Men or women of the transgender experience. They individuals might actively identity as trans and some may prefer to simply be called men or women, without any modifier. It is best to ask which term an individual prefers. 10


Transition: The process of altering one’s coercively assigned sex at birth. This is not a one-step procedure; it is a complex process that occurs over a long period of time. Transition includes some or all of the following personal, medical, and legal steps: telling one's family, friends, and co-workers; using a different name and new pronouns; dressing differently; changing one's name and/or sex on legal documents; hormone therapy; and possibly (though not always) one or more types of surgery. The exact steps involved in transition vary from person to person. Transsexual: An older term that originated in the medical and psychological communities. This term is still preferred by some people who have permanently changed--or seek to change--their bodies through medical interventions (including but not limited to hormones and/or surgeries). Unlike transgender, transsexual is not an umbrella term. Many transgender people do not identify as transsexual and prefer the word transgender. It is best to ask which term an individual prefers. If preferred, use as an adjective: transsexual woman or transsexual man. TW, or a Trigger Warning, is a statement at the start of a piece of writing, video, etc., alerting the reader or viewer to the fact that it contains potentially distressing material (often used to introduce a description of such content). Two-Spirit: is a culturally distinct gender that describes Indigenous North Americans who fulfils one of many mixed/third gender roles found traditionally among many Native Americans and Canadian First Nations indigenous groups.

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Weekend Schedule Day

Friday, th February 19

Saturday, th February 20

Sunday, st February 21

Time

Event

Location

2:00 - 9:00 pm

Attendee Registration

STEW Foyer

5:00 - 6:00 pm

Keynote 1: Jessica Pettitt

Elliott HOM

6:00 pm

Opening Ceremony

Elliott HOM

9:00 - 10:30 pm

An Evening with Todrick Hall

Elliott HOM

7:00 am - 12:00 pm

Attendee Registration

STEW Foyer

10:00 am - 4:00 pm

Exhibitors’ Fair

STEW 302/306

8:00 - 9:00 am

Workshop 1

STEW Rooms

9:15 - 10:15 am

Workshop 2

STEW Rooms

10:30 - 11:30 am

Workshop 3

STEW Rooms

12:30 - 1:30 pm

State Caucuses

STEW Rooms

1:45 - 2:45 pm

Workshop 4

STEW Rooms

3:00 - 4:00 pm

Identity Forums

STEW Rooms

4:15 - 5:45 pm

“Matt is a Friend of Mine” Film Screening

Elliott HOM

6:00 - 7:00 pm

Keynote 2: Judy Shepard

Elliott HOM

8:30 pm - 12:00 am

Drag Show & Dance

PMU’s North & South Ballrooms

8:00 - 9:00 am

Workshop 5

STEW Rooms

9:15 - 10:15 am

Keynote 3: Ret. Bishop Gene Robinson

Elliott HOM

10:30 - 11:00 am

Closing Ceremony

Elliott HOM

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Advisor Schedule (for more information about advisor sessions, see Guidebook) Day

Friday, February 19

Time

Event

Location

2:00 - 9:00 pm

Attendee Registration

STEW Foyer

4:00 – 4:45 pm

Advisor Welcome Social

LGBTQ Center, Schleman Hall of Student Services (SCHL), room 230

5:00 - 6:00 pm

Keynote 1: Jessica Pettitt

Elliott HOM

6:00 pm

Opening Ceremony

Elliott HOM

9:00 - 10:30 pm

An Evening with Todrick Hall

Elliott HOM

7:00 am - 12:00 pm

Attendee Registration

STEW Foyer

10:00 am - 4:00 pm

Exhibitors’ Fair

STEW 302/306

8:15 – 10:00 am

Advisor Track Workshops – Session 1

Breakout rooms: RAWLS 1086 & RAWLS 1057

10:30 - 11:30 am

Open Space Concept

RAWLS 1086 (main session) Discussion breakout rooms: RAWLS 1057 & RAWLS 1011

1:30 – 2:45 pm

Sexual Assault Prevention Panel

RAWLS 1086

3:00 - 4:00 pm

Advisor Track Workshops – Session 2

RAWLS 1086, RAWLS 1057, & RAWLS 1011

4:15 - 5:45 pm

“Matt is a Friend of Mine” Film Screening

Elliott HOM

6:00 - 7:00 pm

Keynote 2: Judy Shepard

Elliott HOM

8:30 pm - 12:00 am

Drag Show & Dance

PMU’s North & South Ballrooms

8:00 - 9:00 am

Advisor Track Workshops – Session 3

RAWLS 1086 & RAWLS 1062

9:15 - 10:15 am

Keynote 3: Ret. Bishop Gene Robinson

Elliott HOM

10:30 - 11:00 am

Closing Ceremony

Elliott HOM

th

Saturday, February 20

th

Sunday, February 21

st

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Keynote 1: Jessica Pettitt th Friday, February 19 : 5:00-6:00 pm

I have been in your shoes: I got the Student Affairs bug while working as an RA and running orientation at a small private liberal arts college in Arkansas. I told my hall director my senior year that I just wanted to be an RA when I grew up. So I went to South Carolina and got a Masters in Higher Education Administration completing internships and practica in every student services office on campus including the First Year Experience Center, Greek Life, International Student Services, Residence Life, and Campus Activities. I then worked as a Hall Director in Oregon, Programming Advisor for LGBT Center, started LGBT and Women’s support services inside a Multicultural Office and established a Center for Social Justice Leadership in Arizona, worked as a Presidential advisor for Diversity in California, and taught some intercultural communication classes along the way. What I have learned from planning my own programming is that you want a speaker/trainer to come in, know about your campus and its surrounding community, be flexible with participants, room set up, and topics, be low maintenance and maybe even fun to work with, have little to no needs, and deliver more than you budgeted. When you book me, I am happy to do what I call “drive-by consulting” for staff and student leaders — this is where I sit in a designated spot and answer questions about membership retention, recruitment, programming initiatives, marketing, even t-shirt designs with anyone who pops in. I am happy to go to meals in dining halls with students, faculty, staff, or community stakeholders too! Whatever you need, the answer is pretty much always, “Sure, I’d love to.” I bring 10+ years of experience to my workshops and keynotes so that you get a low maintenance and super flexible outside perspective that goes with the flow regardless of AV, room set up, or audience turn out. No matter what goes wrong, you get a powerful and effective program even if it is just you and me at the end of the evening over ice cream. This is a promise.

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Entertainment: “An Evening with Todrick [Hall]” th

Friday, February 19 : 9:00-10:30 pm

With a budding career as unique as he is, Todrick Hall has paved his own way as a new kind of star, harnessed by the power of social media, captivating audiences with his incomparable blend of original music, innovative choreography, and creative parody. With 180 million+ YouTube video views, 1 million+ subscribers, and a hyper-engaged, loyal fan base, Hall is emerging as a creative visionary and entertainment powerhouse, eliciting attention from Virgin America, MTV, and Forbes. Raised on a farm in a small Texas town, Hall’s passion for the arts began at a young age, performing in local shows until he landed a starring role in Broadway’s “The Color Purple” alongside American Idol winner Fantasia Barrino. Inspired by his co-star, Hall captured the nation’s attention in season 9 of the reality show, but was voted off as a semifinalist. Deterred but not discouraged, he poured every dime he earned into writing, directing, producing, and starring in YouTube videos featuring creative themes, original music, and innovative choreography. Celebrated for his creative self-expression and innovative vision, Hall takes audiences on a journey that is as unique and entertaining as he is; imparting valuable perspective on developing one’s own definition of success, overcoming obstacles, embracing individuality and diversity, and producing work that inspires others.

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W

Workshop 1 Sessions th

Saturday, February 20 : 8:00-9:00 am Featured Workshop: Cummins, Inc: Our Diversity Journey Location: Fowler Hall We will discuss a little bit about our company, our work with/approach to diversity & inclusion and what it means to be an LGBT employee at Cummins.

Presenters: Susan Lawhead and Jacqueline R. Patterson Being Me in the Job Search This session will help you learn how to find welcoming employers, weigh the pros & cons of being out in the workplace & search process, and give you tips for how to handle the interview process. We will also send you with some helpful resources. Don't miss this workshop! Presenters: Heather Rickerl & Kat Werchouski Room 202 Strategies for Occupying Lived Bodies (TW: Bathroom Politics and discussion of –isms) This presentation will give a summary of Iris Marion Young’s concept of “the lived body” in her text, On Female Body Experience. Judith Butler and Queer Theory are influencing factors on the discussion of a lived body. Young (2005) defines the lived body as “a unified idea of a physical body acting and experiencing in a specific sociocultural context; it is body-in-situation”. Presenter: Katy A. Ross Room 204 Queering the Curriculum: LGBTQ-Inclusivity in Campus Sexual Assault Prevention (TW: Rape/Sexual Assault, Abuse/Violence, Homophobia, Transphobia, Discussion of --isms) Conversations around campus sexual assault often note that 19% of undergraduate women will experience a sexual assault sometime during college. Frequently unmentioned, though, is the fact that this rate doubles for queer and trans students. This presentation highlights recent changes to the longstanding, peer-led First Year Campus Acquaintance Rape Education (FYCARE) program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) to move beyond a discussion of male perpetrators and female survivors, recognize the multitude of intersecting survivor identities, and create safety for queer and trans students. Presenters/Panelists: Molly M. McLay, LCSW; Alex C. Nelson; Blake Bullock; Kaye Usry Room 206 Self-Care 101: How to Fight for Yourself While You Fight for Your Cause (TW: Suicide, Mental Health, Physical Health, Self-harm, Drug/Alcohol Abuse, Rape/Sexual Assault) The theme of MBLGTACC 2016 is “Introspection at the Crossroads,” and what a perfect opportunity for conference-goers to step back, take a deep breath, and look within after having put so much of themselves into their communities. The purpose of this workshop is to stress the importance of self-care while doing movement work, to teach how to self-care, and to point out the benefits of practicing good self-care. Presenter: Maya Klein Room 214 A&B

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Queer Youth Organizing in the Midwest (TW: Bullying, Suicide, Mental Health, Homophobia/Transphobia) This presentation is an opportunity for young people involved in organizations on their campus or in their community to come together and discuss the challenges, triumphs, and benefits of youth--led initiatives. We will begin with a brief history and mission of the Queer Nebraska Youth Network (QNYN), the only peer--led organization for LGBTQ+ young people in the state of Nebraska. Now in its 5th year, the QNYN provides confidential, online spaces, in--person events and social activities, and provides resources and opportunities for young people to get involved in their communities. Then we will share some struggles and successes we have faced, our plans for the future, as well as what we believe are the main benefits of peer--led organizations. Presenters: Missy Ulrich & Jordan Brown Room 214 C&D The Bible Does NOT Say That! Living at the Crossroads of Religion and Homophobia (TW: Spiritual Abuse, Bullying, Homophobia, Transphobia, Sexism, Slurs and/or Derogatory Language) We all live at the crossroads of religion and sexuality. Whether we are personally religious or not, religion continues to affect public policy and personal interactions. For too long, a conservative cadre of voices has dominated discourse around religion and sexuality, shutting down any other views. Too many LGBTQ persons have been excluded, shamed, and silenced in the name of someone’s view of what the bible says. The hegemony of religious rhetoric around the bible and homosexuality can be and is being challenged by scholars, activists, and people of faith. Scholars have known for at least a generation that, as Daniel Helminiak says, “taken on its own terms and in its own time, the Bible nowhere condemns homosexuality as we know it today.” Yet this message isn’t heard enough and isn’t loud enough at the crossroads of religion and sexuality. This workshop will empower participants’ responses to religious homophobia with enough knowledge to be active change agents, writing a new narrative of religion and gay, lesbian, trans*, and queer people. Acting toward change on the topic of the bible and sexuality requires knowledge. Thankfully, it’s out there and it will be brought into this workshop. A professor of religion and gender studies will lead this workshop by addressing the problem that the bible has been, reviewing basic skills and strategies for responding to bible-based homophobia, and initiating discussion on how this can all be put into practical use on campus and in our local communities. Why does the bible say what it does? What does it not say? How does this relate to the world in which we live and work today? How can each of us stand up to even those who claim to speak for God? This workshop will provide answers and strategies in response to those questions and more. Presenter: Caryn D. Riswold, PhD. Room 218 A&B Queering Femininity: Femme History, Identity, and Erasure (TW: Femmephobia, Body image, Misogyny, Transmisogyny) In the queer community, which often prioritizes thin, white masculinity, femme is frequently overlooked or made invisible. Often, even when they are acknowledged, femmes are considered "less queer" or even traitorous for presentng in what is seen as heteronormative ways. Some representations ignore the intersections of gender, race, and class or oversimplify the femme identity. Femmes have existed in queer communities throughout history and have often been integral to community organizing and queer activism. Femme as an identity is not homogeneous but it is, in fact, a thrilling mix of expression and experience, which is unique to every femme. The session will delve first into the history of femmes beginning in the early 20th century. We will speak about how femme identity has evolved to the present day and how it will continue to evolve. We will also go over several ways in which femme as an identity can be used as a political statement, a way to dismantle the patriarchy, and a way to explore gender while subverting traditional gender ideals. The workshop will conclude with a time for discussion and sharing. Presenter: Stefani Vargas Harlan Room 218 C&D Show Me The Money: A discussion on impactful fundraisers for LGBTQIA+ organizations The main purpose of my presentation is to discuss fundraising for college LGBTQIA+ organizations and how we can access the funding from our universities as well as planning events that have shown successful outcomes in regards to funding. Presenter: Katie Smith Room 278

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"You Look Like a Freak..." Gender, Social Recognition, and Trans Community Politic (TW: Historical oppression / trauma, Discussing privilege, Discussing negotiating physical and emotional safety, Homophobia, Transphobia, Discussions of –isms, etc., Bathroom politics, Medical – Pathologization) As the “LGBT" movement moves further into the mainstream eye, trans and queer people are called to analyze our shifting position in society. In a modern context, trans and queer communities have teetered between a desire to achieve safety through normalcy and maintaining unique cultural identities. A culture's interpretation of normalcy is the key determinant for societal recognition, but how does one normalize identities that by are definition queer and freak? Gender identity and sexuality directly relate to defining of who is “normal" and is enforced by intersectional systems of oppression. We carve out spaces for ourselves in different ways, but not without the influence of our communities' oppressed histories..This workshop evaluates the cultural concept of normalcy, how historical trauma connects to how we negotiate our identities, and how systems of oppression impact the presentation and creation of freaks. Through a discussion of identity, culture, and history we may determine who enforces the rules of legitimacy, why we feel we have to follow them, and how we can break them. Presenter: JAC Stringer Room 279 Mental Illness in the LGBTQ+ Community (TW: Self harm, Mental health, Eating disorders, Suicide, Mention of several causes of mental illness: Abuse/Violence, Rape/Sexual assault, Bullying, Terminal illness) In this workshop, I will discuss types of mental illness discussed in the DSM and how mental illnesses can interact with each other. I will explain the possible causes of mental illness and how mental illness affects an individual's ability to function at work or in the classroom and in everyday life. I will discuss society's view of those who are mentally ill and also how mental illness affects the LGBTQ+ community. I will discuss the types of treatment for mental illness. I will explain why the audience should care about this issue and how they can get help or help someone else with mental illness. I may show a video giving an example of what it is like to live with mental illness. And then open the room for discussion and sharing of personal experiences. Presenter: Delaney Miller Room 310 Binarism & White Responsibility (TW: Racial trauma, Racism, and Transphobia) My presentation is directly reactionary to the trend of white nonbinary individuals defining their experience as 'binarism.' It will trace the origin of the term in regards to its original definition of the colonial exclusion and erasure of gender nonconforming people of color. It will be an in-depth conversation about colonialism and the present day effects on communities of color, particularly regarding those who have been disconnected from their pasts, whose cultures have been forcibly whitewashed and bleached. We will discuss the longstanding effects of racial trauma, and what actions white activists and members of LGBTQ communities can take to avoid perpetuating or exacerbating trauma, and helping their siblings of color heal. I will present narratives from people of color experiencing binarism and directly contrast it to the narratives of nonbinary white people. I will encourage the audience to share and discuss, and hopefully have group activities in which we can simulate both instances of oppression and healing. I hope to viscerally invoke a feeling of empathy within those in the audience who might have not experienced what I am talking about, and to present to those who have an avenue and method of healing. Presenter: hex b-n Room 313

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Brotherhood and Sisterhood Redefined: Experiences of LGBTQ Folks in Social Fraternities and Sororities (TW: Homophobia, Transphobia, Discussions of -isms, etc., Bullying, Drug/Alcohol abuse, Mental health) Fraternity and sorority life is a powerful extra-curricular learning experience for members. After college, members of fraternities and sororities have higher levels of well-being than non-members. Members of fraternities and sororities are more likely to graduate on time and have a higher GPA than non-members. Similarly, graduation rates are 20% higher for fraternity/sorority members than nonmembers. However, it is important to understand that fraternal organizations exist in and in some ways exacerbate white, patriarchal, and heteronormative ideals. Sorority women are up to 41% more likely to develop disordered eating habits than nonmembers. Fraternity men are more likely to believe in rape myths and to adhere to patriarchal concepts of power. Fraternity men are three times as likely to commit sexual assault and sorority women are 74% likely to be sexually assaulted than non-members. With these things in mind, fraternities and sororities present a unique set of challenges to queer people. Similarly, queer people present a unique set of challenges to fraternities and sororities. This program seeks to explore this dynamic. Presenter: Kate Wehby Room 314 Neon Signs & Billboards (TW: Privilege, Ally Prejudice, Trans Prejudice) SEX! GAYS ONLY! Is your space screaming sex and intolerance to students walking by? Or are they bowled over by your mountains of advocacy fliers and petitions? Does your space "out" everyone who walks through its doors, even if they are straight? Reflection on our spaces and how we present ourselves to visitors is very important. This presentation is meant to teach the process and skills to create and design a space for your target audience using techniques designed from the study of the psychology of the room. How displays and art can make a lasting first impression on new patrons and guests. How the proper set up, lighting, and amenities can help to increase visitors. Presenter: David Yip Room 320

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Workshop 2 Sessions th

Saturday, February 20 : 9:15-10:15 am

Featured Workshop: Free Speech Location: Fowler Hall Across the country, student activists are continuing a long tradition of working hard to bring meaningful change and progress to their campuses and greater society. Recent campus activism has brought free speech, an issue that previously lurked in the background, back to the fore of the national discussion. Speaking up and out is an essential tool for queer students, and progress will stagnate if their ability to do so is impeded. In this session, you will learn the reasons and history of this importance, as well wel as explain the rights students have to freedom of speech, protest, and changing cultural norms. In this interactive discussion, we'll explore what free speech is, and what it isn't. We'll talk about how you can use the power of free speech as a tool for your own activism, and how to identify when your rights are violated and fight back against any attempts to silence your voice (as has happened to far too many LGBT voices in the past). We'll tackle thorny issues like hate speech and ideological diversity, what to do about words that hurt, and how the right to free speech intersects with other rights on campus, drawing on the experiences of civil rights and LGBT rights activists.

Presenter: Ari Cohn Sexuality and Gender Identity in the Workplace (TW: Bathroom throom politics and Transphobia) In this workshop, participants will learn how to look up or investigate company policies about gender identity. I will be providing pro some of the polices for some of the largest employers in the United States. I will also be providing resources for students, so that when it comes time to look for a job after graduation they will have a great starting point. There will also be open discussion discussi on how these policies can and will affect the individual and how they can be improved if necessary. Presenter: Lucas Toops Room 202 Hip Hop Operable Partitions: The Divisions That LGBTQQIAAP Artists Traverse Using Music (TW: Discussions on Christianity (Oppression by Some Churches), Discussions on homophobia and transphobia Discussions on racism, specific to Black Identities, Explicit lyrics/derogatory language, Hip Hop music genre, Suggestive and revealing clothing) The purpose of this session is to bring awareness to the emerging openly LGBTQ Hip Hop artists and producers who challenge the previous themes of heterosexism, homophobia and misogyny in musics. By looking at current research regarding how selfself identification as a Hip Hop artist and LGBTQQIAAP simultaneously is discordant often, conversations regarding attendees' experiences with musics and cultures will be stimulated through their responses to the music videos of the current artists. The conversations will challenge people's preconceived notions of racial constructions, Hip Hop culture and musics, how being openly ope LGBTQQIAAP in Hip Hop culture carries both overt and covert obstacles. Especially with the attention that has been garnered by Empire's Jamal Lyon (Jussie Smollett) and the VH1 series “Love & Hip Hop Hollywood", more honest conversations surrounding real re LGBTQQIAAP m musicians are necessary. Presenter: Sherrie Hildreth Room 204

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Sexuality and Sensuality 101: Exploration in the Bedroom for all Genders and Sexualities (TW: Sexual content) This workshop will cover the basics of sex toys in regards to self and with partners. The idea of expanding one’s comfort zone with sex toys while educating on proper care and safety. Answering any questions anyone has on sex toys and kink. In addition this course will not focus on gender. It will be inclusive for all genders, binary & non-binary members of the LGBTQQIA community. Also it will focus on sexuality and sensuality, how both of them can work together and also be separate from each other. Also offering sensual education for asexuals and anyone. This is to be inclusive and a safe space for all questions and people to explore the basics of pleasure. This would tie into the theme of crossroads because I personally feel that people who are non-binary or asexual feel excluded in sexual conversations. That most focus on Lesbian, Gay and heterosexual relationships and sexual identity. I would like to expand the conversation and include all. The fact that if one identifies a certain way it should not hinder their part in the conversation or partaking in the education. Also I would like to break away from sex stereotypes and open up the conversation to all. Also general focus on pleasure, whether it be sexual, sensual, emotional or physical pleasure. Presenter: Cort Manton Room 206 Loving the Enemy: Empathy and the Activist Toolkit (TW: Death and dying) Empathy, the ability to understand and share the feelings of another, is a cornerstone of both community building and activism. During this workshop, attendees will learn about the role of empathy in the LGBT community, then progress through a series of exercises designed to cultivate an empathic activist practice. The workshop, an adult version of a curriculum the presenter uses with young teenagers, takes a pragmatic approach to empathy employment, stressing its strategic uses as well as its personal development ones. Presenter: Tobias Gurl Room 214 A&B GaySL: A Crash Course in LGBT American Sign Language During the presentation participants will be introduced to basics of Deaf Culture, learn LGBTQ related signs, discuss the ties between Deaf and LGBTQ culture and identities, and brainstorm ways to make their spaces and activism as a whole more inclusive to Deaf people and people with disabilities. Presenter: Hayden Kristal Room 214 C&D Who Owns Fleek?: The Crossroads of Intersectionality and Cultural Appropriation (TW: Racism, Homophobia, Transphobia, Discussion of -isms, etc., Some profanity, Some sexual content) What is the difference between imitation, admiration, and appropriation? What role does intersectionality play in determining who owns culture? In recent years, there has been much debate surrounding intersectionality and cultural appropriation, both in academic and informal circles. In 2014, Sierra Mannie wrote an open letter titled “Dear white gays," in which she expresses frustration in seeing white gay men enjoying the music, dances, slang, clothing, and hairstyles of black female culture, with little to no recognition of white privilege, racism, and the lived black experience. This letter was met with conflicting reactions as people, especially black females and white gay men, struggled to delineate the line between intersecting identities and cultural appropriation. Taking this initial debate between black females and white gay men as its starting point, this workshop will broadly explore interconnectedness of intersectionality and cultural appropriation as it relates to community building. Presenters: Kody Sexton & Keilah Johnson Room 218 A&B

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High Heels & Hard Hats: Butch/Femme History (TW: Femmephobia, Body image, Misogyny, Transmisogyny) For the queer community to evolve, we must learn from our history and the founders of the movement. We simply cannot do this without delving into butch and femme identities, both separately and the dynamics seen in butch/femme relationships. From factory work to sex work, butches and femmes did, and continue to do, what they have to do to survive. In modern LGBTQ circles, butch and femme people are often ignored for the greater narrative of the androgynous, white, DFAB person. This phenomena began to occur during the early 1990s where many feminist writers started to criticize butch and femme couples as heteronormative and ultimately harmful within the LGBTQ movement. These writings systematically devalued identities that have been used for many years and are integral to communities and the people who identify as either butch or femme. Many of the founders of the LGBTQ movement identify as butch or femme and that is typically glossed over in favor of mainstreaming people into one narrative. In this session, we will discuss the history of butch and femme as identities and talk about how these identities have evolved to the present day. We will look deeper into the persistence of butch/femme couples and discuss how, far from being heteronormative, they are actually a direct challenge to society's ideas of who is, and isn't, allowed to be feminine and masculine. Presenter: Stefani Vargas Harlan Room 218 C&D Queer, Greek, Feminist: Surviving "Incompatible" Identities (TW: Rape/sexual assault [touched on briefly], Homophobia/Discussion of –isms) This presentation will initially address the main concerns/problems that LGBTQ+ and feminist folks have within Greek life. Each concern will be addressed thoroughly with room for discussion, questions, and further input. These concerns will be addressed from my personal experience. The presentation will address some ways to combat or counter the problems LGBTQ+ and feminist folks often see within the system of Greek life. It will also address the fact that some criticisms of mainstream Greek life fail to acknowledge the many Greek organizations that cater to multicultural identities. The presentation will end in general ways to care for yourself and exist in various spaces when you have identities that people view as conflicting. Presenter: Paige Reinhart-Anez Room 278 Queering Reproductive Justice (TW: Rape/Sexual assault, Physical health/Terminal illness, Medical information (surgery, needles, etc.), Sexual content, Homophobia, Transphobia, Discussion of -isms, Discussion of reproductive health) Does your campus health center provide information and culturally competent services for LGBTQ students? Did your sex education in high school include your sexual experiences? What happens when a trans man walks into a health clinic for a pap smear? Understanding the reproductive health issues facing LGBTQ communities is essential to working towards liberation and justice. Bodily autonomy and sexual freedom are central tenets in both LGBTQ and reproductive justice movements. So why do these movements so often operate outside of each other? The truth is that reproductive justice intersects with issues faced by LGBTQ communities in many ways, and working together has the potential to strengthen and build both movements. In this workshop, four students from college campuses in the Midwest will speak about the intersections of reproductive and sexual health and LGBTQ experiences, and the importance of a queer analysis when it comes to thinking about reproductive rights. This panel is dedicated to talking about the reproductive justice framework and participants will learn some ways in which both reproductive justice and LGBTQ organizations are using it to do advocacy work that merges the two while remaining within their missions. Panel Coordinators: Allie Lahey & Haley Miller Panelists: Alaina Littlejohn, Carla Rose Rivas, Edward Vaughn, Nik Worstell Room 279

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Wait, We're Gay Too: People of Color in the Queer Community This interactive presentation will share information about various influential Queer People of Color and their contribution to the modern day Human Right Movement and the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960’s. Participants will also be encouraged to think about whose voices are and aren’t being heard within discussions related to the LGBTQ+ community nationally and on their campuses. Moreover, participants will be placed in small groups to talk about the needs they see on their individual campuses and ways that they can advocate for their unique needs. This session will grounded in the most current research, the use of the identity wheel, values sort, and intersectionality model. Participants will also we asked to complete an action plan to take with them back to their campuses and organizations. Presenter: Shevonne Nelson, M.A. Room 310 Queer Ecology: Undoing Nature (TW: Minor sexual content) Broadly speaking, science tends to encompass fields that aren't typically inclusive of queer perspectives and identities. Often, science is used as justification to further obfuscate or delegitimize certain queer identities, championing rationality and evolutionary logic as foundational values. Queer ecology deconstructs scientific perspectives—particularly those pertaining to the study of animals and ecosystems—through a queer and intersectional lens, often drawing off of ecofeminist analyses. Queer ecology also takes on the idea of “ecosexuality," and, in relation to that, eco-pornography as a method of subverting some of the assumed and troubling facets of pornography within the dominant culture. Furthermore, queer ecology troubles assumptions and, if you will, codified formats within “nature writing" as a broad category, deconstructing ways in which writing about nature not only reinforces heteronormativity and cisnormativity, but reproduces the Nature/Culture dualism, anthropocentrism, and anthropomorphism. Queer ecology proposes a radical “queering of nature" that takes ecofeminist analyses a step further by examining them through an explicit lens of queer theory, and projecting them more thoroughly into a scientific context. Though this has been a generalize summation (by nature of the format), queer ecology aims broadly to complicate generalized notions of both queer theory and scientific understandings as separate areas of study, as well as complicating them simply by way of weaving these perceived separate disciplines together. Presenters: Thryn Hare & Claire Rupnow Room 313 Queer Consumerism The Gender, Sexuality, and Romantic Minority community has long since struggled with a lack of support from family, friends, and even the economy. This session will be focusing on what it means to be a smart, and queer, consumer and how you affect the economy. The session will contain some discussion, but it will also be made up of a unique activity designed to test your knowledge of GSRM friendly and unfriendly companies. We will talk about what it means to be a GSRM friendly company and what it means to be a conscious consumer. We will also discuss the power of your spending habits and how you can make a difference. By educating the community of its power we hope to make a small impact on the economy as well as company policies. Presenter: Sidney Rice Room 314 Being Non-Binary or Trans in the Workplace Topics to be discussed are trans* identity, compliance versus best practice, sex versus gender, sexual orientation, gender expression, changing your legal name, non-binary, genderqueer, gender non-conforming definitions, pronouns, clothes for an interview, statistics about employment in the TGNC community, safe spaces, how to be an ally. Presenter: Matthew Lonski Room 320

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Workshop 3 Sessions th

Saturday, February 20 : 10:30-11:30 am

Featured Workshop: You Can't Change What I Never Chose: How we are winning the fight against conversion therapy (TW: Sexual assault, Abuse, Mental health, Suicide, Bullying, Death) Location: Fowler Hall Since the passage of S. 1172 in California followed by similar bills in New Jersey, Illinois, Oregon, and Washington, D.C., the legislative possibility of ending the abusive practice of conversion therapy has taken great and powerful strides. But it's more than the latest legislative fights that matter. This activism empowers the voice of survivors of abuse unlike any other LGBTQ movement. This session will begin with the history of the abuse of conversion therapy followed by the efforts to ban sexual orientation change efforts that are currently taking place in over 20 states including many in the MBLGTACC region. The leader of this session will also share their experiences in conversion therapy to demonstrate the need for the abuse to end and the successes of the battles already won. Conversion therapy isn't a common household discussion and many don't realize that it affects up to one in three LGBTQ people. From your father telling you to "be a man" to your pastor telling you he'll "pray the gay away" to the horrifying camps of the Dominican Republic--conversion therapy is crushing 1000s of LGBTQ youth every year. Leelah Alcorn's suicide raised the issue to national heights and even President Obama recently condemned conversion therapy. Yet it persists. This session will take the audience (generally applicable to all) from history to personal experience, to activism action in an hour. Presenter: Samuel Brinton Little Queer on the Prairie: Making Meaning of Rural Queer Identity The movement for equity for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and queer identified individuals has historically focused on the urban context. In this workshop we will try to broaden the conversation to include the rural. In the Midwest, many of us have either grown up or moved to live in rural or small towns. Do we experience isolation? Is our safety compromised? Do we inhabit space differently in rural environments when compared to urban settings? This workshop will include a review of academic literature regarding the lived experiences of gender and sexual minorities in rural settings. It will also include a guided group discussion for participants to share their experiences on topics such as developing a community in areas of low population density, visibility and personal safety, and sense of place and belonging in relation to the land. Presenter: Adrienne Conley Room 202 Radical Queer Liberation and Marxism (TW: Homophobia, Transphobia, Misogyny, etc., Sex and sexual taboos, Capitalism/Imperialism, Violence) The purpose of this workshop is to pose challenges to existing liberal queer politics and to understand the possibilities for queer/human liberation from the standpoint of radical Leftism. Due to time constraints, this will most likely serve as an introduction to these questions. Since Marxism has historically been the most influential school of Leftist political thought in the 19th and 20th centuries, we will focus mostly on a Marxian analysis of present society, although other Left positions may be considered depending on the audience Presenter: Ashley Li Room 204

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The Circle of Intersectionalities (TW: Racism, Religion, Bullying, Discussion of Disabilities, Homophobia, Politics, Privilege, Transphobia, Sexuality, Discussions of –isms) The purpose of this activity is to bring attention to various identities that individuals have. This workshop would provide students with the opportunity to learn about the LGBTQ+ community, themselves, and others in terms of how society interacts with individuals and the institutions behind it. This workshop is intended to be more discussion based than anything else. It is also intended to talk about “hot topics" that may make some individuals feel uncomfortable, however, by discussing such things, it will allow people to have open and honest dialogue. The group will start off by doing an icebreaker activity that will be an introspective look into the multiple identities of an individual. Then, the following videos and activities will take a look at society as a whole and determine how society and culture may play a role in identity. This examines how identities and opportunities can influence people, and to what extent we let ourselves be controlled by power, privilege, and oppression. Presenter: Alexia DelosSantos Room 206 The Art and History of Drag; Cultural Foundations in Queer Gender (TW: Historical oppression/trauma, Homophobia, Transphobia, Discussion of -isms, etc., Discussion of appropriation and exploitation, Discussion of transmisogyny) Drag and gender-based performance is one of the most culturally significant forms of expression in the history of trans and queer communities. Uniquely queer, drag is how a wide spectrum of identities take gender into our own hands to address identity, expression, sexuality, and experiences through a lens that is specific to us. It promotes cultural and educational dialogues in ways that other spaces cannot making it a powerful means of self-expression as well as highly vulnerable to methods of appropriation and exploitation. Drag has been used as a mode of self empowerment and as a tool for erasure; it has influenced our community's growth and contributed to its oppression. Whether you love it or hate it, this performance art style is inarguably significant to the development of trans and queer communities today.By gaining a greater understanding of drag, we are participating in an integral part of our communities' historyand contributing to an unmatched space for the artistic critique of ourselves and our queer world.In this workshop, participants will learn about the history of U.S. drag and gender-based performance as anartistic and socioculturalspace, dissect the systems of power and oppression that are tangled within it,see examples of present day drag community dynamics, and gain an understanding of the complex performance style that has greatly shaped the history of what we call the “LGBTQ" community. Presenter: JAC Stringer Room 214 A&B Harnessing Student Government (TW: Sexual assault, Drug/Alcohol abuse, Mental health, Suicide, Bullying, Bathroom politics, Homophobia, Transphobia) The purpose of this session is to help attendees better use student government to create change on campus. This session will examine strategies to build relationships with student government and/or constituent groups, methods of lobbying student government, and why student government is a useful tool for implementing change on campus. Perspectives from both the internal and external viewpoint of student government will be presented. This session will encourage introspection on current strategies. The session will also seek to explore the crossroads of student government, student groups, student activism, and how we can all work better together. Presenter: Nicholas Goldsmith Room 214 C&D

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LGBTQIA+ (re)Presents: Let's Make This Quite Queer. (TW: Transmisogyny, Suicide) Where do our stereotypes come from? How does the media and art control our perceptions of reality? In this presentation we strive to educate members of the LGBTQIA+ community and allies on how the media portrays queer people in theatre, television, and film throughout history and now by exploring prominent queer plays, television shows, and films. We will talk about how each play, TV show, or movie chooses to show any queer characters and whether the representation helps or harms how people perceive the community. In addition to this, we encourage folks to be aware of who gets to write about these queer characters and whether or not they are doing it right. At the end of the presentation, we will share our favorite plays and/or favorite TV shows to further bring awareness to well represented and well-rounded characters in high quality content. Through dialogue, we can share our experiences with media portrayal of our communities and; in doing so, we hope that people will come to think critically about present and future representation and examine pop culture's role in producing, perpetuating, and challenging stereotype. Presenters: Wren Warpula & Marisa Mosqueda Room 218 A&B Queeritualities: Building Constructive Responses at the Intersections of Queerness and Spirituality/Religion (TW: Homo-/Bi/Transphobias, Conversion therapy/Religious violence, Bullying, Death/Dying) What do you find meaningful about religion or spirituality? What prevents us from engaging with religion and/or spirituality to the extent we want? What can we do to overcome these barriers in creative and constructive ways? How can we build and promote the spaces to do so? The point of this presentation is to crowdsource, share, and imagine creative ways that we can constructively (rather than defensively or reactively) respond to religion/spirituality that embrace their meaning for us. This presentation is intended for queer-religions and queer-spiritual people, their friends and allies, and people who are interested in these topics. By exploring these topics, we can better understand through our own and each others' experiences the intersections between queerness and religion/spirituality that can be so important and so overlooked for some LGBTQ+ people. Presenter: Ben Spick Room 218 C&D Two-Spirits: Sacred Intersection of Gender Roles & Identities (TW: Suicide, Harm, Mental health, Homicide) In this session, we will trace the historic roots of the beliefs and identities that led to the adoption of the term “Two-Spirit." Next, we will shed light on some of the commonly mysterious or misunderstood aspects of this non-binary identity. We will explore how fluid gender roles and gender identities are/were sometimes held in sacred regard in tribal community settings. Presenter: Kat Werchouski Room 278 Coming Out: The Stories We Tell Coming out, as a narrative, has a strong history within the queer community and we tell coming out stories frequently as a way of raising awareness and solidifying identity, and as a form of introspection. Our panel seeks to explore both practical approaches to storytelling and weighty questions about the meaning of the stories we, and others, tell. For example: what do the archetypal stories about coming out tell us about what queer life is “supposed” to look like? And, what happens when the narrative of “coming out” is used to describe other stories of emerging identity, that aren’t about gender or sexuality? And practically, how can we structure and perform stories surrounding our coming out as queer individuals? This workshop is a good fit for someone interested in storytelling, critical thinking about public discourse, and what LGBTQA+ stories mean in the broader culture. In this way, we respond to the conference theme of examining introspection at the individual and societal level, and informing the direction we move forward as a community. Presenters: Mariah Pursley & Alison Staudinger Room 279

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Transformational Stories: Talking About Ourselves as a Manner of Self-Care As trans people, we are constantly embroiled in narratives surrounding the identities that we claim for ourselves. Further, we are frequently called upon perform the duty of “telling your story,” for the purposes of awareness raising, activism, and putting a face to a palatable experience of trans life. The way that we are expected to tell our stories follows a pattern of sadness, struggle, pain, and then the eventual “good” ending of success, happiness, and community. Since we are representing our community, we are forced to fit into a narrative of trans storytelling that can quickly become tiring and violent. Similarly, traditional feminist, and even queer, methods of self-care can often be inadequate or lacking for trans people, and many presume pre-existing spaces of health and a lack of gender dysphoria. Directly descending from the conference theme— for what could be more introspective than thinking about how one tells their own story— this workshop seeks to take a radical genderqueer approach to solving these two problems simultaneously. Introducing ways of telling one’s own story in a way that breaks from traditional and expected narratives of trans experience and storytelling, and repositioning telling one’s own story in one’s own way as a mode of self-care, this workshop aims to transform one of the most common burdens of transness into a revolutionary, self-loving act. Attendees will engage in dialogue about trans narratives and learn strategies of self-empowerment through the telling of one’s own story. Participants in the workshop will also gain a radical genderqueer perspective on self-affirming storytelling as self-care. Presenter: Stephanie Skora Room 310 Building and Showing Leadership and Community: How to Demonstrate the Impact of Your LGBTQ+ Program (TW: Bullying and Homophobia) Are you involved with an organization that's making a difference in people's lives and wondering how you can show the effects you're having? This workshop will explain how research can help you evaluate your program and demonstrate your successes. We will discuss how the LGBTQ+ leadership summer camp Brave Trails, located in Los Angeles, has incorporated an evaluation into their program, and the founders of Brave Trails will be Skyping in for a Q&A session. Presenters: Traci Gillig Room 313 When Did We Become Bihets and Monosexuals?: Tracing Tensions Between Bisexual and Lesbian Women (TW: Biphobia, Lesbophobia, Sexualized language) Logging on to Tumblr as a queer woman is tantamount to stepping into a minefield. Slurs, identities, and political discourses are volleyed around in increasingly polemical terms and queer women are both the targets and the aggressors. Words like “bihet" and “monosexual" are used to question women's political allegiances vis-á-vis their sexualities. These developments both are and aren't anything new. Bihet and monosexual can be traced back to 1970's lesbian-feminism as well as the early bisexual organizing of the late 1980's, making them something of a historico-political hybrid. This hybrid has further travelled through changes in sexual politics and methods of queer world-building and communicating. In this presentation I will outline the longstanding tensions between (and among) lesbian and bisexual politics, connecting online discourse to a longer history of intra-community distrust and political scapegoating. I will further explore how the deployment of these discourses in specifically online spaces has fractured how we can understand identity and relate within community. Solidarity between queer women has been fleeting, if possible, because of a lack of understanding of either history or the current political contexts. Presenter: Josie Wenig Room 314

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"From Will and Jack to Brian and Michael. Gays in television: Do we show straight people we are just like them or do we find pride in difference? (TW: Sexual content, Homophobia, Transphobia, Discussions of -isms, etc. Slurs and/or Derogatory language) Few of the television series that addressed topics concerning sexual and gender diversity during the early years of the new millennium were as important—and in many ways detrimental—to the LBGTQ+ community as were Will and Grace and Queer as Folk. Even though these series were groundbreaking in creating spaces for the representation of LBGTQ+ characters that were capable of nuance and complexity in mainstream media, this workshop aims to problematize the identity of these characters and to help students think critically about how stereotypes hindered and continue to deter the struggles of our community. In the early 2000's these series raised the question: Do we show straight people we are just like them or do we find pride in difference? Unfortunately, they largely promoted "straight acting", coarse masculinity, and white muscular bodies as ideal. Presenter: Ricardo Quintana Vallejo Room 320

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State & Regional Caucuses th

Saturday, February 20 : 12:30-1:30 pm Running the State Caucus Meeting Please begin your meeting by identifying the 1-2 current representatives for your state, which were elected at last year’s conference. Those representatives should facilitate the state caucus meeting and the election of new state representatives. If neither are present, select someone to facilitate your state’s meeting and to take minutes of the meeting and keep track of time. It may be easier if these are two separate people, but one person may do both. Begin by reading the oversight committee section above and ask if anyone would like to nominate someone or self-nominate for the 2 state representative positions on the OC. Once there are a number of nominations, have each person introduce themselves by name, school and reason that they would like to be part of the OC and would be a good representative. Have students vote for 2 candidates by raising their hands (or by voice if they are unable to do so). Tally the votes; the 2 candidates with the largest number of votes will be the new representatives. Please note that those elected during the 2016 conference will be subscribing to a full-year commitment. The Oversight Committee The Oversight Committee is the managing entity of MBLGTACC. It exists to select the hosts of future conferences, maintain an archive of previous conference records and control the official conference name. The OC comprises 2 representatives from the current (2016) and future (2017) conferences and 2 elected delegates from each Midwestern state. As stated in the OC’s constitution, the Midwest is comprised of 13 states: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin. State Networking If there are state or region-related issues or current campus issues that you wish to discuss, this is your time to do so! Feel free to discuss these topics in any order and in any way (going around the room, raising hands, pairing delegations together, or creating small discussion groups with one person from each school). Suggested topics include: ● Talking about current issues happening in your state or region ● Discussing issues/initiatives at your school and getting feedback from others ● Sharing best practices for organizing groups or initiatives ● Building statewide coalitions ● Planning field trips to other schools This year’s State, Regional, and International Caucuses will be held in the following locations: Nebraska

Room 202

Kentucky

Room 204

Wisconsin

Room 206

North & South Dakota

Room 214 A&B

Iowa

Room 214 C&D

All regions (NW, SW, NE, SE)

Room 218 A&B

Ohio

Room 218 C&D

Missouri

Room 278

Kansas

Room 279

Minnesota

Room 307

Michigan

Room 310

International

Room 313

Indiana

Room 314

Illinois

Room 320

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Oversight Committee & National Incorporated Board Meeting th

Saturday, February 20 : 2:00-6:00 pm What is the Oversight Committee? MBLGTACC is a student-organized conference and is primarily organized by students at the host school. The Oversight Committee is the managing entity of MBLGTACC. It exists to select the hosts of future conferences, maintain an archive of previous conference records and control the official conference name. The OC comprises 2 representatives from the current (2016) and future (2017) conferences and 2 elected delegates from each Midwestern state. As stated in the OC’s constitution, the Midwest is comprised of 13 states: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin. The conference can be hosted only by a Midwestern college. What is the National Incorporated Board? At last year’s Oversight Committee meeting, Oversight Committee delegates decided that MBLGTACC needed to incorporate, as it was a sustainable move for future conferences. Prior to this, MBLGTACC was a 501©(3) non-profit. Currently, the articles of incorporation are filed and the founding National Incorporated Board has been selected. The National Incorporated Board will serve as mentors and points of contact for each upcoming conference leadership team. Oversight Committee & National Incorporated Board Meeting: What to Expect So you were just elected to be a state representative, now what? Up to 4 representatives from your state (2 elected at last year’s conference and 2 who were just elected) will attend the OC meeting following the state caucus meetings. We will go through the meeting agenda, which includes receiving feedback about this year’s conference; listening to presentation(s) from school(s) that are bidding to host MBLGTACC 2018 and making a selection; and discussing other topics related to the longevity of the conference. We look forward to meeting you! The oversight committee meeting will take place in Rawls Hall room 2070 from 2:00 pm - 6:00 pm.

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Workshop 4 Sessions th

Saturday, February 20 : 1:45-2:45 pm

Featured Workshop: LGBT at GM: Personal stories from GM PLUS members Location: Fowler Hall Today, GM PLUS (People Like US) is known as the affinity group for direct, contract and retired employees of GM Corporation, its subsidiaries and affiliates, in support of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) workplace equality. Learn more about General Motors' employee experiences at this workshop!

Pathogens of the Pathologized (TW: Discussions of mental health, Medical abuse, Medical information, Discussion of Racism/Ableism/Homophobia/Transphobia/Oppression of Intersex people, Discussion of HIV) We currently live in a society where sexuality is considered to be constitutive of our internal psychology on a fundamental level. This places an undue emphasis on the analysis of sexuality and places a pressure on individuals to subject themselves to a medical machine that draws desires out of people and places them under a hyper-invasive and minimizing lens that eliminates people's personhood from clinical settings with respect to sexuality and health related to sexuality. This is the framework set forth by Foucault in History of Sexuality, and this framework becomes more complicated when viewed through an intersectional perspective that incorporates queerness's relationship with other mental illnesses as well as sexually transmitted infections. What does it mean for the medical industrial complex to place primary emphasis on sexuality and the personality traits derived from sexuality when other concerns that disproportionately affect those populations exist? What does that mean when the medical vehicle replicates homophobia, transphobia, and racism, resulting in the distrust of affected groups of seeking help from that system? Presenter: Daniel Muratore Room 202 Finding Ourselves in the Library: Locating LGBTQIA Representational Materials in Libraries (TW: Slurs or outdated language that may misrepresent identities) This workshop serves to assist students in pursuit of queer literatures, histories, and other LGBTQIA-related library materials. Libraries have been a hub for marginalized populations, particularly those of lower-income levels, to access information. Despite being free, though, library materials are not always accessible due to challenges with finding them. Through an intersectional approach, libraries and librarians can improve information access. This workshop will provide search assistance, which will cover subject terms and keyword searches that follow Library of Congress subject headings that will yield more results suited to patron needs. As progressive and queer librarians, we believe that subject headings should reflect the identifications used by queer communities themselves, but the reality is that library materials are still classified under terms and headings that may not be intuitive to the queer researcher or reader. This workshop breaks down why these headings exist and how to use existing headings to find queer-representational materials. Presenters: Brittany Craig & Jessica Colbert Room 204

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Bi the Bi: Unpacking Nonmonosexual Identities, Myths and Phobias Surrounding Them, and Why It's Important to Talk About It. (TW [all are minimally addressed]: Rape/Sexual assault, Abuse/Violence, Drug/Alcohol abuse, Self-harm and/or Mental health, Suicide, Physical Health/Terminal Illness, Bullying, Biphobia, Heteronormativity, Slurs and/or Derogatory language) This workshop will discuss nonmonosexual identities, the myths (i.e. “bisexuals are so promiscuous,") and phobias that exist with them (i.e. biphobia), and why they are important to talk about. Everyone is welcome to learn in this dynamic and engaging workshop. You will learn how and why people who identify as nonmonosexual face worse health outcomes than those who identify as lesbian and gay do. You will learn solutions to confront aggressions and microaggressions related to nonmonosexuality as well. New and existing research on nonmonosexuality will be presented, along with ways to apply this to everyday school and work life. Note: Portions of this workshop will be generalized to bisexuality, this is solely because much of the research has exclusively used bisexuality rather than nonmonosexuality; the presentor will do her best to be inclusive to all nonmonosexual identities. Presenter: Lizzy Bartelt Room 214 A&B Combatting Imposter Syndrome Within Our Communities (TW: Imposter Syndrome, Discussions surrounding Imposter Syndrome) We are often told that we are not “X enough" – not “trans enough," not “gay enough," not “American enough," not “Jewish or Muslim enough," not “old enough" to know our identities, not “experienced enough" to educate our professors or families on queer issues, not “clothed enough" to deserve respect, not “smart enough" to succeed, not “small enough" to be feminine, not “tall enough" to be masculine – you name it, we're probably not “X enough" for someone. This is problematic – who gets to tell us we're not experts on our own bodies or experiences? What's more problematic, though, is when we start to believe this and repeat it to ourselves. “I'm not X enough to do this." “I don't deserve Y because I'm not X enough." “Someone's going to find me out." These statements are all signs of imposter syndrome, and more than likely, you are “X" enough, or are well on your way to being “X" enough. But with all these people and feelings telling you you're not, how do you know you are? Imposter syndrome permeates all professions – acting, teaching, healing, building – every profession and every community. However, it is even more prevalent among people who are oppressed and marginalized. This workshop's presenters will explain imposter syndrome in more depth and, crucially, facilitate a discussion about how we can combat imposter syndrome. Presenters: Katka Showers-Curtis & Annabelle Talia Bruno Room 214 C&D "Beat that mug, hunty": Transitions and transformations within drag culture in central Kansas Through exploring drag culture in central Kansas over the past three years, I argue how drag culture aids in forming personal identities, both while performing in and out of drag, creating perceptions of power, and providing pockets of safety for queer communities in one of the most vibrantly conservative states in the United States. Drag and personal identities are constructed and adapted as one transitions and transforms from one identity to the other, as well as how each performer exhibits growth with time spent performing in drag. Drag performers, all of whom possess multiple layers of oppression, have grown in their gender performativity in drag while simultaneously having to navigate unknown spaces and interactions outside of places of performance. I argue how through personal growth and transformation, the drag performers in central Kansas are positioned near the top of the larger queer community in terms of power. But when that scope is broadened up to larger communities in central Kansas outside of targeted queer communities, that power means nothing. Navigating these systems of power and marginality within already marginalized classes of people is critical to understanding how these performers navigate different spaces. Safe spaces are formed, often with the help of drag performers as a source of entertainment. I examine these notions of perceived safe spaces and what happens to the queer community when these spaces are lost. Presenter: Jakki Forester Room 218 A&B

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Fat & Queer: Loving Your Body & Exploring Your Identity (TW: Body image, Weight loss, Fatphobia, Eating disorders) The mainstream culture has defined beautiful and healthy as thin and small. The queer community has subverted this notion, however, fatphobia is rampant even in so called “safe queer spaces”. We will delve into the false assumption that, for fat identified folks, being fat can be a separate identity from being queer. The intersection of fat and queer will be explored as we move through the session including discussing how both marginalized and privileged identities affect identifying as fat. We will touch upon size privilege within the fat community in order to make sure that small and conventionally pretty white cisgendered women do not take up too much space or talk over the experience of fat queer POC who experience the harshest fatphobia. The history of the body positivity movement, specifically in the queer community, and where the movement stands today will also be a major talking point. The goal of the workshop is to give fat identified folks a space to speak about their experience while at the same time giving fat allies a chance to listen and learn. We will also discuss the “weight = health” myth and the damage that myth can do. We will conclude the workshop with ways to love our bodies because they are fat not in spite of that fatness. Presenter: Stefani Vargas Harlan Room 218 C&D Queer History: What You Never Knew and How to Use It (TW: Suicide, Anti-LGBT violence, Anti-LGBT discrimination, Misgendering) While paying special attention to transgender, intersex, people of color and other marginalized groups' histories, the presenter will cover specific stories of fascinating individuals that illustrate their time and place instead of lecturing on a timeline. Individuals discussed include Christina of Sweden, Elagabalus, Emperor Ai of Han, and Ma Rainey. Showing how every person's action adds up to make a difference over time on a global map with colored dots and providing a handout with a list of dozens of online LGBTQ+ history resources from apps to wikis, participants will come away inspired and informed. Consistently asking participants for their answers and to teach each other what they already know, the workshop will also include small group work. The specific ways that participants will be encouraged to use knowledge of history focuses on two arenas: activism and youth empowerment. Presenter: Adriana Sisko Room 278 The Crossroads of Family, Faith, and Personal Identities: Personal Reflections on the Faith Journey (TW: Religion, Evangelical, Christianity) One's personal identity can be shaped by a number of internal factors and external influences. Two highly influential external factors in today's society are one's identity within a family unit and one's identity within a faith community. When those three pieces— identity, faith, and family-- intersect, there is a reaction that can create beauty, love, and growth or discord, scorn, and confusion. In this session, we will discuss the relationship between one's personal identity, how it is influenced by a faith community, and how it can impact the family unit. The basis of this discussion comes from my own personal history in which my father's personal identity intersected with his faith and family, forcing him to come to a crossroads in his life journey and to come out of the closet as a proud gay man. We will examine how the story of my father at the age of 50, with 2 children, a 30-year marriage, and a pastor position within an Evangelical Christian Church makes a choice based on his personal identity that will drastically alter his identity within his family unit and faith community. We will also discuss how being true to himself affected his marriage, his family, his faith community, and how it influenced my identity within my family and faith community. Presenter: Melissa Smith-Moser Room 279

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Queering Sex Ed: The Past, Present, and Future of Sexual Health Education (TW: Sexual content, Rape/Sexual assault, Abuse/Violence, Homophobia, Transphobia, Discussion of -isms, etc.) Time and again, members of the LGBTQ community have described the lack of representation and personally-relevant knowledge they were taught in sex ed courses. While we are lucky enough to live in an age where knowledge is readily available online, there is much misinformation and mixed messages to be found there, and it often does not teach individuals about other important parts of sexual health, such as healthy relationships, sexual and asexual identities, and communicating with your partner(s). Based on the theme of “Introspection at the Crossroads," this program seeks to take a look at the experiences we have faced in our education of sexual health: what do we remember learning in school? What didn't we learn? What have we had to find out on our own? Once we answer these questions and are able to be open about our own experiences, attendees will learn about the current state of sexual health education by looking at comprehensive sexual health education programs, the National Sexuality Education Standards, and the legal standing of sexual health education federally and in different states across the nation. Finally, looking toward the future, the attendees will discuss what sort of topics they believe are important to be covered in sexual health education courses, followed by a discussion on what direction sexual health education currently appears to be heading. Presenter: Robert Waara Room 310 Brick by Brick Ruins, Rubble, and Rabble are frequently left behind year by year as organizations come to a state of flux as the leaders move on and constituents change. In with the old and out with the new, but what about the lessons that were learned and the relationships that were created? There is always the fear that the organization may come crashing down and be nothing but a shadow of its former self. When it’s time for experienced leaders who have been there for years to move on, what will be left behind to guide the new less experienced leaders? What Kind of leaders will they become? The purpose of this presentation is to offer techniques to leaders and advisors on developing a strong leadership group through self discovery and team building. Understanding personality types, natural personal strengths, and learning styles are keys to build a path for the development of future leaders. Presenter: David Yip Room 313 Trans* 101 (TW: Abuse/Violence, Mental health, Suicide, Bullying, Bathroom politics, Homophobia, Transphobia, Derogatory language, Substance abuse, Homelessness, and Intersectionality conflicts) Topics to be discussed are pronouns, heteronormativity, definitions, the gender binary, breaking the binary, how to be a good ally. Presenter: Matthew Lonski Room 314 Teach Me How to Twerk Gurrrl: A Conversation About Minstrel Entertainment, Hyper Visible Black Bodies, and Cultural Appropriation within White & Non-Black LGBTQIA+ Spaces (TW: Antiblackness, Hypersexuality, Abuse/Violence, Transmisogyny, Minstrelsy, Hate crimes, Sexual content, Discussions of –isms and phobias, etc., Slurs and/or Derogatory language, Death/Dying)

Historically, white LGBTQIA spaces have been riddled with racism on institutional, structural, and interpersonal levels. Black LGBTQIA+ folks in particular face an extraordinary amount of anti-black sentiment and behavior within these spaces. This workshop addresses the hypervisibility of blackness within white and nonblack communities and the ways that this visibility impacts our navigation in those spaces. The sociopolitical positioning of black bodies as entertainment is a byproduct of a white supremacist subjugation and antiblack violence that manifested itself through a number of different mediums. One of the most notable forms this marginalization in contemporary terms is through minstrelsy. Black LGBTQIA folks are fetishized, tokenized, socially dissected, and politically consumed by white and nonblack communities for the sake of entertainment. We are viewed as spectacles that stimulate their voracious sexual and fantastical appetites of nonblack people. Rather than our physical presence and our sociopolitical existence being viewed through a recognition of our personal ties to blackness, our bodies are socially dislocated for the sake of pleasuring others within the larger social imaginary. Through an intersectional gender liberating lens, participants in this workshop will bridge efforts with the facilitator to address the ways that multidimensional black identities are affected by minstrel entertainment, cultural appropriation, and antiblackness. This is a conversation based workshop that ties history and modern culture to theoretical frameworks of interpretation. Presenter: Dua Saleh Room 320

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Identity Forums th

Saturday, February 20 : 3:00-4:00 pm Identity forums are safe spaces for people of a particular identity group. They are for all groups within the LGBTQIA community to come together to discuss issues of importance or concern and to support one another. Please welcome everyone in attendance at any of these forums. To nurture inclusive and educational environments, the identity forums are open to anyone and everyone. Questioning Forum Middle Sexualities Forum Non-binary Forum Gay Forum Trans Forum Queer People of Color Forum Ace Forum Disability Forum Queer Forum Polyamorous Forum Ally and Advocate Forum Lesbian Forum DIY-Forum (Don’t see a forum that fits you? Start your own!)

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Room 202 Room 206 Room 214 A&B Room 214 C&D Room 218 A&B Room 218 C&D Room 278 Room 279 Room 307 Room 310 Room 313 Room 314 Fowler Hall


Film Screening of “Matt is a Friend of Mine” th

Saturday, February 20 : 4:15-5:45 pm

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Keynote 2: Judy Shepard “The Legacy of Matthew Shepard” th

Saturday, February 20 : 6:00-7:00 pm This event is done in collaboration with Purdue’s LGBTQ Center

In 1998, Judy Shepard lost her son, Matthew, to a murder motivated by anti-gay hate. Turning tragedy into a crusade for justice, and determined to prevent Matthew's fate from befalling others, she established The Matthew Shepard Foundation to help carry on his legacy. Activist speaker Judy Shepard has appeared in two Human Rights Campaign advertisements urging an end to anti-gay violence and promoting a greater understanding of gay issues. She is also actively involved with Parents, Families, and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG). In this capacity, she has written an open letter to schools across the country urging officials to make schools safer for gay students by promoting tolerance and diversity. Most recently, Judy Shepard authored the New York Times best-selling book, The Meaning of Matthew: My Son's Murder in Laramie, and a World Transformed, a moving, intimate look at how her life, and the entire fight for equal rights, changed when her son was killed. The 2015 documentary Matt Shepard is a Friend of Mine revisits Matt's murder and provides a new look into his too-short life.

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Workshop 5 Sessions st

Sunday, February 21 : 8:00-9:00 am Navigating Barriers to LGBTQ Healthcare (TW: Physical health and Mental health, Medical abuse and Assault, Misgendering) The healthcare system as it exists now fails to properly care for LGBTQI / gender-variant people. From dual perspectives as a nonbinary trans person and a relative insider to the healthcare process, I will examine existing problems, evaluate some efforts currently in progress, and envision what a truly inclusive healthcare system might look like. Please refrain from wearing scents to this workshop. Presenter: Leslie Boker Room 204 Being a Queer Ally to Movements Centering Around Race This presentation is about how to be a student activist while being queer and not completely always felt welcomed when fighting for causes that are not directly LGBTQIA focused. It will talk about allying when queer and fighting for identities that are sometimes the most salient for individuals fighting. It addresses how to to advocate and support when you have the identity at the center and when you do not. Presented through the lens of the presenter's experience being a black gay male who helps organize for #Concernedstudent1950. The presentation will address coalition building and the importance for all marginalized students to come together to fight for greater quality of education for all marginalized identities even when the identity at the forefront is not necessarily yours. Through this the presentation will address how not to fall into the pitfall of getting the white savior complex for noncolored queer activist truly attempting to help. Navigating being a queer person of color student activist at a predominantly white intuition where it may be hard for a person's racial identity or LGBTQIA identity to be accepted in spaces meant for one or the other. Presenter: Delan Ellington Room 206 MASC 4 MASC: The Idealization of Masculinity (TW: Sexual content, Slurs and/or Derogatory language, Sexism) The discussion will revolve around why masculinity has become a toxic ideal within not just the gay communities, but within lesbian and trans as well. We will showcase a number of tweets with a PowerPoint that will display both the desire for masc4masc and those that make a mockery of it as well. The content of the tweets will encourage either a defense or a criticism from our audience for masculinity and why it is considered such a desirable trait in a partner. We will then move beyond these tweets to provoke a more in depth discussion about why masculinity is so revered within our communities. This workshop will connect with the conference's theme of “Introspection at the Crossroads," because our communities are at a crossroads with masculinity and before we make decisions at these crossroads, we need to be introspective. We will challenge our audience members to analyze and critique their own internal biases and preferences. Hopefully this workshop will lead to the development of queer communities being unafraid of selfreflection and constructive criticism and unafraid to challenge systems of oppression like sexism, homophobia and transphobia. Presenters: Tom DeLeon, Romeo Jackson, and Kyle Urbashich Room 214 A&B

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Breaking Binarism: Towards a Non-Binary Revolution The time for the non-binary revolution is now! As folks of all gender identities gain prominence and space in the larger queer community, it’s time to start thinking about what our justice movement will look like. Our first step must be removing binarist oppressions from our language, and our selves, moving ourselves away from non-binary towards spaces of gender expansive discourse and politics. The number of individuals who identify outside the gender binary has exploded in recent years, as more and more people have begun thinking of themselves as genderqueer, non-binary, and a host of other identities, as well. However, those of us who identify with genders outside the binary have yet to see a justice movement fully incorporate our political needs and goals. In fact, precious few organizations exist in which we can gather to formulate those very goals, outside of large gatherings such as conferences. Even within large-scale activist spaces, gender expansive communities often find our poorly addressed or ignored, or acknowledged with a sparse number of token sessions. In keeping with the theme of Introspection at the Crossroads, the current moment is often posited as a “tipping point” for trans people. Yet reflection on who is counted as trans in this definition, and which trans people this is meant to be a “tipping point” for is essential. We must reflect on how trans people outside the gender binary have been nearsystematically excluded from trans movements, and how to expand trans justice to include our needs. Presenter: Stephanie Skora Room 214 C&D Lowering the Water Line (TW: Sexual assault, Mental health, Isolation, Physical health, Bullying, Homophobia, Eating disorders, Slurs/Derogatory language) From the day we are born, society pressures us to live a certain lifestyle, to act a certain way, and to be a certain person. These expectations come in the form of emotion management, gender roles, and identity expression, among many others. We live every day of our lives hiding parts of us that we do not want our friends, families, or acquaintances to see. What does this do to our self-image? This workshop will work to identify these expectations using a sociological lens and by identifying the varying intersectionalities that we carry with us every day. Using several visual models and metaphors, including Edward T. Hall's Iceberg Model, “Lowering the Water Line" provides a framework to evaluate our own lives and how they are contextualized by the culture and structure around us. From there, the workshop will work to break down these barriers and identify ways to do so in everyday interactions and conversation without becoming or seeming too vulnerable. This workshop aims to break down the walls between us and lower our water lines, revealing who we truly are. Presenter: Stuart Schmidt Room 218 A&B Guilty as Charged: Navigating Queer Self Worth and Validation in an Orthodox Christian Space (TW: Abuse/Violence, Self-harm/Mental health, Suicide, Bullying, Discussion of -isms [Homophobia, Biphobia, Transphobia], Slurs/Derogatory language, Therapy, Conversion Therapy) The purpose of this workshop is to spark the understanding and realization in queer Christians that their emotional, spiritual, mental and literal physical voice is important and needed in their religious spaces. In the workshop, we will be exploring many aspects of the situations that they may encounter in their congregations. First, the importance of one owns spiritual journey: why they love their faith, how they feel satisfied when they attend, etc. This topic will be taught in-group discussions and lecture. Talking about why you feel worthy in these spaces is healing and essential to understanding self worth. Secondly, we will discuss what Christian guilt is, where it comes from/what it does and how to combat it. Attendees will most likely have felt Christian guilt at some point in their life. Exploring and working through emotions toward the origins of Christian guilt allows for the groundwork to be comfortable/cope when we discuss how to combat find self worth within the guilt. Lastly, we will discover what it is like to be unapologetically queer in a religious space by speaking your truth at all times. Presenter: Michele Mathis Room 218 C&D

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Queering Non-Queer Student Organizations and Campus Spaces (TW: Bullying, Homophobia, Transphobia, Discussion of -isms, etc., Slurs and/or Derogatory language) Queer student groups on campuses are incredibly valuable venues for educating college students about queer topics, centers of queer activism and above all, safe spaces for queer students. The expansion of those safe spaces to encompass more of campus can be the arduous work of years of fighting with administrators, negotiating with stubborn faculty and struggling with students determined to prevent it from happening. However, queer student groups are not the only places to do this and grand gestures are not always required. Any student organization, or floor in a residence hall, or student senate room can be a crossroads for queer students and students who would never attend a queer student group and making those spaces more queer-friendly is essential to constructing a safer campus environment for all students. The purpose of this workshop is provide tools for student leaders and other engaged members of their campus communities to bring queer topics out into the campus at large and establish other organizations and spaces on campus as safe spaces for queer students. Presenter: Laddie Arnold Room 278 So You're Dating a Trans Person: A Guided Discussion (TW: Frank discussions of transphobia) A guided discussion centered on the experience of being a partner to a trans-identified person. Discussion will involve being supportive when your partner shares their trans identity, navigating the changes involved with your partner's chosen transition goals, and building support systems with other partners. Thee workshop will also provide a venue for partners to share their unique experiences with the group. The goal of the guided discussion is to allow the partners of trans-identified people to share their experiences in a safe and supportive environment. The session will also act as an educational experience for non trans people who are newly partnered to trans people allowing them to network with others who have already experienced relationships with a trans partner. Presenter: Stefani Vargas Harlan Room 279 This or That: Navigating the Non-Binary in Higher Education (TW: Drug/Alcohol abuse, Self-harm and/or Mental health, Suicide, Rape/Sexual assault, Eating disorders, Homophobia, Transphobia, Discussion of -isms, etc., Slurs and/or Derogatory language, Bullying, Bathroom politics) The purpose of this workshop is to create dialogue on the educational well being of non-binary identified students in higher education. Non-binary visibility, even within the LGBTQIA+ community, is often limited. Allowing non-binary students the space to voice their feelings and experiences as they venture through higher education is important in our fight to make education more inclusive. This workshop will also allow for individuals (mentors, students, advisors, etc.) of all identities from separate universities to discuss what their institution does/does not do in order to create more inclusive spaces. This workshop relates well to the conference theme because it encompasses many components of identity formation and experience. Presenter: Tiff Weekley Room 310 Bienvenidos/as/es: Creating an Inclusive Spanish Language (TW: Slurs and/or Derogatory language, Homophobia, Transphobia, Discussion of -isms, etc., Bullying) In many languages throughout the international community, languages tend to gender not only items, but they fail to incorporate terminology that is inclusive to people who identify as trans and people who do not identify within the binary. The goal of this presentation is to provide the audience with common phrases and vocabulary that are currently being utilized in the Spanish language, provide the audience with information that will allow them to recognize the need to use inclusive language and to reduce offensive language, and to finally begin practicing the Spanish language in a way that is more inclusive to trans and non-binary people. Presenter: Mitchell Martini Room 313

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Getting PrEPared (TW: Discussions of HIV and HIV status) While there are many ways to reduce the risk of acquiring HIV, some of the most debated methods have surfaced in the last few years. Pre and post-exposure prophylaxis are two methods used to stop new HIV infections among HIV negative people. This will be a workshop style session where the facilitators will first quickly review the HIV basics (i.e. risks for transmission, prevention strategies, modes of transmission, what is AIDS versus HIV, etc.). From there, the facilitators will gather information from the participants of the workshop through open ended questions and/or polling about what they know or think about PrEP. This will allow the facilitators to discuss the information or misinformation that participants present. The workshop will then cover the important facts about PrEP and its effectiveness. By highlighting the personal aspect of PrEP, the facilitators hope to show that it is one option for helping to prevent HIV and that it depends on each individual person to determine whether or not they should or should not consider PrEP. Presenter: Noah Barth & Sergio Tundo Room 314 Our Own Worst Enemies: Self-directed microaggressions in the Transgender and Intersex Communities (TW: Microaggressions) Anyone who might be a member of a marginalized group has doubtless experienced some form of microaggression – the everyday (intentional or otherwise) insult, jab, unfair treatment, micromanaging, patronizing, hostile, negative comment, or insinuation that someone knows better than you do simply based on your identity. But what among those microaggressions do we take too much to heart? How often are we internalizing these “innocuous" comments that we hear and letting ourselves begin to believe that we are lesser than the majority? Presenter: Annabelle Talia Bruno Room 320

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Keynote 3: Rt. Rev. V. Gene Robinson “Crossroads, Intersections and All of Us” st

Sunday, February 21 : 9:15-10:45 am

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On June 7, 2003, Gene Robinson was elected Episcopal Bishop of New Hampshire, becoming the first openly-gay and partnered priest to be elected Bishop in historic Christendom. Despite national and international efforts to derail his consecration, Robinson was consecrated bishop on November 2, 2003, and served as IX Bishop of New Hampshire until his retirement in early 2013. Since his retirement, Robinson has been serving as a Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress, a progressive think tank in Washington, DC, speaking and writing on national and international LGBT issues, race, poverty, and immigration reform. He has been a vocal advocate for the transgender community, authoring a biblical and theological understanding of gender identity and arguing for the full inclusion of transgender people in the life of the Church and in American society. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Auburn Seminary, New York City. He has been honored by every national LGBT organization and in 2014 was named by the Washington Post as one of the 21 most influential LGBT people in Washington. In addition to being a popular speaker in the U.S. and abroad, he writes opinion columns on a variety of topics for The Daily Beast, Huffington Post, and Time.com. Co-author of three AIDS education curricula for youth and adults, Gene has done AIDS work in the United States, Uganda, and South Africa. He has been an advocate for antiracism training in the diocese and wider Church. He helped build the Diocese of New Hampshire’s close working partnership with the New Hampshire Community Loan Fund, advocated for debt relief for the world’s most impoverished nations, lobbied for socially responsible investment within and beyond the Church, and had a special ministry to those incarcerated in New Hampshire’s prisons. He is author of In the Eye of the Storm: Swept to the Center by God (Morehouse, 2006) and God Believes in Love: Straight Talk about Gay Marriage (Knopf, 2012). He is the subject of two feature length documentaries: Daniel Karslake’s For the Bible Tells Me So (2007) and Macky Alston’s Sundance Special Jury Prizewinning Love Free or Die (2012). He holds the M.Div. degree from General Theological Seminary, a B.A. in American Studies/History from the University of the South, Sewanee, TN, and several honorary doctorates. In early 2009, President-Elect Barack Obama asked Bishop Robinson to offer the invocation at the opening inaugural event at the Lincoln Memorial, in Washington, DC. He is often a guest at the White House. Robinson enjoys biking, theatre, music, gardening, travel and most people. He is the father of two daughters and the proud grandfather of two granddaughters.


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OFFICE OF THE PROVOST February 2016

Dear MBLGTACC Attendees: Welcome to Purdue University and the Greater Lafayette community. As Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Diversity, I am honored that our campus was selected to host this important conference bringing together students, faculty, staff, and community leaders dedicated to exploration, education, inclusion and social justice. I know you will find our campus to be a welcoming space to cultivate ideas, develop skills, and expand your networks. This event is essential for fostering inclusive campus climates, and Purdue is proud that you are here! Purdue University is committed to providing a community that recognizes and values the inherent worth and dignity of every person; upholds sensitivity, understanding, and mutual respect among its members; and encourages each individual to reach their personal potential. As a campus, we believe that diversity strengthens our institution, stimulates creativity, promotes the exchange of ideas, and enriches us all. Since Purdue opened its LGBTQ Center in 2012, we have greatly expanded our conversations around gender and sexuality, intersectionality, accessibility, and inclusion in all areas of the institution. Today, we are positioned as leaders in LGBTQ topics including student healthcare, research and academics, housing, support services, study abroad, training, programming, and yet we know there is still much more we must do. I express my deep gratitude to the students who have been involved in coordinating MBLGTACC 2016 as well as the staff and faculty members who have committed their support to the success of this historic event at Purdue University. I also thank each and every attendee for your participation in what is sure to be a powerful and transformative conference. Once again, welcome to Purdue, we are pleased that you are here and I wish you a productive and intellectually stimulating conference. Sincerely, Deba Dutta Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs and Diversity Hovde Hall of Administration, Room 100

610 Purdue Mall

West Lafayette, IN 47907-2040 (765) 494-9709

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Peter J. Bunder West Lafayette City Council - District #2 Morton Community Center 222 N. Chauncey, West Lafayette, IN 47906. pbunder@westlafayette.in.gov

Dear Friends, As the city councilman for the Second District in West Lafayette, and as City Council President and as an Episcopal priest, let me welcome MBLGTACC 2016 to Purdue and West Lafayette. Thanks for not boycotting us. As you arrive, not only are we dealing on a state level with the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA), but the Bopp law firm has filed a complaint on behalf of the plaintiffs, Indiana Family Institute, Indiana Family Action and The American Family Association of Indiana against the cities of Indianapolis, Carmel, Bloomngton and Columbus on the theory that the cities ordinances do not allow the groups to freely express their religion. West Lafayette's 1993 and 2010 actions in support of the work of our Human Relations Commission escape notice because they exist through resolution not ordinance. I'd be tempted to boycott us. Yet I think you'll find that both West Lafayette and Lafayette are welcoming communities. Much of the credit for that goes to Pride Lafayette and its mission is to continually educate and promote awareness of diversity, health, culture and acceptance of individuals based on sexual orientation and gender identity. We are thrilled to have Lowell Kane serve as the inaugural Director of the Purdue University Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) Center. The Purdue Office of Diversity and Inclusion is dedicated to improving diversity and inclusion at Purdue as a way of enhancing the academic and research experience for everyone on the Purdue campus. Our city governments struggle to do the best we can with the law as it is. We thank you for your presence. It's a help. Finally, a warm "welcome back" to Purdue to both Judy Shepard and Gene Robinson. Best wishes,

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State of Indiana

Senate

Senator Tim Lanane Minority Leader 200 West Washington Street Indianapolis, Indiana 46204 (317) 232-9427 s25@iga.in.gov

Committees: Rules & Legislative Procedure, RMM Civil Law Corrections & Criminal Law Insurance & Financial Institutions Ethics Elections Joint Rules Public Policy

February 2016 Dear Friends, As an ally of the LGBT community and a legislator that has long advocated for equal rights for th all, it is my distinct pleasure to welcome you to the 24 annual Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference at Purdue University. Your presence in Indiana comes at a crucial time for our state. After the passage of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) in 2015, our state was thrown in the national spotlight as being an unwelcoming place for the LGBT community. The Republican-inflicted fight over RFRA resulted in economic damage to our state and exposed enormous deficiencies in Indiana’s Civil Rights protections. Since then, a majority of Hoosiers have called on lawmakers to send a strong signal – to make very clear that Indiana does not condone discrimination. All Hoosiers, and all visitors to Indiana deserve equal protection under the law. This conference is an opportunity for LGBT students, their allies, and advisors to meet in a safe and supportive environment and to learn and discuss issues of importance to the LGBT community. Thankfully, West Lafayette has taken the steps to ensure that all members of the community are protected from discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity – steps Senate Democrats will keep fighting for to ensure Indiana follows suit and establishes statewide protections for the LGBT community. This conference brings together people from many walks of life to address the issues that directly affect our friends, family, neighbors, and our nation as a whole. The conference is sure to be an incredible event and I am certain that you will all return to your campuses with a strengthened sense of unity and empowerment within the LGBT community. I encourage each and every one of you to use this as motivation to further the causes of advocacy and equality. I commend West Lafayette and Purdue University for being welcoming hosts of the conference and I wish you all the best in your future endeavors. Sincerely,  Timothy S. Lanane Minority Leader, Indiana State Senate State Senator, District 25 53


American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana

February 9, 2016 Dear MBLGTACC Attendees: On behalf of the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana and the Greater Lafayette ACLU, I am pleased to welcome you to West Lafayette/Lafayette and to the state of Indiana. Hoosiers have been vocal since last year’s RFRA debacle that Indiana needs to update our laws to protect sexual orientation and gender identity in housing, employment and public accommodations. In a recent poll, 70 percent of Hoosiers believe the law should be updated to include those protections. The ACLU at all levels has been instrumental in this fight, and we won’t rest until our state’s civil rights law is finally amended to include full protections for LGBT Hoosiers. The ACLU has a long history of defending the LGBT community. We brought our first LGBT rights case in 1936 and founded the national LGBT Project in 1986. State by state, including in Indiana, the ACLU has participated in court and legislative victories for LGBT marriage, and finally last year, in the U.S. Supreme Court case that made marriage equality the law of the land. On other fronts in Indiana, we’re litigating for the resettlement of Syrian refugees and to ensure the mentally ill are not placed in solitary confinement, and our First Amendment cases encompass the full scope of religious liberty and freedom of expression. We hope, while you’re here and after you’ve returned home, that you’ll take time to learn more about our work in Indiana by visiting aclu-in.org and about our national impact by visiting aclu.org. I hope you enjoy your stay in West Lafayette/Lafayette, and that you experience the true spirit of Hoosier Hospitality. Sincerely,

Jane Henegar Executive Director

1031 East Washington Street ■ Indianapolis, Indiana 46202-3952 ■ p 317.635.4059 ■ f 317.635.4105 www.aclu-in.org ■ Twitter @acluindiana ■ www.facebook.com/ACLU.Indiana 54

MBLGTACC 2016 Program Guide  

The 2016 Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference was held February 19-21, 2016 at Purdue University in West Lafayet...

MBLGTACC 2016 Program Guide  

The 2016 Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference was held February 19-21, 2016 at Purdue University in West Lafayet...

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