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Welcome From MBLGTACC 2013 .................................................. 3 Meet the Planning Coalition............................................................. 4 Donors and Special Thanks............................................................. 6 Welcome Letters............................................................................. 9 Etiquette for Inclusion.................................................................... 18 Resources..................................................................................... 20 About MSU’s LGBTA Community.................................................. 22 History of MBLGTACC................................................................... 23 Conference Purpose and Theme................................................... 25 Lansing Center Floor Plan.............................................................. 26 Schedule of Events........................................................................ 27 Visual Spread................................................................................ 28 Keynote Speakers......................................................................... 32 Entertainment................................................................................ 36 Identity Caucuses.......................................................................... 42 Happening on Campus.................................................................. 43 Recommended for Staff, Faculty, Advisors and Grad Students...... 44 Explanation of Our Featured Workshops........................................ 45 Workshop Session 1..................................................................... 46 Workshop Session 2..................................................................... 50 Career and Exhibitor Fair............................................................... 54 State Caucuses and Oversight Committee.................................... 56 Workshop Session 3..................................................................... 58 Workshop Session 4..................................................................... 62 Workshop Session 5..................................................................... 66 Workshop Session 6..................................................................... 70 Workshop Session 7..................................................................... 74 Letter to the Future........................................................................ 88 MBLGTACC 2014......................................................................... 89 Host MBLGTACC 2016................................................................. 90 Glossary of Terms.......................................................................... 91 1


Welcome from the 2013 Planning Coalition Welcome! The 2013 Planning Coalition is thrilled to present the 21st Midwest BLGTA College Conference. It’s been an amazing two-year ride as we have planned, prepared, freaked out, panicked, and otherwise organized the largest LGBTA college conference in the country. The Planning Coalition hopes you have the experience of a lifetime this weekend while you meet new people, listen to great speakers, attend workshops, and more. This conference is a chance for us to see what our community is capable of when we come together to accept and affirm our differences. When our differences stand together, a strong portrait of what equality needs to be is revealed in a beautiful “mosaic.” Our community works to gain the right and freedom to love the way we love, feel the way we feel, and exist the way we exist. The belief in basic human rights — that people must let others live the way they want without harming others — is at the forefront of our constantly changing movement. Our “mosaic” sometimes comes apart when we let hate in, when we turn against parts of our community because they believe differently than us, but we always strive to come back together. Remember what you strive for every day. Fight for the beliefs of those around you, even when you don’t agree. Remember that people can think differently without being wrong. And most importantly, remember that you make the difference in our community. When you stand up and support a friend, a loved one, and even a stranger — no matter their background, identity, or beliefs — you change the world. This weekend, come together in a safe space meant for learning, exploration and growth. The Planning Coalition is excited to have you in Lansing, and we hope you leave here with at least a little more knowledge about how to change the world!

— MBLGTACC 2013 Planning Coalition

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MBLGTACC 2013 Planning Coalition Executive Board Michelle Brack Director of Logistics Michelle is a senior Genomics and Molecular Genetics major. She is the Co-Chair of Trans*Action, a student organization focused on providing a safe social and educational environment for gender-variant and allied students. In the future she plans to pursue research to treat genetic disorders and mutations – unless they result in superhuman powers. Justin Drwencke Director of Programming Justin is a 2012 graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Humanities from the College of Arts and Letters, combining concentrations in Mathematics, Professional Writing, and Gender Studies. In addition to planning the conference, Justin works full time at MSU Federal Credit Union. When he’s not working, planning the conference, or otherwise being a badass, Justin enjoys baking, random dance parties, and watching 1960s TV shows on Netflix. Travis Lunsford Director of Finance Travis Lunsford is a junior studying Women and Gender Studies and Anthropology and is Chair of the Alliance of Queer and Ally Students.. He aspires to one day get a Masters in Student Affairs Administration and work with marginalized populations of college students to ensure programming and campus activities are inclusive and that places are welcoming to all. In his free time, Travis loves to socialize! He is somewhat of a night owl and loves to meet new people. Seriously, he loves a good conversation with a complete stranger. Feel free to drop him a line any time! Kate Miller Project Analyst Kate graduated from Michigan State University in 2011 with a B.A. in Public Administration and Public Policy and with minors in Music and Women’s and Gender Studies. She was the president of PRIDE, a queer and ally organization at MSU, for all four years of her college career. As part of her goal to promote improvement and growth in the MSU queer and ally community at MSU, Kate helped create the Campus Planning Coalition. The CPC, made up of Presidents and Vice Presidents of queer student groups, promotes leadership and mentoring between new and old students. Being named “Outstanding Executive Board Member” of the 2010-2011 school year wasn’t Kate’s last hurrah at MSU, as one can see from her post-graduation involvement with MBLGTACC! Erica Shekell Director of Marketing and Public Relations Erica is pursuing degrees in Journalism and Media Arts & Technology; a specialization in Design; and a minor in Women’s and Gender Studies. Erica is deeply interested in a broad range of social justice issues and works hard to educate MSU’s queer community about these issues. She currently serves as the Communications Coordinator of PRIDE. While at MSU, Erica participated in the 2011 Student Freedom Ride, a commemorative retracing of the 1961 Freedom Rides in which 40 students from across the nation embarked on a 10-day bus trip through the South with original Freedom Riders and civil rights leaders. She also participated in MSU’s inaugural “Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Sexual Politics in the Netherlands” study abroad program. Upon graduation in May 2013, she hopes to do communications work for advocacy organizations. 4


Aminda Smith Advisor Mindy is an assistant professor in MSU’s history department. She teaches classes about the history of sexuality and feminist/gender theory. Associate Directors Jenna B., Associate Director of Purchasing Mady Gildea, Promotions Outreach Assistant Bishop Howard, Associate Director of Booking Katherine Logan, Associate Director of Human Relations

Committee Members Dylan Bambach DaShayla Bradford Ross Kraynak, Bidding Committee Alexandria Mason Emma Nowinski Nick Pfost, Bidding Committee Lee Piecoro Gavin Rienne Pacita Rudder, Bidding Committee JJ Sheets Briandra Turner Colin Wiebrecht Thank you all for your time and energies!

From left: Justin, Kate, Michelle, Travis and Erica


Donors The MBLGTACC 2013 Planning Coalition would like to thank the incredible people and organizations that have supported the conference through direct and in-kind donations. The conference would not have been possible without the phenomenal level of support they have given the planning team over the past two years of planning. Words cannot express our gratitude! Thank you to the following people and organizations:

Platinum: $10,000+

Gold: $5,000 – $9,999

Silver: $2,500 – $4,999

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Bronze: $1,000 – $2,499 Anonymous

Green & White: $250 – $999

Ross Kraynak

Pride: $1 – $249 Chiedozie Okafor Don Johnson Douglas Atwood Genesee County PFLAG Holland PFLAG

Jess Stevens Joseph Marutiak Jordan Decker Juliana Rosser Kelly Murphy

Landon Hall Government Nicholas Bryant Office of the Vice President, Student Affairs and Services Shekell Family 7


Special Thanks

Mindy Smith, Professor of history and Advisor to the planning team, for her insight and humor. Dr. Denise Maybank, interim Vice President for Student Affairs and Services and Director of Student Life, for the water, tea, guidance and lovely monthly meetings over the past two years. Dee Hurlbert, Assistant Director of the MSU LBGT Resource Center, for the fresh ideas, unending support, and mental- and academic health check-ups. The Lansing Center staff for their enthusiasm and personal investment in the success of our conference. The Greater Lansing Convention and Visitors Bureau for their unending support and for connecting us with invaluable resources in the Greater Lansing community. Jon Hoadley for teaching us how to ask the right questions and how to be confident in what we ask for. Shane Windmeyer, Executive Director of Campus Pride, for showing us how a strong relationship between two great organizations can create amazing results. Emily Brozovic, our program guide Designer, for her patience, expertise and fantastic design skills. Our friends, significant others, roommates, housemates, family members, professors and coworkers for their understanding and unwavering support in our two-year journey to pull off the largest LGBTA college conference in U.S. history to date.

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You. Thank you to to the advisors who have been to this conference way too many times to count; to those who attended as students and are now advisors bringing their students to experience this conference. Thank you to the freshpersons who heard the hype about this conference from older students and came along for the ride. Thank you to the students who carpooled, roadtripped, booked giant fancy buses with internet and even flew to get here. Thank you to the student leaders who organized fundraisers, petitioned student governments and held bake sales to help pay for members to attend. Thank you to the LGBT centers who fund scholarships for students to attend. Thank you to the lone students who come from states far away, like California, Texas and the East Coast. Thank you to those from conservative, rural and/or religious colleges; those who may not be supported by their colleges; those who are trying to start their school’s first Gay-Straight Alliance; and those who would be expelled if administrators knew they were LGBTA-identified. Thank you to the straight, cisgender allies who came to “the Big Gay Conference” – who may have received raised eyebrows from parents for coming here. Thank you to those who traveled hundreds of miles to get here – and whose parents have no idea you’re here.


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The Associated Students of Michigan State University is the all-university undergraduate student government at Michigan State University which acts with the authority and responsibility to represent the collective student interest on all academic and student related issues. More than just your average student government, ASMSU strives to improve the quality of life for all MSU students by offering valuable services: Free Blue Books Copies/Faxes Events Employment Funding Free iClicker Rentals Insurance Free Legal Counsel Interest-Free Loans Representation IM West Cameras Free Yearbooks Test-Prep and Tutoring

ASMSU is located on the third floor of the Students Services building which is located on the northern part of Michigan State University’s campus across from the new Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum. Questions? Email us at info@asmsu.msu.edu or call (517) 355-8266 16


Residence Halls Association Your On-Campus Student Government Our Services:

2013 GLACURH

Spartan Leadership Conference

Movie OďŹƒces Campus Center Cinemas RHA TV Health & Safety Special Events Karaoke Representation

We will be hosting the regional RHA conference in November.

Sunday Feb. 17, 2013 Noon - 5:00 PM Case Hall

Contact us at: -- G-7 Holden Hall -- www.rha.msu.edu -- 517-355-8285

You can register online at rha.msu.edu


Etiquette for Inclusion MBLGTACC provides an opportunity for people to come together for a few days to learn and grow through the knowledge and experiences of others. The conference is attended by people from all over the country and from many walks of life. One of the primary aims of MBLGTACC is to promote a safe environment where everyone feels affirmed and supported to be themselves. Only when people feel safe and supported will they be able to participate in the marketplace of ideas and to have the conversations that are vital for improving our communities. The LGBTA community prides itself in being inclusive. Let us strive for greater inclusivity than ever before and set an example for all communities that work toward education and social justice. Please realize and respect that the experiences, realities or perspectives of others may differ from your own. Practice active listening, refrain from making assumptions, leave room for multiple narratives and multiple solutions, and most importantly, approach this weekend with an open mind. To quote the wise Ellen DeGeneres, “Be kind to one another.” The conference has the potential to be a life-changing experience. We encourage you to reexamine and reconceptualize your own perspectives and identities and to rethink the boxes and barriers of our world as you understand them.

Language, Pronouns and Terms We encourage participants to use inclusive language and avoid derogatory language. Be aware and considerate of pronoun usage. For example, if someone prefers gender-neutral pronouns (for definition, see the Glossary in the back), respect their wishes and use that type of pronoun when referring to them. If you are unsure about someone’s pronoun preference, simply ask. If you make a mistake, correct yourself and apologize. For most individuals, it is not a big deal if you slip up unintentionally. Also, diverse pronoun usage may be new and confusing to some, so be patient; this is a conference centered on learning. In general, if you are unsure of a particular term, please refer to the Glossary in the back of this program guide.

Gender Neutral Restrooms Gender-neutral restrooms are available at the Lansing Center. Respect that the gender-neutral restrooms are for the use of anyone, no matter their sex, gender or gender identity. Gendered restrooms are also available.

Disabilities Be respectful of people with disabilities, and forgo using words such as retard(ed), cripple, gimp, downy, special ed, lame, crazy, etc. in a derogatory way. Words like these have been used to bully and oppress individuals with differing abilities for many decades. Please consider the implications of your words and do not use these words casually. In addition, be respectful of people with mental, hearing, sight or other invisible disabilities and/or disorders. For example, if someone doesn’t respond to you, they may not be ignoring you; they may not be able to hear you.

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Calmly gain their attention, be patient, and find a means of communication. Be courteous to those of us with limited accessibility. Don’t block ramps, unnecessarily use accessible restroom stalls/accessible seating, or be inconsiderate of people with mobility restrictions. Please be willing and prepared to move chairs to make room for people using wheelchairs. Ask and wait for a response before helping someone who may appear in need of help. What seems helpful may be disrespectful or even unhelpful.

Service Animals When you encounter someone using a service/assistance or guide dog, it is expected you do not pet, offer food to, or interact with the animal in any way. The safety of their owner may depend on the dog’s ability to focus. You are supporting the independence provided by the service animal by not distracting them.

Allergies and Scent Sensitivity To promote a scent-safe environment for those of us with allergies or sensitivities, we ask that you use scent-free products or limit/forgo excessive usage of perfumes, lotions, scented hair products, etc. while at the conference. Additionally, some people may have food allergies that are very severe, so be self-aware when eating food in workshops or public areas. Try to keep it contained, and don’t leave food lying around.

Smoking The state of Michigan has enacted a law prohibiting smoking in all indoor public places and food service establishments. This includes your hotel rooms and the Lansing Center. The law is enforced by police and is meant to provide indoor comfort for all individuals. If you do smoke, please do so outside, and be aware that many buildings have policies which state that smoking is prohibited within 25 feet from the building. Please be courteous to those who may be near or downwind of you.

Sexual Responsibility We encourage conference attendees who engage in sexual activity to be safe and responsible. We encourage the use of condoms (including female condoms), dental dams, water or silicone-based lube, or other forms of protection. Sexual assault is defined as performing a sexual act with or on a person who has not given, denied, or is unable to give consent. Consent, in regards to sex, is the voluntary approval of a person to engage in sexual activity. A person cannot give consent if they are severely intoxicated, unconscious, asleep or severely physically/mentally disabled. It is in all parties’ best interest to specifically ask or clarify consent before any sexual act. If consent from both or multiple parties is given, we encourage them to be safe and use protection to prevent HIV/ AIDS, STI/STDs and/or pregnancy. If you are sexually assaulted, contact the Listening Ear or MSU’s Sexual Assault Crisis Intervention, which are 24-hour crisis hotlines for the Lansing area. Please see our Resources page for more information about their services.

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Resources Hotels Need to know your hotel’s address? Haven’t booked a room yet and need a place to stay? The following hotels are located on our shuttle bus routes: The Radisson 111 N. Grand Ave. Lansing, MI 48933 Hampton Inn East Lansing 2500 Coolidge Rd. East Lansing, MI 48823 Hampton Inn and Suites Okemos 2200 Hampton Place Okemos, MI 48864 Holiday Inn Express & Suites 2209 University Park Dr. Okemos, MI 48864 Comfort Inn 2187 University Park Dr. Okemos, MI 48864 Courtyard Lansing Marriott 2710 Lake Lansing Rd. Lansing, MI 48912 University Quality Inn 3121 East Grand River Ave. Lansing, MI 48912 Fair Field Inn Okemos 2335 Woodlake Dr. Okemos, MI 48864

Accessibility ASL Interpreters American Sign Language interpreters will be present at each plenary session. Drop off Areas Located on the South side of the Lansing Center on Michigan Ave. Additional drop-off areas are on City Market Dr., located under the Lansing Center. Parking Available for guests with mobility impairments in Lot 19, located under the Lansing Center. Additional mobility-impaired parking is available on the third level of the North Grand Ramp, which is attached to the Lansing Center via pedestrian walkway. Service Animals Service animals are welcome in the Lansing Center. If you bring your service animal to the facility, please contact us at (517) 483-7400, ext. 0 so we may be able to assist you further. For more information about accessibility at the Lansing Center, go to: tiny.cc/LC-ADA Please contact your hotel for more information about accessible accommodations. If you have questions regarding accessibility, please contact accessibility@mblgtacc2013.org. 24-Hour Crisis Hotline Sexual Assault Crisis Intervention (SACI), an MSU-based, 24-hour crisis hotline, may be reached at (517) 3726666. The Sexual Assault Program provides immediate crisis intervention and advocacy services to women and men who have been impacted by rape or sexual assault. For more information, go to endrape.msu.edu. For police, fire and medical emergencies, call 911.

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Greater Lansing App for iPhone The Greater Lansing App includes information about things to do, where to eat, where to stay, transportation and more. It can be downloaded here: m.lansing.org. Don’t have a smart phone? If you have a laptop, an interactive map featuring much of this information may be found here: lansing.org/mapexplorer

CATA Bus CATA is the main public transportation system for the Greater Lansing area. Visit cata.org to find information on bus stops, bus routes and timetables. To figure out how to get from point A to point B, use their “Trip Planner” option. The routes are 60¢ for students with a college ID or $1.25 for adults for a one-way ticket.

Spartan App for iPhone The Spartan App focuses on the East Lansing area but can also be used if you are in downtown Lansing or the surrounding area. This tool features CATA bus schedules, taxi information, nighttime entertainment venues, and local eateries. It is particularly useful for those wishing to explore East Lansing and MSU, as well as those staying in hotels north of East Lansing (Quality Inn University, Hampton Inn - East Lansing and the Courtyard Lansing Marriott).

Taxi Cabs Cabs are usually about $3 per person or have a starting rate of $2, with you paying for the miles. A list of Lansing’s cab companies can be found at yellowpages. aol.com/taxis/mi/east-lansing.

Food For information about dining in the Lansing area, visit our website food page and download the Lansing Dining Guide at mblgtacc2013.org/food. You can also download the Lansing mobile dining app with an interactive map here: m.lansing.org. Don’t have a smart phone? If you have a laptop with you, an interactive map showing places to eat may be found here: lansing.org/ mapexplorer

Parking Need information on parking in downtown Lansing? Visit our website travel page to download a PDF with parking locations and prices: tiny.cc/LansingParking. For up-to date driving directions, parking and construction information, visit lansing.org/visitor/maps

Help Line Need help or have a question to which you’ve been unable to find the answer? Visit the Help/ Registration Desk. For high-importance issues, please email us at help@mblgtacc2013.org or call our help line at (517) 803-7796.

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About MSU’s LGBTA Community Michigan State University has about 16 active LGBTA organizations, and we’re proud to be a part of such a thriving campus environment. Here is a little bit about MSU’s LGBTA community. MSU LBGT Resource Center The resource center is the central hub of MSU’s LGBTA community. Its website is lbgtrc.msu.edu. The LBGTRC offers many programs, including: ƒƒ New2U: A program for LBGTA first-year students. ƒƒ I Am An Ally: An initiative to give visibility and voice to allies. ƒƒ SafeZone Training: Educates MSU offices through workshops about sexual orientation, gender identity and the experiences of LGBTQ people. ƒƒ Panel Program/Speakers Bureau: Allows LBGTA individuals to share their personal stories and answer questions related to sexuality & gender to increase awareness and understanding of the experiences of LBGTA persons. ƒƒ Transforming Theatre Ensemble (TTE) Educational Programs: Provides an interactive learning experience that engages the audience in collaborative problem solving on issues like diversity, inclusion, bias, etc. LGBTA Faculty and Graduate Student Organizations

ƒƒ GLFSA: Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Faculty, Staff, and Graduate Student Association ƒƒ LBGT Graduate Student Group ƒƒ Triangle Bar Association: For students, families, faculty and staff in the legal community. ƒƒ GLBT Alumni Association

LGBTA Student Organizations

ƒƒ The Alliance of Queer & Ally Students: Serves as a voice in MSU student governance and campus and community political action. The Alliance was founded in April 1970. ƒƒ Trans*Action: A group that focuses on the needs of the trans* and allied community. ƒƒ Q-Cross: A Christian organization for LGBTQA individuals who have felt rejected by their Church. ƒƒ Intersection: An organization for LGBTQA Spartans of color. ƒƒ Delta Lambda Phi: A fraternity for gay, bisexual and progressive men. ƒƒ oSTEM: An organization for LGBTQA students with interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

LGBTA Caucuses MSU has one of the largest residence hall systems in the country, with about 14,000 students living on campus. Nearly every residence hall neighborhood has an LGBTA caucus that is funded by the Residence Halls Association, the student government for MSU’s residence halls. The caucuses are LIGHT (Brody Neighborhood), PRIDE (West Circle), PRISM (South), RING (Red Cedar), and Spectrum (East).

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History of MBLGTACC The Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay College Conference (MBLGCC), as it was initially called, was conceived at a conference in Des Moines, IA, in February 1991. An organizing conference was held at Emporia State University in Emporia, KS, in February 1992. The first annual MBLGCC was held at Iowa State University in Ames, IA, in February 1993, and was a collaborative effort between Drake University and Iowa State University. 1993: Iowa State University and Drake University

2003: The Ohio State University

1994: Earlham College (Indiana)

2004: Iowa State University

1995: Southern Illinois University at Carbondale

2005: Saint Cloud State University (Minnesota)

1996: Beloit College (Wisconsin)

2006: University of South Dakota

1997: Indiana State University

2007: University of Minnesota at Twin Cities

1998: University of Illinois at Chicago

2008: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

1999: University of Wisconsin-Madison

2009: Indiana University Bloomington

2000: Saint Cloud State University (Minnesota)

2010: University of Wisconsin-Madison

2001: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

2011: University of Michigan

2002: Michigan State University

2012: Iowa State University The 2013 conference is the 21st annual conference.

Interesting Facts The conference was created (in part) because of the issue of coastalism in the LGBTA movement – that is, “the focus on New York or San Francisco, neglecting all the queer activists working in the midwest or the south.” This sentiment was reflected by Tom Neal, a gay student activist from Texas, who spoke about this issue in his keynote at the 1994 conference. According to Justin Connor, one of the co-organizers for the 1994 conference, “We had this feeling that the east coast and west coast have strong support for LGBT issues on campus, and big active groups, but that we were relatively forgotten in the midwest, which is why this conference was so critical.” 1994: Earlham College, which had a population of 1,100 students, is a small Quaker college in Richmond, IN. When 250 queer college students – almost a quarter of the school’s population – came for the conference, it was hard to miss. The administration was supportive of the conference, but the board of trustees wasn’t. Many of the attendees were housed in the dorms by students – queer and allied friends of the organizers – who agreed to host them for the weekend. 1995 and 1996: The theme for both conferences was “Building Queer Success in the Midwest,” which seems to indicate that this was actually meant to be the conference’s slogan – which eventually developed into a conference theme that changes every year.

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Interesting Facts continued

1997: “Transgender” was added to the conference name. 2001: “Ally” was added to the conference name. 2003: The conference hit 1,500 attendees for the first time at The Ohio State University. The conference would not break that number until 2012 due to yearly fluctuations in attendance and registration caps that were instituted because of limited venue space at subsequent conferences. 2005: For the first time, conference hosts were selected two years in advance: at the 2005 conference, hosts for 2006 and 2007 were selected. However, shortly before the 2006 conference, the hosts for 2007 backed out, and the University of Minnesota at Twin Cities was later selected to replace them. 2006: While the University of South Dakota is located in Vermillion, SD, the conference was actually held 60 miles north of the university at the Sioux Falls Convention Center in Sioux Falls, SD. The University of South Dakota promised institutional support for the conference prior to the students bidding for it, but later rescinded the support. The conference likely suffered as a result; attendance was 800 people, lower than previous years. The conference was organized entirely by three students, who used their own bank accounts to process transactions. 2007: It was because of the 2006 conference’s difficulties that the MBLGTACC Oversight Committee was created in 2007. A number of historical documents from this conference and a few past conferences were placed in the JeanNickolaus Tretter Collection in GLBT Studies at the University of Minnesota Libraries, where they are kept today. 2008: With the help of a lawyer, students organizing the 2008 conference registered MBLGTACC as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organizations with the IRS. While some universities extend their non-profit status to their student organizations, others do not, which created a need for the organization to have its own non-profit status. The status is managed by the treasurer of the MBLGTACC Oversight Committee. 2012: The conference returned to its origins for its 20th conference. Registrations doubled in the last week before the conference, and it broke a conference record by reaching 1,700 attendees.

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Conference Purpose and Theme

Why MBLGTACC is Important MBLGTACC is an opportunity for LGBTA students and those who work with them to meet in a safe and supportive environment to learn and discuss issues of importance to the LGBTA community. Many people in the LGBTA community do not have family members that are similarly-identified, so we learn about ourselves primarily from our peers and the LGBTA elders we may know.

MBLGTACC is a great resource because it allows college students from all over the country to come together for a few days to learn and grow through the knowledge and experiences of others. The conference brings people from many walks of life together to address issues that affect themselves, the LGBTA community and our world as a whole.

Mosaic: Putting the Pieces Together Since MBLGTACC’s inception, nearly every conference has had its own theme. The theme for MBLGTACC 2013 is “Mosaic: Putting the Pieces Together,” and we have worked to incorporate this theme into every aspect of our programming. What does this theme mean? Some say that America is like a melting pot, a collision of cultures that blend and assimilate to create a homogenous, harmonious culture, with all differences erased. Others say it is more like a salad bowl, with communities mixing together while simultaneously retaining their own distinct identities,

which are valuable and ought to be celebrated. We say that the LGBTA community is much like this, and that each color is a valuable piece in a magnificent mural. Thus, the 2013 conference will explore the many identities within the LGBTA community and how those identities are stronger when bonded together to form one beautiful, perfectly imperfect work of art — like a mosaic. The 2013 conference will focus on bringing together the often-fragmented LGBTA community to address issues that affect us both individually and collectively.

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= gender neutral restrooms

Lansing Center 333 E. Michigan Avenue Lansing, MI 48933 Pedway

North Point Cafe

Ph.: (517) 483-7400 Fax: (517) 483-7439 www.lansingcenter.com

River Street Pub

M

Concession

Coats

W

M

101

Gazeebo

River Concourse

Banquet Banquet Banquet Banquet Room 2 Room 4 Room 6 Room 8

Banquet Banquet Banquet Banquet Room 1 Room 3 Room 5 Room 7

Exhibit Hall A

W

M

Governor’s Room

BR2

BR1

Offices

201

202

203

204

205

Upper Concourse

Ph.: (517) 483-7400 Fax: (517) 483-7439 www.lansingcenter.com

Lansing Center 333 E. Michigan Avenue Lansing, MI 48933

W

Exhibit Hall B

102

Michigan Ave. Concourse

Pedway

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103

104

1st Floor

North Point Cafe

Exhibit Hall C

W M

Security Office

2nd Floor

Boardrooms

Tickets

Michigan Ave. Concourse Elevators

W M

Exhibit Hall C

Exhibit Hall B

W M

Rive Stree Pub


Schedule of Events — MBLGTACC 2013 Friday, February 8th

12:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m. Registration 6:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m. Welcome 7:00 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Plenary Session 1 Keynote Speaker: Emi Koyama 9:00 p.m.-11:00 p.m. Entertainment Events Hall A: Staceyann Chin Banquet 5-8: Abigail Stauffer Room 201: “Love Free or Die” Saturday, February 9th

8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Registration 8:00 a.m.-9:20 a.m. Workshop Session 1 9:30 a.m.-10:50 a.m. Workshop Session 2 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. Career and Exhibitor Fair 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Plenary Session 2 Keynote Speaker: Robyn Ochs 1:00 p.m.-2:20 p.m. State Caucuses 2:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m. Oversight Committee Meeting 2:30 p.m.-3:50 p.m. Workshop Session 3 4:00 p.m.-5:20 p.m. Workshop Session 4 5:30 p.m.-6:50 p.m. Workshop Session 5 7:00 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Plenary Session 3 Keynote Speaker: Ben Cohen 9:00 p.m.-10:30 p.m. Identity Caucuses 9:00 p.m.-11:00 p.m. Entertainment Events Hall A: Justin Utley Room 201: “Scary Normal” Sunday, February 10th

8:00 a.m.-9:20 a.m. Workshop Session 6 9:30 a.m.-10:50 a.m. Workshop Session 7 11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Plenary Session 4 & Closing Remarks Keynote Speaker: LZ Granderson Meal Breaks Deciding when and how much time to provide for meals is one of the many challenges of planning the conference. We realize that everyone has different preferences for when they eat and how much time they will take, so in the interest of accommodating everyone and providing more opportunities for workshops, we are using an “eat-on-your-own” schedule. You decide which sessions are most important to you, and you decide when you would like to take a break. Don’t want to miss a session? Both concession stands are open to serve you between sessions.

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Friday 6:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m.

9:00 p.m. 8:30 p.m.

Hall A

Welcome

Plenary 1: Emi Koyama

Poetry: Staceyann Chin

Hall B Governor’s Rm

Banquet 1 Banquet 2 Banquet 3 Banquet 4 Banquet 5-8

Music: Abigail Stauffer

Room 101 Room 102 Room 103 Room 104 Room 201 Room 202 Room 203 Room 204 Room 205

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Film: Love Free or Die

11:00 p.m.


Saturday 8:00 a.m.

10:00 a.m.

11:00 a.m.

1:00 p.m.

9:30 a.m.

3:00 p.m. 2:30 p.m.

Plenary 2: Robyn Ochs

Hall A

Career and Exhibitor Fair

Hall B

Oversight Committee

Governor’s Rm Workshop Session 1

Workshop Session 2

State Caucuses

Workshop Session 3

Banquet 1

Supporting Students with Intersecting...

Deconstructing the Gender Mosaic...

Illinois Caucus

Faculty, Staff and Graduate...

Banquet 2

The Bible and Homosexuality...

Platonic Intimacy

Indiana Caucus

The Bible and Homosexuality...

Banquet 3

Trans*form Your Campus: Making...

May it Please the Court: Gender...

Minnesota Caucus

Victimizing the Victim: The...

Banquet 4

DTF: An Exploration of Ethics...

Utilizing Social Media for Your...

Wisconsin Caucus

Am I the Only One? Peer-Led...

Banquet 5-8

Featured Workshop by Mara Keisling

Featured Workshop by Emi Koyama

Michigan Caucus

Featured Workshop by Ben Cohen

Room 101

Paths to a Social Justice Career...

OUT for Work

North Dakota Caucus

QED, Bullying, and GLBTQ...

Room 102

Beyond GSA’s: Creating...

Fatty Over Here: Being a BBQ...

South Dakota Caucus

Beauty and “the Beast”...

Room 103

Media Circus of the Grotesque...

D-R-A-G: What Does That Spell?...

Nebraska Caucus

The Gay Black and Latino...

Room 104

Polyamory: A Consensual...

Love Thy Neighbor as Thyself...

Kentucky Caucus

Drama Queers, Kings and...

Room 201

Transforming Theatre Ensemble...

T-Time with Bug and Molly

Ohio Caucus

Understanding LGBTQIA-lphabet...

Room 202

Friending Our Foes: An Open Debate

Creating the Pieces: Developing Black...

Iowa Caucus

Otters, Twinks, and Bears... Oh My!

Room 203

Multiple Identities and Dangers of...

Shame and Vulnerability

Missouri Caucus

Talking Trans*: Navigating Trans*...

Room 204

Fired for Being Gay? The Status of...

College POZitive

Kansas Caucus

Sexual Identity Formation and...

Room 205

Zines!: Making, Assembling, and...

The LGBTQ Community &...

Beyond the Midwest

Speakers Panel: Educating Your...

Note: Workshops end 10 minutes before the half-hour or full hour, providing a break between sessions.

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Saturday 4:00 p.m.

6:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m.

continued

9:00 p.m.

5:30 p.m.

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10:30 p.m. Plenary 3: Ben Cohen

Hall A Hall B

Career and Exhibitor Fair

Governor’s Rm

Oversight Committee

11:00 p.m.

Music: Justin Utley

Workshop Session 4

Workshop Session 5

Banquet 1

Advising the Whole Student...

What’s Your Score? The Campus Pride...

Banquet 2

Sex, Please: Looking at the Other Sides...

Non-Monosexual Identities

Banquet 3

The Trans* Workshop for Trans*...

Keeping the “Sex” in Sexual Orientation...

Banquet 4

Poly-tics

Examining Embodiment...

Banquet 5-8

Featured Workshop: Were There LGBT...

Featured Workshop by Robyn Ochs

Identity Caucuses

Room 101

The Future of Feminism: A Guide...

Student Organizations in Rural...

Identity Caucus: Trans*

Room 102

Queer Sex 101

Shhh! They’re Talking about Suicide

Identity Caucus: Queer People of Color

Room 103

Pretty Bois and Femme Guys...

Queering the Classics

Identity Caucus: Disabilities

Room 104

It’s Your Choice, or Is it? The...

The Jagged Piece: How HIV Fits Our...

Identity Caucus: Form Your Own I

Room 201

Featured Workshop: Queer Theology I

Featured Workshop: Queer Theology II

Film: Scary Normal

Room 202

The Biggest Hurdle: Overcoming...

How Do Lesbian & Gay Educators...

Identity Caucus: Form Your Own II

Room 203

We’ve Always Been Redefining...

How to Use Your Tongue (Inclusively)

Identity Caucus: Polyamorous

Room 204

QLA: Queer Library Alliance

Q&A Panel with Queer Ministers

Identity Caucus: Asexual

Room 205

Storytelling for Social Justice: Why...

Gay and Greek: Supporting LGBQ...

Identity Caucus: Middle Sexualities

Note: Workshops end 10 minutes before the half-hour or full hour, providing a break between sessions.


Sunday 8:00 a.m.

11:00 a.m. 9:30 a.m.

1:00 p.m. 12:30 p.m.

Plenary 4: LZ Granderson

Hall A

Closing Remarks

Hall B Governor’s Rm Workshop Session 6

Workshop Session 7

Banquet 1

Queer + Teacher: Mutually Exclusive...

Examining the Attitudes...

Banquet 2

Same Strokes: Lessons from Sex...

Using Social Science Research to...

Banquet 3

The Past, Present and Future of the...

Jewish Answers to Queer Questions

Banquet 4

Same-Sex Relationships in the...

What’s the T: Bridging the Gap...

Banquet 5-8

Featured Workshop: BDSM: Lessons...

Featured Workshop by LZ Granderson

Room 101

The Queer-Friendly Campus...

People Like Me: A Mobile App...

Room 102

Battling the Campus Bureaucracy...

Residence Life: We’re Here, We’re...

Room 103

Fat Bodies, Queer Lives

Equality Talks: Using Everyday...

Room 104

Implementing an Outcome-Based...

Gay, Bisexual, Transgendered...

Room 201

Silly Fruits, Stereotypes Are For Kids

Express Yourself: LGBTQ...

Room 202

Topics in Queer Student Leadership...

Accommodation Awareness...

Room 203

Speculative Gender...

Holey Matrimony: Queering...

Room 204

Asexuality 101: An Introduction to...

You Can’t Change What We Never...

Room 205

By the Water Cooler: LGBT...

Weight of the World: Eating Disorders...

Note: Workshops end 10 minutes before the half-hour or full hour, providing a break between sessions.

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Keynote Speaker 1

Emi Koyama

Emi Koyama is a multi-issue social justice activist and writer synthesizing feminist, Asian, survivor, dyke, queer, sex worker, intersex, genderqueer, and crip politics. These factors, while not a complete descriptor of who she is, have all impacted her life. Emi is currently the director of Intersex Initiative. Emi lives in Portland, Oregon, and is putting the emi back in feminism at eminism.org.

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Emi used to identify as this gender and that gender, and even the neither gender — but nowadays she’s tired of it all. Today, Emi does not identify with any particular gender, but she does not so strongly identify with the state of having no gender to claim that as an identity either. How she views herself depends on the human relationships and interactions that surround her, rather than arising from some intrinsic core sense of self.


Keynote Speaker 2

Robyn Ochs

An advocate for the rights of people of ALL orientations and genders to live safely, openly and with full legal and social equality, Robyn’s work focuses on increasing awareness and understanding of complex identities and mobilizing people to be powerful allies to one another within and across identities and social movements.

Robyn is the editor of the 42-country anthology, Getting Bi: Voices of Bisexuals Around the World and of Bi Women. She has taught courses on LGBTQ history and politics in the U.S. and Canada, on the politics of identity, and on the experiences of those who transgress binary categories of identity.

In addition to speaking at colleges, conferences and youth groups in the U.S. and beyond, Robyn co-founded Harvard University’s LGBT Faculty & Staff Group and its Trans Task Force, and served as adviser for its LGBTQ student group. She is currently the board Vice President of MassEquality, her statewide equality group.

Kate Bornstein has called Robyn, “the absolute empress of sexual fluidity.” You can find Robyn online at www.robynochs.com.

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Keynote Speaker 3

Ben Cohen

Ben Cohen, MBE, is among the world’s greatest athletes. He is an England Rugby World Cup champion, and second in all-time scoring for his country. He is first among straight athletes to focus his philanthropic efforts for the benefit of LGBT people. In May 2011, Mr. Cohen retired at the top of his game to found the Ben Cohen StandUp Foundation. As Chairman of the Foundation, Mr. Cohen travels worldwide speaking to students and corporations about the importance of character, respect and equality in creating a kinder world. The cause is close to his heart, as Mr. Cohen’s own father was beaten to death when he stood up for an employee who was being attacked. Mr. Cohen has reached millions of people with his message through global media coverage, films and nearly 400,000 followers on social media. With his leadership, cities across the United States have passed StandUp declarations, calling for an end to bullying. Working with the UK Home Office, he has led the charge for the StandUp Charter to end homophobia across sports in his country, including broad adoption to date in soccer, rugby and tennis. 34

Ben Cohen StandUp Foundation, Inc. The Ben Cohen StandUp Foundation, Inc. is the world’s first foundation dedicated to raising awareness of the long-term, damaging effects of bullying, and funding those doing real-world work to stop it. We stand up against bullying regardless of to whom it happens. Because lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people are often targeted by bullies, we give particular attention to this community. We include removing homophobia from sports as central to our mission. The Ben Cohen StandUp Foundation, a registered 501c3 non-profit, is funded, in part, through profits generated by the StandUp social-commerce brand, making it the first social-commercial brand focused on LGBT causes. Individuals and corporations contribute generously to the Foundation as well. To engage the consumer marketplace and help drive social change as a partner, learn more about the StandUp brand and visit www.standupfoundation.com. Website: www.StandUpFoundation.com


Keynote Speaker 4

LZ Granderson

“Boxes are for shoes” is the mantra award-winning columnist and TV pundit LZ Granderson lives by. AfricanAmerican, openly-gay, Christian and a father, the diversity of Granderson’s work — from sports, education and race to politics, parenting and dating — has made him one of the most popular online columnists for both CNN and ESPN. Granderson started off as a poor, skinny kid from Detroit — and at one point was involved in criminal activity — but he always believed where a person started didn’t have to dictate where a person finished. Granderson was named Journalist of the Year by the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association. He is

a 2011 and 2010 nominee and the 2009 winner of the GLAAD award for online journalism. In addition to his weekly online columns, he appears frequently on CNN Newsroom with Don Lemon and has appeared on Starting Point with Soledad O’Brien. He’s also appeared on ABC’s Good Morning America, as well as HBO’s Real Sports. Granderson, a senior writer and columnist for ESPN The Magazine and ESPN.com, also contributes to ESPN’s Sports Center, Outside the Lines and the network’s Grand Slam tennis coverage. His TED talk was one of the most viewed in 2012. Follow him on Twitter: @locs_n_laughs For all things LZ, contact OUTmedia.

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Entertainment - poetry Staceyann Chin Friday, 9 - 11:00 p.m. Hall A Staceyann Chin is the recipient of the 2007 Power of the Voice Award from the Human Rights Campaign, the 2008 Safe Haven Award from Immigration Equality, the 2008 Honors from the Lesbian AIDS Project, and the 2009 New York State Senate Award. She unapologetically identifies as Caribbean and Black, Asian and lesbian, woman and resident of New York City. A proud Jamaican National, Staceyann’s voice was featured on the “Oprah Winfrey Show,” where she spoke candidly about her experiences of growing up on the island and the dire consequences of her coming-out there. Widely known as co-writer and original performer in the Tony award-winning “Russell Simmons Def Poetry Jam” on Broadway, her poetry has seen the rousing cheers of the Nuyorican Poets’ Café; one-woman shows OffBroadway; and writing-workshops in Sweden, South Africa, and Australia. Chin’s three one-woman shows, “Hands Afire, “Unspeakable Things,” and “Border/Clash,” all opened to rave reviews at the Culture Project in New York City. Be it on “60 Minutes,” or in the New York Times, Staceyann has a reputation for telling it exactly like it is. Staceyann is the author of the memoir “The Other Side of Paradise.”

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Entertainment - music Abigail Stauffer Friday, 9 - 11:00 p.m. Banquet 5-8 Abigail Stauffer brings all of her experience to the stage. Chances are Abigail won’t break your heart, but she will add color to a black and white memory. Every song is a captivating showcase of confidence and vulnerability, naturally crafting a balance of pain, hope, and joy. Her music and live performances hold so much emotion for her and the audience — it’s hard to believe each song isn’t written specifically about you. Finally, an artist who writes about the things that really matter; Abigail will warm your heart and serenade your soul. www.AbigailStauffer.com


Entertainment - film Love Free or Die Friday, 9 - 11:00 p.m. Room 201 Presented by MSU Q-CROSS “Love Free or Die” is about a man whose two defining passions are in direct conflict: his love for God and for his partner Mark. Gene Robinson is the first openly gay person to become a bishop in the historic traditions of Christendom. His consecration in 2003, to which he wore a bullet-proof vest, caused an international stir. The film follows Robinson from small-town churches in the New Hampshire North Country to Washington’s Lincoln Memorial to London’s Lambeth Palace, as he calls for all to stand for equality – inspiring bishops, priests and ordinary folk to come out from the shadows and change history. For more about the film, go to lovefreeordiemovie.com.

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Entertainment - music Justin Utley Saturday, 9 - 11:00 p.m. Hall A New York City singer/songwriter Justin Utley is quickly gaining momentum as a sought-after national performer and icon within the LGBT community. As an “out” ex-Mormon and survivor of ex-gay therapy, Justin speaks candidly about his life and experiences through his inspiring storytelling and powerful, entertaining music. Justin has been a headliner and featured performed at Pride Festivals worldwide, including Stockholm, New York, Los Angeles, Denver, Atlanta, San Diego and Las Vegas. His album “Nothing This Real” was released November 2011 at a soldout release showcase in New York City with an online broadcast of over 12,000 viewers. He was nominated by the LGBT Academy of Recording Arts for four 2010 OUTMusic Awards, including song and artist of the year. He was winner of “Best Folk/Country Song of the Year.” H composed the theme song for the 2003 Emmy Award-winning movie “Shadow of Light” and was also a featured performer at the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, Utah. YouTube.com/JustinUtleyMusic Facebook.com/JustinUtleyMusic Twitter: @JustinUtley


Entertainment - film Scary Normal Saturday, 9 - 11:00 p.m. Room 201

In the fall of 2004, writer/director Jennifer Bechtel was inspired by a gay-straight alliance from a nearby high school to start thinking about why there are few (if any) movies with strong gay characters in them that are not rated R. It seemed to Jennifer that, just at the age when young people begin to explore these questions of self-identity (frequently late pre-teen, early teens), they were blocked from most media that would reflect their experiences and concerns on the big screen. A powerful connection to the gay community and a concern for the many recent tragedies in the lives of GLBTQ youth across the country led Jennifer to start working on two new screenplays. One of these screenplays was Scary Normal. This movie is a family coming-of-age comedy about Chelsea, a teenager who just wants to be seen as normal. However, 40

with the strange lifestyle that her family lives as her stepdad completes his indie horror movie projects, she spends much of her time frustrated and embarrassed by her family. Then, along comes Danielle, a sometimes brash, almost always self-confident young lesbian who has been kicked out of her own family because of her sexuality. Through their friendship, Chelsea starts to realize the true value of friends and family who love unconditionally. The promo was filmed in June 2011, and with the help of some very generous friends, they raised the money and resources necessary to film the feature in June 2012. The film was shot entirely on location in Champaign, Urbana, and surrounding areas in Illinois. For more information, go to: scarynormalmovie.com


Official Club Sponsor of

Rain

M A S S I V E GLOW

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Royale Hosts Lansings Biggest Dance Party!

F r i d a y

Saturday

2/9/2013

2/8/2013

Free Party Bus, Call to Reserve 517-512-8515

[Spiral Dance Bar] 1 2 4 7 C e n t e r   S t   L a n s i n g   M I ,   4 8 9 0 6  

w w w . S p i r a l D a n c e B a r . c o m / S p i r a l D a n c e B a r  

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Identity Caucuses Saturday, 9 - 10:30 p.m. What’s an identity caucus? Identity caucuses are safe spaces for people of a particular identity group. They are places for small, marginalized and/or invisible groups within the broad spectrum of LGBTA identities to come together to talk about issues of importance or concern and to support each other. It is very important that everyone feels welcome to attend any of these caucuses. Therefore, to foster inclusivity and learning environments, the identity caucuses are open caucuses, meaning that allies are welcome. All identity caucuses, with the exception of the “Form Your Own” caucuses, will have a facilitator.

Asexual Room 204 Disabilities Room 103 Middle Sexualities Room 205 A space for people who identify as bisexual, polysexual, pansexual, omnisexual, fluid, queer, questioning and/ or any other identity that falls “in the the middle” of the sexuality spectrum — or those who do not ascribe to the spectrum or do not identify at all. Polyamorous Room 203 Queer People of Color Room 102 Trans* Room 101

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Form Your Own Caucus I and II Room 104 and Room 202 Make your own space! We will have a sign-up/comment sheet outside the two “Form Your Own” caucus rooms during the conference for people to communicate with others about what they want the identity or topic(s) to be about. Check the sheets periodically to see if others are interested in the same thing! (Or connect with people on our Facebook page or Twitter and plan your own caucus!) People may form multiple discussion groups within a single room or may combine as one large group. These caucuses may select their own facilitator or simply chat as a group. Have fun!


Happening on Campus There are a number of fantastic events happening on Michigan State University’s campus this weekend! Be sure to check them out. Just take the CATA Bus 1 route into East Lansing!

MSU LBGT Resource Center Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., for tours 556 East Circle Drive Student Services Building, Room 302 Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum Friday, noon to 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Opened in November 2012, the brand-new Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University is committed to exploring international contemporary culture and ideas through art. Designed by Pritzker Prizewinning architect Zaha Hadid, the museum features a striking façade of pleated stainless steel and glass, signaling the museum and the university’s dynamic vision. The museum is named for Eli and Edythe Broad, longtime supporters of Michigan State University, who provided the lead gift for the museum.

“East Meets West: The Transgender Community of Istanbul” Guest Lecture MSU Union Ballroom Saturday at 1 p.m. Guest Lecture by Mary Robert (Richmond University, London) about her photographic portraits, which are on display in the Heritage Gallery of the MSU Museum Jan. 21-April 14. “East Meets West: The Transgender Community of Istanbul” Reception MSU Museum Saturday from 2 to 5 p.m.

One-way bus fares are $0.60 with a student ID and $1.25 for a regular one-way fare. For more about the CATA bus, go to cata.org. For maps of MSU’s campus, including an interactive map, go to maps.msu.edu. Please note that the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum and the MSU Museum are different locations.

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Recommended for Staff, Faculty, Advisors, Graduate Students and Others We have created a list of workshops that may be of particular interest staff, faculty, advisors, graduate students, prospective law school students and others who currently work or intend to work with LGBTA young people. We would like to bring your attention to the following workshops: Faculty and Staff Meet-and-Greet Hosted by MSU GLBT Faculty and Staff Association Radisson Lounge Friday, 9 p.m.

Session 1 Supporting Students with Intersecting Identities: A Counseling Approach Banquet 1

Session 2 May it Please the Court: Gender and Sexual Identity in the Legal Profession Banquet 3

Session 4 Advising the Whole Student: Intersection Between Queer and International Identities Banquet 1

Session 5 What’s Your Score? The Campus Pride Index as a Tool for Change Banquet 1

Session 6 Queer + Teacher: Mutually Exclusive Identities? Banquet 1

Session 3

Session 7

Faculty, Staff and Graduate Assistants: Models of Organization and Activism for College/University Employees Banquet 1

Examining the Attitudes, Perceptions and Experiences of the Michigan LGBTQ Community: Results from a Statewide Survey Banquet 1

Some of these workshops are geared toward staff, faculty, advisors, graduate students, etc. rather than undergraduate students; others are geared toward everyone! Please see the workshop description for details. Above all: if the topic piques your interest, you are more than welcome to attend! Other events that may be of interest: Advisor Roundtable Hosted by LBGT Resource Center at MSU and the Consortium of Higher Education LGBT Resource Professionals 328 MSU Student Services Building Saturday, 1 to 2:20 p.m.

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MSU LBGT Resource Center “Behind the Scenes” Tour and LBGTQA@MSU History 302 MSU Student Services Building Saturday, 2:30 to 3:20 p.m.


Featured Workshops An Explanation Through observation and feedback from previous conference organizers and attendees, the MBLGTACC 2013 Planning Coalition decided to create an alternative workshop model that could support popular workshop topics and presenters that are known to draw larger audiences. To avoid overcrowding and turning people away from fantastic workshops — and overall to better support our presenters and our attendees — we created “Featured Workshops,” which are placed in larger rooms that can accommodate larger audiences. We would like to highlight our fabulous line-up of Featured Workshops here:

Session 1 Parallel Movements: LGBT, Queer, Trans, and Maybe Marriage Equality: Turning Forward on Training Wheels, in Flying Cars and Recklessly Using Two Colons in One Title Presented by Mara Keisling Executive Director of the National Center for Transgender Equality Banquet 5-8

Session 2 Emi + Feminism = Eminism Presented by Emi Koyama Keynote Speaker; Director of Intersex Initiative; multiissue social justice activist and writer Banquet 5-8

Session 3 Featured Workshop Presented by Ben Cohen Keynote Speaker; England Rugby World Cup champion, activist, and Chairman of the Ben Cohen StandUp Foundation Banquet 5-8

Session 4 Were There LGBT People in the Ancient World? History, Sexuality, and Identity Presented by Mindy Smith Professor of History at Michigan State University and Advisor of the MBLGTACC 2013 Planning Coalition Banquet 5-8

Queer Theology I Presented by Rev. Matthew S. Cockrum University of Michigan Room 201

Session 5 Bisexuality 101 and Beyond Presented by Robyn Ochs Keynote Speaker; educator, speaker, activist and author of “Getting Bi: Voices of Bisexuals Around the World” Banquet 5-8 Queer Theology Presented by Rev. Matthew S. Cockrum University of Michigan Room 201

Session 6 BDSM: Lessons from a Rubberboy Presented by Tynan Fox Sex educator and Truman State University alumnus Banquet 5-8

Session 7 Featured Workshop Presented by LZ Granderson Keynote Speaker; journalist, commentator and sports writer Banquet 5-8

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1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8:00 to 9:20 a.m.

Featured Workshop 1

Parallel Movements: LGBT, Queer, Trans, and Maybe Marriage Equality: Turning Forward on Training Wheels, in Flying Cars and Recklessly Using Two Colons in One Title Banquet 5-8

We are at a crossroads and haven’t even agreed on who we are. Are we winning or forgetting what we were fighting for? Are we assimilating or changing the world? Mara will have a deliberate, honest, and fun talk about how we are winning and whether we really are. Presented by Mara Keisling Executive Director of the National Center for Transgender Equality

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Beyond GSA’s: Creating LGBTQQIAA-Friendly K-12 Schools Room 102

So you graduated college and are ready to change the hearts and minds of your students! Now what? Come ready to learn the ways to make your school a safe space AND ways to create an inclusive curriculum. This workshop is geared toward those in teacher prep programs, but all those interested in working with youth may feel free to attend. Get ready to learn all the things your professors never taught you! Presented by Rebecca Sawyer Michigan State University alumnus

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3

The Bible and Homosexuality: “The Clobber Passages” Banquet 2

Explore the Biblical texts used to condemn homosexuality with the historical-critical approach. Learn about the cultural contexts for the “holiness code” in Leviticus and the lists of evil-doers in 1 Corinthians and 1 Timothy. Discover the real sin of Sodom and Gomorrah and what Paul meant by “unnatural relations” in Romans. This workshop provides resources for many purposes, including participating in the ongoing debate with Christian fundamentalists and reconciling one’s own spiritual upbringing and journey. Presented by Rev. Dr. Gail M. Simonds Weathervane Ministries


4

DTF: An Exploration of Ethics, Pleasure, and Heteronormativity

6

Banquet 4

Room 202

Most queer folks have experienced or will experience the knee-jerk reaction many heterosexual, cisgender folks have to our QUILTBAG identities: they think it’s all about sex. Once that question is raised, how do we respond and why? This program will encourage dialogue about queer sexualities, queer spaces, and the role of heteronormativity in the development of our own conceptions of ethical sexual behavior. Presented by Nick Pfost Michigan State University alumnus

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Fired for Being Gay? The Status of Anti-Discrimination Protections in Michigan

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Room 204

In 2012, the Michigan Department of Civil Rights received a grant to study the economic and personal impacts that the state’s nondiscrimination laws and policies have on the LGBT community. During the course of the year, the department collected both quantitative and qualitative data that highlighted the disparate impact of these laws on the LGBT community. During this presentation, the findings of the report will be presented, and the project’s most compelling stories will be shared. Presented by Regina Calcagno and Sarah Reed Michigan Department of Civil Rights

Friending Our Foes: An Open Debate

7

Participants will explore how to engage the opposition and learn effective ways to communicate and find the middle ground when having dialogues with our “foes.” Participants will have an opportunity to have healthy debate during this session about controversial topics within the queer rights movement such as Chick-fil-A, role of allies in the movement, and the idea that all bathrooms should be gender neutral. Through debate, the moderator will correct or encourage participants’ behaviors. As a result, participants will be more confident in having productive dialogues that are more purposeful than those of passion-fueled rage. Presented by Shaily Hakimian Indiana University Bloomington and Online Peer Educator for Advocates for Youth

Media Circus of the Grotesque: Rhetoric of Privilege and Violence Room 103

One question echoes through Judy Shepard’s memoir, “The Meaning of Matthew”: Why? Why did they beat and leave him; but also, why did Ellen host a vigil in D.C., and why did Clinton call the hospital? This section will take a queer look at the “insider” LGBT and “outsider” media objectification of Matthew Shepard and Tyler Clementi and examine how coverage of hate crimes, suicide, and war erase people of color, women, and transfolk. Presented by Vince Tripi, III University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee alumnus 47


8

Multiple Identities and Dangers of Labeling and Labels

10

Room 203

Room 104

This workshop will explore what identity means and what it means to have multiple identities. Participants will look into the internalized homophobia, transphobia, and racial differences in identity and other various issues that come from labeling. Participants will also look at the messages that are expressed when someone is expected to pick a “more important” identity, as well as the danger of externally labeling individuals without their input. This session is an experiential opportunity for attendees to discuss their identities and the struggles of having an identity that differs from their perceived assignment.

The queer community has already made itself an exception to the heteronormative ideal of one man and one woman by pairing up regardless of gender. But if we’re going to step outside the box to find our happily-ever-after, why keep one foot inside? Let’s take a look at what happens when you draw up you own idea of what a happy relationship is to you, and find out if polyamory is the key to your storybookromance. In this workshop, we’ll discuss openness, honesty, safety, the dismantling of jealousy and control, and the radical idea that love is infinite. Presented by Eddie Rich Kendall College of Art and Design

Presented by Michael Stephens and Dontea O’Neal University of Illinois-Springfield students

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Paths to a Social Justice Career: Piecing Together Your Undergraduate Experience Room 101

What does it take to work in a social justice job? How can the skills you’re learning in classes transfer to working in the field of social justice? The focus of this workshop is to help participants get an idea of what social justice employers are looking for and how to piece together their undergraduate experiences to meet those expectations. The workshop will assist in integrating participants’ academic & extracurricular portfolios with their personal identities & values. We will also focus on how to isolate and present skills (e.g. in a resume) and how to integrate skills into everyday work. Presented by Chloe Gurin-Sands and Cameron Breither University of Michigan Spectrum Center 48

Polyamory: A Consensual Alternative to Traditional Monogamy

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Supporting Students with Intersecting Identities: A Counseling Approach Banquet 1

Intersectionality affects everyone and must be understood to create inclusive communities. This workshop focuses on one way for professional staff and student leaders to address the needs of LGBT students with intersecting identities. Participants will hear an overview of the current research on intersectionality and queerness. Additionally, case studies will be discussed from a counseling perspective to provide participants with a practical approach to supporting diverse student experiences. Presented by Laura Hamilton, Bria Marcelo, Sharita Williamson and Giacomo Cirrincione Miami University, Oberlin College, Michigan State University and University of Georgia


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Transforming Theatre Ensemble: An Interactive Performance on Health Care Disparities for Aging LGBT People

14 Zines!: Making, Assembling, and

Distributing Zines as Queer Community Media Room 205

Room 201

Zines are self-published or small press publications that have a handmade ethos that might include personal and political writings, collages, comics, drawings, rants, ephemera, and more. In this workshop, we will cover a brief history of zines in queer and feminist activism while spending the bulk of the workshop making zine pages to be compiled into a 2013 MBLGTACC zine. Materials will be provided, but we encourage folks to collect and bring their own materials to contribute.

Transforming Theatre Ensemble (TTE) will perform a new interactive piece written by a group of Lansing-area artists, activists, scholars, healthcare professionals, and community members. Based on Augusto Boal’s “Theatre of the Oppressed,� interactive theatre is an effective tool for initiating a dialogue that unpacks biases and fears and puts a spotlight on non-inclusive policies, practices, and procedures.

Presented by Trixie Smith, Casey Miles, Katie Livingston, Simone West and Becca Hayes Michigan State University

Presented by Lynn Lammers and Penny Gardner Michigan State University staff and faculty

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Trans*form Your Campus: Making Trans* Inclusive College Policy Happen Banquet 3

College campuses present a unique combination of obstacles for trans* students, faculty, and staff, including documentation issues, lack of accessible spaces, minimal educational visibility, and unrefined institutionalized support. Through activism, we have the opportunity to address these unique challenges by reforming college policies to include trans* identities. This workshop will discusses the issues trans* people may face on a college campus, the policies that are required to address their needs, and the tools that can be used to make trans* inclusive policy change a reality. College organizers will have the opportunity to discuss their own work to create a campus that is safe and accessible for all students.

1 2 3 4

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5 6 7

Presented by JAC Stringer University of Cincinnati and Midwest Trans* and Queer Wellness Initiative 49


1

2

3

4

5

6

7

9:30 to 10:50 a.m.

Featured Workshop 15

Emi + Feminism = Eminism Banquet 5-8

Join keynote speaker Emi Koyama in a continuation of her plenary session. Ask questions from the plenary and be prepared to challenge your perceptions of feminism, gender and intersectional approaches to social justice. Presented by Emi Koyama Director of Intersex Initiative, multi-issue social justice activist and writer

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College POZitive Room 204

When was the last time you talked about HIV? Have you ever thought about what HIV “looks like”? Does HIV feel like some far away problem? In the 1980’s, cases of HIV were prevalent in the gay communities of San Francisco and New York City; people were dying by the hundreds by what was then called the “gay cancer.” Thirty-one years of mythbusting, number-crunching, and medical advancements have since changed the face of HIV. However, people in our communities are still battling with this disease. How can we bridge the gap between then and now? How can we make our campuses safer and more welcoming to people living with HIV? How can we educate ourselves about HIV in 2013? Come discuss these questions with a college student living with HIV. Presented by John Yates DePauw University 50

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Creating the Pieces: Developing Black leadership within the LGBT Movement Room 202

The presence of black leadership in the LGBT community isn’t as visible as our white counterparts in social justice and equity work. This workshop will inform attendees about the progress and developments implemented by emerging leaders in Detroit, Michigan. These leaders are determined to make a difference while raising the presence of black leadership in the movement. While marriage equality has been the issue on the forefront, there are additional issues that plague the black LGBT community that limit overall prosperity and growth. Join us as we address these concerns and promote the continued expansion of black leaders. Presented by Rhiannon L Chester, Marlin E. Colyer Jr., and Oliver Buffington Jr. KICK - The Agency for LGBT African Americans


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Deconstructing the Gender Mosaic: The GenderQueer and Non-Binary Pieces of the Puzzle

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Room 102

Banquet 1

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What does the current research in higher education tell us about genderqueer and non-binary college students? What are some examples of good efforts to better include and support genderqueer and non-binary students on campuses? And in what ways does this research and practice improve or further marginalize the experiences of these students? Come find the answers to these questions and help identify what you think are the next steps in working with and serving genderqueer and non-binary students. Self-identified genderqueer and non-binary students in particular are encouraged to attend. Presented by T.J. Jourian, Kara Devaney, and Symone Simmons Loyola University Chicago

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D-R-A-G: What Does That Spell? You Tell Me. Room 103

What does drag mean to you? Whether you are a performer or just someone who frequents drag performances, this workshop will work to both identify and de-bunk stereotypes about the drag community. There are a plethora of identities within this community and it is important to show the world that drag may be just as fluid as gender and sexuality. This workshop emphasizes the importance of understanding the diversity of drag through the perspectives of drag performers. Presented by Jenna Culina Ohio Wesleyan University

Fatty Over Here: Being a BBQ (Big, Beautiful Queer) Learn about loving your fat bod (and/or everyone else’s) by examining fat politics, fatphobia, and the fat-positive movement within the queer community and beyond. Unlearning body shame is something many of us struggle with daily. Fat bodies are radical, beautiful, and constantly under attack for their very existence. This workshop is about the radical love of your body and reclaiming bodily autonomy. Come listen, share, and learn. Presented by Taylor Dukes University of Missouri - Columbia

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The LGBTQ Community & Collegiate Athletics Room 205

Queer athletes and allies represent a unique and important, yet often overlooked, part of the queer community. Join in a discussion about the media portrayal of male and female athletes, the challenges faced by queer athletes and allies, and possible strategies to foster more inclusive and welcoming athletic environments and campus communities. Presented by Kathryn Vincent Grinnell College

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Love Thy Neighbor as Thyself: How to Start a Productive Dialogue Between LGBTQ Activists and Evangelical Christians on a College Campus

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Banquet 3

Room 104

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LGBTQ communities have been oppressed by most organized religions to varying degrees. Much of this oppression comes from wellmeaning people who have misinformation about LGBTQ populations. Additionally, many LGBTQ people are frustrated with the mistreatment by religious communities and often voice these opinions publicly, alienating LGBTQ people who are religious. In response to this alienation, a lesbian-identified graduate student at Oregon State University started a weekly discussion group between LGBTQ student leaders and the religious student group Campus Crusade for Christ. The group was extremely successful in building lasting friends and breaking down stereotypes. This workshop is intended for college campus leaders who are interested in engaging authentic conversations with religious organizations. Participants should have knowledge of LGBTQ issues, strong facilitation skills, and good presentation skills. Presented by V Martin Ohio University Women’s Center and LGBT Center

May it Please the Court: Gender and Sexual Identity in the Legal Profession

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This workshop will focus on those who wish to pursue law school but wish to get more information about the experience from those who have been there. It will focus on the challenges and risks involved in remaining true to yourself in this most conservative of professions. While we do not suggest that the profession is unwelcoming or even unfriendly toward LGBT individuals, it is more difficult to navigate the endless networking events, interview, classes, office hours, internships and externships and, most of all, court appearances. Law school will teach you more about yourself than you ever wanted to know, simply because it is a trial by fire that will push you harder than you have ever been pushed before. For those of us who have had to grow into our identities, it is a time of laughter, love, tears and anger. Presented by Grace Crivello, Jillian Sharpe, and Aaron Simonson Michigan State University College of Law

24 OUT for Work Room 101

This presentation will give students insight into the LGBTQ-specific career materials that are available, how to get more materials on their campuses, and how to get involved with OUT for Work. This presentation will feature a panel of “out” LGBTQ employees sharing their coming out stories in the workplace; tips and advice for students transitioning from academia into the workplace; pros and cons of being out

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in the workplace; what to expect after college; how to find LGBTQ-inclusive organizations; and tips on difficult topics such as being out on resumes and in interviews.

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25 Platonic Intimacy Banquet 2

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Presented by Anthony Curi University of Toledo

26 Shame and Vulnerability Room 203

Room 201

Join us for a cup of “T” as we offer a brief overview of the trans*gender spectrum and touch on topics including trans* health issues, laws, and what it means to be trans* in college. We will speak from experience on how to integrate inclusive programming within residence halls and how to acquire gender neutral housing on your own campus.

Presented by Riley Folds Founder and Director of OUT for Work

There exists a continuum between friendships and romantic relationships. Those that find themselves in this grey area are often pressured by friends and family to change the relationship into something it’s not. “Romantic friendship” is a term for an overlooked type of relationship that exists on this continuum (e.g. Will & Grace). Generating understanding and acceptance of this term would allow us to explore profoundly intimate platonic connections with people other than family. This workshop will examine the history of romantic friendships and how social norms cause people to believe they need a romantic relationship to provide emotional intimacy.

T-Time with Bug and Molly

Presented by Bug Wilburn and Molly Ferris Eastern Illinois University

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Utilizing Social Media for Your LGBT Organization Banquet 4

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Learn how to properly and effectively create, manage and maintain successful social media accounts for your LGBT organization. Learn the best practices for properly managing accounts, creating engaging content, increasing name recognition, responding to crises, running social media campaigns, and more. This workshop will provide you with real-life examples from non-profit organizations (including LGBT organizations) and companies that have demonstrated successful use of social media.

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Presented by Mary Patterson and Scott Clanin Illinois State University

Shame has become an epidemic in our society. We are constantly shaming ourselves and others for behaviors. The only way to combat shame is with vulnerability and empathy. This session will walk participants through shame and vulnerability based off the research by Dr. Brene Brown. The presenter will share personal stories about shame and vulnerability that are specific to the LGBT community. Presented by Lucas Graff University of Wisconsin - La Crosse 53


Career and Exhibitor Fair Saturday, 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Exhibit Hall B The Career and Exhibitor Fair will take place all day Saturday. Some of the organizations represented are promoting their events, schools, publications or resources; others may be looking for potential interns or employees. Check out these great organizations between or during workshop sessions!

Some of the great organizations participating as exhibitors are:

Some of the organizations participating in the career fair include:

ƒƒ Cleveland Special Events Corporation - Gay Games 9

ƒƒ Deloitte

ƒƒ Elsie Publishing, publisher of Lesbian Connection magazine

ƒƒ MSU Federal Credit Union

ƒƒ Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois ƒƒ Michigan State University Press

ƒƒ General Electric ƒƒ Northrop Grumman ƒƒ PNC ƒƒ TEKsystems

ƒƒ MiLove ƒƒ MSU Program in Public Health ƒƒ Oakland University’s Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) Education Conference ƒƒ OUT for Work ƒƒ Planned Parenthood Mid and South Michigan ƒƒ Trans-Kin: A Guide to Family and Friends ƒƒ Trans Oral History Project ƒƒ Tynan Fox from Tynan Fox Speaking ƒƒ Western Michigan University - Office of LBGT Student Services

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Please see the paper insert to the program guide for a full list of organizations participating in the Career and Exhibitor Fair.


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Heritage Gallery • Jan. 21 - Apr. 14, 2013

EASTMEETSWEST THE TRANSGENDER COMMUNITY OF ISTANBUL Photographic portraits by Mary Robert, Richmond University, London

Programs • Exhibit Opening Monday, January 21, 4-5:30 p.m. Presented with MLK Jr. Commemorative Celebration at MSU • Guest Lecture: Mary Robert Saturday, Feb. 9, 1:00 p.m. MSU Union Ballroom 2-5 p.m., Reception at MSU Museum in partnership with Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference (MBLGTACC), Feb. 8-10, 2013 at the Lansing Center

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State Caucuses and Oversight Committee

The purpose of the state caucuses is threefold: to elect 2 state representatives to the MBLGTACC Oversight Committee; give feedback on the 2013 conference; and network with other schools.

Background: What is the Oversight Committee? MBLGTACC is an entirely student-organized conference and is primarily organized by students at the host school. The Oversight Committee is the managing entity of MBLGTACC. It exists to select the hosts of future conferences, maintain an archive of previous conference records and control the official conference name. The OC comprises 2 representatives from the current and future conferences and 2 elected delegates from each Midwestern state. As stated in the OC’s constitution, the Midwest comprises 13 states: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin. The conference can be hosted only by a Midwestern college. Running the State Caucus Meeting (20 minutes) Please begin your meeting by identifying the 1-2 current representatives for your state, which were elected at last year’s conference. Those representatives should facilitate the state caucus meeting and the election of new state representatives. If neither are present, select someone to facilitate your state’s meeting and to take minutes of the meeting and keep track of time. It may be easier if these are two separate people, but one person may do both.

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Begin by reading the “Background” section above and asking if anyone would like to nominate or self-nominate for 2 state representative positions on the OC. Once there are a number of nominations, have each person introduced themselves by name, school and reason that they would like to be part of the OC and would be a good representative. Have students vote for 2 candidates by raising their hands (or by voice if they are unable to do so). Tally the votes; the 2 candidates with the largest number of votes will be the new representatives. Feedback About MBLGTACC 2013 (20 minutes) Discuss how the 2013 conference has been so far, including aspects that you like, dislike and/or would like to see in the future. (State representatives will bring this feedback to the OC.) Please refrain from repeating observations that have been already stated. (We want you to have as much time as possible to talk about state/school issues!) The person keeping the minutes should record this feedback and remind attendees when there is 10, 5 and 0 minutes remaining, and the facilitator should keep the discussion on track. We greatly appreciate all of your observations, comments and constructive criticism — we want the conference to keep improving! Please email the meeting minutes to us at info@mblgtacc2013.org. Please note which state the minutes are for in the title and within the body of the document. Thank you for your help!


Room 101 Banquet 3

Banquet 4

Room 102

Banquet 5-8 Room 103

Room 202 Banquet 1

Room 204

Room 203

Banquet 2

Room 201

Room 104

Beyond the Midwest: Room 205

State Networking (20-30 minutes) The facilitator will continue by supporting a discussion about state-related issues and current campus issues, concerns and successes. Feel free to discuss these topics in any order and in any way, including going around the room, raising hands, pairing delegations together, or creating small discussion groups with one person from each school. Suggested topics include: ƒƒ Talking about current issues happening in your state ƒƒ Discussing issues/initiatives at your school and getting feedback from others

Oversight Committee Meeting: What to Expect So you were just elected to be a state representative. Now what? Up to 4 representatives from your state — 2 elected at last year’s conference and 2 who were just elected — will attend the OC meeting following the state caucus meetings. We will go through the meeting agenda, which includes receiving feedback about this years’ conference; listening to presentation(s) from school(s) that are bidding to host MBLGTACC 2015 and making a selection; and discussing other topics related to the longevity of the conference. We look forward to meeting you!

ƒƒ Sharing best practices for organizing groups or initiatives ƒƒ Building statewide coalitions ƒƒ Planning field trips to other schools 57


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2:30 to 3:50 p.m.

Featured Workshop 29

Featured Workshop Banquet 5-8

Join keynote speaker Ben Cohen, who works to end bullying and homophobia in sports and emphasizes the importance of character, respect and equality in creating a kinder world. Come get to know him and ask questions before his plenary session! Presented by Ben Cohen England Rugby World Cup champion, activist, and Chairman of the Ben Cohen StandUp Foundation

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Am I the Only One? Peer-Led Youth Initiatives in the Midwest Banquet 4

Peer-led groups provide a unique appeal to LGBTQ+ youth but simultaneously come with their own set of challenges. This workshop will briefly outline the history, successes, and struggles of the Queer Nebraska Youth Networks, a peer-led grassroots organization in its third year which provides social activities, connections to resources, and confidential online discussion for LGBTQ+ youth in Nebraska. Participants will collectively consider what they still need in their local communities, what actionable steps are required to get there, and what we can do to help each other meet those goals. Presented by Drew Heckman, Anne Johnson and Jordan Brown University, University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Creighton University 58

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Beauty and “the Beast�: Homonormativity and Fat Gay Men Room 102

Join us for a discussion of the place held by fat gay men within the larger gay community. This workshop examine how the media (film, television and print) have affected how gay people view their own bodies and the bodies of others. This will be a space where participants may talk about experiences that have been shaped because of their body size and may also analyze their own privileges. We will be talking about eating disorders and depression within the gay community, as well as the question of who gets to be seen and heard and accepted as gay. Presented by Juan Chavez DePaul University


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The Bible and Homosexuality: Queering the Good Book

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Banquet 2

Come read the Christian Bible with 21stcentury queer eyes and retell the old, old stories: The alternative family constellation of Ruth, Naomi and Boaz. The love triangle of David, Jonathan and Saul. Ester’s coming out saves a nation. The Syro-Phoenician woman who schools Jesus of Nazareth. The great faith of the Roman Centurion. Join us as we reclaim the best of the Judeo-Christian tradition — radical hospitality, inclusion and love.

Banquet 1

This roundtable discussion amongst those active in faculty, staff and graduate assistant organizations will highlight our efforts to address campus climate, spousal/partner benefits, administrative support for LGBT employee recruitment and retention, and related topics. It will highlight different organizational structures, strategies, and records of success across campuses and allow us to learn best practices from each other, which will be of value to those from campuses where such organizations do not yet exist.

Presented by Rev. Dr. Gail M. Simonds Weathervane Ministries

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Drama Queens, Kings, and Queers

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Room 104

Do you participate in the sport of social drama? Chances are you or someone you know has been a victim, perpetrator, or witness of some form of intra-community bullying on your campus. From trash-talking about ex-lovers and un-kept secrets to serious bullying about identity issues, this session should leave you with new ideas and strategies to de-dramatize your everyday life on campus and create a positive environment. Presented by Kate E. Gaga Ohio University - Athens

Faculty, Staff and Graduate Assistants: Models of Organization and Activism for College/University Employees

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Presented by Grant Littke Michigan State University GLBT Faculty, Staff and Graduate Student Association

The Gay Black and Latino Ballroom Scene: The Invisible Correlations to HIV Transmission Room 103

This session will discuss the microcosmic culture: of the ballroom scene and its correlation to HIV and HIV transmission. This session will focus on health disparities of HIV as it relates to Black and Latino gay populations. Racism and other social constructs will be highlighted to better understand the underground culture. Presented by Lilianna Angel Reyes University of Michigan-Flint

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Otters, Twinks, and Bears… Oh My!

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Room 202

Room 204

Are you a twink, twank or twunk? A bear, otter or scruff? As a community that is often times based on looks, how can we move past the physical layer and learn to truly connect with one another? This facilitated discussion will explore the effect of media portrayal and labels on body image in the gay community.

Coming out in college can be invigorating, empowering, and a step in the right direction of embracing the LGBT identity and lifestyle. This session will explore the forces and support systems on campuses that both encourage and inhibit this process. Sexual Identity Theory will provide a platform for discussion on the many aspects of the coming out process and how it relates to the college student.

Presented by Barry Closser and Kandis Rodgers Missouri University of Science and Technology

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This panel discussion introduces QED: A Journal in GLBTQ Worldmaking, and its forthcoming inaugural special issue, “The End of Bullying?” QED 1.1 includes essays by activists and academics who are already making a difference in their diverse efforts to address the issue of bullying in the United States. Contributors explore a variety of perspectives on bullying, including the specific lives affected by bullying; those who perpetrate bullying; the systemic, institutional, cultural, communal, and relational conditions that enable, abet, obscure, erase, resist and perpetuate bullying; individual, mediated, communal, structural, governmental, political and cultural responses to bullying. Panelists include QED co-editors Charles Morris and Thomas Nakayama, and two contributors to the special issue, Queer Educational theorists and activists Therese Quinn and Erica Meiners. Presented by Gabe Dotto, Therese Quinn, Erica Meiners, Charles Morris III, Thomas Nakayama Michigan State University Press, University of Illinois at Chicago, Northeastern Illinois University, Syracuse University, Northeastern University

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Presented by Robin Walters-Powell, Padraic Stanley, and Brandon Mooney University of Findlay

QED, Bullying, and GLBTQ Worldmaking Room 101

Sexual Identity Formation and the College Student

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Speakers Panel: Educating Your Campus in Order to Create Change Room 205

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Education is the key to change. Come learn how to educate and enlighten your campus on LGBTQIA-related topics through speakers panels. Speakers panels try to educate individuals on terminology, topics, and identity using individuals personal experiences along with educational resources and activities. Workshop attendees will learn how to establish an effective outreach program that is focused on peer-to-peer education within a multidiscipline classroom setting. Presented by Beric J. Wessely Western Illinois University alumnus


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Talking Trans*: Navigating Trans* Identities in the Classroom

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Room 203

Victimizing the Victim: The Current State of Accessibility for GLBTQ Survivors Banquet 3

This workshop offers a closer look at how to navigate a trans* identity in the classroom. Participants will learn language tools that can be used to create safe spaces for trans* people. Additional attention will be given to how teachers and classroom leaders can make their classrooms more trans* friendly through respective language and by taking action. Previous experience is recommended, but not required.

In this session, we will analyze the barriers to domestic violence/sexual assault/intimate partnership victim/survivor services for LGBTQ individuals. We will look at the ways in which policy, service agencies, first responders, and language used around the topic often re-victimize LGBTQ individuals in their search for services and in their healing process. We will also discuss current work being done to increase accessibility for LGBTQ individuals in agencies which assist victims/survivors.

Presented by Ben Paul Hamline University

Presented by Adrik Curtis and Xine Drost Winona State University

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Understanding LGBTQIA-lphabet Soup I am Demi-nonmonosexual Homoromantic Polyamorous Male-Presenting Gender Fluid. If you understood all of that, then this session is not for you. It can be hard to understand all of the minute complexities of the sexual/gender/ romantic world. This workshop is intended as an overview to help attendees better understand and describe a myriad of complex communities and identities.

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Room 201

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5 6 7

Presented by Noah Scott University of Missouri-Kansas City

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4:00 to 5:20 p.m.

Featured Workshop 43

Were There LGBT People in the Ancient World? History, Sexuality, and Identity Banquet 5-8

The earliest historical records leave no doubt that men have loved men and women have loved women throughout time and around the world. Over the past several decades, however, historians have been engaged in a fierce debate over whether scholars should label all individuals who engaged in same-sex romantic and sexual relationships “gay,” “lesbian,” or bisexual.” Do these terms name categories that would have made sense to historical actors? Are sexual identities innate or socially constructed? What do the answers to those questions mean for political organization and activism today? Presented by Mindy Smith Professor of History at Michigan State University and Advisor of the MBLGTACC 2013 Planning Coalition

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Featured Workshop

Queer Theology I Room 201

Note: There will be a break between sessions, and attendees are welcome to join both or either session. Whose interests are served by the politics of religion, spirituality and faith? How do the confessional and transformational cultures of even the most progressive religions intersect with those of gender, orientation and affection? Join The Rev. Matthew Cockrum (Unitarian Universalist) and others in this interactive session of provocation and exploration. Bring your whole self to the work that we might put the pieces together...together. This session will include academic exploration of queer theory as it pertains to theology, religion and spirituality. Experiential exercises coupled with reflection, small and large group discussion and embodied movement will equip participants with tools for conversation and activism. Attendees will explore their multiple spiritual identities, as well as their religious and spiritual life-maps, and plan engagement strategies for the faith communities in their campuses and larger communities. Presented by Rev. Matthew S. Cockrum University of Michigan 62


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Advising the Whole Student: Intersection Between Queer and International Identities

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Room 101

Banquet 1

What does it mean to be a feminist? An activist? Participants will leave this presentation with resources about how to make their voices heard on their campuses. While many stereotypes exist surrounding the “isms” — for example, that feminism is about bra-burning, hating men and being lesbian — I am here to tell you that this is not the case! While you may not have time to spearhead rallies fighting for a woman’s right to choose, donating money to an organization that supports this cause is just as important. For those looking to be those leaders of change, this presentation will help provide resources on a national, state and local level. For those who may not have so much free time, this workshop emphasizes that your support, whether financial, verbal, etc., is necessary for bringing about change and making this a more equal world for all!

While higher education faces an increase in international student enrollment on U.S. college campuses, there is simultaneously a high demand for LGBT issues to be accommodated among this growing population. This session takes student-centered counseling skills and applies it to queeridentified international student advising. It provides a practical framework to balance queer and international student theories while advocating and empowering students/scholars. Attendees will participate in discussion and activities and will leave with advanced tools that incorporate empathic/reflective listening skills and intercultural awareness and sensitivities.

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Presented by Mark Chung Kwan Fan Michigan State University

The Biggest Hurdle: Overcoming Internalized Homophobia Room 202

Internalized homophobia has been referred to as the biggest hurdle for LGBT youth. In order to continue formation of a homosexual identity, LGBT college students must learn how to move past their own internalized homophobia. Using qualitative research, this session will provide insight into how gay college men experience internalized homophobia and the resources needed to continue forming a homosexual identity. Presented by Lucas Graff University of Wisconsin - La Crosse graduate student

The Future of Feminism: A Guide to Campus Activism

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Presented by Lacey Rogers Ohio University graduate student

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It’s Your Choice, or Is it?: The Intersection of the LGBTQ orientation and Religious Identity Room 104

This dialogue is designed to create a safe, educational space for individuals to voice personal experiences and opinions surrounding the intersection of LGBTQ and religious identities. We encourage participants with different beliefs to share views with one another through dialogue. At Clemson University, we hold biweekly dialogue sessions each fall semester for all freshmen and transfer students. The workshop utilizes activities and an openminded atmosphere to allow individuals to learn from one another and to provide a call to

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action to make campus a more tolerant and collaborative place.

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Presented by Celeste Jilich and Marie Rosasco Clemson University

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Poly-tics Banquet 4

Presented by Lucas McKeever, Jane Sandberg and Becca Sorgert University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

Presented by Kelsey Friemoth University of Toledo

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Pretty Bois & Femme Guys: NonFemale Identities with Feminine Expressions Room 103

In our culture, being feminine is associated with being “female,” but what happens when feminine people identify as something else? Whether you are trans*, male, non-binary, fluid, or one of limitless identities, we all face our own unique challenges as non-female people with feminine expressions. In this workshop, we will discuss our experiences being femme; break down the issues that we face; share how we negotiate cultural spaces, including public perceptions, privilege, language, and empowerment; and talk about how fun it is to be femme! Presented by JAC Stringer University of Cincinnati and Midwest Trans* and Queer Wellness Initiative 64

Room 204

Within resource centers, it is fairly common for the needs of one marginalized identity to be the major focus of the organization. This service model disregards issues surrounding the larger gamut of singular as well as intersecting identities that are possessed by underrepresented individuals. It is critical that libraries — as resource centers for entire regions — effectively address the needs and desires of all identities that come together to create the mosaic known as a community. This workshop explores various ways that librarianship as a profession has been used to advocate for and implement a more socially responsible society.

Polyamory is when a person experiences the ability of loving more than one person. Polysexuals are people who identify themselves as capable and willing to be attracted emotionally, physically, and romantically to more than one sex. Social norms dictate that both of these are ambiguous and therefore undesirable. In this workshop, we will explore why that is and how we still conform to these norms within the LGBT community.

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QLA: Queer Library Alliance

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Queer Sex 101 Room 102

Do you like to talk about sex? Is sexual health important to you? Do you feel that LGBTQ folks deserve relevant sex education? Come to our workshop for a discussion of participants’ experiences with LGBTQ sex education, a celebration of LGBTQ sexuality, and information about safe sexual practices for LGBTQ individuals! Presented by Aubree Henderson and James Haas University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


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Sex, Please: Looking at the Other Sides of the Coin

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Banquet 2

Banquet 3

“Sex, Please” began as a personal exploration of how sex is defined. Designed for the novice and expert, this workshop provides a space to see the variety of different sexes that exist beyond the male/female binary. There will be an anonymous activity to demonstrate how one’s sex can change over time, and non-binary & trans* individuals are especially welcome. Combining presentation, activity and tales of a sex-queer gynandromorph’s experiences, “Sex, Please” is the perfect place to join others who have changed their sex, obtain information for your journey, and gain a foundational understanding of the topic. Presented by Andrew Leigh Emporia State University

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Storytelling for Social Justice: Why Your Story Counts Room 205

This session will explore the importance of storytelling within social justice. Presenter Ellie Hail will start with their own story and how it has empowered them to become an advocate for themselves and for the trans* and gender non-conforming communities. Then the conversation will turn inward: What is your own story? How can your story change attitudes? We will explore our own stories and how we can use them as a tool for social justice and advocacy. Presented by Ellie Marie Hail University of Northern Iowa

The Trans* Workshop for Trans* Folks, Advanced Allies and Partners Have you been waiting for an advanced trans* workshop? Are you a trans* person struggling in a relationship? Do you want more information about being out in the workplace or to your friends or family members? Then this is the workshop for you! This workshop is designed for trans* folks as well as advanced allies and partners. It will discuss all topics listed above, as well as provide time for FAQ’s and discussion, time willing. Presented by Kyle Watson University of Minnesota Duluth

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We’ve Always Been Redefining Sexual Morality: An Exploration of the Curious Turns in Religious Sexual Ethics Room 203

Some people in this country are waging a “culture war.” They do so under the banners of “traditional morality” and “defending the traditional family.” They champion this not only in particular churches, but in legal spheres, too. They tell us that their perspective was established by God and has been venerated throughout history, and therefore it should function as the moral norm upon which society is ordered by law. The facts, however, get in the way of their narrative. In this workshop, we will explore the many revisions of religious teachings on sexual ethics and discuss how we might conceive inclusive sexual moralities today.

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Presented by Dr. Richard W. McCarty Mercyhurst University

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5:30 to 6:50 p.m.

Featured Workshop 57

Bisexuality 101 and Beyond Banquet 5-8

What does it mean to identify as bisexual, pansexual or fluid? What are some of the challenges to recognizing and understanding this often-overlooked segment of the LGBTQ community? However you identify, come to this lively and interactive program with MBLGTACC 2013 keynote speaker Robyn Ochs, particularly if you could use some tools for challenging ignorance and biphobia. Presented by Robyn Ochs Educator, speaker, activist and author of “Getting Bi: Voices of Bisexuals Around the World�

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Featured Workshop

Queer Theology II Room 201

Note: There will be a break between sessions, and attendees are welcome to join both or either session. Whose interests are served by the politics of religion, spirituality and faith? How do the confessional and transformational cultures of even the most progressive religions intersect with those of gender, orientation and affection? Join The Rev. Matthew Cockrum (Unitarian Universalist) and others in this interactive session of provocation and exploration. Bring your whole self to the work that we might put the pieces together...together. This session will include academic exploration of queer theory as it pertains to theology, religion and spirituality. Experiential exercises coupled with reflection, small and large group discussion and embodied movement will equip participants with tools for conversation and activism. Attendees will explore their multiple spiritual identities, as well as their religious and spiritual life-maps, and plan engagement strategies for the faith communities in their campuses and larger communities. Presented by Rev. Matthew S. Cockrum University of Michigan

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Examining Embodiment: What Can a Body Be?

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Banquet 4

Room 202

This workshop will include a brief historical overview of different recognized forms of the body, as well as an examination of the roles that prosthetics, medical technologies, hormonal therapy, and surgical advancements play in opening up new possibilities for bodily transformations that challenge ableism and social constructs of gender, race, and class. Finally, we will examine the body as a site of expression and empowerment in which attendees will share their experiences and ideas about constructing or “putting together” their own embodiments.

LGBT school educators are practically invisible within the nature of heterosexist and homophobic education (Blount, 2005). The presenter will discuss his research on how gay and lesbian teachers negotiate their identities and how those affect their relationships in their school settings. Six gay and lesbian educators were interviewed about their experiences in their public school communities. Additionally, a focus group was conducted consisting of five gay and lesbian Catholic school educators, including a soccer coach and a football coach at an all boy’s Catholic school. The workshop includes a presentation about the findings of this study as well as a discussion about school policies and a question and answer session.

Presented by Amy Harris Purdue University graduate student

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Gay and Greek: Supporting LGBQ Fraternity and Sorority Members Room 205

Do LGBQ fraternity and sorority members experience similar benefits as their heterosexual peers? This session answers this question by presenting recent research on the educational gains of LGBQ fraternity and sorority members. As a result of this presentation, participants will be able to explain the importance of creating safe and inclusive environments in fraternal organizations and identify resources for supporting LGBTQA Greeks. While this presentation is meant for student leaders and advisors, other supporters are encouraged to attend as well. Presented by Larry Long and Moni Crissman Community directors at Michigan State University

How Do Lesbian & Gay Educators Negotiate Their Sexual Identities in Their K-12 School Settings

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Presented by Steven D. Hooker, Ed.D. Arcadia University

How to Use Your Tongue (Inclusively) Room 203

Words can be weapons, and they can be a sweet embrace — especially in the queer community, where the language surrounding identity and orientation is used to sometimes ostracize and sometimes bring together, and not always intentionally. This session addresses why “gender-neutral” language specifically is crucial for creating an inclusive environment for everyone within the community, particularly the often-overlooked non-binary gender identities. In addition to some sexy language theory, we will also briefly cover the not-sobrief history of the gender neutral pronoun

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(including current incarnations) and do some down and dirty workshop activities practicing pronouns and de-gendering everyday phrases.

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The Jagged Piece: How HIV Fits Our Mosaic Room 104

HIV/AIDS is no laughing matter. This workshop will give those who attend a better understanding of how HIV affects your interpersonal relationships and your body, as well as the risk we face in the midwest and the policy and politics that give the disease a negative stigma.

Presented by CJ Brady and Kasey Catlett University of Oklahoma

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Presented by Ryan Church Cincinnati State

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Keeping the “Sex” in Sexual Orientation: The Importance of Creating Sex Positive Environments Banquet 3

VAGINA! TESTICLES! CLITORIS! PENIS! These words probably incited either a giggle or a cringe, but why? In this session, we will examine the messages we receive about sex and sexuality and how these messages affect emotional and behavioral development, especially of young people. We will then thrust forward into exploring how we can create sex positive spaces that affirm and embrace sexual expression and freedom. This session will certainly tickle and moisten your fancy. Presented by Jen Hsu and Ashley Schwedt Western Michigan University LGBT Student Services and University of Michigan

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Banquet 2

Join us as we explore the myths, assumptions, and facts about non-monosexual identities in mainstream culture. Learn about the basis of these identities and ways in which you can be an ally to an underrepresented part of the great LGBTQ acronym. After this workshop, we hope you will be able to better understand and utilize our information in informative and influential ways in your unique community.

Presented by Amy Vanderpool University of Nebraska - Lincoln

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Non-Monosexual Identities

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Q&A Panel with Queer Ministers Room 204

A short discussion about the intersection of faith and sexuality. Focus will be on why the stereotype that one can’t be both queer and Christian is wrong, and how it feels to be gay in a Christian community or Christian in the queer community. After discussion, there will be a panel of LBGTQQA people who currently serve in ministry to answer questions and continue discussion. This will be fun for those who identify as Christian or anyone who is interested in seeing our side of this topic. Presented by Justin Merkel Michigan State University Q-CROSS


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Queering the Classics Room 103

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Room 101

From “Isolde and Tristan” to “All About Eve,” classic film and literature fill our lives every day. There is a remarkable lack of queer characters and relationships in the classics, but there are people out there who wish to change this. This workshop will discuss what the classics are, who is trying to change them, and if changing them is a good idea.

Attending college in a rural area can be hard and frustrating. We are here to help! Through advice, information and experience, we focus on how you can change policies at your college to be more inclusive. With a small LGBT population on campus, we can help locate allies in the student body as well as administration.

Presented by Trevor Warzecha University of North Dakota

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Shhh! They’re talking about Suicide Room 102

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Suicide is a topic that is often downplayed or outright ignored. We lament when we hear of the suicide of a person within the community, but too often we do nothing about it. This will begin as an informational presentation and end with discussion about actions that participants can take in their communities. The presentation will cover social causes and influences on those who attempt/ commit suicide; adult suicide within the queer community; the roles that other mental health issues (such as alcohol and drug addiction) play in suicide; and the roles that schools and students can play in suicide advocacy work. Presented by Kyle Krebs University of North Dakota

Student Organizations in Rural Areas

Presented by Joshua Sulloway and Rachel Wilson South Dakota State University

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What’s Your Score? The Campus Pride Index as a Tool for Change

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Participants will learn about the Campus Pride Index, a national assessment tool that measures LGBT-friendly campuses on a five-star scale based on eight areas ranging from policy inclusion to academics to student life. We will highlight Midwest colleges and universities already on the index and discuss how students, faculty, staff, and alumni can use the Index to make their campuses more inclusive. We will also discuss Action Planning as a tool for creating change on campuses.

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Presented by Jess McDonald, Shane Windmeyer and Jennie Rokakis Media, Communications & Programs Manager and Executive Director/Founder of Campus Pride; Eastern Michigan University student

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BDSM: Lessons from a Rubberboy Banquet 5-8

What can you learn from a Rubberboy? There’s more to the fetish than first meets the eye. High school sex education plans are filled with scare tactics that shame students from embracing sexuality as a gift. Meanwhile, we are bombarded with messages promoting sex and sexual lifestyles from movies, TV, advertising, and the Internet. In short, we are taught to make enemies with ourselves. In this workshop, Tynan Fox, an RN, certified Public Health Nurse, and proud Rubberboy will present a dimension of sex education you’ve never seen before. Discussion will include kinky sex and BDSM basics, safety, resources, and the most important lesson: the SELF is the ally we need most. Presented by Tynan Fox Sex educator and Truman State University alumnus

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Asexuality 101: An Introduction to the Asexy World Room 204

Asexuality 101, presented by a bona fide asexual, is an informational session designed to familiarize participants with asexuality and the asexual community. We will work to dispel myths and misconceptions about asexuals and discuss the importance of asexual awareness in both the LGBTQIA community and in the greater conversation of sex positivity. Presented by El Jagaraj St. Olaf College

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By the Water Cooler: LGBT Employment Issues Room 205

Hanging out at the water cooler, a co-worker assigns you a gender pronoun you don’t identify with. What do you do? This session explores employment issues, especially as they relate to gender identity and expression. Presented by Elinor Landess and Dee Hurlbert Michigan State University LBGT Resource Center


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Battling the Campus Bureaucracy: Strategies for Effecting Lasting Change

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Room 102

Room 104

This workshop will equip participants with the tools to make lasting, sustainable progress in their community. Participants will receive tips on battling hostile administrations, building coalitions within and beyond the LGBTQI+ community, and implementing change without the support of a student group or united community. If you have ever struggled to update your non-discrimination policy, advocate for all-gender housing options, or are itching to share a successful advocacy project you have worked on, this is the workshop for you. 22

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Presented by Daniel J. Rossi Indiana University - Bloomington

Fat Bodies, Queer Lives Room 103

This is a body positive workshop that will explore the intersection of fatness and queerness. We will discuss the history of the fat acceptance movement, the place of queer folk within the fat acceptance movement, and our queer relationship with beautiful, big bodies. This workshop is open to all interested participants, keeping in mind that we will be working to maintain a comfortable and safe space for those who want to share their experiences as a fat-identified queer person. Presented by Molly Baumkel University of Michigan

Implementing an Outcome-Based Condom Distribution Program on Your Campus

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Condom distribution programs have long been a fixture on many college campuses. Data have shown that effective condom distribution programs have several hallmark features when implemented as a structural level intervention (CDC, 2010). Additionally, an effective condom distribution program is often cost-effective when compared to treating HIV infections and other sexually transmitted infections. This session will highlight how one large research institution implemented a condom distribution program, as well as potential ways to increase stakeholder buy-in, acceptance, and support. Presented by Erica Phillipich Health educator at Michigan State University

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The Past, Present and Future of the LGBTQ Athletic Community Banquet 3

The number of athletes who identify openly as part of the LGBTQ community is on the rise, bringing to light issues previously left unrecognized. We will outline the evolution of the reception and attitudes of the LGBTQ athletic community throughout history. We will also discuss how our past influences our present and future and how the world of sports and LGBTQ issues interface with our college campuses and the world at large today. Presented by Eric Stafford and Phil BeardsleySchoonmaker St. Olaf College 71


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The Queer-Friendly Campus: Using Community for Effective Institutional Change

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Banquet 4

Room 101

We will examine two relationships in the Bible that are generally written off as friendships, which others argue were more than friendships: the relationship between David and Jonathan and between Ruth and Naomi. Our first focus is to open people up to the idea that there were, in fact, same-sex relationships in the Bible. Secondly, we want to point out how these couples are examples of healthy relationships, even if viewed as being strictly friends.

As student leaders and student organizers, our ultimate goal is to create a safe, friendly environment on our campus. We try to create change on our campus through lobbying the institution/administration, but we also discuss community. We often talk about community as if we know exactly what it is, how to grow it, and how to use it effectively. This program breaks down how to build community on your campus and ways to use it effectively to move towards change.

Presented by Queer Christians Reclaiming Our Sexuality and Spirituality Michigan State University Q-CROSS

Presented by Katherine Barnes St. Olaf College

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Queer + Teacher: Mutually Exclusive Identities? Banquet 1

Teachers and faculty, specifically those who identify as LGBTQ, are an equally crucial, inherently related, but largely silent voice in the current dialogue surrounding topics of gender and sexuality in K-12 schools. However, this subset of historically persecuted educators has transformative potential for directly confronting the propensity for heteronormativity in a foundational institution. The history of this group will be discussed, as well as the contemporary politics, policy and experiences of queer educators, with the totality of the presentation calling for a critical shift in teacher education programs in response to an increasingly dynamic, complex understanding of gender and sexuality. Presented by Callie Youngman Northern Michigan University alumnus

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Same-Sex Relationships in the Bible?

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Same Strokes: Lessons from Sex on the Margins Banquet 2

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New ideas from the trans, BDSM, and poly communities can help you talk about your body, sex, and relationships, regardless of where your identity falls. This workshop will begin with a lecture covering language that isolates body parts from gender and bodies as a whole, tools for talking about safe sex and consent, and how to talk with partners about jealousy and other relationship pitfalls. From there, participants will be welcome to ask questions and discuss the material using their own experiences. This workshop is open to participants of all identities and levels of experience. Presented by Toby Gurl Beloit College LGBT Coordinator


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Silly Fruits, Stereotypes Are For Kids

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Room 201

This workshop will provide an educational, interesting, and hilarious depiction of the falsities of stereotyping and how best to defy subjective prejudice. Through audio, visuals, and yes, even a performance, the dashing GLBT leaders of Southwest Florida will present these issues from a passionate anti-stereotyping perspective!

Room 202

Designed for queer young adult leaders, this session explores techniques for organizational management and planning as applied to student groups. Through an interactive and participatory workshop, attendees will learn techniques for goal setting, data gathering, assessment, and transitioning to new leadership. Content is taken from the experiences of the leaders of Out in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (oSTEM) Incorporated, but is adapted for all organizations targeting this demographic.

Presented by Matthew Stoner, Jackie Reale, Steph Mold and Robert Lloyd Florida Gulf Coast University

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Speculative Gender Room 203

Love the Doctor? Self-identify as a Trekkie? If you have an unquenchable passion for science fiction and gender study, bring both with you! In this workshop, we’ll peer into what genders might exist in the distant future among interstellar societies and how they compare to the established and emergent social identities we have now. Given that successful science fiction franchises have ratings and profitability to consider, we will also peer into the writers’ knowledge and interpretations of gender, as well as their target audiences’ openness to speculation about gender.

Topics in Queer Student Leadership: Effective Leadership Transitions, Assessment, and Goal-Driven Planning

Presented by Adam Stoffel and Drew Sabelhaus University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee and University of California, Berkeley; oSTEM National Board Members

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Presented by Vince Tripi, III University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee alumnus

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Featured Workshop

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Featured Workshop Banquet 5-8

Join keynote speaker LZ Granderson, who is a columnist and TV pundit for CNN and ESPN. LZ is African-American, openly-gay, Christian and a father, and was born and raised in Detroit. Come get to know him and ask questions before his plenary session! Presented by LZ Granderson Journalist, commentator and sports writer

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Accommodation Awareness: Student Organizations and Accessibility Room 202

This interactive session will address issues of accessibility and accountability in queer spaces. Leaders often unintentionally do what is best for themselves rather than what is best for the whole group, leaving people with disabilities who require accommodations to fend for themselves or face not being included. This session will demonstrate how, through collaboration and clear communication, student leaders can be inclusive and respectful to people of all abilities. Please expect to participate in or observe two activities and lengthy discussions! Presented by Nik de Leon, Katka Showers-Curtis, Lisa Helms, Rachel Nepper, Glen Gaylor; and Anna Bruno University of Wisconsin – Whitewater; University of Wisconsin – Madison 74

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Equality Talks: Using Everyday Conversations to Advance LGBT Equality Room 103

Conversations with our friends, family and co-workers about LGBT equality are the most effective way to educate them. However, conversations about these issues usually don’t come naturally and can be emotional. But being able to communicate with someone who may not be completely supportive requires more than passion. It requires practice, knowledge of facts and an ability to communicate without alienating your audience. Equality Talks offers an in-depth, practical look at how to communicate the issues of our lives and current lack of equality to others. Attendees will be engaged


throughout the workshop with interactive instruction, role play in small groups and an open discussion of best practices.

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Room 201

Presented by Candace Gingrich-Jones Associate Director of Youth & Campus Outreach at the Human Rights Campaign

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The past decade in entertainment has brought a new wave of LGBTQ characters and storylines, and a variety of actors have embodied the people we love to watch on the big and small screen. Why are these shows and movies so entertaining? More importantly, are they accurate? We will take a look at primetime television’s new surge in programming, including “Glee,” “Modern Family,” “How I Met Your Mother,” “The New Normal” and more, as well as the lives of LGBTQ actors. We will also take an interactive look into drag performance.

Examining the Attitudes, Perceptions and Experiences of the Michigan LGBTQ Community: Results from a Statewide Survey

Banquet 1

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This session is a research presentation overviewing the results of a recent state-wide data collection. More than 1,000 participants completed an anonymous online questionnaire surveying the Michigan LGBTQ community about their attitudes, perceptions and experiences. This presentation will discuss the results regarding gender identity, sexual identity, social connection, openness with social networks, priority community issues, and experiences with discrimination. Implications and recommendations for educational campaigns and change will be considered. Presented by Dr. Kelly Morrison and Dr. Steven McCornack Communication professors at Michigan State University

Express Yourself: LGBTQ Representation in the Media

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Presented by Frankie Bennett Northwestern University

Gay, Bisexual, Transgendered, and Progressive Men in Fraternity Life Room 104

This workshop aims to examine gay, bisexual, transgendered, and progressive men and their involvement in fraternity life on a college campus. How open are these men in expressing their sexual orientation and identity while being involved in fraternity life? What are the factors that determine how open a man can be in this realm of campus life? By examining interviews of gay, bisexual, transgendered, and progressive men in fraternity life, we hope to provide insight and answers to these very questions. Presented by Jeff Devereaux and Kyle Shupe Delta Lambda Phi brothers at Bowling Green State University 75


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Holey Matrimony: Queering the Marriage Debate

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Room 203

Room 101

This session will examine the contemporary same-sex marriage debate, particularly as it has been staged between the mainstream LGBT movement and the queer anti-assimilationists. Is marriage equality the wrong goal? Can the push for gay marriage ever be made compatible with queer politics? Bring your best critiques or defenses of the mainstream LGBT movement’s emphasis on marriage equality, as this session will be largely discussion-based.

What began as a master’s thesis project is now molding into a large-scale LGBT community involvement and activism project. “People Like Me” is an application designed for the LGBT population which aims to help individuals in their quest for “voting with their dollars” on businesses that demonstrate equality towards their patrons. Its primary objective is to help individuals identify and locate LGBT-friendly business establishments based on both their own experiences as well as referencing the experiences of others. Learn where the project started, where it is now, and how you can become involved.

Presented by Nick Curry and Pax Yarrows Washington University in St. Louis

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Presented by Emily Brozovic Michigan State University alumnus and Designer of the MBLGTACC 2013 program guide

Jewish Answers to Queer Questions Banquet 3

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What have we read between lines of Biblical texts regarding sexuality? How has Jewish tradition interpreted these Biblical verses over the past thousand years? In this workshop, we will discuss the stances of the three major Jewish movements and how they approach LBGTQ issues. Come discuss these questions and more with a queer Rabbinical student through the lens of the Hebrew Bible and other Jewish sources. Presented by Dana Benson and Hannah Henschel Hebrew Union College - Jewish Institute of Religion and University of Cincinnati

People Like Me: A Mobile App Project for the LGBT Population

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Residence Life: We’re Here, We’re Queer, We Live and Work Here, Too Room 102

College is very formative time for many individuals. The first couple years can be especially difficult when self-discovery is happening in the context of a residence hall. Residence Life student staff members have the ability, and arguably the responsibility, to foster inclusion, acceptance, and equality in these living spaces. This workshop will provide ideas and points of discussion concerning the roles of Residence Life staff in the lives of the students with whom they interact. Presented by Jordan and Molly Ferris Creighton University and Eastern Illinois University

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Using Social Science Research to Reduce Prejudice Against LGBTQ People of Color and Advance Inclusion and Equality

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Banquet 4

Banquet 2

Have you ever wondered what causes division within the trans* community? Have you ever been frustrated when someone (trans* or not) assumes all trans* people have something in common? Using feminist scholar Chandra Mohanty’s concept of “common difference,” this workshop will address some of those questions and attempt to bring together this often-fragmented community. We will work together as a collective to isolate and assess some of the problems of the (falsely-identified) monolithic trans* community and figure out where to go from here.

Discrimination within the LGBTQA community limits our ability to achieve inclusion and equality. Because LGBTQ communities possess racial, ethnic, ability, religious diversity, each member of the LGBTQA community likely has opportunities to be at least one kind of ally. Using the intersection of race with sexual orientation and gender as a model, this session provides social science-based information on the links between mental health of LGBT people of color, discrimination, and social activism. Learn how to reduce racism against LGBTQ people of color in everyday interactions and practice effective prejudice reduction skills.

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Presented by Melissa J. Grey, Ph.D. Psychology professor at Monroe County Community College

Weight of the World: Eating Disorders in the LGBTQ Community Room 205

Eating disorders and negative body image affect people of all genders, ages, races, classes, and sexualities. However, studies indicate that certain identities experience these issues in different ways. This presentation will explore how individuals across the LGBTQ spectrum experience these issues, why they experience these issues, and what we can do to address them in ourselves, our campuses, and our communities.

What’s the T: Bridging the Gap in Transgender Community Organizing

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You Can’t Change What We Never Chose

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With the passing of California’s Bill SB 1172, conversion therapy for minors has finally been recognized for what it is: torture. This session will discuss the history, current status, and future of conversion therapy efforts and the work to eliminate it. From the personal story of a survivor, to steps we can take to end the practice of reparative therapy, this is a session for anyone interested in the concept of forced “change” of one’s sexual orientation.

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Presented by Sam Brinton Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Presented by Paul Reeves University of Missouri-Columbia

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ROBYN OCHS Robyn Ochs would like to give a shout out to all of the MBLGTACC 2013 organizers for the work that you have put into making this year's conference a success. Also, an enormous thank you to student activists across the Midwest for making change on your own campuses. Let's change the world together! To book Robyn for your event, visit www.robynochs.com or email robyn@robynochs.com

WELCOME MBLGTACC Don’t forget to stop by MSU’s new Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum during your visit to East Lansing!

broadmuseum.msu.edu // 517-884-3900 // eebam@msu.edu


LZ Granderson TV pundit, award-winning journalist, and one of the most popular online columnists for CNN and ESPN

OUTmedia is a leading global source for LGBTQ and queer-affirmative national acts and celebrity talent, and works to create more accepting and tolerant campus communities. We are deeply committed to the promotion of diversity within mainstream and LGBTQQIA culture, giving voice to African American, Latino/a, Asian, Jewish, and women artists.

Our Motto is “Changing the World One Act at a Time” and We Are Ever So Proud To Take Action and Sponsor for the 4th Time

mblgtacc 20 THIRTEEN MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

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www.OUTmedia.org

@OUTmedia info@OUTmedia.org 718.789.1776 Follow LZ @Locs_n_Laughs


SPARTANS FIND STRENGTH IN THEIR DIFFERENCES

At MSU, differenceS Are ASSetS. They make us better students and scholars, athletes and artists, scientists and leaders. Each Spartan’s voice enriches campus conversation and adds value to our vibrant community. MSU’s roots as a land-grant university have created an environment that encourages us to step outside comfort zones, to cross disciplines and cultures, and to work side by side. As we achieve our potential, we empower others to achieve theirs—on campus and beyond.

Office for Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives

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Opening Doors

OFFICE OF DIVERSITY AND PLURALISM The mission  of  the  Office  of   Organization  and  Professional   Development  for  Diversity  and   Pluralism  (ODP)  is  to  serve  as  a   resource  that  faculty,  staff  and   graduate  students  within  the  units  of   the  College  of  Agriculture  and   Natural  Resources  (CANR)  use  to   develop  intentional  efforts  to  recruit   and  retain  diverse  faculty,  staff  and   graduate  students  to  enhance   teaching,  research  and  extension.  

WWW.ODP.ANR.MSU.EDU

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The Office of Diversity and Pluralism sponsors several events annually, one of which is the Opening Doors Workshop held in the spring. Opening Doors is an overnight three (3) day retreat that lays the foundation for personal and organizational growth. Through this workshop, participants explore a framework that deepens their diversity awareness and enhances their ability to create inclusive organizations.

ADVANCE TICKETS

First Tuesday Gatherings

Come meet CANR faculty, staff and graduate students at the 1st Tuesday Graduate Student, Faculty & Staff Mixer. Enjoy a presentation by our guest speakers.

Support and Advocacy

Students, staff at all levels, faculty, and administrators should feel free to come to the ODP office to express issues and concerns. You will receive a supportive, listening, confidential environment as well as assistance, advocacy, referrals, and other support to address and assist in helping resolve your concerns in a safe zone.


Michigan State University College of Law Proudly Supports MBLGTACC 2013 Michigan State Law has been a trendsetter in opening its doors to individuals from across the global community since its founding in 1891. By recruiting and retaining a diverse student body, MSU Law continues its century-long commitment to providing a superior legal education to qualified individuals from all communities. www.law.msu.edu/diversity

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AS AMERICAN AS DETROIT; AS DIVERSE AS AMERICA. At Chrysler, our suppliers, dealers and employees are as diverse as America. They represent a community of which people like you and me are proud to be a part. Each one of our vehicles embodies their ingenuity and quality promise to you. We thank you for allowing us to embrace diversity as one of our main drivers.

Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram, SRT and Mopar are registered trademarks of Chrysler Group LLC. Š 2012 Chrysler Group LLC. FIAT is a registered trademark of Fiat Group Marketing & Corporate Communication S.p.A., used under license by Chrysler Group LLC.


s e m o c l e W

The

Visit our booth on Feb. 9th!

Our scientists are driven by a passion to educate the leaders of the future in a diverse and inclusive environment.

NS.MSU.EDU

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Letter to the Future You may have noticed the detailed history section earlier in this program guide. Hours were spent Googling, emailing universities’ archives and tracking down previous organizers to learn about the history of MBLGTACC. One of our board members had the privilege of speaking with organizers of the 1994 and 2007 conferences and seeing program guides from 1994-6, 2002, and 2007-12. Much has been done to uncover its history, and the stories of its organizers is far from complete. What the 2013 planning team has learned is that not much information is passed year-to-year; it’s hard to do so when organizers change, students graduate and some organizers burn out. Thus, planning teams have had to reinvent the wheel nearly every year for 21 years. It is an absolute miracle that this conference has been held for 21 years in a row – and also an extraordinary testament to the strength, energy and passion of student organizers. The people we spoke with emphasized the importance of preserving the institutional memory of the conference. And the budgets, program guides and advice from previous organizers we have worked to collect from them have been integral to the planning of the 2013 conference. It is a philosophy of the MSU LBGT Resource Center that “instead of ‘It Gets Better,’ it should be ‘Make It Better.’” The MBLGTACC 2013 Planning Coalition has wholeheartedly embraced this philosophy in our work. In every step of the planning process, we have been careful to document and preserve planning information for future conferences – and to make it better. It is for you – attendees and organizers – that we have worked so hard on collecting history of this conference. It is for you that we are creating a guide on how to plan this conference. (It’s 30-pages – before the appendix!) It is for you that we pushed to launch our website and open registration sooner. It is for you that we have been working to improve communication between planning teams and to mentor and become friends with the 2014 organizers. It is for you that we have poured two years of our love and energy into planning this conference. We hope that the precedent of “making it better” – of communicating more, of mentoring others, of passing information along and of aiming higher – is one that continues. As Rev. Dr. Jamie Washington, a keynote speaker last year, said: “It is important that you know that you must be setting up your campus – so that people can pick up from where you left off.” When you return to your campus, what issues will you be picking up? What pieces will you be putting together? Who will you bring together? And who will be picking up where you left off? We’re all making history in our own way – and we’re in it together. In Love and Solidarity,

— MBLGTACC 2013 Planning Coalition

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Consider Hosting MBLGTACC 2016 Loved the conference? The MBLGTACC 2013 Planning Coalition strongly encourages student leaders to consider bidding at MBLGTACC 2014 to host MBLGTACC 2016 at their school. It’s never too early to start thinking about it! The conference can be hosted only by a Midwestern college. As stated in the Oversight Committee’s constitution, the Midwest comprises 13 states: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin. Hosting MBLGTACC — the largest LGBTA college conference in the nation — is a great honor, and the conference provides a phenomenal opportunity for students to develop leadership skills and for your university to showcase its outstanding student resources and academic programs. These past two years have been an incredible experience for us, and planning this conference has been far more work than we could have imagined — but we poured our hearts into it and loved nearly every minute of it. Feel free to contact any of the 2013 Executive Board members for advice and information about planning MBLGTACC. If you are interested in bidding to host the 2016 conference, please also contact the organizers of MBLGTACC 2014 at the University of Missouri - Kansas City. The legacy of MBLGTACC continues — see you next year in Kansas City!


Glossary of Terms We fully acknowledge that this glossary may not speak for the experiences, realities or perspectives of all individuals. We have tried to be open-ended and inclusive while simultaneously striving to be as descriptive and useful as possible to those this conference serves. We recognize that it is impossible to capture the full range of experiences within our community, and we encourage you to explore each of these terms in greater depth. Ally:A person whose attitudes and behaviors are anti-heterosexist and anti-cissexist in perspective and who works towards combating homophobia, heterosexism, transphobia and cissexism, both on a personal and institutional level. Most commonly used for those who do not identify as LGBTQIA (A in this case meaning asexual), etc. — in other words, those who identify as straight and cisgender — however, anyone can be an ally. For example, a lesbian woman can be an ally to the trans community, a straight asexual person can be an ally to the LGBTQIA community, etc. Aromantic:One who lacks a romantic orientation or is incapable of feeling romantic attraction. Aromantics can still have a sexual orientation (e.g., “aromantic bisexual” or “aromantic heterosexual”). A person who feels neither romantic nor sexual attraction is known as an aromantic asexual. Asexual / Ace:An individual who does not experience sexual attraction. Individuals may still be emotionally, physically, romantically, and/or spiritually attracted to others, and their romantic orientation may also be LGBTQIA (A in this case meaning ally). The prefixes of homo-, hetero-, bi-, pan-, poly-, demi- and a- have been used to form terms such as heteroromantic, biromantic, homoromatic asexual, and so on. Unlike celibacy, which people choose, asexuality is intrinsic. Some asexual people do engage in sexual activity for a variety of reasons, such as a desire to please romantic partners or to have children. Bigender:Refers to those who have masculine and feminine sides to their personality. This is often a term used by cross dressers. It should not be confused with the term two-spirit, which is specifically a term used by Native Americans. Bisexual / Bi:An individual who is physically, romantically, emotionally and/or spiritually attracted to men and women. “Bisexual erasure/ invisibility” refers to the tendency for some people to forget about those who are attracted to more than one gender. Butch:An identity or presentation that leans towards masculinity. Butch can be an adjective (“she’s a butch woman”), a verb (“he went home to butch up”), or a noun (“they identify as a butch”). Although commonly associated with masculine queer/lesbian women, it’s used by many to describe a distinct gender identity and/or expression, and does not necessarily imply that one identifies as a woman. CAFAB and CAMAB:Acronyms meaning “Coercively Assigned Female/Male At Birth.” Sometimes AFAB and AMAB (without the word “coercively”) are used instead. is No one, whether cis- or trans, has a choice in the sex or gender to which they are assigned when they are born, which is why it is said to be coercive. In the rare cases in which it is necessary to refer to the birth-assigned sex of a trans person, this is the way to do it. Cisgender / Cis:A prefix of Latin origin, meaning “on the same side (as).” Cisgender individuals have a gender identity that is aligned with their birth sex, and therefore have a self-perception and gender expression that matches behaviors and roles considered appropriate for their birth sex:for example, a person who is femininely-identified that was born female. In short, cisgender is the opposite of transgender. It is important to recognize that even if two people identify as men (one being cis and the other being trans*), they may lead very similar lives but deal with different struggles pertaining to their birth sex. Cissexism:Synonymous with transphobia, this definition is associated with negative attitudes and feelings toward transgender people, based on the expression of their internal gender identity. Cissexism is also the belief that cisgender individuals are superior to transgender people and that a cisgender lifestyle is more desirable to lead. Crip:Increasingly used to refer to a person who has a disability and embraces it, rather than feeling sorry for themselves. Historically used as a disparaging term for a person that is partially disabled or unable to use a limb or limbs. It is similar to the word queer in that it is sometimes used as a hateful slur, so although some have reclaimed it from their oppressors, be careful with its use. 91


Cross-dressing:The act of dressing and presenting as the “opposite” binary gender. One who considers this an integral part of their identity may identify as a cross-dresser. Transvestite is an obsolete (and sometimes offensive) term with the same meaning. Cross-dressing and drag are forms of gender expression and are not necessarily tied to erotic activity, nor are they indicative of one’s sexual orientation. Do NOT use these terms to describe someone who has transitioned or intends to do so in the future. Drag:Exaggerated or theatrical gender presentation and/or performance. Although most commonly used to refer to cross-dressing performers (drag queens and drag kings), anyone of any gender can do any form of drag. Doing drag does not necessarily have anything to do with one’s sex, gender identity, or orientation. Femme:An identity or presentation that leans towards femininity. Femme can be an adjective (“he’s a femmeboy”), a verb (“she feels better when she femmes up”), or a noun (“they’re a femme”). Although commonly associated with feminine lesbian/queer women, it’s used by many to describe a distinct gender identity and/or expression, and does not necessarily imply that one identifies as a woman. Gay:A common word for a man who is physically, romantically, emotionally and/or spiritually attracted to similarly-gendered individuals. It is often used in reference to anyone attracted to similarly-gendered individuals. Gay/Lesbian Baiting:Attempting to lure someone who may be LGBTQIA into “revealing” themselves by giving off indications that one might be LGBTQIA as well. Used by homophobes to establish grounds for verbally or physically attacking LGBTQIA people. Gender:The set of social expectations for attitude, behavior, capability, dress, gender role, profession, etc. assigned to an individual at birth, usually based on sex. These expectations vary between cultures. While gender is said to be fluid, social expectations may be rigidly-defined, and those who violate these norms may face prejudice or discrimination. Related terms:genderqueer, woman, man. Gender Binary:A system of viewing gender as consisting solely of two categories (termed woman and man) which are biologically-based (female and male) and unchangeable, and in which no other possibilities for gender or anatomy are believed to exist. This system is oppressive to anyone who defies their birth assignment, but particularly those who are gender-variant people and do not fit neatly into one of the two categories. Gender Expression/Presentation:The physical manifestation of one’s gender identity through clothing, hairstyle, voice, body shape, etc., typically referred to as feminine or masculine. Many transgender people seek to make their gender expression (how they look) match their gender identity rather than their birth-assigned sex. Gender Fluid:A general term for non-binary gender identities. This term overlaps with genderqueer and bigender, implying movement between gender identities and/or presentations. Gender Identity:One’s actual, internal sense of being man or woman, neither of these, both, etc. Genderqueer:A general term for non-binary gender identities. Those who identify as genderqueer may identify as neither woman nor man; may see themselves as outside of the binary gender boxes; may fall somewhere between the binary genders; or may reject the use of gender labels. Genderqueer identities fall under the “trans umbrella.” Gender Non-Conforming:A term for individuals whose gender expression is different from societal expectations related to gender. GSM:Gender and Sexual Minority. This is a basic catch-all for people who are not cisgender and/or heterosexual, and is sometimes used as a shorter and more inclusive alternative to “LGBTQIA” etc. Hate Crime:Any act of intimidation, harassment, physical force or threat of physical force directed against any person, or their property, motivated either in whole or in part by hostility toward their actual or perceived age, disability, gender identity, ethnic background, race, religious/spiritual belief, sex, sexual orientation, etc. Heteroflexible:Similar to bisexual, but with a stated heterosexual preference. Sometimes characterized as being “mostly straight.” Commonly used to indicate that one is interested in heterosexual romance but is “flexible” when it comes to sex and/or play. The same concepts apply to homoflexible. Heteronormative/Heteronormativity:A culture or belief system that assumes that people fall into distinct and complementary sexes and genders and that heterosexuality is the normal sexual orientation. A heteronormative view is one that involves alignment of biological sex, sexuality, gender identity, and gender roles. 92


Heterosexism:The assumption that all people are heterosexual and that heterosexuality is superior and more desirable than non-heterosexual identities. Heterosexism is also the stigmatization, denial and/or denigration of anything non-heterosexual. Homonormative/Homonormativity:The assimilation of heteronormative ideals and constructs into LGBTQIA culture and identity. Homonormativity upholds neoliberalism rather than critiquing monogamy, procreation, normative family social roles, and binary gender roles. It is criticized as undermining citizens’ rights and erasing the historic alliance between radical politics and gay politics, the core concern being sexual freedom. Some assert that homonormativity fragments LGBTQIA communities into hierarchies of worthiness:those that mimic heteronormative standards of gender identity are deemed most worthy of receiving rights. Individuals at the bottom of the hierarchy are seen as an impediment to this elite class of homonormative individuals receiving their rights. Because LGBTQIA activists and organizations embrace systems that endorse normative family social roles and serial monogamy, some believe that LGBTQIA people are surrendering and conforming to heteronormative behavior. Homosexual:A person who is physically, romantically, emotionally and/or spiritually attracted to a person of the same gender. Many prefer “gay,” “lesbian,” etc. because of the term’s origins as a medical term at a time when homosexuality was considered a disorder. Inclusive Language:The use of non-identity specific language to avoid imposing limitations or assumptions on others. For example, saying “you all” instead of “you guys” in order to not impose assumptions regarding a person’s gender identity. Intersex:Describes a person whose natal physical sex is physically ambiguous. There are many genetic, hormonal or anatomical variations which can cause this (e.g. Klinefelter Syndrome, Adrenal Hyperplasia, or Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome). Parents and medical professionals usually assign intersex infants a sex and perform surgical operations to conform the infant’s body to that assignment, but this practice has become increasingly controversial as intersex adults are speaking out against having had to undergo medical procedures which they did not consent to (and in many cases caused them mental and physical difficulties later in life). The term intersex is preferred over “hermaphrodite,” an outdated term which is stigmatizing and misleading. -isms:Ableism, ageism, cissexism, classism, heterosexism, mentalism, monosexism, racism, sexism, sizism, etc. See “Phobias.” Lesbian:A femininely-identified individual who is emotionally, physically, romantically, sexually and/or spiritually attracted to femininelyidentified individuals. LGBTQQIAAP:Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Questioning, Intersex, Ally, Asexual, Pansexual (and more) communities. While the acronym may get a little exhausting, this list is not exhaustive! Monosexual/Multisexual:Umbrella terms for orientations directed towards one gender (monosexual) or many genders (multisexual). Passing:A term used by transgender people to mean that they are seen as the gender with which they self-identify. For example, a transgender man (born female) who most people see as a man. Also a term used by non-heterosexual people to mean that they are seen as or assumed to be heterosexual. Pansexual/Omnisexual:“Pan,” meaning “all.” Someone who is emotionally, physically, romantically, sexually and/or spiritually attracted to all gender identities/expressions, including those outside the gender-conforming binary. Similar to bisexual, but different in that the concept deliberately rejects the gender binary. Polysexual people are attracted to “many,” but not necessarily all, genders. Phobias:Biphobia, heterophobia, homophobia, lesbophobia, transphobia, fat-phobia, xenophobia, etc. See “-isms.” Polyamory:Having more than one intimate relationship at a time with the knowledge and consent of everyone involved. It is distinct from both swinging (which emphasizes sex with others as merely recreational) and polysexuality (which is attraction towards multiple genders and/or sexes). People who identify as polyamorous typically reject the view that sexual and relational exclusivity are necessary for deep, committed, long-term loving relationships. PGP:Preferred Gender Pronoun. Examples include she/her/his and he/him/his, as well as gender-neutral pronouns such as ze/zir/zes, they/ them/theirs, etc. Queer:General term for identities, presentations, and sexual orientations that reject conventions and expectations. There’s a lot of overlap between queer and trans, but not all queer people are trans, and not all trans people are queer (many trans people do in fact conform to gender norms and expectations). The word queer is still sometimes used as a hateful slur, so although many have reclaimed it from their oppressors, be careful with its use. 93


QPOC:“Queer People Of Color” or “Queer Person Of Color.” Romantic Orientation:A person’s enduring emotional, physical, romantic and/or spiritual — but not necessarily sexual — attraction to others. Sometimes called affectional orientation. “Romantic orientation” is often used by the asexual community in lieu of “sexual orientation.” Safe Space:A place where people who identify within the LGBTQIA communities feel comfortable and secure in being who they are. In this place, they can talk about the people with whom they are involved without fear of being criticized, judged or ridiculed. Safe spaces promote the right to be comfortable in one’s living space, work environments, etc. It is focused toward the right to use the pronoun of a significant other in conversation, and the right to be as outwardly open about one’s life and activities as anyone else. Same-Gender Loving:A term created by the African-American community that some prefer to use instead of “lesbian,” “bisexual” or “gay” to express attraction to and love of people of the same gender. SGL is an alternative to Eurocentric homosexual identities which may not culturally affirm or engage the history and cultures of people of African descent. Sex:Sex refers to the biological traits, which include internal and external reproductive anatomy, chromosomes, hormones, and other physiological characteristics. The assignment and classification of people at birth as male or female is often based solely on external reproductive anatomy. Related terms:intersex, female, male. Sexual Orientation:A person’s enduring emotional, physical, romantic, sexual and/or spiritual attraction to others. Gender identity and sexual orientation are not the same. Trans* people can be heterosexual, gay, lesbian, pansexual, queer, etc., just like anyone else. See affectional/ romantic orientation. Stealth:Going stealth means for a trans* person to live completely as their gender identity and to pass in the public sphere; when a trans* person chooses not to disclose their trans* status to others. This can be done for numerous reasons including safety, or simply because the person doesn’t feel others have the right to know. For transexuals, going stealth is often the goal of transition. Trans*:Prefix or adjective used as an abbreviation of transgender, derived from the Greek word meaning “across from” or “on the other side of.” Many consider trans* to be an inclusive and useful umbrella term. Trans (without the asterisk) is most often applied to trans men and trans women, and the asterisk is used more broadly to refer to all non-cisgender gender identities, such as agender, cross-dresser, bigender, genderfluid, genderfuck, genderless, genderqueer, non-binary, non-gendered, third gender, trans man, trans woman, transgender, transsexual and two-spirit. Trans Woman / Trans Man:Also, transwoman and transman. Trans woman refers to a woman of transgender experience. She might actively identify herself as trans*, or she might identify as a woman and simply consider being trans part of her medical history. Some say it is better to include a space between trans and woman/man so that trans* becomes an adjective rather than an all-encompassing noun (just as it is better to say “gay men” rather than “gays” or “a disabled person” rather than “a handicapper”). Using trans as an adjective allows trans to be simply one of many components of a person’s identity. Transgender:An umbrella term for people whose gender identity differs from the sex or gender they were assigned at birth, and for those whose gender expression differs from what is culturally expected of them. The term transgender is not indicative of sexual orientation, hormonal makeup, physical anatomy, or how one is perceived in daily life. Transition:The complex process of leaving behind one’s coercively assigned birth sex. Transition can include:coming out to one’s family, friends, and/or co-workers; changing one’s name and/or sex on legal documents; hormone therapy; and possibly (though not always) some form of surgery. It’s best not to assume that someone will “complete” this process at any particular time:an individual’s transition is finished when they are finally comfortable with how their gender identity is aligned with their body, and may not include going through all of the aforementioned steps. Transsexual:Similar to transgender in that it indicates a conflict between one’s gender identity and sex assigned at birth, but with implications of hormonal/surgical transition from one binary sex to the other. Unlike transgender, transsexual is not an umbrella term, as many transgender people do not identify as transsexual. “MTF” indicates a person who has or intends to transition in some way from Mate-to-Female; “FTM” indicates a person who has or intends to transition from Female-to-Male. Two-Spirit:A contemporary term that references historical multiple gender traditions in many First Nations cultures. These individuals were sometimes viewed in certain tribes as having two spirits occupying one body; two-spirit indicates a person whose body simultaneously manifests both a masculine and a feminine spirit. Many Native/First Nations people who are LGBTQIA or gender non-conforming identify as Two-Spirit; in many Nations, being Two-Spirit carries both great respect and additional commitments and responsibilities to one’s community. 94


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MBLGTACC 2013 Program Guide  

The 2013 Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference was held February 8-10, 2013 at Michigan State University in East...

MBLGTACC 2013 Program Guide  

The 2013 Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference was held February 8-10, 2013 at Michigan State University in East...

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