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VISITORS GUIDE 2010

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VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Sequim-East 842 E. Washington St. 360-683-4844 800-431-0661

4 convenient locations to serve you. Visit us or shop online for the best in Peninsula Real Estate!

www.realestate-sequim.com

Sequim-SunLand 137 Fairway Dr. 360-683-6880 800-359-8823 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

Port Angeles 711 E. Front St. 360-457-0456 800-786-1456

Port Ludlow 9526 Oak Bay Rd. 360-437-1011 800-848-6650

www.portangeles.com

www.windermereportludlow.com

We know the Peninsula like our own backyard ... because it is!

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One coupon per visit, per custom er. Expires April 31 , 2011

51 Dryke D Rd., Sequim WA | 360.582.1050 582.1050 OlympicRestaurantEquipment.com VISITORS GUIDE 2010

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Port Townsend’s New, Inviting, Overwater Hotel

Located in the heart of downtown Port Townsend

Sleep S l iin lluxury, surrounded by history This boutique, all-suite overwater hotel offers unobstructed views of the Cascades and Olympic Mountains, Whidbey Island and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Gourmet kitchen in every suite. Dogs welcome.

111 Quincy Street Port Townsend, WA 98368

Visit our website at www.ClamCannery.com

“Outstanding quality job, 100% on budget.” - W.M.

Thinking of making the Olympic Peninsula more than a vacation location? Cost or Site Questions? Call Today! 360.683.8756

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800.630.4399

Olympic Peninsula's Award Winning Builder

“You have an outstanding team of professionals that are fun to work with from design to delivery.” - R.B. ESTESBL981DL

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VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Serving... • Port Angeles • Sequim • Port Townsend • Discovery Bay • Kingston • Edmonds • SeaTac Airport • Seattle Hospitals • Greyhound • Amtrak • Downtown Seattle

Free snacks, water and WIFI! Olympic Bus Lines is the local agent for Greyhound. You can now purchase your Greyhound tickets with us.

Late night or early morning flight? Ask us about special hotel rates!

Port Angeles/Sequim 360.417.0700 Outside the area: 1.800.457.4492

www.dungenessline.us Reservations Recommended VISITORS GUIDE 2010

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Welcome

TO THE OLYMPIC PENINSULA

VISITORS GUIDE

2010

Salt Creek surfers by Robert S. Morris

Visitors Guide editor: Patricia Morrison Coate Contributing photographers and writers: Donna Barr, Patricia Morrison Coate, Chris Cook, Michael Dashiell, Jerry Kraft, Robert S. Morris, Leif Nesheim and Joan Worley Cover Photo of Hurricane Ridge: Melanie Reed Cover Design: Melanie Reed • Editorial: Donna McMillen, news assistant; Cathy Van Ruhan, copy editor • Publisher: Sue Ellen Riesau • General Manager: Steve Perry • Managing editor: Jim Casey • Advertising: Debi Lahmeyer, Visitors Guide sales coordinator, with Vicki Coughlin, Holly Erickson, Stephanie Howell, 6

John Huston, Harmony Liebert Liebert, Julie Speelm Speelman man In Forks: Denise Graham, sales • Design: Mary Field with ad design assistance from Cathy Clark, Jay Cline, Darlene Dale, Holly Erickson, Mandy K. Harris, Robert S. Morris and Melanie Reed. Bert McArthur, proofing • Circulation: Bob Morris, circulation manager, distribution • Administration: Naomi Blodgett Send corrections or suggestions to: Pat Coate, special sections editor, P.O. Box 1750, Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-3311 • patc@sequimgazette.com This guide published by Olympic View Publishing, LLC ©2010

7 8 11 12 13 14 16 16 17 19 22 24 26 27 28 30 33 34 35 37 42 45 50 52 57 58 61 62 63 66 70 76 77 78 80 81 82 83 87 90 92 94 97 98 99 100 102 103 104 106 110 111 113 114 115 118 120 122

Hood Canal hideaway Gems along the Hood Canal Olympic Music Festival Port Townsend area map Port Townsend Jefferson County history Port Townsend Marine Science Center Historical Port Townsend Port Townsend Aero Museum Northwest Maritime Center Wooden Boat Festival Fun at the forts Sequim-Dungeness Valley area map Sunny Sequim John Wayne Marina Sequim Lavender Festival Lavender Festival Schedule Jamestown S’Klallam tribal campus Olympic Game Farm Dungeness River Audubon Center Sequim is for kids Lighthouses Olympic Peninsula tribes Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge Museum and Arts Center Olympic National Park ONP rules and regulations State park rules and regulations 5-1-1 travel information Sequim berry farms Olympic Discovery Trail Port Angeles map Port Angeles Wineries Olympic National Forest Olympic Hot Springs U.S. entry regulations Victoria, British Columbia Hurricane Ridge Lake Crescent Feiro Marine Life Center Olympic Discovery Center Salt Creek Recreation Area Arts in Action Mileage from Port Angeles Museum at the Carnegie West End area map West End Hoh Rain Forest “Twilight” phenomenon West End Thunder Kayaking and rafting LaPush Surfing the Pacific Clallam Bay/Sekiu Cape Alava, Ozette Loop Makah Nation Services directory VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Moonrise over Hood Canal, Hoodsport Photo by Dave Hampton

For an especially scenic and leisurely drive to the Olympicc Peninsula, take U.S. 101 along the west side of Hood anal. From Bremerton, follow state Highway 3 South Canal. ward Shelton, then Highway 106 to its junction with toward Highway 101 North. Settled in the late 1800s, Hoodsport is located in the shadow of the Olympic Mountains on the western shore of Hood Canal, a glacier-carved fjord (the only one in the lower 48 states) known for its world-class scuba diving spots, giant octopi and water depths reaching 700 feet. The Hoodsport area offers incredible scenery, abundant wildlife and just about every kind of water recreation you can imagine. Public beaches north and south of town provide fresh, “off-the-beach” shellfish, including clams, oysters and geoduck (though the last is both rarer and difficult to catch). In May, the much-beloved Hood Canal shrimp season commences, with limited but highly desired giant shrimp being pulled from the deep waters of the middle canal. Bring the whole family to celebrate the Fourth of July during Celebrate Hoodsport, which has been a tradition since 1986. Vendors selling their merchandise and food

provide a fun-filled afternoon, as well as live entertainment and an auction. A fantastic fireworks display culminates the weekend’s event on Saturday evening at the Hoodsport dock. In the late summer and fall, Hoodsport becomes the center of salmon fishing, with major runs accessible to anglers who fish the northern shore or sand flats at the head of Finch Creek. Visitors to Hoodsport often travel farther west on state Highway 119 to Staircase, the southeast entrance to fabled Olympic National Park. Backpacking trails from Staircase fan out into the deepest recesses of the Olympic Mountains, offering hikers days or weeks of wilderness seclusion. No roads or commercial facilities exist anywhere within the interior of Olympic National Park. For the vacationer, Hoodsport offers all the major amenities. Motels, RV parks, campgrounds, restaurants, a coffee shop, boutiques and gift stores, plus fuel, ice and food provisions. Lodging facilities cater especially to scuba divers, who come from as far away as Portland, Ore., to explore Hood Canal’s dramatic depths and clear, cold waters. For more information on other events that may be happening, go to www.hoodsportwa.com.

JULY 3-4 25TH ANNUAL CELEBRATE HOODSPORT DOWNTOWN HOODSPORT WITH FIREWORKS ON JULY 3 AT HOODSPORT DOCK AUG. 15-16 HOOD CANAL SALMON DERBY & SEAFOOD FEAST DOWNTOWN HOODSPORT NOV. 6-7 HOOD CANAL CHUM DERBY DOWNTOWN HOODSPORT DEC. 5 HOODSPORT TREE LIGHTING CEREMONY DOWNTOWN HOODSPORT FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: PO BOX 554, HOODSPORT, WA 98548 360-877-5301 OR WWW.HOODSPORTWA.COM.

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

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Chimacum

20

Discovery Bay

Uncas

y

Port Ludlow Shine Tidelands State Park

104

e Dabob Shin Hood Canal Bridge

Port Gamble

Quilcene

Lofall

3

307

Poulsbo

Ba y

Seal Rock

Dosewallips State Park

Da bob

101

River Dosewallips

Dab obRd.

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OLYMPIC NATIONAL FOREST

19

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101

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Keyport

3

DISCOVERING THE EMERALD TOWNS of QuilD cene and Brinnon is like finding a gem. These quiet towns Silverdale offer visitors a place to relax and experience life the way it Duckabush Camping 303 shou be lived. should k bec Sea Cove State Park Triton State Park O of the first things visitors and newcomers alike learn One Ranger Station n erto abou about Hood Canal is that the 61-mile-long, 600-foot deep body Brem on ? Informati ca of calm water is not a canal at all; it’s a saltwater fjord carved ard Orch 101 n Port Boat Launch Eldo g by glaciers about 15,000 years ago. Varying from half a mile to four n Junction 3 erto Brem 16 Hamma Hamma d mile miles in its width, Hood Canal abuts Kitsap County on the east, Jefferson County on the d Gorst Nfd 24 R nort northwest and Mason County on the south and west. 3 W Well-known for its clams and oysters, the Hood Canal region also offers seasonal crabLilliwaup Belfair Lake 16 State Park bin shrimping and fishing opportunities. For those who would rather let others do the bing, Dewatto Belfair Cushman H Purdy hun hunting and gathering, there are many area seafood retailers and restaurants. Nearby are Hoodsport Beach set Sun tch pris pristine scuba diving opportunities. There are five public or private boat launch ramps Potla 119 State Park Tahuya 302 from Quilcene to Triton Cove, south of Brinnon, and three marinas. The Hood Canal Twanoh Park State p is perfect for kayak beginners and experts alike. Bring your kayaks or rent them locally 106 Potlach and go exploring. bor Gig Har Grapeview Union ? The Quilcene/Brinnon Chamber of Commerce, www.emerald towns.com, invites yo to enjoy the area’s small-town charm. you Brinnon is host to the very popular Shrimpfest every Memorial Day weekend. Featured 101 are fresh raw shrimp, seafood booths, crafts and entertainment for all ages. The festival Shelton dr draws more than 8,000 visitors to the area to eat local shrimp, buy arts and crafts and om lis listen to music. The season for shrimp harvesting begins in May and is open on selected laco oom ilac Stei Ste Carmill Station da throughout the month. Check the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife days ood

Scenic Beach State Park

Sidney Rd

River

Old B elfa ir R

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Ducka

Brinnon

HOOD CANAL

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VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Web site at wdfw.wa.gov for rules and regulations. For those who prefer the RV life or tent camping, opportunities exist in several federal, state, county or private campgrounds. Some of these are in the seclusion of quiet forests, while others are adjacent to or within easy walking distance of the Hood Canal and the three main rivers that flow out of the Olympic Mountains to it — the Dosewallips, Duckabush and Hamma Hamma. And there are a few fishing lakes near Quilcene. That’s not to say that all the facilities are rustic. Modern accommodations, from well-appointed cabins to lodges to B&Bs, are available. Look under the lodging category for accommodations that will make your stay a memorable one. Yet even those who choose to stay in closer to urban areas on the Olympic Peninsula will find the Emerald Towns to be an easy drive with opportunities for a variety of day trips. Quilcene and Brinnon are nestled among the trees of the Olympic National Forest. While exploring the beaches, riverbanks and forest roads or trails, visitors ca can observe an abundance of w wildlife including a variety oof bird species, seals and pperhaps a glimpse of one of th the several bands of majestic eelk that roam throughout B Brinnon’s Dosewallips and D Duckabush valleys. Three waterfalls, all w within surprisingly easy hhiking distance, can be seen aand enjoyed in the span of a single day. These are Falls V View, Rocky Brook and Murhut. A fourth cascade, Dosewallips Falls, is accessible only by foot due to a large section of the Forest Service road having washed out a few years ago. On a day of enjoying the waterfalls, don’t forget to take a drive to the top of Mount Walker for incredible views of Seattle and the Puget Sound to the east or magnificent views of the mountains within Olympic National Park to the west. The

road to the top of Mount Walker is open seasonally and may be closed due to weather. A year-round option is to park at the base for a two-mile hike. Learn about salmon at the Quilcene National Fish Hatchery, which is two miles south of Quilcene where the river crosses under U.S. Highway 101. Several other hiking and equestrian trails, from easy to challenging, allow the visitor to experience nature and serene vistas. The Hood Canal area has been deemed the “Gateway to Olympic National Park” and Dosewallips Road is a popular eastern portal to ONP for hikers and equestrians. Quilcene is growing as a mecca for artists and has a number of galleries that feature quality artwork and crafts. The first Saturday of every month several galleries host an art walk. The Saturday of Memorial Day weekend in Quilcene, artists present demonstrations at The Olympic Art Festival. The visitor information center at the Forest Service Ranger Station, 295142 Highway 101, on the south end of Quilcene, is open daily. Additional details and information are available at the Chamber of Commerce Web site: www. emeraldtowns.com. Don’t forget your camera! The Emerald Towns of Hood Canal welcome you.

Mike’s

BEACH RESORT AT Hood Canal Waterfront cabins, full hookup RV, tent sites, boat launch & moorage, sauna, hot tub, cinema, children’s play area, scuba diving, private beach and shellfish farm.

360-877-5324 www.mikesbeachresort.com

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Sequim Beach House 4 Bedrooms, 4 Baths, Sleeps Up To 16 $499 per night June 14-Labor Day Breathtaking beach retreat is a rare vacation rental find. 1.3 acres of flat, no-bank waterfront. The beach is sandy and there even is a lagoon to splash around in! You have a view right in front of the home of the Sequim Lighthouse, the Dungeness Sand Spit, the Strait of Juan De Fuca, and the incredible ship traffic from the front windows. The other direction you view mountains and wetlands with all kinds of wildlife.

Quilcene Bay Hideaway 3 Bedrooms, 3 Baths, Sleeps Up To 6 $299 per night June 14-Labor Day Your own private retreat on 10 wooded acres with 500 ft of warm summer swimming waterfront. One-of-a-kind vacation rental with breathtaking view of the Olympic Mountains. Enjoy a short trail to the beach. You can rent our kayaks and go across the Bay with the resident seals to explore the National Forest land to your heart’s content. Ride bikes down the country road into Quilcene or just take a stroll around the area. Call For Our Low Season Bargain Prices:

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VISITORS GUIDE 2010

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Come to Historic Port Gamble

Conferences Weddings Reunions Events

www.portgamble.com 360-297-8074

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VISITORS GUIDE 2010


A summer surprise between the Hood Canal bridge and Discovery Bay along Highway 104 is the Olympic Music Festival near Quilcene. Founded in 1984 by professional musicians, the festival is a summer-long celebration of classical chamber music performed in a 100-year-old dairy barn by some of the best and brightest classical musicians in the country. Make your reservations early and you can claim a pew or hay bale to have a front-row seat. Pick a comfortable spot outside the barn in open seating or stroll around the farmstead as sweet sounds of violins and cellos waft in the air. Please note that no pets are allowed on the farm and that it is dangerous to leave them in a vehicle, so it’s best to leave them at home. Now in its 27th year, the festival draws some 10,000 concert visitors throughout the summer and features two dozen guest musicians. The 2010 season runs from July 3-Aug. 22 every Saturday and Sunday with concerts at 2 p.m. Concerts typically last several hours. To learn more about the Olympic Music Festival, go to www.olympicmusicfestival.org or call 360-732-4800. Tickets are available online, over the phone or at the festival gate.

Welcome to the beautiful Olympic Peninsula! To make your stay a pleasant one, please pay attention to these advisories: • Law enforcement agencies strictly enforce speed limits, seat belt use, child restraint and cell phone laws. Speeding ticket fines begin at $113 for 1-5 miles over the limit in a 40 mph zone. In a school zone, the ticket for the same jumps to $177. Driving 6-10 miles over the limit is a fine of $124. Not wearing a seat belt will get you a fine of $124 as will not having child restrained properly. It is against the law to talk on a cell phone while driving. The fine is $124. For traffic, travel and weather alerts, go to http://wsdot.wa.gov/ traffic, or call 877-595-4222 or 5-1-1. Have a safe and smooth trip on the Olympic Peninsula.

OLYMPIC

EAST END

SHOPPING & DINING

Words to the wise

art gallery

OVER 50 NATURE &WILDLIFE FINE ARTISTS

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Fri., Sat., Mon. M 11-5, 11 5 Sun. S 12:30-5 12 30 5 • Call C ll anytime ti for f appointment i t t

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SServing rving Beer, Wine W & Mixed Drinks kss Fri-Sat: Sun-Thurs: Se 11am to 9:30pm 11am to 10pm Lounge in the El Borracho B

email: mckaypots@earthlink.net www.mckayshrimpandcrabgear.com 306362 Hwy. 101, Brinnon, WA 98320 360-796-4555 • fax 360-796-3491

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294773 Highway 101 • Quilcene, WA 98376 • 360-301-3244 VISITORS GUIDE 2010

Closed Wed. & Sunday • Debbie & Larry Williams greenmountaingourmetgifts.com

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Strait of Juan de Fuca

Passenger Ferry to San Juans

Port Townsend Boat Haven Old Ft. Townsend Port State Park Townsend Bay

Marrowstone Island Indian Kala Point Kilisut Island Harbor Irondale Nordland

19

Gardiner Discovery Bay

To Port Angeles 101

EAST JEFFERSON COUNTY

Port Hadlock

Anderson Lake State Park Anderson Lake

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uce Spr V MARINE SCIENCE CENTER U St. Ceda Cente r St. r St. T S St. 35th t M S i l la . t. 3 S il 3r St. Dr. St. o Wood 32nd d St. P land St. O St. Dr. 29th Tremont S N t . C Q S R St S arolin F St St. Hastin t. t. . St. e St. . M gs L S St. . d R K t. y r e v S t. J Disco H St. Reed St. Jefferson Jefferson G St. Healthcare Healthcare S Root St. t . HASTINGS F S E MORGAN t. SATHER Foster St. POND D St. St. HILL PARK To Sims Way PORT Cosgrove St. 20 BS Highway To Water St. TOWNSEND A t. Taft St. 101 & Ferry Jefferson St. S t. GOLF Roosevelt St. Pt. Townsend COURSE CHETZEMOKA Van Ness St. High School Van Ness St. Washington St. Blaine St. Blaine St. PARK Garfield St. KAH-TAI UPTOWN Garfield St. LAGOON PORT OF Lincoln St. Lincoln St. BOAT LAUNCH PORT TOWNSEND Lawrence St. Clay St. PORT BOAT HAVEN Franklin St. POINT Jefferson St. 20 HUDSON MEMORIAL Washington St. SEE FIELD INSET COURT Water St. POINT HUDSON MARINA E MARINE ROTARY HOUSE YSTO N PARK CITY HALL & Y TO KE STATE FERRY PARK ATE FERR

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Airport

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VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Port Townsend:

strollable seaport

Photo by Robert S. Morris

PORT TOWNSEND, at the northeast corner of the Olympic Peninsula on Highway 20, takes pride in being the area’s cultural hub. It is the county seat of Jefferson County, which has a population of about 30,000. Artists representing all disciplines seem to gravitate to the town of 9,100 that relishes its eclectic personality. You can find venues for dance, drama/theater, film/ movies, literary and visual arts and music in Port Townsend. Established in 1851, Port Townsend’s character today comes from its boom in the 1880s and 1890s as a major seaport, fishing and lumber area. Town leaders and merchants built ornate and spacious Victorian homes and fine brick or stone buildings for their businesses downtown based on the promise of a railroad line — but the railroad never came. Port Townsend quietly folded back into itself for decades, never losing its Victorian character. It was rediscovered a hundred years later and in 1976 the downtown waterfront and bluff above it were designated as a National Historic District. Port Townsend is one of only three Victorian seaports on the National Register of Historic Places in the U.S. and the only one on the West Coast. PortGUIDE Townsend is at the tip of the Quimper Peninsula, which is bordered by VISITORS 2010 the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Admiralty Inlet, Port Townsend Bay and Discovery

Bay. It is blessed with a temperate marine climate with winter highs in the 40s and summer highs in the 70s and sits in the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains, so annual precipitation is about 18 inches. Port Townsend is home to the Wooden Boat Festival every September and some of the best boat craftsmen in the world. The Northwest School of Wooden Boat Building is just south of the city and the Wooden Boat Foundation and the Northwest Maritime Center just opened waterfront sites for maritime educational programs. Fort Worden State Park and Conference Center is just a few blocks outside the city limit — the fort was one of three built in the area in the early 1900s to defend Puget Sound. Its barracks and officers’ quarters have been restored and the site is designated as a National Historic Landmark. Some of the former military buildings are dedicated to Centrum, a statewide center for arts and creativity that offers workshops, classes, events and performances. Points of interest in or near Port Townsend include the Port Townsend Marine Science Center, the Victorian downtown district and marina, the Port Townsend Aero Museum, the Coastal Artillery Museum, Jefferson County 13 Historical Society Museum and self-guided tours of art studios.


Photos by Patricia Morrison Coate

JEFFERSON COUNTY HISTORY

Jefferson County Historical Society Museum 540 Water St., Port Townsend Open Friday-Monday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 360-385-1003 • www.jchsmuseum.org

THE JEFFERSON COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM is in the magnificently restored 1892 Port Townsend City Hall building. Housed in the former municipal court room, fire hall and jail spaces, the museum’s exhibits illustrate the lively history of communities born in waterfront forests more than 150 years ago. The exhibit also features historical examples of extravagant Victorian regalia. The Fire Hall Gallery has exhibits on Jefferson County’s maritime history and the Port Townsend Fire Department, as well as a Victorian

hearse and Gurney Cab. The Jefferson County Historical Society also manages the Old Bell Tower, the Native Canoe Shelter, Point Wilson Lighthouse at Fort Worden and the Rothschild House State Park in Port Townsend, which are open for tours. Visitors to the Rothschild House, built in 1868 for merchant David C.H. Rothschild and his wife, Dorette, can see the family’s period furniture, personal belongings, original carpet and wallpaper that have changed little over 140-plus years. The spare simplicity of the Greek Revival-style house pre-dates the more ornate Victorian architecture common to many old homes in Port Townsend. As the smallest state park in Washington, the Rothschild Historic Home Museum can be visited at Taylor and Jefferson streets in the uptown district. The house is open for tours May-September from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. daily. Admission is $4 for adults, $1 for children under 12. Nearby is the 1890 Fire Bell Tower on the bluff overlooking downtown Port Townsend. Constructed in a pyramid shape to withstand winter’s strong southwest winds, the tower alerted volunteers of fires and housed a fire engine. There is a small admission fee. Museum hours daily are 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Admission: Adults $4, children 3-12 are $1. Passport to museum and Rothschild House $6. 540 Water St., Port Townsend, WA 98368. 360-385-1003. Web site: www.jchsmuseum.org.

Rothschild House

14

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


PORT TOWNSEND

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Open 7 Days

• Incense/Perfumes/Essential Perfumes/Essential oils • Candles/Accessories • Soaps/Bath goods

921 Washington n Street

(360) 344-4144 • Reclaimed clothing • Jewelry • Accessories

360.379.2273

926 Washingt W Washington g on Port Townsend o

Fountain Café

Fresh, creative seafood, pasta and steak dishes. Gourmet Northwest cuisine with an international fl air. flair. r Loocals’s’ ffavorit Locals’ favorite te for 29 years fo y

Featured in more than F 40 guide books & newspaper articles across the country.

Lunch and Dinner Every Day 11:30-3 and 5-9 Fri.-Sat. ‘til 9:30ish 920 Washington W Street r Downtown Port Townsend Just up from the Haller F Fountain Fount tain in the historic t Mar Mary ry Webster t Building Building. g.

Wo Teas, eas, Tonics & Herbs

(360) 385 385-1364 1364 • Nick Ni k Y Yates, t S Sole l P Proprietor it

Specialty Teas, Unique Teaware, Elixir Tonics, Organic Herbs, Tinctures, Flower Essences... 924 Washington St. • 379-1222 • wildsageteas.com

Wearable Art Gallery Handcrafted Clothing, Jewelry and Gift Items Open Daily: 11am – 6pm • 360-385-9545 • 234 Taylor Street, Downtown Port Townsend 98368 • www.Vagabond-Arts.com

The

Silverwater Café Creating the unique, artfully crafted flavors of Port Townsend

Dancewear • Dance shoes Fitness Apparel • Legwear • Swimwear Fine Hand Knits • Mom’s Antiques Cheri Raab’s

VISITORS V VI ISI SITORS TO ORS SG GUIDE UIDE UI DE 2 201 2010 01 10

Open 7 Days A Week 823 Washington St.

Body Shop (360) 385-1341

Silverwater

Mezzaluna Lounge

Entrance on Washington St.

• Late night dining • Specialty cocktails • Extensive wine list • Beers on tap Open til 10 p.m. weeknights 11 p.m. weekends Extended summer hours!

237 Taylor Street • (360)385-6448 • www.silverwatercafe.com

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PORT TOWNSEND MARINE SCIENCE CENTER

Port Townsend Marine Science Center Fort Worden State Park Hours: April 1-June 15 – Fri.-Sun. noon-4 p.m.; June 15-Sept. 5 – Wed.-Mon. 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sept. 7-Oct. 31 – Fri.-Sun. noon-4 p.m.; There is a small fee for nonmembers. For more information, contact the center at www.ptmsc.org, 360-385-5582 or 800-566-3932.

MANY RESIDENTS AND VISITORS, on their way to the Point Wilson Lighthouse or campgrounds in Fort Worden State Park, take little notice of two buildings that make up the Port Townsend Marine Science Center. Those whose curiosity gets the better of them, however, are rewarded with dynamic displays of intertidal plants and animals indigenous to Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca and an exhibit called “The Land Meets the Sea.” Built on a pier in the 1940s as a supply warehouse, the 50-foot marine science building now gives the illusion of being in an underwater world, thanks to a $1.1 million renovation. The center was founded in 1982 as an educational and scientific organization devoted to understanding and conserving the area’s marine and shoreline environment. The center’s exhibits are in collaboration with the Burke Museum-Seattle and Washington State Parks. Several closed tanks, touch pools and hands-on exhibits allow visitors to observe marine life in its live-seaweed habitat, which must be replaced every few weeks. Among the colorful sea creatures on exhibit are sea anemones, orange-lipped scallops, sea cucumbers, sea squirts and sea urchins, serrated-edge rockfish, pinto abalone, rock scallops and decorator crabs. Have you ever seen the tide have an ebb-and-flow cycle of 14 minutes? You can see it happen with the push of a button in the intertidal tank. The natural history exhibit in a separate building focuses on the area’s geology — beach rocks, an interactive Washington geo-puzzle, fossils of mammals and invertebrates millions of years old, including a million-year-old sockeye salmon, and the 12-foot model of a bluff with its distinct layers of sedimentary materials. Every day that the buildings are open, there are interpretive programs at 2:30 p.m. During the summer, marine science programs are Mondays, Thursdays and Saturdays; natural history programs are Wednesdays and Sundays. Guided beach walks along Admiralty Inlet are offered Fridays at the same time. The Port Townsend Marine Science Center also embraces the “marine” in its name with wildlife cruises on the yacht Glacier Spirit and sailing trips on the schooner Adventuress around Protection Island National Wildlife Refuge at the mouth of Discovery Bay. For dates and prices, see the Web site or call the center. ■ PATRICIA MORRISON COATE

HISTORICAL PORT TOWNSEND

SETTLED IN 1851, Port Townsend’s heyday as a late-Victorian seaport brought wealth and style to the community as upwardly mobile captains and merchants built fine homes for themselves. A leisurely drive around the “uptown” area overlooking Admiralty Inlet reveals about 30 homes built between 1860 and 1900, restored to their late 19th-century glory in a variety of styles, including classic Victorian and Victorian Gothic, Italianate, Italianate Villa and Italianate Renaissance, Queen Anne and Georgian. Most are private residences and are not open to the public. Several have been converted into bed and breakfasts and one, the D.C.H. Rothschild house, built in 1868, is the state’s smallest park. The Jefferson County Historical Society manages it. It is furnished in period pieces from the Rothschild family and is open Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sun. 1-4 p.m. May through September. The house museum is at the corner of Jefferson and Taylor streets. Port Townsend boomed in the 1880s and 1890s with the promise of a railroad, so many of the homes reflect the style of the waning Victorian Age with massive construction and elaborate ornamentation. Tasteful plaques and signs give a mini-history lesson with the original owners’ names and dates built. The state’s oldest Methodist church, from 1871, has a museum open to the public, and the Episcopal church, built in 1860, remains a place of worship today. But the most magnificent Port Townsend structure overseeing the entire city is the classically Victorian Jefferson County Courthouse

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built in 1892 of red brick and sandstone. The county’s business still is conducted in the building, a National Historic Landmark and one of the two oldest courthouses in the state. Port Townsend, one of only three remaining Victorian seaports in the country, was designated a National Historic Landmark District in 1976. After 15 years with an active Main Street program, Port Townsend was honored in 2000 with the Great American Main Street award from the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Several blocks of buildings restored to their late-Victorian facades and tree-lined streets make ambling downtown a pleasurable activity. So if you’re walking or driving, there’s plenty of history to absorb in Port Townsend. ■ PATRICIA MORRISON COATE

VISITORS GUIDE DE 2 2010 010


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IF ANTIQUE AIRPLANE AFICIONADOS are anything like their carworshiping counterparts, they’ll hit every museum within a hundred miles. One not to miss on the Olympic Peninsula is the Port Townsend Aero Museum at the Jefferson County International Airport, four miles south of the junction of Highways 19 and 20. About 30 antique airplanes have been donated to the nonprofit and, after meticulous restoration, are displayed on three levels. At any given time, half a To Port Townsend dozen are being hand-restored by youth Aero Museum apprentices in the building’s shop, menFrom Seattle take the tored by skilled volunteer craftsmen. The ferry to Bainbridge Island. 18,000-square-foot museum is the dreamFollow Highway 305 to Highcome-true of Jerry Thuotte, a former way 3. Follow the signs commercial pilot for three decades, and to the Hood Canal bridge his wife, Peggy, also a licensed pilot. The (Highway 104). Take a right couple founded the museum in 2001 as turn onto Highway 19. Travel a program to teach youths craftsmanship through Chimacum, the airand life skills. The Thuottes, their crew and port is on your left. Turn left volunteers celebrated its grand opening in on Airport Road. August 2008. From Whidbey Island, The museum is open from 9 a.m.take the ferr y to Por t 4 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday and is a “living Townsend. As you exit from museum” as Thuotte believes most of the the ferry, turn left. You will p planes should fly at least once every two be on Highway 20. Outside weeks. k Stay S long long enoughh andd you might miight h weeks. of town the road splits: see some some in in flig ight ht. see ight. Highway 20 is right and For iinformation, nfform format attio ion, n ccall allll 36 al 3360-437-0863 60-4337-08 08663 08 63 oorr For Highway 19 is left/straight. ww w..pt ptaaeeroomuuse seum uum m.com .coom .c m. go ttoo ww www.ptaeromuseum.com. Follow Highway 19 to ■ PATRICIA PATR PA TRICIA TRI CIA A MORRISON MO MORR RRI RIISO R SON ON O N COATE CO C OATTE TE Airport Road on your right.

URGENT CARE Minor Emergency & Walk-in Clinic

WALK-IN MEDICAL CARE Treating Illness - Injuries On-Site X-Ray & Lab Specialized Screenings - No Outside Order Flu Shots & Other Immunizations DOT, Sports & Other Physicals Employment Drug Testing L&I Private Worker’s Comp

~~~~~~ Medicare - Other Major Insurance

TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS SERVING YOU MADRONA HILL PORT TOWNSEND

MADRONA HILL PORT LUDLOW

2500 W. Sims Way

9481 Oak Bay Rd.

360-344-3663 360-437-9990 Bradley A. Bringgold, MD Steven K. Hillman, MD Elinor J. Tatham, MD James C. Blair III, PA-C

No Appointments - Walk-In Call for Open Hours VISITORS GUIDE 2010

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ART Galleries PORT TOWNSEND

1. Gallery 9 North Olympic Peninsula Artists’ Cooperative 1012 Water St. 360-379-8881 Daily 10-6 www.gallery-9.com

2. William’s Gallery

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t.

914 Water St. 360-385-3630 Daily www.williams-gallery.com

3. Artisans on Taylor 236 Taylor St. 360-379-1029 Daily 11-6 www.artisansontaylor.com

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4. Forest Gems Gallery

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807 Washington St. 360-379-1713 Daily 10-6 West coast woods and local artists A haven for wood lovers! www.forestgems.com

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5. Earthenworks Gallery 702 Water St. 360-385-0328 Daily 10-5:30 www.earthenworksgallery.com

6. Port Townsend Gallery

To Ferry

715 Water St. 360-379-8110 Daily www.porttownsendgallery.com

Washington St.

Jefferson

first Saturday evening of every month

Kearney

Hwy 2 0

ART WALK

7. Ancestral Spirits Gallery Native Art 701 Water St. 360-385-0078 Daily www.ancestralspirits.com “An exquisite gallery” – National Geographic Traveler

8. Northwind Arts Center 2409 Jefferson St. 360-379-1086 Th-M 12-6, Winter 12-5 www.northwindarts.org Juried, invitational shows & poetry

www.EnjoyPT.com 18

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


NORTHWEST MARITIME CENTER:

A STAR ON THE SEA

The new NWMC & WBF facilities are open with a little bit of festival all year long! The Compass Rose features names and sayings from more than 1,000 people who’ve donated to this community project. The boat shop (in background on first floor and lower left) is open year-round with small boatbuilding projects available for closeup public viewing. Photos by Jan Davis

VISITORS V ISITTORS GU GUIDE UIDE E2 2010 010 0

PORT TOWNSEND CELEBRATES ITS MARITIME PAST and future with the longanticipated opening of the $12.8 million new Northwest Maritime Center at Point Hudson in the town’s northeast end. The Northwest Maritime Center is a nonprofit organization backed by an impressive crosssection of citizens, nonprofit groups and government agencies. The campaign to raise millions to build the facility is a public/private partnership led by mountaineer and sailor Jim Whittaker and other distinguished regional leaders. The concept of a public center preserving and celebrating Port Townsend’s rich maritime history began 15 years ago and quickly expanded to include the entire Puget Sound region. As one of only three Victorian seaports in the nation and with some 8,000 vessels sailing by it annually into Puget Sound, Port Townsend welcomed the opportunity to focus on its maritime history and culture, provide maritime experiences for novices to experts and educate the public on the maritime heritage and economics of Puget Sound and the importance of marine trades to the region. The Northwest Maritime Center collaborated with The Wooden Boat Foundation, the Alliance for Northwest Maritime Education, marine trades and marine recreational businesses and the city of Port Townsend on the project. The complex, located in the core of Port Townsend’s National Landmark Historic District, includes the: ➤ Maritime Heritage and Resources Building — 15,840 square feet — with a boat livery, chandlery, information desk, exhibition space, resource library, meeting rooms and offices; ➤ Maritime Education Building — 9,520 square feet — with a craft demonstration area, wood shop, the Learning Lab for hands-on learning, classrooms and a pilothouse tower; ➤ Outdoors public commons area — more than 40,000 square feet — with a beach boardwalk, small-boat staging platform and ADA-accessible, hand-launch boat ramp; ➤ 23

19


Everything port townsenD 20

360.379.5244 105 Airport Road Port Townsend

Come and enjoy a variety of new daily C specials as we continue the tradition of sp excellent food and service at T’s Restaurant. excel

Casual waterfront outdoor dining C in Port Townsend 360-385-0700 360 Reservations Welcomed 1141 Hudson Street • Port Townsend www.Ts-Restaurant.com

• 1920-1950s aircraft • Large collection of aviation art

Half OFF Starter Course With the purchase of two entrees. *Not valid with any other coupon or discount.

General admission $10 • Seniors $9 1941 Ryan PT-22

Open Wednesday - Sunday 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

What’s on your rack? Bath, Body & Beauty William’s Gallery offers a wide selection of fine arts and crafts from a variety of exceptional local northwest and national artists; as well as other handmade items from around the world.

Lingerie, Lounging & Nightwear Aromatics, Oils & Perfumes

914 Water St. • Port Townsend

A Ga Gallery of Fine Arts & Crafts

(360) 385-3630

www.williams-gallery.com

922 Water St. Port Townsend • 379-1437

Everyday wine values from 2 for $7

7KH§VPDOOWRZQ¨ZLQHVKRSZLWKWKH ©ELJFLW\ªVHOHFWLRQ NEW LOCATION: 1010 Water St., Port Townsend, WA (Just a few steps closer to the Ferry!)

Wine Tastings 1st & 3rd Fridays

360-385-7673 • 1-888-MAX-WINE (1-888-629-9463) 360www. www.PTWIneSeller.com Open 7 days a week 10:30 am till at least 7:00 pm Open even later on weekends & holidays and during Summer

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


to see the selection to believe it!

• Loose be beads eads • Gemstones Gemsto • Books • Findin Findings • Seed beads b • Delicas charms • Sterling ch By Lois

Wynwoods Gallery & Bead Studio 360-385-6131 www.wynwoods.com

• • • • •

Fine Fibers Needles • Books Local Buttons Yarn Expert Advice

360-385-4844 4 Open daily 10-6 www.divayarn.com

940 Water Street • Port Townsend

New Ice Cream Memories Made Here Artisan Ice Cream hand crafted fresh healthy local

627 Water Street, Port Townsend 360-385-1156

Established in 2006. Offering fine wines and hard ciders from one of the original homestead orchards.

www.eaglemountwinery.com www eaglemountwinery com • (360) 7732-4084 Near Hwy 101 & Hwy 20, 9 mi. south of Port Townsend VISITORS GUIDE 2010

Everything port townsenD

BEADS!

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Point Hudson Hu marina is filled to capacity with more than 200 wooden vessels. Photos by Jan Davis

34TH PORT TOWNSEND WOODEN BOAT FESTIVAL

‘Tools, Tales & Tradewinds’

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INGENUITY AND ART collide at every turn at the annual Wooden Boat Festival, Se 10-12, in Port Townsend. The “Tools, Tales & Tradewinds” theme will feature Sept. cra craftsmanship in boat-building, clever new tools and techniques, genres of creativity for all ages abound. Music, demonstrations, educational talks, children’s and family activities, rac and hundreds of wooden boats to see, climb aboard and even sail! races At the 34th Wooden Boat Festival in Port Townsend (and frankly all year now) you can see and be a part of this unique and world renowned event. This year’s Wooden Boat Festival will feature special guest British author, sailor and inv inventor Nigel Calder with the latest on hybrid technology for marine applications as we as his ever popular book topics. Expanded “green technology” programs sponsored well by The Center of Excellence for Marine Manufacturing & Technology of Skagit Colleg will showcase environmental and industry research, new techniques, new products lege an tools. and WoodenBoat Magazine editors, lifetime achievement award winner Bent Jespersen, the best boat schools in the nation, international representatives from Australia and De Denmark, experts from “green” bottom paint and engine companies, as well as the VISITORS GUIDE 2010


usual crowd of wooden boat experts from around of the maritime culture. the world will be on hand and presenting information throughout the weekend. “Ask a Shipwright” GO ABOARD BOATS options for boat maintenance, traditional and AND MEET THE OWNERS contemporary boatbuilding, kayak and native At the Port Townsend Wooden canoe building, informative “how to” classes from Boat Festival, all boats in the harbor are cruising experts and authors are available all day available for you to go aboard. Ownevery day. ers, builders and crew are there to tell With the expanded campus now including you about the boat and her adventures. the Northwest Maritime Center and Wooden The flagship of Washington and movie Boat Foundation’s new buildings at the main star, the Lady Washington, will be on gate, the number of presentations and lectures hand for mock battle sails and dockside is more than doubled. All presentations and tours; the 136-foot schooner Adventurdemonstrations during the day are included in ess offers environmental programs and the ticket price. Nearly 250 wooden boats also sailing every few hours; climb aboard are available to go aboard, meet the owners, the the 100-year-old restored tug Sand builders and crew. Man (Olympia), or converted Gillnetter “We’re serious about our commitment to this BeBop, a magnificently restored R class racing place and the people who’ve worked so hard for yacht, Pirate; a restored halibut schooner Merrie decades to keep Port Townsend an active and Ellen and more! authentic seaport,” said Kaci Cronkhite, WBF See small (12-25 feet) boats of all kinds, from director since 2002. “Point Hudson will be packed rowing and sailing dinghies to Redfish or Pygmy to capacity with a nautical mile of wooden boats! kayaks and Adirondack guideboats or a range of Power, sail, paddle, they’re all here and as commit- small trailer sailers and kit boats from Chesapeake ted as we are to passing on this legacy to the next Light Craft to Grapeview or Callisto Craft. See a generation of mariners and to preserving wooden pod of Devlin designed boats, Pocock Classic Ceboats, the skills and the culture they inspire.” dar single rowing shells and a model boat or two. This 3½-day eduCheck out a full list of boats attending this year cational celebration and past on the Web site at www. has grown through woodenboat.org. the years to boats on 34th Annual Wooden L E A R N A B O U T B O AT S , land, all along the Boat Festival Port Townsend waCRUISING, BUILDING Sept. 10-12, 2010 terfront and filling Exhibitors of some of the best the marina at Point hardware, boatbuilding supplies, The Port Townsend Wooden Boat Hudson. Surroundtools, books, art and clothing for Festival is the most talked about ing the marina full of boaters, as well as an increasing wooden boat festival in the world, wooden boats are 80 number of maritime and environ“the Woodstock of wooden boats.” exhibitor tents (an eclecmental educational organizations A beautiful location, 200 boats and tic group of products exhibit and do presentations at the hundreds of experts make this a and services connected festival. one-of-a-kind event in a one-of-ain some way to wooden Educators include North Amerkind town. You don’t have to own a boats) and at least seven ica’s best boatbuilding schools, boat to experience the inspiration demonstration areas: including the Northwest School or meet the people for which this Edensaw Woodworking of Wooden Boatbuilding in Port festival is famous. Stage, Kids’ BoatbuildTownsend, Landings School of ing, Platt & Irwin Music Maine, Skagit Maritime Center Stage, Hasse Sail Loft and for Excellence, Anacortes Maritime Fisheries Supplies Marina Room talks and all-day and IYRS. Also meet representatives from Gaboptions to go sailing or rowing. There’s something riola Island Shipyard School, Center for Wooden for everyone — for youths of all ages — with a love Boats, Wooden Boat School of Maine and smaller

NW MARITIME CENTER from page 19 ➤ Renovated 289-foot-long, deep-water pier with floats and mooring buoys. The new chandlery or store stocks marine supplies, fine hand tools and an extensive collection of maritime books, artwork, publications and gift items. Facing the water, the large livery stores dozens of kayaks and rowing shells with easy access to Port Townsend Bay. On the building’s second floor there are offices for the center’s maritime partners, plus a library of hard-to-find maritime reference materials. A meeting and conference area above the livery offers panoramic vistas of downtown, Port Townsend Bay, Admiralty Inlet and the Cascade and Olympic mountain ranges. The space accommodates up to 185 people with a full-service catering kitchen. Programs at the Maritime Education Building highlight maritime artisans VISITORS GUIDE 2010

People from around the world come to town for this annual event. Last year’s guests included people from Brazil, Denmark, Germany, China, Italy, France and Norway — a total of 13 countries! Here, festival director Kaci Cronkhite shows Luiz Peaze of Brazil aboard her classic Danish spidsgatter.

programs internationally.

DATES, TIMES AND TICKETS The 34th Wooden Boat Festival officially begins at 9 a.m. Friday, Sept. 10, and ends at 5 p.m. Sunday. However, “locals” start early on Thursday evening as the festival boats and exhibitors are settling in. Music and beer are available that evening from 5-10 p.m. Day tickets are required for Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Cost is $15/day and $10 for seniors and students. Children under 12 are free. Evening entertainment is free. Three-day weekend passes are $30 ($20 for seniors). There are plenty of activities for youngsters, including children’s boat-building, fish printing with the Port Townsend Marine Science Center, the North Star Stage and a pirate treasure hunt on Sunday. There are rowing and sailing races (26 feet and under sailing, festival rowing race plus the Northwest Schooner Cup) and the spectacular festival sail-by on Sunday at 3:30 p.m. For latest schedule and ticket information, go to www.woodenboat.org or call 360-385-3628, ext. 106. The Wooden Boat Festival is sponsored by and raises funds for The Wooden Boat Foundation. WBF supports sailing, rowing, boat shop and maritime education programs at the Northwest Maritime Center year-round.

and craft demonstrations featuring sail-making, leather and rope work and hand-tooled, small-craft boat-building and maintenance. The Wooden Boat Foundation operates a hands-on learning laboratory for students, with a wide array of courses and activities related to nautical science and maritime history. A mezzanine, running the full length of the building, provides a great vantage point to observe the Learning Lab activities and a hoist system anchored there raises small boats and materials to second-floor classrooms. In the building’s east-end tower, there’s a glass-encased pilothouse where students will be able to employ traditional and modern navigational tools and techniques to track vessels in Admiralty Inlet. Both buildings have wrap-around, interconnecting upper level decks. The public commons area is bound to be a popular site for concerts and craft shows. A boardwalk links a city park, the center’s dock and the Point Hudson jetty.

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Barracks from the 1890s, now are dormitories at Fort Worden.

IF YOU WANT TO UNCOVER the best places to romp with your dog on the beach, hike to your heart’s content, be lullabied by waves slapping on the shore and fling open your tent flap to the sun sparkling over the mountains, just ask some Olympic Peninsula residents for their favorite parks. More than likely, they’ll direct you to a trio of former forts, now state parks, that are destinations unto themselves. Fort Flagler State Park, Old Fort Townsend State Park and Fort Worden State Park and Conference Center all are within a short drive from the Hood Canal bridge and Port Townsend on the eastern side of the Olympic Peninsula.

FORT FLAGLER STATE PARK Fort Flagler State Park on the tip of Marrowstone Island is more out of the way but definitely worth the scenic detour as it is surrounded by powerful Puget Sound. Getting there: From the Hood Canal bridge, head west for five miles on Highway 104 to the junction with Highway 19 (Beaver Valley Road) and turn right. Travel 10 miles to the Chimacum four-way stop. Continue straight through Chimacum and turn right at the sign for Indian Island and Highway 116. Go straight at the four-way stop in Hadlock and follow Highway 116 for about 10 miles to the park’s entrance. Fort Flagler State Park has about 785 acres on a high bluff with vistas of Puget Sound and the Cascade Mountains. It has 12.5 miles of roads, five miles of hiking/biking trails and more than 3.5 miles of generous, sandy shoreline. For the intrepid, there are swimming and water skiing as well as saltwater fishing in the brisk water or from the shore. Mammals, birds, fish and sea life enjoy all the island has to offer, too, and it’s a photographer’s paradise. The park has 101 standard tent sites, 14 utility spaces, one dump station, four restrooms (one ADA) and eight showers (two ADA). Forty-seven standard tent sites are in the upper camping area. Since

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this area is on a bluff above the water and is canopied with trees, it is not suitable for large RVs. Fifty-four sites are in the lower park area and have easy access to the water. Maximum site length is 50 feet (may have limited availability). To reserve a campsite, call 888-CAMPOUT or 888-226-7688. The park is peppered with 19 sheltered and 40 unsheltered picnic tables, most of which are beachside. There are two boat ramps and 256 feet of moorage. Fort Flagler was a working fort from 1897-1953 and became a state park in 1955. A number of its Victorian buildings remain and can be toured by calling the park office at 360-385-3701. Visitors also can explore the military museum with its interactive, interpretative display. It’s open daily from June 1Sept. 1 and maintains weekend hours from October through May.

OLD FORT TOWNSEND STATE PARK Getting there: From the Hood Canal bridge, head west for five miles on Highway 104 to the junction with Highway 19 (Beaver Valley Road) and turn right. Stay on Highway 19 to its junction with Highway 20 and take Highway 20 north toward Port Townsend. Turn right at the sign for the park. Although the Strait of Juan de Fuca and its

Above, the Cascades loom large from the beach at Fort Flagler State Park on Marrowstone Island. VISITORS GUIDE 2010


inland bays had been explored and named by Capt. George Vancouver in the late 1790s, the settlement of Port Townsend (originally Port Townshend) didn’t begin until about 1850. Old Fort Townsend was established in 1856 on Port Townsend Bay to protect the early settlers from surrounding Native American tribes. Over the next century, the fort was on furlough more than it was in service. In 1895, after Port Townsend’s heyday, the barracks burned and the fort, like its namesake, faded into Jefferson County history for decades. None of the original buildings remain but a history loop has descriptive signage on the site of each of the fort’s buildings. Douglas-firs planted by the soldiers more than 150 years ago stand as sentinels along the path. Owned by the state since 1953, the site has about 370 heavily wooded acres and 3,960 feet of saltwater shoreline offering views of Admiralty Inlet, Port Townsend Bay and the Cascade Mountains. The park covers about one-third of the original fort. There are 6.5 miles of forested hiking trails, including a self-guided nature trail and one highlighting the park’s fort history. The amenities include 40 campsites, a dump station, two restrooms, a shower, 43 picnic tables and three picnic shelters, ball fields and a children’s play area. The nearest boat launch ramps are at Port Townsend, Fort Flagler and Port Hadlock. Compared to its cousins, Old Fort Townsend State Park offers a more serene and solitary experience, all the better to revel in its flora and fauna. The park is open year-round for day use; camping is permitted from March 28-Oct. 15 and is on a firstcome, first-served basis.

FORT WORDEN STATE PARK/CONFERENCE CENTER Getting there: From the Hood Canal Bridge, head west for five miles on Highway 104 to the junction with Highway 19 (Beaver Valley Road) and turn right. Stay on Highway 19 to its junction with Highway 20 and take Highway 20 north into Port Townsend. Take Sims Way (Highway 20) to Walker Street and turn left. Keep going straight for about 1.5 miles until you reach the park entrance: The street changes names several times. There is a Visitors Center on Fort Worden Way within the park. Fort Worden State Park and Conference Center draws visitors from across the nation in large part due to Centrum, the Washington state arts organization, which presents workshops in the arts and seminars in the sciences on-site. But it’s also a day trip and camping destination for Olympic Peninsula residents with its two miles of sandy beaches. Upon entering the park, visitors will be swept back a century by three dozen Victorian houses that were used as barracks in the fort’s early years. The houses, ranging from one-bedroom to six-bedroom units with living rooms, dining rooms and kitchens, may be reserved by calling 360-344-4434 or going online to www.parks.wa.gov/fortworden/ accommodations. Fort Worden, along with Fort Flagler on Marrowstone Island and Fort Casey on Whidbey Island, was established in the late 1890s to protect Puget Sound and remained an active military base until 1953. Its 433 acres were opened to the public as a state park in 1973. The park has 12 miles of hiking/biking trails and five miles of trails that are ADA compliant. The park also features a baseball/softball field, kayak, rowboat and bike rentals, tennis courts, two boat ramps and 235 feet of dock/moorage. Camp near the beach at one of 50 full-service sites with views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Admiralty Inlet and Mount Baker or go up the hill to 30 more private and primitive camping sites. Reservations are highly recommended — call 360-344-4431 for individual campsite reservations. Along the beachside road are the Port Townsend Marine Science Center with its marine touch tanks, the Natural History Museum, a concession stand with restrooms and the Point Wilson Lighthouse. One of the park’s crown jewels is the Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum housed in Building 201, which chronicles the fort’s 55-year military history and offers tours of the fort’s gun batteries on Artillery Hill. Housing is available for rent year-round and camping is permitted all year at the park. ■ PATRICIA MORRISON COATE

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

One of several bunkers to explore at Fort Worden Photo by Robert S. Morris

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O'Brien Rd

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Boat Ramp

Dungeness Wildlife National Refuge

Viewpoint State Parks

Casino School

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Sequim Ave North Brown Sequim Ave South

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VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Sunny Sequim SEQUIM, PRONOUNCED “SKWIM,” is a growing community of about 5,700 in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley. The valley is bounded by Jefferson County on the east, the Strait of Juan de Fuca on the north, Port Angeles on the west and the Olympic National Forest on the south. In the rain shadow of the 7,000-foot Olympic Mountains, Sequim is one of the driest locales in Western Washington, receiving an average of 16 inches of precipitation annually. The town and valley gladly have adopted the moniker of “Sunny Sequim” as they are blessed by an average of 300 days of sunshine. Sequim also is known as the “Lavender Capital of North America” and draws crowds of 30,000 to its Lavender Festival in July. Approximately two hours from Seattle, Tacoma and Olympia, the Sequim-Dungeness Valley is home to some 26,000 residents, many of whom retired to the area from across the country. Sequim is situated just off scenic U.S. Highway 101, which connects with state highways to Port Townsend to the east and Washington’s coastline to the west. The area is served by one airline from Fairchild International Airport, connecting to Seattle, and two ferries, all in Port Angeles, 15 miles west, and a countywide transit system. Sequim Valley Airfield, four miles north of town, offers charter flights, courier service and general aviation. John Wayne Marina at Sequim Bay is popular with small boat traffic. The Olympic National Forest and Olympic National Park cover the majority of the Olympic Peninsula, making Sequim and its environs a prime viewing area for birds and wildlife. Just outside the eastern city limits, a Roosevelt elk herd grazes much of the year. Several of the herd’s leaders are tagged with radio collars and occasionally elk-crossing warning signs flash yellow on Highway 101. It’s wise to heed them — bull elk can weigh up to 1,100 pounds. In addition to the federally managed park and forest, several state parks and campgrounds are within a 25-mile radius of Sequim. Points of interest in or near Sequim include Olympic Game Farm, the New Dungeness Lighthouse on Dungeness Spit, the Olympic Discovery Trail, the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal Center, 7 Cedars Casino, the Dungeness River Audubon Center, area lavender farms, the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge and the Sequim Museum and Arts Center. Photo by Melanie Reed

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

A BLOOMING BURG

27


John Wayne Marina

Popular with boaters and landlubbers alike, John Wayne Marina offers a beautiful park-like area, full marine services, moorage, boat launches, kayak rentals and a fine restaurant.

Located Locate tedd on P Pit Pitship itsh ship ip P Poi Point oint n in Sequim Bay (Longitude 123 /Latitude i de 4488 03 03’ 43” N), the John Wayne Marina 02’ 18” W/ W/Latitude is of course Thee Duke,” Duke ” but since opening in is, course, named for “Th 1985, the marina has made a reputation for itself as a fullservice facility in a superb location. The marina offers both permanent and guest moorage, on a first-come, first-served basis, parking and a launch for smaller craft and boat rentals. Ashore, the John Wayne Marina includes a marine store, a restaurant, restrooms, showers, laundry and even a public meeting room with kitchen. Film actor John Wayne loved sailing his Wild Goose in the area of Sequim Bay, which he considered a prime place for a marina. Wayne and his family donated the land in 1975. Owned and operated by the Port of Port Angeles, the marina is a popular stop, included as “Best of the West” by Sea Magazine. Boaters can take advantage of a fuel dock open seven days a week and the marina offers electric and water hookups. Trash disposal, a sewage pump-out and waste oil disposal also are available. Award-winning chefs prepare lunch and dinner at the marina’s restaurant, The Dockside Grill. Along with fresh seafood and cedar-planked salmon, the restaurant serves steaks and poultry, salads, sandwiches and appetizers. There is a full bar and great selection of wines. The Bosun’s Locker marine store offers a wide range of boating needs, including hard-to-find nautical charts.

MUSEUM & ARTS EXHIBIT CENTER

175 W. Cedar St, Sequim • (360) 683-8110 Tues - Sat 10am - 4 pm

• Manis Mastodon Exhibit • Local History • New Art Exhibit Monthly • Museum Store

The Dungeness Schoolhouse 2781 Towne Rd., Sequim (360) 683-4270 • Washington State Historical Site • A National Historic Site • Available for event rental, call for availability

Second Chance Consignment Shop • Fine women's clothing at fabulous prices • Special Sales • Casual to Formal 155 W. Cedar St, Sequim • (360) 683-9201 Mon - Sat 10am - 3:30 pm All proceeds benefit the Museum & Arts Center

www.macsequim.org

28

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


A great selection of books, from cruising guides to pirate stories, shares the shelves with John Wayne souvenirs and casual clothing. The Bosun’s Locker also rents fishing, crabbing and shrimping gear, along with bicycles, power boats and kayaks. (It’s smart to phone ahead to reserve kayaks.) The marina and its beautiful park areas are popular walking and picnicking places for nonboaters. Dozens of species of waterfowl make for good birding and the Olympic Discovery Trail runs nearby.

Leashed pets are welcome at the marina.

John Wayne Marina 2577 West Sequim Bay Road, Sequim • 360-417-3440 Fuel Dock Hours: 8:30 a.m.-noon and 1-4:30 p.m. Seven days a week.

Bosun’s Locker Marine Supply Store:

The Dockside Grill:

Phone: 360-683-6521; Fax: 360-582-0832 Hours: 8 a.m.-6 p.m. seven days a week. E-mail: info@bosunslocker.com

Phone 360-683-7510, 888-640-7226 Hours: Lunch: 11 a.m-3 p.m. Dinner: 4-9 p.m. Reservations recommended. Closed Monday and Tuesday.

Proud to be the Presenting Sponsor of the 2010 Lavender Festival For all your Real Real E Estate state N Needs eeds Contact John L. Scott Sequim Today! JLS1@olypen.com

1-800-998-4131 1 800 998 4131

1190 E. Washington St. • Sequim, WA 98382 This Office Independently Owned/Operated VISITORS GUIDE 2010

29


Sequim, Washington

® Celebrate Lavender®

July 16, 17, & 18, 2010 6 beautiful Farms on Tour in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley Juried Street Fair • Food • Music Demonstrations & more! Culinary Program on Sunday Farm Tour Tickets $15. Children 12 and under free. Military Discounts • Children’s Program!

Presented by the Sequim Lavender Growers Association ™ Voted one of the Top 100 Events in North America by the American Bus Association!

For more information, call toll free

®

877-681-3035

www.lavenderfestival.com 30

Sequim Lavender Festival

Lavender Capital of North America ®

SEQUIM’S SEQ QUI LAVENDER FESTIVAL® has drawn crowds in tenns of thousands to its lavender-bedecked downtown and the tens o blo fields of blooming lavender. The event, now in its 14th year, is 6-18 from 10 a.m.-7 p.m. It features a street fair where July 16 16-18 shoppeers ca shoppers can buy all manner of goods containing a little or a t fragrant fr lot of the flower that’s made itself quite at home in the Sequim m-Du Sequim-Dungeness Valley. Co ome ffor the tours of six lavender farms and learn how Come m par Sequim parlayed an agricultural idea into blooming businesses addd va that add value to the raw product. Chat with lavender farm ownerss to llearn how they got started and how they make and markett the their products. Venture out into the fields yourself for U-pick session. se a U-pick Farms on the tour are Cedarbrook Lavender Herrb Fa & Herb Farm, Jardin du Soleil Lavender, Lost Mountain Lavender, Oly Olympic Lavender Farm, Purple Haze Lavender Farm unshi Herb & Lavender Farm. and Su Sunshine Wa ander the several blocks of the animated street fair along Wander Ave Secondd Avenue and Cedar Street to see and purchase lavender produccts oof every kind — from oils and lotions to lavender products lemonaade aand salad dressing. There also will be arts and crafts lemonade usic and food offered by more than 150 vendors. and m music Dr op by informal demonstration sessions at the farms where Drop l you’ll learn tips and techniques on everything from growing wn la your ow own lavender to brewing lavender tea. There will be shuttle aavaila from the street fair to the farms. buses available Ma aster Gardener and local media personality Ciscoe MorMaster ris willl ope open the festival July 16 at 11 a.m. on the street fair stage. Forr lavender lav conference costs and reservations, contact info@llaven info@lavenderfestival.com. Ad dmiss Admission to all six lavender farms, hosted by the m La Sequim Lavender Growers Association, is $15 for adults for a sup festivall support button, with children under 12 admitted free. Buttonns wi Buttons will be sold at information booths at the street fair, entranc of each farm and the Sequim-Dungeness Valley the entrance Chambber oof Commerce Visitors Center at 1192 E. Washington Chamber (36 St. (360-683-6197). All the farms on tour will host culinary demonstrations on Sunday to show how lavender can enliven a variety of dishes. Make reservations for the annual Lavender Festival dinner at John W Wayne Marina on Sunday, July 18. See specific information in the official Sequim Lavender Festival guide, distributed during festival week. Festival organizers ask that festival attendees leave their pets at home because of the throngs of people and because the farms don’t allow pets. VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Lavender Farms

www.lavendergrowers.org

Farms open to the Public year-round 1. Jardin Du Soleil 3932 Sequim-Dungeness Way www.jardindusoleil.com 360-582-1185 or 877-527-3461 Summer Hours: April thru September, daily 10am-5pm. Winter Hours: October thru March, Friday - Sunday 10 am - 4 pm

4 Oliver’s Lavender Farm

Tw in

view

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ree

8. Olympic Lavender Farm 1432 Marine Drive www.olympiclavender.com E-mail: lavender@olypen.com 360-683-4475 or 360-681-3388 Open Daily June thru mid-August 11am-5pm

Cr ab sR 3 Crabs Rd. d

Olympic Lavender Farm 1 Jardin du Soleil

.

Old Olympic Hwy.

Old Olympic Hwy.

*

Farm hours subject to change. Please contact farms directly for current information. Open by Appointment. Brown Rd.

. Schmuck Rd

Purple Haze

SEQUIM BAY Guiles Rd.

2 Lost Mountain Lavender

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

h. Was or b Har d. R W. Sequim Bay Rd.

Bell Bottom Rd.

River Road

Nelson’s 3 Duck Pond & Lavender Farm

Sequim Visitors Center

5 Lavender

Taylor Cutoff Rd.

Hooker Rd.

Washington Ave.

Sequim Ave.

Carlsborg Carlsbor orgg Rd. Rd

Port Williams Rd.

Fir Street

© fresh design 2008

1141 Cays Road www.lavenderconnection.com 888-881-6055 & 360-681-6055 E-mail: susan@lavenderconnection.com Open weekends July-August 10am-5pm or by appointment.

Sequim Dungeness Way

Cays Rd.

8

Farms open during lavender season

7. The Lavender Connection

180 Bell Bottom Road www.purplehazelavender.com 888-852-6560 or 360-582-1131 Open daily April thru September 9am to 5pm. Downtown Sequim Store: 127 W. Washington St. Open daily all year long!

Woodcock Rd.

Woodcock Rd.

Kitchen Dick Road

274154 Hwy 101 www.sunshinelavender.com 360-683-6453 Open daily April - January 10am-6pm Winter, February thru March 10am-4pm

5. Purple Haze Lavender

Dr. Marine Anderson Rd. . ll Rd gese Lotz

Camreron

73 Humble Hill Road www.nelsonsduckpond.com 360-681-7727 Gift Shop May thru September Open daily 10am-5pm October thru April 10am-5pm Thursday thru Monday

82 Cameron Acres Lane www.oliverslavender.com 360-681-3789 Open daily April thru September 10am-5pm October thru March Open Thursday thru Monday 10am-5pm Closed last 2 weeks of December.

1541 Taylor Cutoff Road www.lostmountainlavender.com 360-681-2782 1-888-507-7481 Open daily June thru August 10am-6pm. Open Thursday thru Monday 10am-5pm September thru May

Lavender Connection 7

6. Sunshine Herb & Lavender Farm

4. Oliver’s Lavender Farm

2. Lost Mountain Lavender

Lotzgesell Rd.

3. Nelson’s Duck Pond & Lavender Farm

6 Sunshine Herb & Lavender Farm

31


LAVENDER ON THE PENINSULA

U-Pick Lavender (in season) Year-Round Cabin Rental Try our Famous Lemon Lavender Pound Cake 73 Humble Hill Rd (off Hooker Rd), Sequim

(360) 681-7727

nelsonsduckpond@msn.com www.nelsonsduckpond.com

PURPLE HAZE LAVENDER FARM

180 Bell Bottom Rd., Sequim • 1-888-852-6560

Organic Blossoms Natural Products Lavender Products for Gifts, Decorating, Crafts & Cooking

May - Sept. 10-5 daily Bring your summer guests to our farm for lavender ice cream, and U-pick lavender.

PURPLE HAZE DOWNTOWN 127 W. Washington St., Sequim 360-683-1714 • Daily

www.purplehazelavender.com

Featuring our

Sequim Lavender Company welcomes its newest member,

Elaine, Mary & Dr. Lavender’s granddaughter, to its “Enjoy Lavender” sales team.

32 2

Lavender Dog Bandana & Dr. Lavender Featured favorite at the Sequim Lavender Festival,® Port Townsend Farmers Market & Wild Birds Unlimited.

VISITORS V ISI SITO TO ORS SG GU GUIDE UID DE E2 2010 010 01


Sequim Lavender Festival Schedule

LAVENDER ON THE PENINSULA

Friday July 16, 2010 Festival Events 9 a.m. Street Fair opens — all craft/information booths and Fun on the Field 10 a.m. All the Farms on Tour open to the public Street Fair Stage opens with live music, food booths open 11 a.m. Opening Ceremonies at the Street Fair with Cisco Morris 11 a.m. Meet the Farmers at all the Farms on Tour 6 p.m. Farms on Tour close for the day 7 p.m. Street Fair closes for the day (food, craft booths and music) Community Events 10 a.m. Sunbonnet Sue Quilt Show and Display, Sequim Middle School gym, ends at 5 p.m. 10 a.m. Wineries on tour open until 7:30 p.m. 10 a.m. Sequim Arts Studio Tour closes at 5 p.m. 10 a.m. Olympic Driftwood Sculptors Art Show ends at 6 p.m. 4 p.m. Totem Tour — Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal Center 6 p.m. Salmon and Stories by the Bay — Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal Center 7 p.m. Audubon Puffin Sunset Marine Cruise begins 7 p.m. Dinner & Concert with Harpist Bronn Journey at Cedarbrook Garden Cafe 7:30 p.m. Olympic Theatre Arts presents “Bullshot Crummond” 7:30 p.m. Peninsula Singers & Readers presents “Gilbert & Sullivan a la Carte: A Merry Musical Revue” at the historical Dungeness Schoolhouse

Saturday July 17, 2010

Over 2100 lavender plants provide fresh cut (in season only), dried lavender bundles and bulk buds.

Visit our

Don & Welc Claudin ome Y e ou!

Country Cou untryy Gift Store

• Handmade Gifts • Embroidered Linens • Lavender Body Products • Live Plants

er’s Lavender F m 82 Cameron Acres Lane • Sequim O www.oliverslavender.com • 681-3789 Off Old Olympic Hwy, 1/2 mile west of Kitchen-Dick Road Open 10am - 5pm daily

Festival Events 9 a.m. Street Fair opens — all craft/information booths and Fun on the Field 10 a.m. All the Farms on Tour open to the public Street Fair Stage opens with live music, food booths open 11 a.m. Meet the Farmers at all the Farms on Tour 6 p.m. Farms on Tour close for the day 7 p.m. Street Fair closes for the day (food, craft booths and music) Community Events 8:30 a.m. Dungeness Audubon Bird Walk at Railroad Bridge Park 9 a.m. Golf Tournament begins — shotgun start 10 a.m. Sunbonnet Sue Quilt Show and Display, Sequim Middle School gym, ends at 5 p.m. 10 a.m. Wineries on tour open until 7:30 p.m. 10 a.m. Sequim Arts Studio Tour closes at 5 p.m. 10 a.m. Olympic Driftwood Sculptors Art Show ends at 6 p.m. 7 p.m. Unwind by the River — Audubon River Center 7 p.m. Audubon Puffin Sunset Marine Cruise begins 7:30 p.m. Olympic Theatre Arts presents “Bullshot Crummond” 7:30 p.m. Peninsula Singers & Readers presents “Gilbert & Sullivan a la Carte: A Merry Musical Revue” at the historical Dungeness Schoolhouse

Sunday July 18, 2010

U-Pick Lavender Live Plants

Lavender Products Lavender Still

Open June through August Daily 11 am to 5 pm

1432 Marine Dr., Sequim (360) 683-4475 www.olympiclavender.com

VISITORS V VI ISI SITO TOR ORS RS G GUIDE UIDE UI DE 2 2010 010 01

(360) 681-3388 Farm

Festival Events 9 a.m. Street Fair opens — all craft/information booths and Fun on the Field 10 a.m. All the Farms on Tour open to the public Street Fair Stage opens with live music, food booths open 11 a.m. Meet the Farmers at all the Farms on Tour 6 p.m. Farms on Tour close for the day 6 p.m. Street Fair closes (food, craft booths and music) 7 p.m. Celebrate Lavender Dinner begins Community Events 10 a.m. Sunbonnet Sue Quilt Show and Display, Sequim Middle School gym, ends at 5 p.m. 10 a.m. Wineries on tour open until 7:30 p.m. 10 a.m. Sequim Arts Studio Tour closes at 5 p.m. 10 a.m. Olympic Driftwood Sculptors Art Show ends at 4 p.m. 2 p.m. Olympic Theatre Arts presents “Bullshot Crummond” 2 p.m. Peninsula Singers & Readers presents “Gilbert & Sullivan a la Carte: A Merry Musical Revue” at the historical Dungeness Schoolhouse

33


7 Cedars Casino, operated by the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, is a local center for entertainment, fine food, art and gifts. A free shuttle bus runs to Sequim and Port Angeles.

7 Cedars Casino Address: 270756 Highway 101 (about five miles east of Sequim) Phone: 360-683-7777 Hours: Sun.-Thurs. 10 a.m.-3 a.m. Fri.-Sat. 10 a.m.-4 a.m. Web: www.7cedarscasino.com

Totem poles tell tales

of Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe WITH ITS HEADQUARTERS just east of Sequim at Blyn, the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe supports peninsula residents through business enterprises, h l h care centers andd lleadership d hi iin naturall resources health conservation. The campus of the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe also is one of the area’s most rewarding stops for visitors, with entertainment, great food and a glimpse into Northwest Native American culture.

THE JAMESTOWN S’KLALLAM TRIBE Resisting pressure to move from their traditional lands to a reservation at Skokomish, several S’Klallam communities under the leadership of Lord James Balch pooled their resources and in 1874 purchased 210 acres of land north of Sequim at a place they named Jamestown Beach. This group, the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, remained organized and involved in the local economy. In 1981, the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe achieved federal recognition. Purchasing more land in a central location on U.S. Highway 101, the tribe established its governing offices. Services at the Blyn campuses include health and dental care, a tribal library, social services and an elder center.

7 CEDARS CASINO Perhaps the first place to draw the visitor’s eye, 7 Cedars Casino offers fine dining and entertainment, along with casino table games, slots, keno and off-track betting. Full-service dining at the Salish Room or the Totem Grill is supplemented by snacks at the Bingo Bay Deli.

34

Club 7 offers live music several nights a week and books various entertainers throughout g the year. y The casino also sponsors all kinds of special events, from kkaraoke k to sports action, i on a regular l bbasis. i The casino gift shop offers souvenirs, local products and Native American art. Across the lobby, the Smoke Shop provides fine tobaccos, cigars and accessories. 7 Cedars Casino runs a free shuttle to Sequim and Port Angeles. Phone the casino for the schedule.

NORTHWEST NATIVE EXPRESSIONS ART GALLERY Located across Highway 101 about a quarter-mile east of 7 Cedars Casino, Northwest Native Expressions specializes in first-rate work by Northwest Native American artists. The gallery also stocks souvenirs, clothing, music and books. The children’s book selection is worth a stop in itself.

LONGHOUSE MARKET & DELI The Longhouse Market & Deli sits halfway halfw between 7 Cedars Casino and the main Jamestown S’ l ll T b campus. In addition dd l andd S’Klallam Tribe to gasoline groceries, the store offers fresh seasonal produce and seafood. A walk-in tobacco humidor and a wine shop also are part of the Longhouse Market. Open 24 hours daily. The Cedars at Dungeness, also owned by the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, is a championship 18-hole golf course located just west of Sequim on Woodcock Road. Open to the public, The Cedars at Dungeness offers a pro shop as well as food at the Double Eagle Steak and Seafood Restaurant, open for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

THE HOUSE OF MYTH CARVING SHED Just down a flight of steps from Northwest Native Expressions is the center of operations for the artisans, headed by lead carver Dale Faulstich, who create totem poles and other artwork for the tribe. Visitors always are made to feel welcome at the carving shed. The carvers will answer questions and tell some of the history of the poles and photographs are encouraged. (Usually open to visitors weekdays 8 a.m.-5 p.m.) The carving shed is a great place to start a walking tour of the tribe’s totem poles.

Northwest Native Expressions Art Gallery 033 Old Blyn Highway 360-681-4640 Mon.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Olympic Game Farm A FAMILY FAMI FA FAMI MILLY Y RUN RUN N BUSINESS, BUS USIN NES ESS, Olympic Olym Ol ympi ym mppiic ic Game Game Ga me Farm Far arm at at 1423 144223 Ward Ward Wa rd Road, Roaadd,, Sequ Sequ q im, iim m, is is hhome om ome me to m anyy an an aanimal imall sspe imal im peci cies ci es,, bo es bboth othh eendangered ndan nd dan a ge g re redd an aand ndd no none neend nend ndan dan ange g re ge redd. Sequim, many species, nonendangered. M off its it animals i l are veterans t off television t l i i andd movies. i Many The Olympic Game Farm has been entertaining families for four decades. For more than 28 years, the Olympic Game Farm worked with Walt Disney Studios and many others on features for theater and television including “The Grizzly Adams Series,” “The Incredible Journey” and many more. Today, the farm is home to more than 20 exotic and nonexotic species, with hundreds of animals on site for families to “get face to face with wildlife” from the comfort of their vehicles on the farm’s driving tour. The farm also has walking tours for groups of 10 or more. Reservations are required between Memorial Day and Labor Day. Also visit its historical studio barn and freshwater aquarium. The driving tour leaves visitors with vivid memories of these amazing creatures. There are friendly llamas that eat bread from your hand, performing bears, grazing elk and buffalo. You also will see many animals that are on the endangered species list, such as timber wolves, Bengal tigers and African lions. In addition to the endangered species, the farm is home to coyotes, bobcats, cougars and many more. Driving tours are open year-round from 9 a.m.-4 p.m., except Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. There is an admission fee for the tours. Go online to www.olygamefarm. com or call 360-683-4295 or 800-778-4295 for rates. Local chambers of commerce have brochures on the farm and directions to it.

n ce 1 9 8 0 Si

Live theatre at its best! Experience it in Sequim

Over 3 miles of Drive-Thru Adventure Petting Farm Observation Tower & Picnic Area Gift Shop

414 N Sequim Ave Sequim, WA 98382

360-683-7326

Driving Tours Available 363 Days a Year Snack Bar in Summer

www.olympictheatrearts.org

Open Daily 9:00 am

1423 Ward Road • Sequim

800-778-4295 360-683-4295

www.olygamefarm.com VISITORS GUIDE 2010

35


36

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


JOHN WAYNE MARINA 2577 W. SEQUIM BAY RD. SEQUIM, WA 98382 ph 360-683-6521 • fax 360-582-0832 info@bosunslocker.net www.bosunslocker.net

Hands-on learning KEY TO THE DUNGENESS RIVER AUDUBON CENTER

WHY Y DOES A STELLAR R JAY’S FEATHER LLOOK OOK whhen there is no blue pigment in it? Whyy does BLUE when the murre’s egg have that odd shape? How do you tell a lynx from a bobcat? All kinds of answers — and a wonderful place to ramble — are found at Railroad Bridge Park. With its stunning displays, hands-on exhibits and knowledgeable staff, the Dungeness River Audubon Center is a must-see, a focal point for study and education concerning the Dungeness River watershed and its environs. Families, as well as natural science enthusiasts, will find a warm welcome and plenty to intrigue in the collections at the center. The main room is lined with cases housing hundreds of examples of birds of the area, along with lynx, black bear, raccoons and cougar. Hands-on exhibits include drawers full of the fascinating and the curious: bones, feathers, eggs and teeth of species from songbird to mammoth. Stroke-able pelts of local fur-bearing animals are arranged in front of a “can-you-spot-it” mural of Olympic Peninsula wildlife. A binocular microscope invites visitors to view the intricate mysteries of natural objects. Other displays profile the “Life Story of a River” and the reference library includes a complete herbarium of local plants. The Audubon Center’s staff and docents — including director Bob Boekelheide and education coordinator Powell Jones — are eager to show visitors the collection and answer questions. Children will enjoy going on a scavenger hunt through the park and the Audubon Center is a great place to begin a ramble along the riverside trails through the forest or over the stony shore of the Dungeness River. ➤ 38 VISITORS VIS SITO ORS G GUIDE UID DE 20 2010 010

John Wayne Souvenirs • Apparel • Gifts MERCHANDISE • Marine Supplies • Bait, Tackle • Groceries • Beer & Wine • Sundries • Nautical Charts • Gifts & Apparel LICENSES • Fishing • Crabbing • Hunting RENTALS • Power Boats • Crabbing Gear • Kayaks • Bikes OPEN DAILY 37


In any given week, the center is sure to offer a special program. Birders, of course, will want to attend the Wednesday morning bird walks through the park. In certain seasons, songbird walks and “owl prowls” are popular. Guides on these walks bring spotting scopes; the center also has “loaner” binoculars. The annual Olympic Peninsula BirdFest is the first week of April. In alternate Septembers, the center sponsors a River Festival. Both events feature unusual field trips, expert presentations and a great deal of fun. History buffs will enjoy the park’s namesake railroad bridge. The Howe through-truss bridge served the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway line from 1915 until the mid-1980s. Now transformed by board planking, the bridge is accessible by ramp as well as by stairs. It’s a popular place for leashed dogs and their owners. During vacation season, summer river talks cover specific subjects, from bats to birds to bugs, with a butterfly walk scheduled to coincide with July’s Lavender Festival. Throughout the year, the Dungeness River Audubon Center sponsors workshops and presentations. Among the topics are global warming, volcanoes/earthquakes and the Conservation Service snow-pack monitor system. The wealth of programs offered by the center is a collaborative effort built over the years by several groups. The Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe has taken a lead in monitoring and restoring habitat in the area and is a key sponsor of the River Center Foundation, along with former members of the Sequim Natural History Museum. The other two sponsors are the Olympic Peninsula Audubon Society and the National Audubon Society (through Audubon Washington).

Dungeness River Audubon Center 2151 W. Hendrickson Road, Sequim (At Railroad Bridge Park) 360-681-4076 • www.dungenessrivercenter.org Hours: Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sun. noon-4 p.m. To east side parking: Take the River Road exit off U.S. Highway 101, north into Sequim, go right at the roundabout, then left onto Priest Road, and left onto Hendrickson Road, all the way to the end. To west side parking: Turn north on Carlsborg Road off U.S. Highway 101, then right onto Runnion Road to parking area. Walk over the bridge to the center. The center is open Tues.-Sat. from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sunday noon-4 p.m. • 8:30-10:30 a.m. every Wednesday, bird walks with volunteers from the Dungeness River Audubon Center. Meet at the center in Railroad Bridge park. • Other one-day and ongoing classes, as well as field trips, occur throughout the year. Drop into the center for a complete schedule.

y

s to Live B ord W

Proud to be a Presenting Partner of the Lavender Festival

More than just your hometown newspaper! Locally Owned

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VISITORS GUIDE 2010


DINING IN SEQUIM

SEAFOOD S EAFO O – STEAKS – PASTA Fresh Oysters • Dover Sole 16 oz. T-Bone • Prime Rib Fresh Dungeness Crab Meat

Early Bird Dinner Menu 11am–6pm Full-Service Lounge Happy Hour In Lounge 4pm–6pm Banquets To 50 Tues. – Fri. 11 am – 9 pm Serving Sat. 4 pm – 9 pm Sequim for Sun. 11 am – 9 pm over 22 years Sequim Closed Monday

360-683-1977

703 N. Sequim Ave.,

Homemade, hand-tossed

GOURMET PIZZA PANINI • PASTA SALAD BAR AMERICAN FOOD FAVORITES VIDEO ARCADE 380 E. Washington Street Downtown Sequim

683-9999 HOURS

Sunday-Thursday 10 am to 9 pm Friday & Saturday 10 am to 11 pm

Enjoy “Buzz-Time Trivia,” Texas Hold ‘Em and Sports Events

Welcome to the Finest Thai Cuisine in Sequim! “Dine with us here at Galare Thai and travel to my hometown of Chiang Mai without ever having to leave the country.”

Suree Chommuang, Proprietor & Chef An artful dining experience 120 West Bell St. • Sequim, WA

360-683-8069

www.galarethai.com Open Monday-Saturday • Lunch 11 am - 3 pm • Dinner 4 pm - 9 pm

Elegantly prepared meals since 1920.

DUPUIS Reservations Recommended

HOMEMADE DINNERS Fresh Seafood & Steaks Blackberry Pie, the Northwest Treat Fine Wines & Cocktails Dinners to-go a specialty

(360) 457-8033 • dupuis@olympus.net Located on Hwy 101 between Port Angeles & Sequim Open daily 5 p.m. • Closed on Tuesdays in the Winter

VISITORS VI V IS SIITORS TTO OR RS SG GUIDE UIID U DE E2 2010 01 0 10

39 39


Sequim’s Finest

Chinese Cuisine Lunch • Dinner • Take Out Mon.-Fri. M Mo Mon o on..-F -FFri. ri. 11am-9:30pm ri 11 1 11am1am amm 9:3 9:30pm :3 30pm 0p 0p pm m S 9 30 Sat. N Noon-9:30pm Sun. 11:30am-9:30pm

“Fine Dining & True Hospitality set in a lovely atmosphere”

DINING IN SEQUIM

145 East Washington n St. • Sequim • 360.681.6888

Greathouse JA

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All Motel Guests Receive:

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740 E. Washington St. • Sequim

Bistro Style Lunches • Casual Fine Dining Dinners Delicious food at a price that’s less than you’d expect. 134 S. 2nd Street, Sequim • 360-683-6727 Lunch: Tues-Sat. 10:30-3 • Dinner: Tues.-Thurs. 4:30-8:30 • Fri.-Sat. 4:30-9

Daily specials for Breakfast - Lunch - Dinner

683-1055

Family Mexican Restaurant Daily Specials - Lunch & Dinner Take-out Orders Also visit our Port Angeles Restaurant: Sergio’s Hacienda Family Mexican Restaurant

271 S. 7th St. • Sequim Behind McDonald’s

360-582-1006

Open every day, 7am-8pm

707 E. Washington St., Sequim (Next to the Econo Lodge)

Hearty, Homestyle Meals Check out these weekly specials: All You Can Eat OYSTERS Wed. 11 am - 3 pm All You Can Eat FISH N’ CHIPS Fri. 11 am - 3 pm Complete PRIME RIB DINNER Every Fri.

Perfe Pleas ctly in Pies g

Take a stroll back in time and enjoy a home-cooked

BREAKFAST, LUNCH or DINNER

Where the locals dine

Breakfast & Lunch

At the Old Mill

in the heart of downtown Sequim 145 W. Washington St., Sequim Additional parking in alley behind restaurant

360-683-4282

Burgers ~ Steaks ~ Seafood ~ Pasta Salads & Sandwiches ~ Cocktails ~ Beer ~ Wine Homemade Desserts

721 Carlsborg Rd. Tues. 8am - 3pm • Wed., Thurs. Sun. 8am - 8pm

582-1583 40 40

Fri. & Sat. 8am - 9pm • Closed Mondays Hours may change seasonally

VISITORS VI V IS SIIT ITO TORS SG GUIDE UIID U IDE DE 2 2010 010


Welcome To Our Family-Style Restaurant Award-Winning Mexican Cuisine Banquet room available for any occasion Air Conditioned • Cocktail Lounge •Outdoor Patio Dining Open 7 days for lunch and dinner

www.el-cazador.com

and Award-Win ning t Pasta s e B Pi d z ote

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Good Old Fashioned Fun & Great Food

V

535 W. Washington, Sequim • (360) 683-4788 • Fax (360) 683-2203

Burgers • Shakes Full Dinners Breakfast • Lunch Dinner OPEN 7 DAYS 4th & Washington Sequim 683-3388

Bring the Whole Family!

Fresh Seafood and Steaks

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner • Cocktails You’ll love our Salad & Soup Bar!

Open Daily O Op pen nD ail ai ily ly aatt 7 a. aa.m. a.m .m. m.

609 W. WASHINGTON ST. • SEQUIM • 683-5809 ng

Lunch 11-3, Dinner 4-9 Wed. thru Sun.

Prime Rib Wednesday & Thursday www.docksidegrill-sequim.com 360-683-7510 Banquet facilities are available

Waterfront dining at John Wayne Marina Happy memories begin here!

COCKTAILS,WINE AND LOCAL MICROBREWS FRESH SEAFOOD, STEAKS, PASTA, GLUTEN-FREE AND MORE!

Moon Palace

Award-Winning Simply Enchanti Cuisine Voted Sequim’s #1 BREAKFAST #1 AMBIANCE Specializing in Handcrafted Breakfasts and Creative Lunches Since 1979

360-683-2179

292 W. Bell St., Sequim WA www.oaktablecafe.com

WE DELIVER!

Authentic Chinese Cuisine

FREE fountain drink and chips

$ 95

~ Sunday Buffet - only 7 ~ No MSG - Orders To Go Welcome!

Tues. - Thurs. ~ 11:30am to 8:30pm • Fri. ~ 11:30am to 9:00pm Saturday ~ 3:00pm to 9:00pm • Sunday ~ Noon to 8:00pm

Creamery Square 323 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 (360) 683-6898 VISITORS V VI ISI SITO TOR RS SG GUIDE UID UI DE E2 2010 01 0 10

with purchase of any regular or large sub.* Subs • Torpedoes • Sammies • Soup • Salad Kid's Menu • Catering • Order on-line

1400 W Washington St # 106 • Sequim

(360) 681-4321 • Next To State Liquor Store *Excluding everyday value subs, bullets, torpedoes, sammies. Not to be combined with any other offer. One coupon per person. Expires May 19, 2010.

41 41


Sequim is for kids! NOTED AS ONE OF THE BEST PLACES in the country to retire, Sequim also provides much for visitors with children: playgrounds, animals, old bones, music and enough activities to settle even the most tireless in bed peacefully come nightfall. The Olympic Game Farm offers a chance to meet animals up close on drivethrough or walking tours. Animals represent a great variety of species and many are retired

film “actors.” Olympic Game Farm: (1423 Ward Road; 360-683-4295 or 800-778-4205; www. olygamefarm.com. Open nearly every day; fee for tours.) Fishing is available on Ward Road at Jubilee Farm’s trout pond. On the other side of town, Carrie Blake Park (on Blake Avenue near the QFC shopping center) is a family playground with woodsy groves, trails, an off-leash dog park and duck ponds. Colorful playground equipment appeals to the younger set. Next door to the south, the Sequim Skateboard Park offers challenges and thrills for older children and

Fifth Avenue 560 N. Fifth Avenue Sequim, WA 98382

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Outstanding Agents. Outstanding Results®. 360-683-1500

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❤ Activities 7 days a week ❤ Physical Fitness Program ❤ 24-Hour professional licensed nursing ❤ Overnight respite care offered ❤ Musical events ❤ Delicious, nutritious planned meals ❤ Interior courtyard and large secured backyard with fruit orchard ❤ Conveniently located in the heart of the medical community ❤ Adult daycare program offered 7 days a week

Independently Owned and Operated

A place place w where here a pe person erson w with ith loss never forgets they are Loved! m memory When hen you walk into Dungeness Courte Alzheimer’s Community, you walk into a “HOME” that is made up of compassion, understanding and the special warmth that will keep the feeling of “Love” embedded in your heart for many years to come. Our residents and their families truly experience a “Better Way of Life” for even the most challenging times in the disease process; the experienced and caring staff at Dungeness Courte Alzheimer’s Community has made a commitment to love and honor the lives of our residents, their families and their friends.

360-582-9309

w w w. d u n g e n e s s c o u r t e . c o m Specialized Expert Care For All Forms Of Dementia

651 Garr y Oak Drive • Sequim, WA

42

Fifth Avenue

two ball fields offer space for a game. Just north of Carrie Blake Park, the Water Reuse Park has walking and biking trails, exercise stations and a pond for radio-controlled boats where children under 14 can fish. In summer, concerts and family films are offered free at the city band shell here. Concerts are at 3 p.m. the third Sunday of the month through the summer. (These public parks are open during daylight hours only.) Along with vibrant local history exhibits, the main attractions for children at the Museum and Arts Center are the bones of a mastodon found at the Manis site near Sequim in 1977. The bones are displayed in their proper positions on a large artist’s rendering of the mastodon, with the tusks displayed separately. A short video covers the archaeological excavation of the site. Admission by donation; museum store. (175 W. Cedar St.; 360-683-8110; open Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m.) The Dungeness River Audubon Center at Railroad Bridge Park offers indoor and outdoor adventure. Outdoors, the old railroad bridge, a wooded segment of the Olympic Discovery Trail, and the Dungeness River are open to explore. Indoors, the Dungeness River Audubon Center overflows with family-friendly exhibits. Children can look through a microscope to discover what gives the blue color to a jay’s feather or they can explore drawers full of bones, feathers, eggs and teeth of species from songbird to mammoth. They are invited to stroke the pelts of local fur-bearing animals and locate the animals themselves in a mural of Olympic Peninsula wildlife. Hundreds of mounted examples of area birds line the shelves, along with black bear, lynx and cougar. Knowledgeable staff and docents are happy to answer questions and assist visitors. Railroad Bridge Park is open every day during daylight hours. The Audubon Center is open Tues.-Sat. from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sundays noon-4 p.m. (360-681-4076; www.dungenessrivercenter.org.) On Wednesdays, a free guided bird walk in the park starts at 8:30 a.m. Active family adventures go forward on land and sea in Sequim. The walk along Dungeness Spit to the lighthouse is a favorite. Rest, snack and take a volunteer-guided tour of the lighthouse before beginning the walk back. (Best walking is at low tide. It’s wise to pack water, snacks and jackets and allow half a day for this 11-mile round-trip hike.) The Olympic Discovery Trail features great hiking, jogging and bicycling through scenic areas. VISITORS GUIDE 2010


(Bicycles available for rental at Mike’s Bikes, near the trail at 150 West Sequim Bay Road; 360-681-3868; or at The Bosun’s Locker at John Wayne Marina. Sequim is home to protected waters perfect for boating and kayaking. A great family day-trip is a kayak tour of the Dungeness Spit, with a stop at the New Dungeness Lighthouse. Tours and rentals can be booked through Dungeness Kayaking (360-681-4190) or Adventures Through Kayaking (360-417-3015). At John Wayne Marina, boats and kayaks can be rented by the hour or the day at the Bosun’s Locker (360-683-6521.) The Sequim Aquatic Recreation Center at 610 N. Fifth Ave. offers swimming (including a children’s pool, rope jump and a water slide), basketball, volleyball and racquetball. Call ahead to check best pool times. (360-683-3344.) As family energy winds down, quieter fun is available at the area’s many U-pick berry farms (JuneOctober) and at the weekly Open Aire Market held on Saturdays (May-October) in downtown Sequim. The market offers local crafts, produce, snacks galore and music. Throughout the spring and summer, watch the Sequim Gazette for other festivals and events, as well as pancake breakfasts, ice cream socials and spaghetti or salmon dinners.

Offering Wholesome Raw Milk

Garden manure available

Family-owned & operated by The Brown wn Family Jeff & Debbie Brown •Sarah & Ryan M McCarthey C th

• No growth hormones or rBST • Unpasteurized & unhomogenized Visit us Mon. - Sat. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

1915 Towne Road, Sequim 98382

360-683-0716

willowsmb@yahoo.com www.dungenessvalleycreamery.com

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SEQUIM VEHICLE/VESSEL LICENSING

R E A L E S TAT E

for all your Car-Boat-RV Licensing Needs

Rita A. Adragna

WELCOME!

Serving Sequim Since 1988

W. Ba Seq y R um d.

Quick, Courteous Service... and free candy!

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Hours: Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 1001 E. Washington St. East end of Sequim

(360) 683-8375

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

Phone: 360.460.3692 692 • Toll Free: 1.800.998.4131 Email: Ritaa@olypen.com • www.JohnLScott.com/Ritaa J h LS tt /Rit I am committed to excellent service and continuing eductaion to better meet my clients’ needs. Please feel free to give me a call with any Real Estate questions. I look forward to hearing from you. • Accredited Buyer Representative • Accredited Seller Representative • Certified Negotiator Expert • Certified Residential Specialist • Graduate Realtor Institute 43


r eal estate professionals 44

Your Sequim Real Estate Specialist

Tanya Kerr, Associate Broker Cell: 360.670.6776 Office: 360.683.4131 1190 E. Washington Street, Sequim JohnLScott.com/TanyaKerr John L. Scott-Sequim This Office Independently Owned/Operated

317 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382-3488 800-962-7307 • 683-4116

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FOR COMPLETE LISTINGS:

WWW.SEQUIM.COM

SEQUIM’S HOME TEAM Cathy Reed & Sheryl Payseno

360.683.3564

Your Real Estate Professionals

Office: 360 360.683.5056 683 5056 Cathy’s Cell: 360.460.1800 Sheryl’s Cell: 360.460.9363

Web: www.sequimwa.com ®

REALTOR

Windermere Real Estate / Sequim East

Diann Dickey 360-477-3907 Associate Broker

Ronald L. Gilles 360-808-2242 Designated Broker

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842 East Washington Street Sequim, Washington 98382

www.realestatesequim.com l i 112 W. Washington St. (next to Hurricane Coffee)

Toll free: 1.877.683.3564

Robert Kelley 360-670-3411

www.mchughrealtors.com (360) 683-4122 (800) 814-4122 422 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


In love with

Lighthouses

PRESERVING AND CHERISHING the North Olympic Peninsula’s maritime heritage also extends to its lighthouses. In 1850, Congress authorized 16 lighthouses along the Pacific coast and Strait of Juan de Fuca as shipping and passenger traffic surged with settlement of the Northwest. Clallam County, established in 1854, has a lighthouse heritage going back to 1857 when Congress appropriated about $40,000 to build the Cape Flattery (Tatoosh Island) and New Dungeness lighthouses, both of which are functional as automated navigational aids today. Others, such as Slip Point Lighthouse at Clallam Bay and Ediz Hook, exist only in historical records. The lighthouses of Jefferson County (1852) — Point Wilson (1879), Destruction Island (1891) and Marrrowstone Point (1912) — came considerably later and all three remain active, but with automated equipment. The Point Wilson Lighthouse and tower are open to visitors from May-September on Saturdays between 1-4 p.m. For information, call 360-385-5520 or 360-582-3890. The lighthouse is owned by the Coast Guard and managed by Fort Worden State Park and Conference Center. Marrowstone Point Lighthouse at Fort Flagler is closed to the public. Destruction Island Lighthouse, three miles off the coast in western Jefferson County, is visible from U.S. Highway 101 at Ruby Beach, LaPush, and is closed to the public. The Cape Flattery Lighthouse on Tatoosh Island is the northwesternmost spot in the continental United States. The island is part of the Makah Nation. The lighthouse marks the entrance to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, that wide and deep passage from the open Pacific Ocean to Puget Sound. Tatoosh Island is not open to the public but it and the lighthouse can be seen from high cliffs at the end of Cape Flattery Trail. ■ PATRICIA MORRISON COATE

Top: Point Wilson Lighthouse, Port Townsend. Right: Marrowstone Point Lighthouse, Marrowstone Island Photos by Patricia Morrison Coate

VISITORS VI ISITTOR RS GU GUIDE UIDE E2 2010 010 0

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New Dungeness Lighthouse Early settlers in the Dungeness area lit bonfires along the beach on stormy nights to warn ships of the spit. It was called Shipwreck Spit in those days and volunteers provided lifesaving service to imperiled mariners. Commissioned on Dec. 14, 1857, the New Dungeness Lighthouse was the first navigational light on the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Its light is visible for 17 miles. Until March 1994, the lighthouse was manned and maintained by the U.S. government, for 82 years by the Lighthouse Service, then for 55 years by the Coast Guard. A small group of local residents formed the New Dungeness Light Station Association and in September 1994, the Coast Guard leased the facility to them. If you want memorable vacation accomodations, membership in the group will put you on a list to spend a week or more as a lighthouse keeper. Association members have kept the light station property open to the public while maintaining the buildings and grounds. They also conduct tours to the top of the light tower. On site also is a fascinating museum displaying artifacts, articles and photographs documenting the history of the lighthouse and life on the spit. The New Dungeness Light Station is a gem of history and a perfect place for a picnic before the hike back along the spit. For more information, go to www.newdungenesslighthouse.com/. Call 360-683-6638.

Cape Flattery Lighthouse, Tatoosh Island. Photo by Dave Woodcock

Anacortes

Lopez Island

San Juan Island

Squally Reach

Lighthouses

Cape Flattery Lighthouse Tatoosh Island

Slmilk Beach Dewey

Sooke

Slip Point Lighthouse

Cape Flattery Rd

Cape Flattery

Rosario Beach

Victoria

Allen

20

Cornet Avon

(Demolished)

Fish Town

Neah Bay

20

112

Riv e

r

Clallam Bay

Ho ko

Ho

Oz te ko- et

Ediz Hook Lighthouse

Pillar Point

Sekiu

Madrona Beach

East & West Twin Beach

112

Crescent Bay

Freshwater Bay

Joyce ver Lyre Ri

112

Lake Ozette

Sappho

Lake Pleasant

101

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Olympic National Forest

ive cR

N

Ca

Elwah

Olympic Hot Springs

Lake Aldwell

Marrowstone Point Lighthouse

Port Townsend

Dungeness Bay

KEYSTONE FERRY LANDING

Saratoga Shores Bretland

Agnew Carlsborg

Sequim er s Riv nes Duunge

Lake Crescent l Du So

101

Port Angeles

112

Piedmont

101 Beaver er h Riv la w a

Dungeness Spit Ediz Hook

River

113

Stanwood

Terrys Corner

Pysht

Rd.

Miltown

Oak Harbor

Point Wilson Lighthouse

(Demolished)

112

Lake Dickey

Whidbey Island

New Dungeness Light Station

Strait of Juan de Fuca

Deer Park Rd.

Makah Indian Reservation

Ozette Indian Reservation

Sedro Woolley

Bay Town

20

Diamond Pt.

Miller Peninsula 101 Gardiner Blyn

Quimper Peninsula

Fort Flagler

Discovery Bay

Port Hadlock 20 19

Greenbank 525

Mabana Beverly Beach

Tyee Beach

Nordland Langley Freeland

Fairmont Chimacum

r

Quile ute Riv e

HERITAGE HOMES of SEQUIM 6

HOMES on Display 907 sq. ft. to 2761 sq. ft. 60 floor plans

360-683-2811 (800-446-1166) We do the complete package: Site prep, installation, service

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259335 Hwy 101, Sequim WA 98382 3.5 Miles West of Sequim 46

www.heritagehomesofsequim.com

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Sequim lavender fields bloom throughout the summer.

Hard to heat your home? Impossible to install ductwork? Mini-Split M ini-Split A Air ir C Conditioners onditioners aand nd H Heat eat P Pumps umps

Receive up to $1,50000 rebate on an approved installed product SOME SYSTEMS QUALIFY Q FOR AN ADDITIONAL $1,500 $ 00 STIMULUS TAX CREDIT Call today for program details and schedule your free in-home assessment and estimate In all of us, a green heart

360

681-3333 6 81-3 3333

“WE SET THE PENINSULA STANDARD FOR QUALITY WORK & CUSTOMER SATISFACTION”

782 Kitchen-Dick Road • Sequim

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

47


LODGING

“Escape from the Ordinary”

UNIQUE ROOMS

IN SEQUIM

• Charming decor & comfort • In-room coffee, microwave and refrigerator • Fully-furnished & equipped cottages also available for weekly & monthly stays

(360) 683-4144 • 1-800-528-4527 740 W. Washington • Sequim, WA 98382 • www.olypen.com/swi

Greathouse MOTEL

JA

PA N

All Motel Guests Receive:

AN T

N ow Se rv in Brea kfa st g !

ESE RESTAUR

40% Off Breakfast 15% off Lunch & Dinner

Experience Authentic Oriental Cuisine 360-683-8773

360-683-7272

Delivery available with minimum purchase of $20

Open 7 Days a Week at 8a.m.

740 E. Washington St. • Sequim

Whether you crave a charming cottage for a romantic getaway or a larger house with room for the entire family, our goal at Brigadoon is to provide you with a relaxing, comfortable, carefree vacation. Port Angeles to Sequim and surrounding areas. Two-night minimum stay.

1-800-397-2256 • (360) 683-2255 www.sequimrentals.com

We’re proud to serve our guests. Enjoy an indoor pool and hot tub, fitness room, business center, hi-speed internet and free deluxe-continental breakfast. Everything you need to relax.

Sequim Quality Inn & Suites 134 River Road, Sequim WA 98382 (360) 683-2800 www.sqis.net 48

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


LODGING IN SEQUIM

True Luxury in the Country...

• Queen size bed • Private bath • Refrigerator • Wi-Fi • Gift Shop • Huge country kitchen • Close to beaches, shopping and downtown Sequim

Riverside House

Todd and Laurie Yarnes, Proprietors (360) 582-0339 Sequim-Dungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce 481 Riverside Road • Sequim, WA 98382 Member

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Mineral Pool & Spa Spacious Conference Room Free guest laundry • Continental breakfast Low group, business & senior rate Microwave & refrigerators in rooms

Online Reservation

1095 E. Washington Sequim, WA 98382 Toll Free 1-800-683-1775

QFC

Blake Road

Brown Road

(360) 683-1775

Off Hwy 101 on Washington Street at the east end of downtown Sequim. Sequim Ave.

www.sequiminn.com

N Visitor Info. Center Was hin

gton

Stre

et

Hwy 101

Sequim Exit

Sequim Retreats Unique pet-friendly vacation rentals in Sequim

“A rare treat, a marvelous spot, a musical stream, a cathedral totally h d l off cedars, d ll relaxing.” l i ” Call to reserve your Sequim getaway today.

360-582-9663 or email reservations@sequimretreats.com www.sequimretreats.com

DOGS WELCOME!

T OP 40 S PECIAL P LACES IN W ASHINGTON FOR R OMANCE , A DVENTURE & G OURMET C UISINE

■ Highest rating Best Places to Kiss, Best Weekend Escape North America

We’re dedicated to making your visit to Washington’s “Adventure Playground” memorable. • • • •

Indoor Swimming Pool Fitness Center 24-Hour Business Center Free High-Speed Internet Access 1441 East Washington Street, Sequim Front desk: 1-360-681-8756 • Fax: 1-360-681-8749

■ Private 9-acre estate NWF Habitat with sunny mountain views & idyllic ponds

■ Spacious fireplace suites with King-beds, 32” widescreen HDTV-DVDs, free Wi-Fi

■ Savor your morning latté on a sunny deck chair. Linger in hydrospas under the stars.

Romance & Spa Getaway Packages 360-683-2431

OR

888-683-2431

www.lostmountainlodge.com

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

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Tribes welcome visitors Native Americans have lived on the Olympic Peninsula for 4,000 to 12,000 years and continue b a strong part off the h Northh Olympic l to be Peninsula’s fabric, culturally and economically. Today, the tribes are active in providing social services for their members by building health clinics, enterprises and entertainment venues such as casinos. You are welcome on all Olympic Peninsula Indian reservations.

JAMESTOWN S’KLALLAM TRIBE On the southern end of Sequim Bay, between Port Townsend and Sequim at Blyn, are tribal headquarters for the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe. The public art here is spectacular with authentic totems in front of the tribal center and artwork on most of the public buildings, at the visitors’ center and on highway signs. Northwest Native Expressions Art Gallery has two locations, one inside the casino and one showcasing fine art near the tribal center.

LOWER ELWHA KLALLAM TRIBE The Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, who have become internationally known since the ancient village of Tse Whit Zen was uncovered

50

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


in 2004 at the base of Ediz Hook in Port Angeles, have worked tirelessly for fish restoration and the removal of the Elwha River dams. You are welcome to visit their fish hatchery in the beautiful Elwha Valley on the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The tribe’s small reservation is just west of Port Angeles — its Elwha River Casino is on Stratton Road.

QUILEUTE NATION Visitors can spend hours sitting on the end of a jetty at LaPush watching eagles, osprey, brown pelicans, seals and whales (that spout and breach just offshore in March and April). Surrounded by Olympic National Park, with nearby trails to Second Beach and Third Beach, the Quileute Tribe has hosted visitors quietly here for years, allowing campfires and camping on their beautiful crescent beach facing the Pacific Ocean. They now offer luxury cabins with whirlpool spas and gas fireplaces at the Quileute Oceanside Resort.

HOH TRIBE This small tribe lives at the mouth of the Hoh River that runs untouched by dikes or diversion into the Pacific Ocean. The Hoh, famous for its king salmon run, is jammed at its mouth with a maze of massive driftwood spruce, hemlock and cedar old-growth driftwood. The meandering river today, however, threatens to overtake the reservation. The Hoh Visitor Center has exhibits on the temperate rain forest and offers a flat, 0.25-mile trail that gives users a taste of the rain forest.

MAKAH NATION The Makah Nation at Neah Bay occupies the northwesternmost area in the contiguous U.S. The nationally renowned Makah Cultural and Resource Center museum displays about 5,500 artifacts recovered from a village buried in a mudslide 500-700 years ago. Nearly 15,000 visitors find their way to the museum’s exhibits annually, 70 miles west of Port Angeles at the end of Highway 112 at Neah Bay. Also on the reservation, from the Cape Flattery Trail, are sweeping views of the Pacific Ocean and Tatoosh Island.

JAVA JOINTS Sequim’s Local Coffee House

Serving “Tully’s” Fine Coffee

Fresh Olympic Bagels, Sandwiches & Pastries Ice Cream • FREE Wi-Fi Hot Spot 104 W. Washington St • Sequim • 360-681-6008 Open Mon.-Thur. 7 am - 6 pm • Fri. & Sat. 7 am - 7 pm • Sun. 8 am - 6 pm

Now offering Sweet Shop Decadent Truffles - exclusive HERE! • Deli items • Espresso • Homemade pastries 660 Evergreen Farm Way • Sequim, WA

360.460.1000 Luxury Retirement Living

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

Hours: Mon-Fri 7:30am-6pm Sat 9am-5pm • Sun 11am-3pm

The Cracked Bean

Coffee Company

101 Old Olympic Hwy (Roundabout at Rock Plaza) and 108 Del Guzzi Dr., Dr., (Olympic Plaza) Port Angeles

Mon.-Fri. 5am-6pm, Sat 6am-6pm, Sun. 7am-5pm 681-2560 • web: cracked-bean.com

51 1


Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge To get to Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge: Take U.S. Highway 101 west of Sequim about four miles and turn north on Kitchen-Dick Road and continue three miles to the entrance on Voice of America Road. Go through the recreation area to the refuge parking lot to access Dungeness Spit. There is a small entrance fee per individual or family. No pets or mountain bikes are allowed on the spit and fires are prohibited.

52

EVERY HIKE on the Dungeness Spit is dierent. i the h same. Weather, W h tide id andd time i off Every hik hike is year make each visit unique, but there’s something familiar on every trip. The spit is part of the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge, which is home to more than 250 species of birds, 41 species of land mammals and eight species of marine animals. The refuge is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and covers 631 acres. Hikers are restricted to the north shore of Dungeness Spit to reach the New Dungeness Light Station and must arrive and depart between sunrise and sunset, avoiding high tides. For a tide schedule, go to www.newdungenesslighthouse.com. Camping and VISITORS GUIDE 2010


PRODUCE

BUYING CLUB

• Farm-Direct • Organics • Sequim & Eastern Washington beachcombing are not permitted in the refuge. Stretching 5.5 miles to the New Dungeness Light Station and several hundred yards beyond, Dungeness Spit is one of the world’s longest natural sand spits, growing at a rate of about 20 feet per year. At the head of the trail in the Dungeness Recreation Area, pay the $3 fee and leave your pet in your car — pets are not allowed on the trail or the spit. Some 6,000 visitors annually make the trek. If you’re not up for a strenuous hike, take your pet and stroll along the straitside bluffs of a four-mile loop in the Dungeness Recreation Area for a bird’seye view of the spit. Picnic tables and 67 camping sites are available. The first half-mile of the refuge is a picturesque trail through the upland conifer forest before reaching a pair of overlooks that give a spectacular view of the narrow ribbon of the sand spit. The lighthouse is a tiny beacon that appears to be far, far away. The inner shore of the spit is a wildlife refuge for nesting birds and lucky hikers will be favored with seeing a variety of feathered critters. At its highest point, the spit is about 15 feet above sea level and parts of it are under water during winter storms. Stones of all sizes and colors — black, whitestriped, amber, green and black, gray, rust red — are strewn upon the dark sand. The pebbles are larger the closer one gets to the crest. Water-worn logs and root wads provide an infinite variety of shapes and angles to interest the eye. Upon reaching the lighthouse, the lush green lawn — well tended and manicured — and the bright, white cheeriness of the buildings make the grounds seem almost otherworldly amid the wild, near-desolate natural surroundings. The 150-yearold New Dungeness Light Station is a gem of history and a perfect place for a picnic before the hike back along the spit. Tour the museum in the former keeper’s quarters to learn about the history of the spit, the lighthouse and local Native American tribes — then climb the 74 spiraling steps to a million dollar view. Volunteer keepers are on hand to answer questions. The Web site at newdungenesslighthouse.com indicates the New Dungeness Light Station is one of the oldest lighthouses in the Northwest with several of the buildings intact. The lighthouse has been in continuous operation, providing navigational aids since its completion in 1857. The light station is maintained and operated by the New Dungeness Light Station Association. The New Dungeness Light Station is open to the public and tours of the lighthouse are available daily from 9 a.m. to two hours before sunset. Boat access is permitted by reservation only through the refuge office, 715 Holgerson Road, Sequim (360-457-8451). VISITORS GUIDE 2010

• Everybody’s a Member!

UNIQUE MERCANTILE

NATURAL GROCERIES

• Gifts & Greeting Cards • Kitchen Supply

• Organics • Bulk Foods • Natural Body Care • Nutritional Supplements

OLDTYME BUTCHER • Our Own Beef • Fresh Poultry & Seafood

COUNTRY-STYLE DELI • Daily Soups, Salads, & Sandwiches • Espresso & Fruit Smoothies

FARM STORE • Animal Feeds • Hay & Straw • Pet Supplies • Birdseed

NURSERY • Fruit & Veggie Starts • Ornaments • Flowers • Natural Fertilizers & Soils • Potted & Bare-Root Trees

Come see our store in the Sequim Village Center • Vitamins • Herbal Remedies • Homeopathy • Skin & Nail Care • Natural Cosmetics • Largest Selection of Domestic & Imported Organic Wines

Monday-Saturday 9am - 6pm • (360) 683-6056

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SHOPPING IN SEQUIM

Serving the Community for over 63 Years:

Since 1947

1-Hour Full-Service Photo Pharmacy Fine Gifts • Souvenirs Always friendly and courteous service

Authorized

Located at the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal Center Dealer

Convenient Drive-Thru for film drop-off & Rx

• Prints • Masks • Blankets • Baskets • Plaques

• T-shirts • Jackets • Jewelry • Books • Cards

• Spirit Boxes • Handcrafts • DVDs/Music • Moccasins • Flutes

683-4004 683-9536 683-2695

Daily 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. (360) 681-4640

Offering Unique Forms of Northwest Native American Art

609 W. Washington St. • Sequim Village Center • Sequim

gallery@jamestowntribe.org

Gift Cards Available

Store Phone

Rx Phone

Remote Control Hobbies 1254 West Washington, Sequim 360-681-0506 web: www.rc-hobbies.com/sequim E-Mail: sequim@rc-hobbies.com

Photo Phone

• CARS • BOATS • PLANES • HELICOPTERS

FINE LINENS & UNIQUE GIFTS FROM INDIA Mon. - Fri. 10-5:30, Sat. 11-5 • Sundays, July - August 11-5

119 E. Washington St • Downtown Sequim 360-681-4431 • www.pondicherrionline.com

Best Northwest and Worldwide Wines & Cheeses ✦ Truffles, caviar, sauces ✦ Coffee, specialty teas, scone mix, gourmet jams and honey ✦ Gifts and gift baskets, gourmet food and delicacies

Dungeness Bay Wine & Cheese

123 E. Washington • Sequim (360) 681-2778 • Mon.-Sat. 10-5:30 www.dungenessbaywineandcheese.com

54 5 4

Gifts for Guys, Gals & Lil’ Shavers! Old Fashioned, Old West ... Modern and trendy Nice selection of gifts, decor, toys, balloons & Old Tyme candy. NOW SERVING HAND-SCOOPED ICE CREAM!

(360) 683-2550 Rock Plaza, 10175 Old Olympic Hwy (Intersection of Sequim Ave/Old Olympic)

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


SHOPPING IN SEQUIM

BLUE WHOLE

GALLERY Great Art. Local Artists. First Friday 5-8 p.m.

bluewholegallery.com Mon-Sat 10-5 • Sun 11-3 129 W. Washington, Sequim • 360-681-6033

The UPS Store

®

• All your shipping needs • Notary • Mail boxes • Fax & Scan to disc • Binding • Laminating • Enhanced Printing • Call us for freight services

1400 W. Washington St., Ste. 104, Sequim

(360) 582-9534 www.theupsstore.com

&T R CRYSTALS Monday - Thursday 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Friday & Saturday by appointment only

• Carvings C i • Beads d • Massage Tools l • Naturall &P Polished li h d Crystals C l •T Tumbled bl d Stones S • Jewelry Findings & Wire • Books • Rock Tumblers and Grit • Mineral Specimens

681-5087

www.rtcrystals.com

158 E. Bell St. Sequim, WA A-1 offers the best auto parts at the lowest prices.

Your One Stop Auto Parts Store

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

360-681-2883

Phillips’ Hallmark

144 W. Washington St., Sequim • Mon.-Fri. 7-7 • Sat. 7-6, Sun. 8-6

680 W. Washington Sequim • 360-683-9786

We’re keeping you on the road. 5 55


Come have fun and relax with us!

SHOPPING

Everything for knitters, crocheters, weavers & spinners Twilight Fans - stop and see us on your way to Forks! We have have kits for you! KNITTING MACHINES LOOMS 170 West Bell St. • Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-1410 Hours: Mon. - Sat. 10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. www.adroppedstitch.net

YARN

IN SEQUIM

Sequim’s finest wine bar and bistro Presenting a world of Wine by b ottle an d gl a s s

• Discounts on case purchases • Tasting every other Thursday • Live music

We make our Potpourri fresh daily

Monday - Friday 10-5 Saturday 11-4

(360) 683-7278

www.damianascellars.com

143 West Washington Street, Sequim • (360) 683-7697

129 S. 2nd Ave., Sequim

Step into yesteryear...

Having Ha ing F Fun n • Sa Saving Money • Helping Kids!

New er n Desigs & Jean s Bag

Vintage pieces and Estate items Fine stationery & social paper

139 W. Washington St. • Sequim • 360-683-8252

Lavender & Lace Gift Boutique

Proud Sponsor of

• Children’s Items • New Handbags • Designer Jeans • Housewares • Quality Clothing

• Furniture • Books • Linens • Jewelry

Pick Up And Delivery Available Mon.-Sat. 10-5 • Sun 12-4 • Accepting Quality Donations

520 E. Washington St., Sequim • (360) 683-0669

visit us @ www.treasuresnthrift.com 56 5 6

NOT YOUR USUAL GIFT SHOP! A nostalgic flavor of yesteryear blended with the décor of today.

• Local lavender products • Jewelry • Local arts & crafts • Rock Art • Collectibles • Home & garden décor • much more

Always Excellent Quality at Affordable Price 243 W. Washington St. Sequim WA, 98382 email: lavenderandlace@olypen.com

(360) 582-0931

We ship

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Museum and Arts Center exhibit building Quality hand-carved granite statuary, including birdbaths, water features, Japanese lanterns, benches, bridges and bamboo panels, poles and much more. Roji also carries granite elements for the home, including ornamental iron, granite, marble sinks and pottery.

$

10 OFF

Open Mon. - Sat. 10-5

your purchase of $100

360.683.1078

With this coupon. Expires 10/31/2010.

114 Ruth’s Place, Sequim

Banana Belt Kelly Right on Secor

Riverside Road

Beautiful Home Décor Gifts • Soaps • Lotions • Garden Items “Enjoy The Ambience!”

South on River Road

“A Unique Shop” N

THE MUSEUM AND ARTS CENTER, 175 W. Cedar St., in Sequim, features exhibits placing the Sequim-Dungeness Valley into the cultural context of the Olympic Peninsula. Here you will find the famous Manis mastodon bones and a life-size hi former f i species. i See S the h video id narratedd by b its i discoverer, di murall off this native Emanuel Manis, and see images from the original dig. Read why this mastodon was such an important find and still draws attention from the anthropological community. Curious as to how the Sequim-Dungeness Valley has changed over the past century? Peruse historical photographs, discover some early residents and see how they continue to influence life in the valley today. Featured exhibits change quarterly. While the focus is on local arts and history, highlights from the collection also are presented. The Cowan Theater features rotating specimens from a local family’s longtime collections. Before leaving, take a stroll through the museum’s store, where you can find art prints and cards by local artists, jewelry from local designers, postcards, children’s gifts, apparel and a fine selection of local history books for all ages. Hours are 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. Admission is by donation. ■ INFORMATION COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM AND ARTS CENTER

101

481 Riverside Rd., Sequim

Tues.-Sat. 10-3

582-0339

Sequim’s Helping the Homeless of Clallam County

It’s a great time to shop here! LOW PRICES - DAILY SPECIALS HALF-PRICE SALES Mon. - Fri. 9:30–5:30, Sat. 9:30-4:30, Sun. 11-4 Clothing • Furniture • Appliances • Household Items & More 215 North Sequim Ave. • Sequim • 683-8269

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

Junior paleontologists will not want to miss the Manis mastodon, a major local find displayed at the Museum and Arts Center.

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VARIETY IN NATURE

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK

Ruby Beach is one of the most beautiful sites on the Washington coast and a frequent destination for Olympic National Photo by Jerry Kraft Park visitors.

Photos by Leif Nesheim

VISITORS TO OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK K often come to experience the beauty of a true wilderness. With 95 percent of its 1,400 square miles undeveloped undeveloped, the majority of this magnificent magnificent landscape is accessible only by trail, although there are many extraordinary sites that can be visited by car and many other locations fully accommodating to those with disabilities and physical limitations. Whether the goal is to see snow-capped mountains, rugged Pacific coasts or etherial old-growth rain forest, the park is a treasure trove of natural beauty. Tourists can drive up to Hurricane Ridge from Port Angeles in about 35 minutes. Once at the lookout, the view is awe-inspiring. Snowcapped mountains and deep, forested valleys, often swathed in low-hanging clouds, present a vast landscape. On summer nights star-gazers often come to the ridge to watch the heavens from a viewpoint above the reach of the city’s ambient light. It also is the taking-off point for many backcountry hikes and snowshoe trails. Part of what makes Olympic National Park so unique is that it contains three distinct ecological systems: glacier-capped mountains, Pacific coastline and temperate rain forest. Each contains varied plant and animal life and each offers unforgettable sights and experiences. The high mountain areas topped by mighty Mount Olympus are best explored on foot, along the miles of high country trails. Glaciers are one of the favorite destinations. There are about 266 glaciers crowning the Olympics peaks, most quite small. The prominent glaciers are those on Mount Olympus, covering approximately 10 square miles. Beyond the Olympic complex are the glaciers of Mount Carrie, the Bailey Range, ➤ 60

58

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


PET SERVICES

WAGGIN’ WHEELS MOBILE PET GROOMING

Spay/Neuter Cash, Check, Visa or Mastercard ONLY!

Sarah Kimzey Owner, Operator/Groomer

AVAILABLE 7 DAYS A WEEK! Call, email or book your appointment online!

Pet carrier or leash and collar required.

Serving Port Angeles, Sequim and surrounding areas

(360) 670-3501

2105 W. Hwy 101 • Port Angeles • 360.457.8206 210 Mon.-Sat. 10am-5pm • Sun. Closed

www.wagginwheelsgrooming.com info@wagginwheelsgrooming.com

www.cchumane.com

Tails are Waggin’ & Dogs are Braggin’ About

COUNTRY PAWS RESORT & GROOMING 22+ Years’ Experience

Condo-Style Boarding Open 7 days a week 42 Dory Rd. • Sequim • 582-9686

Jane Elyea owner

DOG GROOMING DOGGIE DAY CARE PREMIUM DOG FOOD, TREATS & TOYS 53 Valley Center Pl. (Across from PUD warehouse) • Sequim Nancy Tinker & Sharon Johnson • 360-681-5055

COZY CARE Pet Boarding

Dog & Cat Boarding with a Professional & Compassionate Touch. Rural Sequim Facility Easily Accessible from Hwy 101 By Appointment Only

(360) 681-0113 CozyCarePetBoarding@wavecable.com

Custom care at our cats-only facility in a quiet country setting. Daily one-on-one love, play, and conversation. Short and long-term boarding in large, multi-level private suites. Cats are our passion, not just our business!

We are a full service companion small animal, avian and exotic pet hospital. Mike C. Tyler, D.V.M. Maya Bewig, D.V.M. Jennifer Tavares, V.M.D.

VISITORS VISI VI S TORS G GUIDE U DE UI D 20 2010 010 0

NEW CLIENTS WELCOME! Caring Professionals ~ Professional Care 1102 E. Washington St. • Sequim, WA

360-683-2106

www.greywolfvet.com 59 5 9


Mount Christie and Mount Anderson. The most-visited glaciers in the park are the Blue and Anderson. From the Hoh Rain Forest southeast of Forks, the upriver hiking trail leads 18 miles up to the snout of Blue Glacier. Anderson Glacier can be reached by hiking the Dosewallips River Trail, on the west side of the Hood Canal, for 11 miles or from the west side by the East Fork of the Quinault River for 16 miles. Surrounded on three sides by water, the Olympics retain the distinctive character that developed from their isolation. The temperate rain forest provides one of the most lush and vibrant environments in the park. This ecosystem stretches along the coast from Oregon to Alaska and it is home to astonishingly dense and prolific flora and fauna, including some of the largest trees in the world. Several specimens reach record sizes. In some locations, the forest canopy is so thick that falling snow is caught in the trees and never reaches the ground. Sixty miles of good highway along the coast make this one of the most accessible and most popular areas of the park. For visitors, the beautiful beaches, dramatic arches and rock towers on the many beaches and the constantly changing moods and conditions of the Pacific and Strait of Juan de Fuca coasts make these shorelines a constantly evolving and thrilling place. Whether visiting one or all of these unique ecosystems, Olympic National Park is a place of discovery and natural wonder. Hiking, camping, beachcombing or just driving through, the variety and breathtaking natural beauty will provide an unforgettable experience. ■ JERRY KRAFT

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VISITORS GUIDE 2010


AS ONE OF A MERE FEW temperate rain forests in the Western Hemisphere, Olympic National Park definitely is a national and international destination. There are entry points to it and Olympic National Forest off U.S. Highway 101 from the Hood Canal, Sequim, Port Angeles and Forks. ▲ There are 17 campgrounds in Olympic National Park. They operate on a first-come, first-served basis, with the exception of Kalaloch Campground, which takes reservations for a limited time (see information below for details). ▲ Summers are most popular and more crowded as weather is warmer and drier. Plan to arrive early to obtain space, especially on weekends. Entrance fees (good for seven days) are collected at Elwha, Heart O’ the Hills/Hurricane Ridge, Hoh, Sol Duc and Staircase entrance stations from May-September or later. Camping is limited to 14 consecutive days. ▲ Camping fees are subject to change. Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Most campgrounds provide water, toilets and garbage containers. Individual campsites offer a picnic table and fire pit or grill. No hook-ups, showers, or laundry facilities are available in park campgrounds. Sites best accommodate trailers 21 feet or less. Major campgrounds have a few sites that will accommodate larger RVs. ▲ Higher elevations are snow-covered from early November to late June. Some campgrounds and comfort stations are closed and water systems drained during off seasons. The number of sites also may be limited at that time. Inquire about open facilities upon arrival during the off season. ▲ Water repellent clothing is advisable. Include warm clothing and a windbreaker for higher elevations and cool evenings. ▲ Group reservations are available at Kalaloch and Mora by contacting the respective ranger station directly. ▲ Firewood — In campgrounds where wood is not available for sale by concession services, visitors may collect dead wood on the ground within one mile of the campgrounds. Wood gathering is permitted along road corridors within 100 feet of the road. In the Deer Park area, firewood may be collected only in designated areas. ▲ Hunting and Firearms — Hunting or disturbance of wildlife in any manner is prohibited in national parks. Firearms may be transported on park roads in vehicles, provided they are adequately sealed, cased or otherwise packed to prevent use, and out of sight. Firearms are not necessary for protection from wildlife. ▲ Laundry Facilities — Available in Port Angeles, Sequim, LaPush, Forks and some smaller towns along U.S. Highway 101. ▲ Feeding wildlife is prohibited for the health of the animals and your safety. ▲ Showers — Available at Sequim Bay, Bogachiel, Dosewallips, and Lake Cushman State Parks. Contact local chambers of commerce for privately-owned facilities. ▲ Pets — Pets are permitted on a leash (up to 6 feet in length) in park campgrounds and parking areas. Pets are prohibited in all park buildings, in the backcountry and generally all park trails. Leashed pets are permitted on trails in Olympic National Forest. See the directory in this guide for detailed information. VISITORS VISIT TORS GUIDE 2010

Olympic National Park RULES & REGULATIONS

...the e Penins Peninsula’ss

one-stop

LOCAL

ffood ood d source! sou rce! e!

Providing you with daily access to the wide variety of fresh food products that are grown or processed here on the North Olympic Peninsula. Stop on by for a visit. • seasonal produce and fruit • grass-fed, hormone and antibiotic-free beef • cheese, milk and dairy products • baked goods

• • • • • •

chocolates syrup and jam beer and wine eggs honey locally-roasted coffee

• plants, seeds • To-go items: soup, baked potato w/topping • soap, bath and body products • cooking items • apparel & more...

134-½ W Washington St., Sequim Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8:30-6:30, Sat. 9-5, Sun. 10-4

www.theredroostergrocery.com 61


WASHINGTON STATE PARKS RULES AND REGULATIONS • Park hours vary depending on weather and season. However, all day-use areas close at dusk. Campers may enter parks until 10 p.m. • Campground check-in begins at 2:30 p.m. Check-out is at 1 p.m. • Quiet hours are from 11 p.m.-6:30 a.m. unless otherwise noted at the park. Enginedriven electric generators may be operated only between the hours of 8 a.m.9 p.m. • During summer months, the maximum length of stay in any one park is 10 days. From Oct. 1-March 30, the maximum stay is 20 days. • Campers may not “hold” campsites for parties who have not yet arrived. • Use the trash cans and dumpsters to help keep parks clean. Recycling is encouraged in all Washington state parks. In parks with a pack-it-in/pack-it-out program, visitors must carry out everything they have brought in. • Do not harm wild plants or animals. Feeding of wildlife is strictly prohibited. • Do not damage or remove any park facilities, including picnic tables and park signs. • Pets are allowed in most state parks but must be under physical control at all times on a leash no more than 8 feet long. Owners are responsible for cleaning up after their pets. Pets are not permitted on designated swimming beaches. • Horses are allowed only in designated parks. • Smoking and pets are not allowed inside vacation houses, yurts, cabins or other rustic structures. • Glass bottles or metal cans are not allowed on swimming beaches. Alcoholic beverages are permitted only in designated campground and picnic areas. • All Washington state laws are enforced in Washington state parks. Sequim Bay State Park

■ COURTESY OF WWW.PARKS.WA.GOV/REGS.ASP.

Photo by Michael Dashiell

ART GALLERIES ON THE PENINSULA

W I L D L I F E

A R T I S T

Award-winning Images of Watercolor and Acrylic

360.582.0339 www.LaurieYarnesArtist.com info@LaurieYarnesArtist.com

6 62

Studio 481 Riverside Rd. Sequim, WA 98382

VISITORS V VI ISI SITTORS SI RS G GUIDE UIDE UI D 201 DE 2 2010 0 0


Olympic Peninsula residents and visitors alike are invited to use the state’s free 5-1-1 travel information number. Call 5-1-1 also for road and traffic conditions, statewide road construction, weather-related data, including mountain pass conditions, and the state’s ferry system. Passenger rail and airline 800 numbers also are available by dialing 5-1-1.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

“Connect with Boy Scouts of America, now celebrating 100 years of helping to form character in our future leaders.” Derek Ballinger Mt. Olympus District Executive (360) 460-7030 dballinger@seattlebsa.org

CLALLAM COUNTY GEM & MINERAL SOCIETY General Meeting 3rd Tuesday of the month

Lapidary Shop

Sequim 143 Port Lodge BPOE Williams Rd. #2642 683-2763

Drop by for a tour and newsletter 921 E. Hammond St. (Across from QFC)

(360) 683-6806

• Make new friends • Keep fit in mind, body and spirit • Become involved • Plan travel in the area or world-wide

www.sequimseniorcenter.org

ROTARY CLUBS OF SEQUIM EQUIM SEQUIM SUNRISE CLUB 7 am Friday • SunLand 109 Hilltop Dr. sequimsunriserotary.org SEQUIM NOON CLUB Noon Thursday • Sequim Elks Lodge (143 Pt. Williams Rd.) sequimnoonrotary.org

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

Ongoing classes in jewelry making, casting, silversmithing, wire wrapping, faceting and others...

Rock and Gem Show - October 1st, 2nd & 3rd

Call for more information: 681-2323 or 681-7981 www.olympicrocks.com

Sequim Valley Lions Club Meet 6:15 pm on 2nd & 4th Wed. Me (dinner meeting) Call for location Non-smoking facility Con Contact: Betty Wilkerson 457-5600 or Arndt Lorenzen 683-7550

Sequim Masonic Lodge #213 F & AM Meets 2nd Thursday of each month 6:15 Dinner • 7:30 Lodge Thursday Morning Coffee 10 a.m. - 11 a.m.

(360) 504-1180 (Voice Mail) Sojourners Welcome

South 5th Ave. & Pine, Sequim 98382

Come enjoy musical theater with PALOA this summer by attending "Oklahoma" July 23, 24, 25, 29, 30, 31 at the Port Angeles High School Performing Arts Center. All shows begin at 7:30 PM except the Sunday matinee at 2:00 PM. Tickets can be ordered at www.PALOA.org or by calling 360-457-5630.

Clallam County Republican Party 360-417-3035 “Come Join Us for Less Intrusive Govt.” 509 S. Lincoln St., Port Angeles, WA

www.clallamrepublicans.org

63


CHURCH DIRECTORY Peninsula Evangelical Friends Church Old Olympic Hwy. at North Barr Rd. 1291 N. Barr Rd., Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 452-9105 Service Times Sunday School 9:30 a.m. • Meeting for Worship 10:45 a.m. jfodge@olypen.com/www.pefcpa.com

Applying the Scriptures to our Daily Lives

F IRST UNITED METHODIST & Congregational Church 110 E. 7th St. (7th & Laurel) 360-452-8971 Rev. Jo Ann “Joey” Olson

SUNDAY

8:30 & 11:00 a.m. Worship 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Breakfast during Summer 4:00 p.m. Youth Group ~ Nursery provided for all services ~ FRIDAY 5:30 p.m. Friendship Dinner for all - free email: portangelesumc@tfon.com www.gbgm-umc.org/portangelesfumc

Nursery, Children, Youth & Adult Sunday School Scott Culver

Wayne Yamamoto

Sunday morning Worship 10:00 am Mon. - Fri. 8-4

www.dcchurch.org E-mail: info@dcchurch.org

683-7333 45 Eberle Lane, P.O. Box 2920, Sequim 3.9 miles north on Sequim Ave. from Hwy. 101

First Baptist Church Spanish Worship 9:00 AM Sunday Small Group Bible Study 9:30 AM Worship 11:00 AM Evening Bible Study 6:00 PM Wed. Prayer Meeting 6:00 PM Monday Youth Group 5:30 PM 1323 Sequim-Dungeness Way P.O. Box 1557 360-683-2114

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church A CHURCH WITH A DIFFERENCE 525 N. 5th Avenue 683-4862 Fr. Robert Rhoads Worship Times: Sunday: 8:00 & 10:00 a.m. Child Care Provided www.stlukesparish.net

Port Angeles Campus Pastor David Rich 1018 W. 16th, Port Angeles Sunday Worship 10am Cell: 360-460-4146

Sequim Campus Pastor Michael VanProyen 1023 Kitchen-Dick Road Sunday Worship 9am & 11am 360-683-8020

Administrative Office Mon. thru Wed. 9am-12pm 360-683-8020 1023 Kitchen-Dick Road, Sequim

kingsway@olympus.net 64 64

VISITORS VI V IS SIIITO TTO ORS RS G GUIDE UIID U DE E2 2010 01 0 10


CHURCH DIRECTORY TRINITY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 100 South Blake Ave.

Seventh-Day Adventist Church Wed. – 7pm Prayer Meeting Sat. – 9:30 Interactive Bible Classes for all ages 10:45 Praise & Worship 11:30 Morning Message (360) 683-7373 • 30 Sanford Lane Pastor Dale Kongorski sequimadventist@qwestoffice.net Promoting a joyful mind, healthy body, Christ-centered Spirit!

Celebration Service: 9:30 a.m. Traditional Service: 11:00 a.m. Sunday School & Nursery: 9:30 a.m. Bill Gordon, Pastor

683-5367 Email: church@sequimtumc.org Web site: www.sequimtumc.org

Dennis J. Ackley, Pastor

Sequim Community Church

503 N. Brown Rd., Sequim, WA (Corner of Fir & Brown)

360-683-7897

Email: pastord@olypen.com

Dungeness Valley Lutheran Church E.L.C.A. 925 N. Sequim Ave. / 681-0946

dvelca.org Check out our website for summer service times and other activities Nursery Service Available Pastor Jack Anderson Parish Assistant, Mary Griffith, RN

Sunday Worship Contemporary @ 9 & 11 a.m. Traditional @ 10 a.m. Sunday School for all Loving infant care Dr. Scott E. Koenigsaecker, Senior Pastor Rev. Rick Dietzman, Minister to Adults Rev. Tony Toth, Pastor to Youth Joel Rosenauer, Director of Worship Arts Peggy McKellar, Director of Children’s Ministries

950 N. Fifth Avenue - (360) 683-4194

www.sequimcommunitychurch.org

Sequim Center for Spiritual Living “Teaching the Principles of Science of Mind”

Holds Sunday Service 10:00 Pioneer Park Rev. Lynn Osborne INFORMATION CALL

681-0177

Faith Lutheran Church LCMS www.flcsequim.org 382 West Cedar, Sequim (360) 683-4803 Sunday Worship Services: 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Bible Classes: 9:45 a.m. (Cryroom & nursery available) Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays (both services) Youth Groups • Christian Pre-School Pastor Steve Eaton & Pastor Roger Stites

Everyone is welcome at the new home of

Olympic Bible Fellowship Highway 101 #261913 – just west of Sequim • 683-6731 Mailing address: 394 Kirner Road Sequim

SUNDAY

MONDAY

THURSDAY

10:45 am - Worship Service, 7 pm - Youth & College Group 7 pm - Couples Study nursery & Sunday School TUESDAY Meetings throughout Rich Hay, Pastor 5:45 pm - Awana 3 years 10 am - Precept Bible Study the Week Jed Cary, Outreach Pastor through high school WEDNESDAY 6 pm - Evening Bible Study 7 pm - Prayer Meeting For current info go to: www.obfchurch.org

Hendrickson St.

Sunday Services 10:45 AM & 6 PM

Fir St.

Rev. David L. Westman 640 N. Sequim Avenue • 360-683-7981

Washington St.

VISITORS VI V IS SIITO TORS RS G GUIDE UIID U DE E2 2010 010 01

Sequim Ave.

Sequim Worship Center

www.sequimworshipcenter.org

65 6 5


Sweet treats on hand AT SEQUIM BERRY FARMS

THE U-PICK BERRY FARMS of Sequim are travelers’ treasures, opportunities to stop, stretch and snack in the fresh air. A low-cost, low-tech activity for hosts and their visitors, especially children, berry picking creates memories of shared work and sweet rewards. For year-round residents, berry farms promise the midwinter riches of preserves, syrups and frozen whole berries. This summer the pickings are good around Sequim, with farms opening their U-pick stands throughout the season to offer a variety of berries. Most farms will provide containers or preweigh customers’ containers, but it’s always wise to bring light, flat containers that keep berries from stacking up and squishing. A sun hat, a long-sleeved shirt and a handy water bottle make picking in summer sun much more comfortable.

For good frozen berries, both Nelson’s Blueberries and Rainbow Farms recommend placing unwashed berries on a tray lined with wax paper, then freezing them until firm (an hour or so). Once firmly frozen, the berries can go into freezer bags for storage. They will come out of the freezer separate, whole and unmushed. Graysmarsh Farm recommends a similar process, except with a rinse and drain before freezing. However, this kind of care need not be taken with berries destined for syrups or preserves. These berries can be rinsed and put immediately into bags, preferably in quantities that match the recipes to be followed later. Strawberries freeze well, according to Dave Cameron of the Cameron Berry Farm, if dipped in water and quickly frozen on a tray, then put into plastic freezer bags.

Tires • Brakes Alignment • Wheels Batteries • Shocks

The LES SCHWAB Warranty

FREE

• Road Hazard Warranty • Mounting • Air Checks • Rotations • Flat Repair - Passenger & Tubeless Light Truck Tires

“If We Can’t Guarantee it, We Won’t Sell It! Serving The West Since 1952 With Over 400 Locations Sequim 802 E. Washington .......................... 360.683.7261 Port Angeles 2527 E. Hwy 101 ................ 360.452.7691 Port Townsend 355 Sims Way................ 360.385.0124 Monday-Friday 8am - 6pm • Saturday 8am - 5pm

lesschwab.com 66

b The berry farms invite the public to phone ahead for further information or to request special picking times. F ll h local l l farms f h Following are some off the andd their offerings:

CAMERON BERRY FARM (Strawberries) U-pick open mid-June to mid-July. Hours: Mon.-Sat. 7 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Corner of Woodcock and Wheeler roads. 360-683-5483 or 683-6765

DUNGENESS MEADOW FARM (Blueberries) U-pick open second week of July-second week of August. Hours: Phone ahead (after 7 a.m.) Prepicked berries also available. Certified organically grown Reka, Blue Crop, Spartan and Duke blueberries. 135 Meadowmeer Lane. 360-582-1128

GRAYSMARSH FARM (Five varieties) U-pick open June through September. Strawberries, raspberries, loganberries, blueberries, blackberries. Also available: lavender and Graysmarsh Preserves. Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 6187 Woodcock Road. 360-683-5563

NELSON’S BLUEBERRIES U-pick blueberries mid-July to September. Hours: Please phone ahead. If possible, bring pre-weighed basket or plastic containers. 1556 Atterberry Road. 360-683-8055

RAINBOW FARM (Blackberries) June to October. Specializing in certified organic blackberries. Also Olally blackberries, Black Douglas blackberries, Triple Crown blackberries. Hours: Daily dawn to dusk. 142 Towne Road. 360-461-3043

SUNSET BERRY FARM Rick Eason, 683-7651. Call for information and directions. Organic blueberries, blackberries and raspberries.

Les Schwab Credit Plan 90 days same as cash (OAC)

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


VISITORS GUIDE 2010

67


North Olympic Peninsula Recreational Map

Tatoosh Island

Sooke

Allen

20

9

Mount Vernon

Cornet Avon

t

Cape Flattery

Victoria

Burlington

Slmilk Beach Dewey

i Stra

Cape Flattery Rd

Sedro Woolley

Bay Town

20

Rosario Beach

o Har

UN

ITE

112

Fish Town 20

DA

DS TAT E

? Sekiu r

Riv e Ho ko

Pillar Point

Salt Crescent Creek Bay

112

Piedmont

B.C

ER

Florence

Elwha

Agnew Carlsborg

Sequim

Mount Carrie

r ive Hoh R

Sunny Shores

Miller Miller Peninsula Miller Peninsula Peninsula Peninsula

?

101

Sequim Bay State Park

Gardiner Blyn

?

Saratoga Shores Bretland

Fort Flagler State Park

Quimper ?

Fort Greenbank Flagler

Port Hadlock 20 Irondale 19 Fairmont Chimacum

Olympic National Forest

Center

Mabana Tyee Beach

Beverly Beach

525

Discovery Bay

Langley

Mission Beach

Freeland Austin Clinton

Port Ludlow

CLINTON-MUKILTEO FERRY

Maxwelton

Mukilteo 526

Shine Tidelands State Park

Fairmount

104

Puget Sound

Olympic Peninsula Gateway Visitors Center

Port Gamble

Hood Canal Bridge

Quilcene

Serene 5

KINGSTON TO EDMONDS FERRY

?

Mount Deception

Edmonds

104 Hoh S F or k

r ive

hR

Ho

Kitsap Memorial State Park

Mount Queets

Hoh Indian Reservation

Olympic National Park

Olympic National Park

Indian Reservation

iv

Duc sh k a bu

er

ive r

Dosewallips State Park

River

Brinnon Duckabush Triton Cove State Park

Mount Duckabush

Toandos Peninsula Kitsap Coyle Peninsula Scenic Beach State Park

3

The Highlands

Poulsbo

Kalaloch Clearwater South Beach

eets River

Queets

National Wildlife Refuges City Area

Quinault Indian Reservation

?

Ranger Station

Drive-on ferries

Hospital

Shelter

Boat Ramp

Golf

Public Camp

Marina

Airport

Information Winery Visitors Center Highway 101 (2-lane highway with pullouts) apprx. 10 miles

Seabeck

BAINBRIDGE TO SEATTLE FERRY

303

Port Blakely

State Park

Mountains

Accessible to disabled

Holly

16

Bremerton Junction

Belfair State Park

Elliott Bay

Seattle

West Seattle

Port Orchard

5

Tahuya

? Union

Wauna 106

Twanoh State Park

Tukwilla

Burien Seatac

To Gig Harbor & Tacoma

405

Klahanie

Burley Purdy

Minter

599

518

Olalla

Sunset Beach

509

Banner Bethel Park

16

Sunbeach

Potlach To Shelton

Lake City

Alki

BREMERTON TO SEATTLE FERRY

Bethel

3

Dewatto

H

Potlatch State Park

Amanda Park

Belfair

l na

Lilliwaup

101

522

Gorst

Lake Cushman

Quinault Ocean City

Bremerton

Hamma Hamma

Hoodsport Lake Quinault

101

West Blakely

City marker

Viewpoint

Meturn Sunset Hill

Bainbridge Island

3

Museum

Casino

99

520

101

Eldon

Richmond Highlands Shoreline Manitou

Agate Point

3

?

Richmond Beach

Kingston

Silverdale

Triton

Qu

Olympic National Forest

Mount Anderson

101

R

r ve

Quinault

r Ri ate

Cle

101

arw

Pacific Ocean

Dose wa llip sR

Ca

Hoh

Mount Olympus

oo d

Oil City

Tulalip

Nordland

Anderson Lake State Park

River ha E lw

Hoh Rain Forest Visitors Center

KEYSTONE FERRY LANDING

Protection Island Diamond Pt.

Elwha Valley

Bogchiel State Park

Norman

Ebey's Landing

Hurricane Ridge

ah River

101

Stanwood

Terrys Corner

Port Fort Worden Townsend State Park

r

Forks

C

5

RY

r

ork

?

Lake Mills

Sol Duc Hot Springs

w

Quileute Indian Reservation

?

River

IA

Dungeness Bay

Lake Aldwell

Olympic Hot Springs

ive

N

For k

uc R

SF

iel ch ga o B

Marymere Falls

Port Angeles

?

Madison Falls

ala

La Push

Olympic National Forest

110

ucc Sol Derr Quil iv layut e River R

ICT OR

Coveland

ive ss R

lD So

C

Ediz Hook

101

Lake Crescent River ah alaw

Miltown

Oak Harbor .F

e Dungen

Beaver

Quileute

Lake Aldwell

Lake Sutherland

101

101

TO V

Dungeness Spit

Freshwater Lower Elwha Indian Reservation Bay

112

Sappho

Lake Pleasant

Rialto Beach

Lyre River

Joyce 113

Lake Ozette

LE

Madrona Beach

East & West Twin Beach

112

Lake Dickey

AT T

Pysht

e Rd. zett o-O k o H

Ozette Indian Reservation

SE

Whidbey Island

Strait of Juan de Fuca

Clallam Bay 112

S

Deer Park Rd.

Makah Nation Reservation

NA

FERRY TO VICTORIA B.C.

CA

Neah Bay

River

Cape Flattery Lookout

Anacortes

Lopez Island

San Juan Island

Squally Reach

Des Moines Shawnee

Kent Woodmont Beach

167


North Olympic Peninsula Recreational Map

Tatoosh Island

Sooke

Allen

20

9

Mount Vernon

Cornet Avon

t

Cape Flattery

Victoria

Burlington

Slmilk Beach Dewey

i Stra

Cape Flattery Rd

Sedro Woolley

Bay Town

20

Rosario Beach

o Har

UN

ITE

112

Fish Town 20

DA

DS TAT E

? Sekiu r

Riv e Ho ko

Pillar Point

Salt Crescent Creek Bay

112

Piedmont

B.C

ER

Florence

Elwha

Agnew Carlsborg

Sequim

Mount Carrie

r ive Hoh R

Sunny Shores

Miller Miller Peninsula Miller Peninsula Peninsula Peninsula

?

101

Sequim Bay State Park

Gardiner Blyn

?

Saratoga Shores Bretland

Fort Flagler State Park

Quimper ?

Fort Greenbank Flagler

Port Hadlock 20 Irondale 19 Fairmont Chimacum

Olympic National Forest

Center

Mabana Tyee Beach

Beverly Beach

525

Discovery Bay

Langley

Mission Beach

Freeland Austin Clinton

Port Ludlow

CLINTON-MUKILTEO FERRY

Maxwelton

Mukilteo 526

Shine Tidelands State Park

Fairmount

104

Puget Sound

Olympic Peninsula Gateway Visitors Center

Port Gamble

Hood Canal Bridge

Quilcene

Serene 5

KINGSTON TO EDMONDS FERRY

?

Mount Deception

Edmonds

104 Hoh S F or k

r ive

hR

Ho

Kitsap Memorial State Park

Mount Queets

Hoh Indian Reservation

Olympic National Park

Olympic National Park

Indian Reservation

iv

Duc sh k a bu

er

ive r

Dosewallips State Park

River

Brinnon Duckabush Triton Cove State Park

Mount Duckabush

Toandos Peninsula Kitsap Coyle Peninsula Scenic Beach State Park

3

The Highlands

Poulsbo

Kalaloch Clearwater South Beach

eets River

Queets

National Wildlife Refuges City Area

Quinault Indian Reservation

?

Ranger Station

Drive-on ferries

Hospital

Shelter

Boat Ramp

Golf

Public Camp

Marina

Airport

Information Winery Visitors Center Highway 101 (2-lane highway with pullouts) apprx. 10 miles

Seabeck

BAINBRIDGE TO SEATTLE FERRY

303

Port Blakely

State Park

Mountains

Accessible to disabled

Holly

16

Bremerton Junction

Belfair State Park

Elliott Bay

Seattle

West Seattle

Port Orchard

5

Tahuya

? Union

Wauna 106

Twanoh State Park

Tukwilla

Burien Seatac

To Gig Harbor & Tacoma

405

Klahanie

Burley Purdy

Minter

599

518

Olalla

Sunset Beach

509

Banner Bethel Park

16

Sunbeach

Potlach To Shelton

Lake City

Alki

BREMERTON TO SEATTLE FERRY

Bethel

3

Dewatto

H

Potlatch State Park

Amanda Park

Belfair

l na

Lilliwaup

101

522

Gorst

Lake Cushman

Quinault Ocean City

Bremerton

Hamma Hamma

Hoodsport Lake Quinault

101

West Blakely

City marker

Viewpoint

Meturn Sunset Hill

Bainbridge Island

3

Museum

Casino

99

520

101

Eldon

Richmond Highlands Shoreline Manitou

Agate Point

3

?

Richmond Beach

Kingston

Silverdale

Triton

Qu

Olympic National Forest

Mount Anderson

101

R

r ve

Quinault

r Ri ate

Cle

101

arw

Pacific Ocean

Dose wa llip sR

Ca

Hoh

Mount Olympus

oo d

Oil City

Tulalip

Nordland

Anderson Lake State Park

River ha E lw

Hoh Rain Forest Visitors Center

KEYSTONE FERRY LANDING

Protection Island Diamond Pt.

Elwha Valley

Bogchiel State Park

Norman

Ebey's Landing

Hurricane Ridge

ah River

101

Stanwood

Terrys Corner

Port Fort Worden Townsend State Park

r

Forks

C

5

RY

r

ork

?

Lake Mills

Sol Duc Hot Springs

w

Quileute Indian Reservation

?

River

IA

Dungeness Bay

Lake Aldwell

Olympic Hot Springs

ive

N

For k

uc R

SF

iel ch ga o B

Marymere Falls

Port Angeles

?

Madison Falls

ala

La Push

Olympic National Forest

110

ucc Sol Derr Quil iv layut e River R

ICT OR

Coveland

ive ss R

lD So

C

Ediz Hook

101

Lake Crescent River ah alaw

Miltown

Oak Harbor .F

e Dungen

Beaver

Quileute

Lake Aldwell

Lake Sutherland

101

101

TO V

Dungeness Spit

Freshwater Lower Elwha Indian Reservation Bay

112

Sappho

Lake Pleasant

Rialto Beach

Lyre River

Joyce 113

Lake Ozette

LE

Madrona Beach

East & West Twin Beach

112

Lake Dickey

AT T

Pysht

e Rd. zett o-O k o H

Ozette Indian Reservation

SE

Whidbey Island

Strait of Juan de Fuca

Clallam Bay 112

S

Deer Park Rd.

Makah Nation Reservation

NA

FERRY TO VICTORIA B.C.

CA

Neah Bay

River

Cape Flattery Lookout

Anacortes

Lopez Island

San Juan Island

Squally Reach

Des Moines Shawnee

Kent Woodmont Beach

167


Photos courtesy Peninsula Trails Coalition

In the 1980s, the citizens of the North Olympic Peninsula developed a shared vision of a trail system that would connect their population centers across the 125-mile wide peninsula with the natural splendors of the area. Today the Olympic Discovery Trail is taking shape as a paved, multi-user (hike, bike and ride) trail connecting Port Townsend on Puget Sound, through Sequim, Port Angeles and Forks, to the Pacific Ocean beaches. It follows the old Milwaukee Road railroad much of the way. Major sections now are complete and ready for use with more being added each year (see map for trail route and status). There is a 28-mile segment of continuous trail connecting Port Angeles, Sequim and Blyn. A 6-mile segment leads south from Port Townsend. Another 6-mile segment connects the west end of Lake Crescent with the Sol Duc River Road and hot springs. And a 25-mile segment of excellent dirt trail connects the Elwha River to Lake Crescent. More detailed maps and route and service information can be found on the trail Web site, www.olympic discoverytrail.com.

PORT ANGELES TO BLYN SEGMENT This 28-mile segment can be accessed from the downtown Port Angeles waterfront on the waterside of the Red Lion Inn.

It continues east 4 miles along the harbor and Strait of Juan de Fuca, then turns south along Morse Creek. It crosses the creek on a 400-foot railroad trestle converted to trail bridge and then climbs to the Deer Park overlook with views of the Olympic Mountains. It continues east through second-growth forest with many bridges over the streams coming down from the Olympics. It breaks out of the trees onto the Agnew and Sequim prairies with many farms and ďŹ elds and passes through Robin Hill Farm Park with picnic facilities. At the Kitchen-Dick Road crossing, a 2-mile side trip north takes trail users to the famous Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge for a 5.5-mile each way hike to the New Dungeness Light Station near the end of the spit and camping facilities at the Dungeness Recreation Area. Farther east it passes through the old mill town of Carlsborg

TRAIL SYSTEM GROWS ON THE OLYMPIC PENINISULA Adventure Route Whiskey Creek Bridge: The Adventure Route is an exciting adjunct to Olympic Discovery Trail that provides a 25-mile unpaved shortcut from the Elwha River through the foothills to Lake Crescent. Here construction crew members are admiring the just-completed trail bridge over Whiskey Creek.

70

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


The start of Olympic Discovery Trail in Port Townsend follows the old railroad grade south along the shore past the paper mill, with striking views across the bay. This section is referred to as Larry Scott Memorial Trail in honor of one of the founders of the Peninsula Trails Coalition and the ODT concept.

then crosses the Dungeness River on a restored railroad trestle and timber bridge. Just across the bridge is Railroad Bridge Park and the Dungeness River Audubon Center with outstanding displays of local wildlife. At about 18 miles, the trail passes through Sequim, following the famed irrigation ditch that made farming possible in the Olympic rain shadow (“blue hole”). Leaving town, the trail passes through Carrie Blake Park, then crosses Johnson Creek on an 85-foot high, 400-foot long converted railroad trestle. Continuing through mature forest, the trail crosses Discovery Creek on a 150-foot trestle and comes to Sequim Bay State Park with full camping facilities and beachfront on Sequim Bay. At mile 27, it continues on Old Blyn Highway for three or four blocks, then resumes and passes through the Jamestown S’Klallam’s tribal campus. The tribe’s 7 Cedars Casino and Longhouse Market and Deli are accessible through an underpass of U.S. Highway 101. The current trail end is three-quarters of a mile past the tribal headquarters.

PORT TOWNSEND SEGMENT This 6-mile segment can be accessed from the Boat Haven just south of the cross-sound ferry dock on the downtown waterfront. The trail runs along the water side of the Boat Haven and follows the bay south on the old railroad grade. It turns inland at the Port Townsend Pulp and Paper Mill, goes under Highway 20 on the railroad underpass, passes under Discovery Road, then turns south again at the Cape ➤ 72 VISITORS GUIDE 2010

The Elwha River Trail crossing is suspended below the new Lower Elwha bridge providing a spectacular view of the river valley and salmon hatchery. It can be reached from Elwha Bridge Road off Highway 112 or by a 1-mile trail off Lower Elwha Road at Kaycee Way.

71


The Johnson Creek trestle is a popular entryway east of Sequim to the Olympic Discovery Trail. Photo by Patricia Morrison Coate

BUSINESS SERVICES

ARE YOU THINKING OF MAKING SEQUIM YOUR HOME TOWN? IF SO, WE CAN HELP.

WE HAVE RENTALS! www.landmarkpm.com the most listings in the area

(360) 683-3338 (866) 937-5676 TOLL FREE ✓ FREE Business counseling for startups or existing businesses ✓ Community or market demographics ✓ Available Commercial Properties 25 YEARS! ✓ Business Networks

609 W. Washington St. #4 (JC Penney Plaza) Sequim, WA 98382

Contact the Clallam Economic Development Council at (360) 457-7793 or visit our website: www.clallam.org

72

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Photo by Robert S. Morris

Portions of the Olympic Discovery Trail are wheelchair accessible. For more information, see the Accessible Trails Web site.

NURSERIES

George trailhead. It now ends at the Discovery Bay Golf Course but work is under way to extend it 2 miles to the 4 Corners intersection.

ELWHA RIVER TO LAKE CRESCENT SEGMENT This 25-mile segment, called the Adventure Route, is a beautifully constructed 5-foot-wide dirt trail that passes through rolling forested hills to Olympic National Park on the north side of Lake Crescent. The Adventure Route is not recommended for touring bikes and the regular Olympic Discovery Trail paved route is being planned on level ground along the old railroad grade from the Elwha to Joyce, then up the Lyre River valley to the lake. However, the scenic Adventure Route is a great hiking, mountain bike and horse trail experience and has two crossing roads so that shorter trips can be planned. Going west, the trail access and parking area is on the west side of Highway 112 just past the Elwha River bridge. On the other end, use the Olympic National Park parking area at the end of East Beach Road on the southeast side of Lake Crescent. The Web site has details on the route and points of interest along the way.

261461 Hwy 101 W., Sequim

(360) 683-8003

Open Every Day 8am-8pm

Compost & mulch Seasonally organic apples • potatoes garlic • cider • mixed vegetables 457-5950 or 461-4157 225 Gehrke Road • Port Angeles

➤ 74 VISITORS GUIDE 2010

73


The 30-mile bicycle ride from Ediz Hook to east of Sequim can provide a perfect weekend trip for Canadian visitors who want to leave their autos at home. After debarking (The Victoria Express and the M.V. Coho permit bicycles on board) cyclists can enter the trail near the Red Lion Hotel on the waterfront, then bike to Sequim, see the sights, ride on to Sequim Bay State Park and camp for a night or two. Alternatively, visitors can return to Sequim to stay at one of the hotels in town. It’s also fun to ride around bike-friendly downtown Sequim and shop for a while. For those who don’t wish to bike all the way back to Port Angeles, Clallam Transit is ready to help. It has six bus stops in Sequim and the buses are equipped with bike racks — available on a first-come, first-served basis. Too crowded? Look for another bus in 30 minutes. In all cases, it’s best to plan ahead. Remember: Buses don’t run on Sundays. Call Clallam Transit for updates or consult the olympicdiscoverytrail.com Peninsula Trail Coalition Web site for bus and other trail-related information, e.g., lodging, bike rentals/repairs and bus transportation. For the adventurous cyclist, there are mountain bike trails nearby, such as the Burnt Mountain and Gold Creek trails. Bike shops in the area can help locate those trails. See the bike shop listing at the olympicdiscoverytrail.com Peninsula Trail Coalition Web site.

Neah Bay

The trail crosses Bagley Creek about 4 miles east of Port Angeles.

LAKE CRESCENT TO SOL DUC ROAD SEGMENT This 12-mile segment runs along the north shore of Lake Crescent and up Fairholm Hill as far as the access road to the Sol Duc falls and hot springs. It is not yet open as the Olympic Discovery Trail and does not have trail signs but is owned by and accessible to the public. Only the westernmost 6 miles is paved at this writing. East end access is from the same ONP

trailhead as the end of the Adventure Route. The trail along the north shore is known as the Spruce Railroad Trail and starts from the parking area. The trail is on the railroad grade except for two steep but short detours around the closed railroad tunnels. When the trail is paved, the tunnels will be repaired and the detours will be eliminated. Otherwise the trail is very usable for the first 3 miles and then becomes an access road to the end of the lake. Fantastic lake and mountain views occur all along this

Olympic Discovery Trail

Legend Completed trail section Proposed section of trail not complete

Clallam Bay

N 112

Joyce Port Townsend

Sappho

101

101

Port Angeles

Sequim Port Hadlock

La Push

Forks

Olympic National Park

Port 104 Ludlow

Quilcene

74

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Five SeaSuns Bed & Breakfast Ambiance and romance of the 1920s 1006 S. Lincoln St. Port Angeles, WA

www.seasuns.com This trail bridge crossing the Devil’s Punchbowl on the Spruce Railroad Trail provides a unique view of Lake Crescent and the surrounding mountains. Olympic Discovery Trail uses the historical Spruce Railroad Trail in Olympic National Park and will be paving the surface and reopening the railroad tunnels soon.

(360) 452-8248 1-800-708-0777

BED & BREAKFASTS ON THE PENINSULA

section. The paved trail splits off to the right before the end of the lake and climbs gradually through mature forest for 6 miles until it ends at Highway 101, just across from the Sol Duc Road. If you cross the highway here, use caution as the sight lines are poor and the traffic fast. For more information on the Olympic Discovery Trail, see www.olympicdiscoverytrail.com or call 683-4549.

Web sites and phone numbers Official Olympic Discovery Trail Web site: www.olympicdiscoverytrail.com Parks, City of Sequim: www.ci.sequim.wa.us/pubworks/parks.cfm or call 360-683-4139 Clallam County Parks: www.clallam.net/CountyParks/index.asp or Clallam County Public Works at 360-417-2291 Olympic Discovery Bike Adventure: www.olympicdiscoverybike.com/index.html or call Dan at 360-417-4557

Eden by the Sea Bed and Breakfast Lush Grounds, Panoramic Views Wildlife • Peaceful Rooms in a French Country Setting Afternoon “English Style” Tea upon request

452-6021 1027 Finn Hall Road, Port Angeles Reservations@edenbythesea.net

Peninsula Trails Coalition: www.olympicdiscoverytrail.com Accessible Trails (ADA): www.accessibletrails.com/Olympictrails/sequim.htm Clallam Transit: www.clallamtransit.com/ or call 360-452-1316 ODT Adventure Route: www.washburnemarine.com/ODT/ODTAdvAll.htm Dungeness River Center: www.dungenessrivercenter.org/index.html or call 360-681-4076 Equestrian Contacts: Ask at local feed stores. Also, contact e-mail addresses listed at: www.rideandtie.org/contact.html Mount Muller Loop Equestrian Adventure Trail: www.fs.fed.us/r6/olympic/recreation-nu/trails/ MtMuller.pdf

➢ Waterfront B&B ➢ Peaceful and Elegant ➢ Majestic Mountain Views

Groveland Cottage Find home away from home in one of our many vacation rentals www.sequimvalley.com B&B guests enjoy Simone’s Breakfast featuring local farm-fresh ingredients www.grovelandcottage.com

4861 Sequim-Dungeness Way

(360) 683-3565 www.sequimvalley.com VISITORS GUIDE 2010

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VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Port Angeles PORT ANGELES PORT AN NG GEL ELES E IS ES IS THE THE COUNTY CO OUN UNTY T SEAT TY SEA EATT of Clallam Cla lallllam am m Couunnty Coun ty,, tu tuck cked ck edd bbetween eettwe ween en tthe he SStrait trai tr aitt off JJuan ai uaan dee F uan Fuc u a an uc aandd th tthee County, tucked Fuca Olym Ol ympi picc Mo pi Moun unta tain inns IInn 20 0100 aapproximately ppro pp roxi ro xima xi mate teely 119,000 9 00 0 0 off the he Olympic Mountains. 2010 county’s 70,400 residents live within the city that markets itself as “Port Angeles — the Center of It All.” The S’Klallam Tribe lived along the Strait of Juan de Fuca’s shoreline for centuries before the Spanish discovered the deep harbor in 1791. President Abraham Lincoln designated Port Angeles as a town site for a customs house in 1862, but there was little settlement by newcomers until the 1890s. U.S. Highway 101 is the only major highway serving the Olympic Peninsula with state Highway 112 (Strait of Juan de Fuca Highway) taking travelers to Washington’s coast, known as the West End to locals. A commercial air carrier serves Port Angeles from Fairchild International Airport, landing at Boeing Field with shuttle service to Sea-Tac International Airport. The MV Coho, car/passenger ferry, and the Victoria Express, a passenger ferry, shuttle between downtown Port Angeles and Victoria, British Columbia. The Clallam Transit System, a countywide bus system, serves Forks, Port Angeles and Sequim. Because of the rain shadow effect of the Olympic Mountains, Port Angeles has a temperate coastal climate with winter lows in the 40s and summer highs in the 70s. Average rainfall in Port Angeles is 25 inches annually. At the city’s back door are the Olympic Mountains, cresting to some 8,000 feet, and the gateway to Olympic National Forest and Olympic National Park. Hurricane Ridge, which offers stunning views of the mountains and strait, is a 35-minute and 17-mile drive up switchbacks to an elevation of 5,230 feet. The Port Angeles area is outdoor-friendly with scores of campgrounds, hiking and biking trails. The Olympic Discovery Trail spreads out more than 30 miles from Ediz Hook near downtown Port Angeles to east of Sequim and is suitable for walkers, leashed dogs and road bikes. Port Angeles is served by Olympic Medical Center (360-417-7000) with 126 inpatient beds, a Level III trauma center, a state-of-the-art surgery suite, 22 private short-stay rooms, laboratory, imaging and rehabilitative departments. Points of interest in or near Port Angeles include the Arthur Feiro Marine Life Center at Hollywood Beach downtown, the Clallam County Historical Society’s Museum at the Carnegie, Port Angeles Fine Arts Center, Olympic Coast Discovery Center, Ediz Hook and Hurricane Ridge.

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

THE CENTER OF IT ALL

77


UNWIND THE OLYMPIC PENINSULA is many things to many people — from Port Townsend’s Victorian seafaring flavor, to Sequim’s lavender fields, from the gateway to Olympic National Park at Port Angeles, to the wild beaches of the West End. Whether tourists are from Seattle or Sweden, there’s no doubt the Olympic Peninsula is a vacation destination for hiking, biking, angling and dozens of other activities. In the past few years, the region has cultivated its culinary attributes — and that includes wine. “Visitors are looking for more than one experience and wineries, great restaurants and farmers markets translate to the trendy words ‘lifestyle tourism,’” said Vicki Corson, coowner of Camaraderie Cellars and president of the Olympic Peninsula Wineries Association, which has seven members from Port Townsend to Port Angeles. They are Finnriver Wines and Cider, Chimacum; Fairwinds Winery (#6) and Sorensen

We specialize in Fruit & Grape Wines Come and taste our wine! Winery Hours Sunday-Thursday 11am-4pm or call for an appointment

360-457-0748

Visit us at 334 Benson Rd. Port Angeles www.cameraderiecellars.com

www.blackdiamondwinery.com

360-417-3564

2976 Black Diamond Rd. Port Angeles

...invite you to visit. 7 World Class Wineries 1 Spectacular Region! Visit our website at:

www.olympicpeninsulawineries.org

78

Crafted wine excellence in a beautiful garden setting.

Wine Tasting 360-452-4262 Conveniently located on Hwy. 101 W. 3 miles west of Port Angeles

www.harbingerwinery.com

Open to the Public Open daily Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. and Sunday 11 a.m. 5 p.m.

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Cellars (#5), Port Townsend; and Black Diamond Winery (#3), Camaraderie Cellars (#2), Harbinger Winery (#1) and Olympic Cellars (#4), Port Angeles. “Peninsula wineries offer that facet of tourism,” Corson said. “Our wineries are small and family owned and often visitors to the winery get to talk to the winemaker. Also, most of the hand-crafted wines produced on the Olympic Peninsula only are marketed on the peninsula, so tourists get wines not available elsewhere.” Corson said visitors on a self-paced tour of local artisan wineries will find a broad range of types for the discerning palate — from fruit wines fermented from local berries to highly awarded, medal-winning wines of a more classical type made with Eastern Washington grapes.

Men & W M Women OOutdoor td Cl Clothing thi Boots • Tents • Kid Carriers Sleeping Bags • Backpacks • USGS Maps Treking Poles • Day Packs • Travel Dept. Stoves & Fuel • Knives • Food Binoculars • Headlamps

(360) 457-4150

“Each winery has its own charms and the tasting rooms are small but cozy,” Corson said. “People tell us we’re all different and I think visitors will find specialty wines at each. All of us are very keen on promoting local excellence — we’re not satisfied with ‘good enough’ — we’ve got to be great.” When tourists find a favorite blend at one of the wineries, owners will be glad to recommend local restaurants that serve it — and vice versa. Corson said the atmosphere of the tasting rooms is casual — hikers and bikers are welcome off the trail or highway to sample wines. The association hosts wine-focused events such as Red Wine & Chocolate in February; the Northwest Wine & Cheese Tour in April; the Celebrate Lavender Tour (July 10-18); the Dungeness Crab Festival Wine Tour (Oct. 9-10); and the Passport Wine Tour (Nov. 13-14). The wineries of the Olympic Peninsula welcome you to stop and sip awhile! See Page 130 in the directory for contact information on the wineries. ■ PATRICIA MORRISON COATE

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

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OLYMPIC NATIONAL FOREST

OLYMPIC NATIONAL FOREST is a distinct area, its 633,000 acres in two sections bordering the much larger Olympic National Park (922,000 acres) west of Hood Canal and south of Sequim and at the northwest corner of the park. It was established in 1897 as a reserve and was designated as a national forest in 1907, some 30 years before the park was established. The forest’s topography includes a temperate rain forest where annual precipitation often exceeds 120 inches, yielding ferns the size of dining room tables and skyscraping Sitka spruce and Douglasfir; the Olympic Mountains with Mount Olympus looming to about 8,000 feet; large lowland lakes with Lake Crescent, a turquoise gem 12 miles long and 625 feet at its maximum depth; cascading rivers and waterfalls. A green cathedral, the forest has 2,178 miles of canopied roads, 200 miles of trails for hikers, bicyclists and horses, several providing access to Olympic National Park, and 19 developed campgrounds. It also has five boating sites, four nature trails and one viewpoint. Five wildernesses in the forest, totaling 88,480 acres, provide solitude and scenic beauty where the only access is by foot or horseback. Leashed pets are permitted in the forest but not in the park. The forest receives more than 1.2 million visitor days annually. See www.fs.fed.us/r6/olympic.

FOREST, PARK ENTRANCE FEES Olympic National Forest Day pass $5: Admits driver and passengers; multiple days require multiple daily passes or: Annual pass $30: Admits driver, passengers Olympic National Park Single visit: (good for up to seven consecutive days at any Olympic National Park entrance.) Vehicle: $15 Individual: (on foot, bicycle, motorcycle) $5. Children 15 years old and younger are admitted free of charge. Annual pass: Vehicle: $30 — any Olympic National Park entrance station for one year from the month of purchase. Purchase passes at forest and park entrances, ranger stations, visitors centers and select retailers.

CAMPGROUND FEES The nightly fee for camping in one of Olympic’s established campgrounds ranges from $12-$24, depending on location and season. For a complete listing of campground fees, check the campground pages at www.nps.gov.

WILDERNESS OVERNIGHT USE FEES Permits are required for all overnight trips into the Olympic wilderness backcountry. Permits (good for the entire hiking group) cost $5, plus $2 per person per night. For more information about backpacking in Olympic, check the overnight hiking pages at www.nps.gov.

OTHER USE FEES RV Dump Station Fee: $5 per use (dump stations available at Fairholme, Hoh, Kalaloch, Mora and Sol Duc campgrounds)

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VISITORS GUIDE 2010


OLYMPIC

Hot Springs THERE ARE THREE CREEK crossings on the way to Olympic Hot Springs. The first is relatively easy. The second crossing has a secure log bridge with a hand railing to cross a waterfall gully where frequent washouts have carved a rather deep crevasse in the creek. Trees, water and debris roaring down the mini-canyon dislodged the bridge in the past but it has since been rebuilt. A full-scale footbridge just downstream of a small, picturesque waterfall bridges the third crossing over Boulder Creek. Once across, hikers soon spy the first of 10 mud-bottomed hot springs. A slight whiff of sulfur permeates the air but sometimes the scent can be rather pungent, like a ripe outhouse. Some of the pools are little warmer than tepid dishwater and little better to sit in. Others, however, are as warm as hot baths and the best are hot as hot tubs. Some folks bathe au natural at the hot springs so be prepared possibly to see more of human nature than you typically see at the beach. Pay attention to notices about fecal coliform levels. A brief side trip to Madison Falls on the way out, by the park’s entrance gate, makes a nice detour. Whitewater races over the edge some 60 feet up and cascades into the misty green grotto below.

Visit us at the Quality Inn Uptown

Approved

Olympic Hot Springs How long: 2.4 miles How hard: Easy, except for several creek crossings How to get there: Take U.S. Highway 101 to Olympic Hot Springs Road, west of Port Angeles at the Elwha River. Follow the road into Olympic National Park and drive to the end of the road. The trail begins where the road ends.

Madison Falls How long: 0.2 mile How hard: Way easy; one of the only handicap access trails in the park. How to get there: Take U.S. Highway 101 to Olympic Hot Springs Road, west of Port Angeles at the Elwha River. Follow the road to the National Park entrance booth. Park in the lot on the left; hike. VISITORS GUIDE 2010

Below the mountains, above the harbor....

Located just minutes away from the ferries to Victoria, British Columbia and the San Juan Islands. Welcoming both business and leisure travelers, the Quality Inn Uptown is conveniently located in the heart of beautiful Port Angeles. Situated high on the bluff overlooking the Port Angeles Harbor, Strait of Juan de Fuca and Vancouver Island, Canada. Guests will enjoy magnificent views of the Olympic Mountain range and/or the harbor. Imagine a view with a room! • Conveniently located near shipping, art galleries, • Complimentary Q Corner Cafe Breakfast excellent restaurants and exciting adventures • Free wireless high-speed internet access • 100% non-smoking • USA Today provided weekdays • 2009 Choice Hotels International APEX award for Service Excellence • Freshly baked cookies every evening

• Commitment to your satisfaction

101 East 2nd Street, Port Angeles, WA, US, 98362 • www.qualityinnportangeles.com Phone: (360) 457-9434• Reservations: 1-800-858-3812 • Fax: (360) 457-5915

81


U.S. Entry Regulations Since June 1, 2009, U.S. citizens returning from Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean or Bermuda, by land or sea, are required to present one of the travel documents listed below.

must be paid. Contact the Canadian Em Embassy or a Canadian consulate in the U S for more information U.S. information.

U.S. PASSPORT

If you are a naturalized citizen and do not have a passport, you should travel with your naturalization certificate. A driver’s license or Social Security card is not valid proof of citizenship. All U.S. citizens entering Canada from a third country must have a valid passport.

This is an internationally recognized travel document that verifies a person’s identity and nationality. It is accepted for travel by air, land and sea.

U.S. PASSPORT CARD

NATURALIZED CITIZENS

PERMANENT RESIDENTS

This is a new, limited-use travel document that fits in your wallet and costs less than a U.S. passport. It is only valid for travel by land and sea.

Alien permanent residents of the U.S. must present their Alien Registration Card, commonly called the “Green Card.”

ENHANCED DRIVER’S LICENSE

DUAL CITIZENS

Several states and Canadian provinces/territories are issuing this driver’s license or identification document that denotes identity and citizenship. It is specifically designed for cross-border travel into the U.S. by land or sea.

TRUSTED TRAVELER PROGRAM CARDS NEXUS, SENTRI or FAST enrollment cards can speed your entry into the U.S. and are issued only to pre-approved, low-risk travelers. The cards are valid for use at land or sea; the NEXUS card can be used in airports with a NEXUS kiosk.

CHILDREN U.S. and Canadian citizens under the age of 16 or under the age of 19 traveling with a school, religious or other youth group, may present a birth certificate, consular report of birth abroad, naturalization certificate or Certificate of Canadian Citizenship. Birth certificate can be an original, photocopy or certified copy.

If you are a dual U.S.-Canadian citizen you always should present yourself as a Canadian citizen when entering Canada and as a U.S. citizen when entering the United States.

TRAVELING WITH CHILDREN • Due to international concern over child abduction, children traveling with one parent, grandparents or other guardians must carry proof of custody or letters from the non-accompanying parent/s authorizing travel. This is in addition to proof of the child’s citizenship. • Any person under the age of 18 and traveling alone must carry a letter from his/her parent or guardian authorizing the trip.

CANADA ENTRY REGULATIONS REQUIRED DOCUMENTS When entering Canada from the United States, U.S. citizens must show either a U.S. passport or other proof of U.S. citizenship, such as an original or certified birth certificate together with photo identification. U.S. citizens entering Canada from a third country must have a valid passport. A visa is not required for U.S. citizens for a stay up to 180 days. A driver’s license is not valid identification alone.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES DRUNKEN DRIVING OR OTHER CRIMINAL RECORD Anyone with a criminal record (including a drunken driving conviction) may be excluded from Canada. A waiver of exclusion may be issued but several weeks are required and a processing fee

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VISITORS GUIDE 2010


A neighbor with an international flavor NO MATTER WHERE YOU’VE COME FROM in the U.S. to vacation on the Olympic Peninsula, be sure to pencil in a trip to nearby V B l b Victoria, Britishh C Columbia. The city is a 90-minute ferry ride across the Strait of Juan de Fuca from Port Angeles and a must-see for visiting family and friends for its lingering British colonial flavor. The province’s capital of 80,000 — more than 300,000 in Greater Victoria — pulses with an urban beat but its downtown district and harbor area retain the affable ambiance of a small 19th-century city. Laid out in an easy-to-navigate grid from the Inner Harbour and Upper Harbour, downtown Victoria, with its shops featuring British Isle imports and First Nations art plus international restaurants, deserves a slow stroll, so stay several days if you can. An architectural treasure trove greets visitors as they round a point into Victoria Harbour — the imposing 500-foot facade of the Romanesque Revival Parliament Building with its verdigris dome (1898) and the Edwardian-style grand Empress Hotel (1908), an overwhelmingly popular place for the English ritual of afternoon tea. Nearby is the Royal British Columbia Museum, an amazing facility with hundreds of thousands of Northwest artifacts and many dynamic dioramas. Its permanent galleries are dedicated to the First Peoples, modern history and natural history. The museum is open daily from 10 a.m.5 p.m. Plan to dedicate at least three or four hours at the museum to absorb the tremendous amount of history it has to offer. For more information, see www.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca. ➤ 84 VISITORS VI V ISI S TO ORS R G GUIDE UIIDE D 2 2010 010 01

Photos by Melanie Reed

83 3


If you want to go slightly farther afield, drive or ride 10 minutes east of downtown to the Oak Bay Village district for high-end shopping and authentic afternoon tea. Of if vintage Victoriana is your quest, walk south from downtown for a mere five minutes to the James Bay neighborhood where Victoria’s founding families built lavish homes in the latter half of the 19th century. The Rockland/ Fairfield region is a showcase for arts and crafts mansions with stunning views of the ocean and mountains. For a significant part of Victoria’s past and present, visit Chinatown, the second oldest Chinese enclave in North America, after San Francisco. It has unusual architectural features and attractions such as the narrowest street in Canada and the ornate and vibrant Gate of Harmonies Interest, Chinatown’s symbolic entrance. ■ JERRY KRAFT

HINT

Remember to apply to receive a portion oof your sales tax back in a rebate. In British Columbia, all shoppers pay a provincial and a federal sales tax. Visitors can have the provincial sales tax refunded to them by filling out a form that takes just a few moments. The forms can be found at the ferry terminals in Port Angeles and Victoria and in most downtown-area hotels.

HOW TO GET THERE

Year-round: MV Coho Ferry — takes passengers and vehicles between Port Angeles and Victoria every day of the year, once per day during slow times and up to four times a day during peak vacation times.

VICTORIA EXPRESS

It leaves from Port Angeles to Victoria during the peak travel months of May-September. There is plenty to do within a short walk of the Belleville Street ferry terminal in Victoria and there always are taxis waiting to take tourists off in any direction. Motorized scooters can be rented just a few hundred yards away from the ferry docks, too.

FUNNY MONEY?

Remember, there is an exchange rate difference from U.S. to Canadian dollars. Confused about how to figure and account for the exchange rate? Just charge your purchases and your bank/credit card company takes care of the exchange rate for you. Some of them, however, do tag on a fee for handling the exchange for you. Currency exchanges are available at both the Coho and Victoria Express ferry areas, and at a variety of locations in Victoria. Many downtown Victoria businesses take U.S. currency, but the farther you venture in to Victoria, the less likely you are to find a business owner who accepts U.S. funds. Although Victoria-area banks accept U.S. funds and do exchanges for their clients, very few U.S. banks offer the same courtesy, so if you are carrying Canadian money, make sure to convert it before you leave or at the ferry terminals in Port Angeles. There is one other thing to remember about using U.S. money. You are in a foreign country so don’t expect every business to accept your dollars just because you are American. There are far too many Victoria stories of the “ugly American” who pitched quite the verbal fit because his or her dollars weren’t accepted at the business they were in. Don’t add to the stereotype.

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VISITORS GUIDE 2010


DINING

Fairchild Airport

IN PORT ANGELES

Port Angeles

Serving Breakfast & Lunch All Day ...made to order, and fresh for you!

360-457-1190

at Fairchild International Airport • Port Angeles Open Monday - Friday 7:30am - 3pm

Always free parking for our customers!

Hearty Breakfasts! Filling Lunches! Delicious Dinners! Steaks • Soups • Salads • Senior Specials Stop in for a homestyle meal and dine “where the locals eat.”

welcomes you to come enjoy authentic Mexican and German dishes.

CORNERHOUSE Restaurant & Lounge

Family Owned

101 E. Front St. Downtown Port Angeles

408 S Lincoln St Port Angeles, WA 98362 Phone: (360) 457-5269

452-9692

Restaurant opens daily at 6 a.m. Come on in!

Wonderful Steaks Outstanding Seafood

C’EST SI BON

French Restaurant

On Hwy 101-Across from Deer Park Cinema www.cestsibon-frenchcuisine.com

360

452-8888

E AK UB

Call Ahead Orders Welcomed

360 452.4955

 S. Lincoln - Port Angeles, WA 

RESTAURANT

Fiesta Jalisco M E X I C A N R E S TA U R A N T

(360) 457-1656

Enjoy Delicious Mexican Food!

612 S. Lincoln Port Angeles

6:30am to 2:30pm 7 Days a Week

MEMORABILIA MUSEUM

Come see our Electric Train run around the room. HOME-COOKING VISITORS VI V ISI SITO TORS RS G GUIDE UIDE 2 UI 2010 010 01 10

PIZ ZA

PARTY SUBS  SOUPS  SALADS  SANDWICHES

30 Years in Business Many Awards

Shirley’s

DRAKE’S PIZZA & SUBS

Servingg Beer, Wine & Mixed Drinks Sun-Thurs: 11am to 9:30pm

Fri-Sat: 11am to 10pm

(360) 452-3928 636 E. Front St.• Port Angeles www.fiestajalisco.net

85 8 5


Let Rick’s Do the Cooking! Dine in, Take Out

DINING

IN PORT ANGELES

Breakfast Lunch Dinner Drinks in the Lounge 102 W. Front St., P.A. • 360-452-8683

Home of

Edward & Bella’s first date!

Fresh Olympic Coast Cuisine Award-Winning Italian Cuisine www.bellaitaliapa.com

Ready for a Cool Treat? Featuring Ice Cream, Shakes,

Coffee Drinks & More!

360.457.5442 118 E. First St. Port Angeles, WA Open 4pm Daily

360-452-7777

1611 E. Front St. Port Angeles

®

Hours: Mon.-Sun. 10:30am-8pm

Southwest Food for your Steaks, Hickory-Smoked Ribs Pasta, Seafood & Salads Northwest Mood Re Southwest Real Hand-Crafted Food Han We Can Accommodate Special Dietary Needs

360.457.6040 203 E. Front Street Port Angeles

Visit our new Kokopelli Underground – Live Music! WE DELIVER!

FREE fountain drink and chips

with purchase of any regular or large sub.* Subs • Torpedoes • Sammies • Soup • Salad Kid's Menu • Catering • Order on-line

112 Del Guzzi Dr. #6 • Port Angeles (360) 452-9208 • Next to Super 8 *Excluding everyday value subs, bullets, torpedoes, sammies. Not to be combined with any other offer. One coupon per person. Expires May 19, 2011.

86 86

FAMILY MEXICAN

RESTAURANT 205 E. 8th St., Suite B Port Angeles, WA 98362

(360) 452-8434

Open: 11-9:30 weekdays 11-10 Sat.-Sun. Banquet Room Visit our NEW LOUNGE Sergio’s Cantina

Food made the old-fashioned way: with love. Angela Roszatycki Owner 235471 Hwy 101 Port Angeles, WA 98363

(360) 928-3266 grannyscafe@me.com

grannyscafepa.com

VISITORS VI V ISI SITTO ORS RS G GUIDE UIDE DE 2 2010 010 01 0


Thursday – Friday – Saturday – 4-9pm

RESTAURANT

Great food you can afford to enjoy! BREAKFAST: From traditional to creative favorites. LUNCH: Large salads, pastas as well as deli, gourmet sandwiches, and sautees. DINNER: Available for private dinner parties. DESSERTS: From our in-house baker PRIVATE BANQUET ROOM (Capacity 25 to 35)

1506 E. First St., Port Angeles, 360-457-4611, www.cafegardenpa.com

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Locally owned & operated for 19 years by David & Laura Reynolds • Open 6:30am-2:30pm every day

e m’

Cockadoodle Doughnuts are Dee-licious!

ot g if yo u cockadoodledoughnuts.com

105 East Front Street, Port Angeles • 360-477-8144 A full menu offering Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner A well-stocked bar with all of your favorite drinks A waterfront location with a view of the harbor Make It A Date Night!

Great Seafood and friendly service is our daily special Set a course for adventure!

Smugglers’ Landing 115 East Railroad (in the Landing Mall) Downtown Port Angeles

360-452-9292 VISITORS V ISITO ORS G GUIDE UIDE UI D 201 DE 2010 01 10

Photo by Melanie Reed

Chicken • Steelhead • Ribs • Steak Blue Cheese Ribs • Northwest Beer & Wine

E N A C I R R HU RIDGE

HURRICANE RIDGE HAS A MOUNTAIN EXPERIENCE for everybody. Seventeen miles south of Port Angeles at an elevation of 5,225 feet, the ridge is Olympic National Park’s most easily reached mountain destination. Paved meadow loop trails traverse the ridge top near the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center. Blacktailed deer often are seen browsing among the meadow flowers. The trails are handicapped accessible with some assistance and provide magnificent views. Stretching from the east to the south, the snowcapped peaks of the Olympics have an awe-inspiring alpine majesty, especially Mount Olympus at 7,965 feet. The fresh scent of hemlock and fir wafts on the breezes that sweep Hurricane Ridge. Delicate mountain flowers, from early-blooming alpine lilies that poke their drooping white heads from melting snow patches to the bright red Indian paintbrushes and tiny pink phlox blossoms, there is a panoply of pretty. The Big Meadow Loop leads to the Cirque Rim Trail, with scenic overlooks past the Elwha Valley to the west. The deep blue water of the Strait of Juan de Fuca is visible past fire-scorched Griff Peak. Because there is so much to see so easily, summer crowds can seem overwhelming. Fortunately, there are two easy ways to get beyond the crowds. In the summer, the sun rises early, providing light to even the earliest risers. Beat it — and you beat the crowds. The longer you sleep in, the more elbows there are to bump. If early rising isn’t for you but you’re willing to foray a little farther, there are two eye-popping trails that head out from Hurricane Ridge. The first is the 3.8-mile trail leading from Sunrise Point to Klahhane Ridge. The steep High Ridge Trail climbs to a stunning view before dropping to a four-way juncture. To the left, the trail loops back to the meadow trails, ahead is a short climb to Sunrise Point (worth the detour) and to the right is the Mount Angeles Trail. This trail parallels Sunrise Ridge to Mount Angeles. It offers gorgeous mountain views as it traverses flowered meadows and stands of sub-alpine forest. It also offers relative solitude as few venture far from the meadow loops. After about 2.8 miles, the trail encounters ➤ 88

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the Switchback Trail for a steep 1-mile climb up Klahhane Ridge and a perfect picnic point. The trail continues down the shale slope past Lake Angeles to the park entrance but it’s a long trek and might be best to turn back here. The second option involves a drive beyond the Visitor Center to Hurricane Hill. The road is narrow and winding and deters many would-be hikers. The 1.6-mile trail is paved for much of the way and is accessible, with assistance, though there are no guardrails. For a relatively easy hike with beautiful views, scenery and a modicum of isolation, Hurricane Hill is a pleasant option. There is an entrance fee of $15 per car. Stay on designated trails and do not feed wildlife. Pets and bicycles are not permitted on paved or dirt trails.

TRAILS AT HURRICANE RIDGE

➤ Cirque Rim: Easy paved trail with views of Port Angeles and the Strait of Juan de Fuca; wheelchair accessible with assistance; one-way 0.5 mile.

t Northwes Salmon: Salmon Salmo • Kippered Ki red d•H Hard d Smoked k d • Jerky • Candy • Pepperoni

➤ Big Meadow: Easy paved trail crosses open meadows with views of the Olympic Mountains; wheelchair accessible with assistance; one-way 0.25 mile. ➤ High Ridge: Partially paved loop climbs to 360-degree views and a 0.1-mile dead end spur trail to Sunrise Point; 0.5-mile loop. ➤ Klahhane Ridge: The first 2.8 miles of this trail are on a ridge to a junction with the Klahhane Switchback Trail. An additional mile climbs 800 feet on the Switchback Trail to Klahhane Ridge; one-way 3.8 miles. ➤ Hurricane Hill: Paved trail climbs to a panoramic view of mountains and saltwater. The first 0.25 mile is wheelchair accessible with assistance; one-way 1.6 miles. ➤ Wolf Creek: Dirt trail descends 8 miles to Whiskey Bend in the Elwha Valley; one-way 8 miles; elevation change 3,772 feet. ➤ Little River: Dirt trail descends 8 miles to Little River Road; one-way 8 miles; elevation change 4,073 feet. ➤ Hurricane Hill/Elwha: Dirt trail descends from Hurricane Hill through meadows and steep forested switchbacks to the start of Whiskey Bend Road; one-way 6 miles; elevation change 5,250 feet.

HURRICANE RIDGE CAMPING The closest vehicle campground is at Heart o’ the Hills, 12 miles downhill on Hurricane Ridge Road. Get wilderness camping permits at the Wilderness Information Center inside the Olympic National Park Visitor Center, 3002 Mount Angeles Road, Port Angeles. 360-565-3100.

Mailed Anywhere in U.S.A. Gift Packages for All Occasions Try & Beat Our Prices!

360-457-3211 1-800-953-3211 1325 E. 1st St. Port Angeles Mon.-Fri. 8-5:30 Sat. 8-5 88

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Photos by Melanie Reed

Rising a mile high, Hurricane Ridge offers winter recreation and activities and features winter vistas unmatched anywhere in the Pacific Northwest. It is a small, family oriented ski area, offering to residents and visitors alike a quality winter sports experience, without the high cost or congestion of most ski areas. The ridge boasts some groomed areas, but for the accomplished skier or snowboarder the steeps, bowls and glades are well worth the effort it takes to get there. With a summit elevation of 5,240 feet, the average annual snowfall is 400-plus inches.

NO APPOINTMENT N E C E S S A R Y On-Site Lab And X-Rays • Advice For Travelers • Acute Injuries Seasonal Allergies • Free Blood Pressure Checks

LINI C ARE C 621 E. Front • Port Angeles • 452-5000 Mon.-Fri. 9-8 • Sat. 9-5 • Most Holidays

LODGING

1.866.452.8401 360.452.8400

Motel

IN PORT ANGELES

www.royalvictorian.net If you y are looking for upscale aand economical

On Hwy. 101 at East end of Port Angeles 2104 E. First St. Port Angeles, WA

(360) 452-8401 1.800.800.8000 super8.com See you along the way.

Free High igh Speed Wireless Internet Free SuperStart® Breakfast • Suite Children 17 & Under Stay Free Free Local Calls Cable TV with HBO • Fax & Copy Services Pets Allowed (with fee) • Guest Laundry Free 24 Hour Coffee

VISITORS VISITO TOR TO RS GUI GUIDE UIDE UI IDE D 2 2010 01 10

lodging

in Port Angeles, t Royal Victorian Motel the is sure to suit your needs.

Minutes from downtown, Victoria Ferry and O O O O O O O O Olympic National Park, with nearby restaurants O O O O O O O O and service stations 16 large non-smoking/smoking units with queen beds, kitchens or microwave/refrigerators Single or 2 bed UNITS • Cable TV • Guest Laundry Ample parking for boats & trucks • Mtn view Commercial and weekly rates available October 1st to Memorial Day

Sportsmen

WA SH I N GTO N

— You’ll Enjoy —

521 E. First Street Port Angeles

MOTEL • • • •

www.sportsmenmotel.com

Sorry, No Pets

2909 Hwy. 101 E. • Port Angeles, WA 98362 • (360) 457-6196

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Marymere Falls Photo by Chris Cook

“76” Firebird Re-refined Lubricants 15-40..... API CJ-4 is a universal fleet engine oil designed for use in 2007 and later model diesel engines equipped with exhaust after-treatment devices and in older engines specifying the previous API categories of lubricants. It provides uncompromised performance in bus fleets, overthe-road diesel trucks, off-highway diesel equipment, farm tractors and passenger cars and light trucks, while conserving our valuable natural resources. It exceeds API CJ-4 performance standard and OEM Engine Oil specifications for use in modern heavy-duty engines operating under severe conditions and over a wide temperature range.

Pettit Oil Company 638 Marine Drive • Port Angeles 392 LaPush Rd • Forks 23 Senton Rd • Port Townsend PRODUCTS COMPANY 90

800-300-9404

THOSE WHO SEEK a relaxing, serene weekend getaway need venture no further than the gateway to Olympic National Park. ONP’s Lake Crescent, with its pristinely clear, teal-tinted water and majestic mountain views, is just a 20-minute drive from Port Angeles. Lake Crescent is one of the deepest in Washington at nearly 650 feet. The bottom of the lake is 100 feet below sea level. Visitors to Lake Crescent get to experience the uniqueness of the lake in several ways. Though personal watercraft have been banned on the lake since 1997, the lake offers an easily accessible boat ramp for motorboats for water skiers, fishermen and sailors. Kayakers, row boaters and canoeists are welcome on the lake as environmentally friendly alternatives that match the peace and serenity of Lake Crescent’s setting. Olympic National Park offers five hiking trails along the shores of Lake Crescent, with different degrees of difficulty and length. Source: www.nps. gov/archive/olym/dayhike.htm ➤ Moments in Time Nature Trail — 0.5-mile loop trail winding through old-growth forest and former homestead sites. Exit off U.S. Highway 101 at the Storm King Ranger Station exit, follow signs. ➤ Marymere Falls — approximately 2-mile round trip. Follow U.S. 101 west of Port Angeles to turnoff for Marymere Falls. Trail leads through old-growth forest to a 90-foot waterfall. ➤ Mount Storm King Trail — 1.7-mile extension from Marymere Falls trail. A steep climb, the

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


trail offers great views of Lake Crescent from above. ➤ Pyramid Peak Trail — 3.5 miles one-way. Climbs 2,600 feet with a World War II aircraft spotter station at the summit and amazing views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the lake. Follow U.S. Highway 101 to the western tip of Lake Crescent. Turn north at Camp David Jr. Road and watch for signs. ➤ Spruce Railroad Trail — 4 miles one-way. From Port Angeles, go west on U.S. Highway 101 for about 15 miles. At milepost 232, take a right onto the East Beach Road. Continue on this narrow two-lane road for three miles. Just past the signs for Log Cabin Resort, take a left at the sign for the Spruce Railroad Trail. Cross the one-lane bridge over the Lyre River. Stay left and continue on 0.3 mile to the trailhead parking area on the left side of the road. The trail begins just on the other side of the road. A relatively flat hike, it runs along a former World War II railway bed. The trail is a designated bike trail and leads the way to Devil’s Punchbowl, a popular swimming spot on Lake Crescent.

Lake Crescent Photo by Chris Cook

Come on down to the

91st Annual

August 19-22, 2010

Music • Animals Exhibits • Food Carnival Rides Vendors • Rodeo Logging Show CLALLAM COUNTY Draft Horse/ PARKS • FAIR • FACILITIES Mule Show 417-2551 More Entertainment

www.clallamcountyfair.com

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

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l a c i g a M marine life FEIRO MARINE LIFE CENTER A great sculpin buries itself in sand.

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TTHE TH H TANKS AT THE TH HEE FEIRO FEEIIR RO O MARINE MARIN AR RINE INE LIFE IN LLIIFEE CEENT C NT are gurglingg aan nd sw wea eati ting ng,, tth he 45 45-d -ddeg egre re re CENTER and sweating, the 45-degree wate wate wa ter ssiphoned from Port Angeles Harbor at odds water with wi th a warm summer morning. The marine life with wiithhin w in them seems static until center coordinator within Boob C B Bob Campbell points out a scallop filtering plankton an to aand n several starry flounders and great scupins ton bbllan annke kkee in sand. blanketed “I If you stand in front of the tanks long “If enou en ough ough gh you’ll be amazed at what comes out — enough, nnooott be bbecause e not it’s become more active, but because you’ u’rree more aware,” Campbell said. This and other you’re leessssonns are what Arthur Feiro, a Port Angeles biollessons ogy te tteacher ea ogy with a passion for marine life, wanted hiis lle hhis eg to be in establishing the center a stone’s legacy tthhro row from Hollywood Beach. The aquarium was throw ddeeddiiicca ca in November 1981, but Feiro died in dedicated earrlly 11982 before it opened to visitors. In January ea early

220 008, 088, itt aachieved chhiieevveed nonp nno onp nproofit st sstatus taattuuss aand nndd hhas aass 110,000 00,,,00 00000 2008, nonprofi vi isi sittoorss aannually. nnua nn u lllly. y. visitors Nearby, in The Landing mall, is the Olympic Coast Discovery Center for information on the 3,330-square-mile Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, including its biodiversity, the importance of conservation and man-made challenges the sanctuary faces. Visitors can observe local marine life in the Feiro’s three touch tanks, two view tanks and bank of 16 aquariums, including one with a young giant Pacific octopus captured in the strait. Among the marine life visitors can see and/or touch are starfish, sea cucumbers, sea urchins, several types of small crabs and shrimp, scallops, tubeworms, sculpins, eel-like gunnels, sponges, mussels and starry flounders. A new addition is an Elwha River hands-on

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


exhibit and interpretive display. As a public aquarium, the center is open from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday from Memorial Day through Labor Day weekends. During the October-April offseason, it’s open from noon-4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday or by special arrangement. There is a small admittance fee. About a dozen docents are attuned to whether or not visitors want to interact or just browse the marine life. Campbell said volunteers donate 1,300-1,500 hours per year to the center. “All you really have to do is call us if the grandkids are visiting and if I’m around, I’ll let you in,” Campbell said. “It’s a great place to get insight into the beauty of the area we live in, the magical biodiversity. It’s a great place to come to do tidepool watching, something I consider a contemplative experience,” Campbell said.

A great Pacific octopus presses against the glass in its own aquarium. When mature, each of its eight arms can reach up to 6 feet long. As with all other creatures in the center, the octopus was captured from the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Photos by Patricia Morrison Coate

■ PATRICIA MORRISON COATE

The Feiro Marine Life Center 315 N. Lincoln St., Port Angeles 360-417-6254 e-mail feirolab@olypen.com or visit www.olypen.com/feirolab.

An orange-colored scallop opens its shell to filter plankton.

• 98 ROOMS • 11 SUITES AVAILABLE • NON-SMOKING & SMOKING • AIR-CONDITIONED • MICROWAVES & FRIDGES • 32-INCH PLASMA SCREEN TVs • SEASONAL POOL & SPA • DAYBREAK BREAKFAST • MILITARY DISCOUNTS/ CLC CARDS ACCEPTED • RESTAURANTS NEARBY • GROUP RATES • MEETING ROOM • WIFI WIRELESS INTERNET • CLEAN ROOMS & FRIENDLY STAFF

1-800-329-7466 360-452-4015 1510 East Front Street • Port Angeles, WA PROUD MEMBERS OF THE WYNDHAM WORLD WIDE FAMILY.

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

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OLYMPIC COAST

Olympic y p Peninsula

Senior Games Sports Competition for those 50 & Better Fri.–Sat.–Sun., Aug. 27–28–29 Register Now! 20 SPORTS • 68 EVENTS • 3 DAYS

Come for the sport, Stay for the fun! Port Angeles Senior Center • 328 E. 7th Street, Port Angeles 360-457-7004 • www.olympicpeninsulaseniorgames.com

$6.00 Off any Large Size Pizza 801 E. Front Street Corner of Front & Francis Port Angeles, WA Not good with any other offer. Must present coupon, no reproductions. Expires 05/01/11

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457-7760

OLYMPIC COAST NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY has an area of more than 3,300 square miles — it’s kind of hard to miss. But your first stop should be the Olympic Coast Discovery Center at 115 E. Railroad St., on the waterfront in Port Angeles. It’s a great place to begin your learning adventures on the Olympic coast. At the center you can plan your trip to Neah Bay, LaPush, Kalaloch or other coastal destinations. Trained staff will provide detailed information on where to hike, where to see whales, the best views or secluded beaches. You’ll get road distances and driving times and tips for getting the most out of your visit. Find out what makes national marine sanctuaries so important in the efforts to protect the oceans, marine ecosystems and marine wildlife. Because each national marine sanctuary is unique, you’ll discover why the Olympic coast is so important. You’ll meet its marine mammals, sea birds and habitats, including tide pools and deep sea canyons. At the center, learn about the history of the Olympic coast and the many tools that researchers use to understand the underwater landscapes, living communities and ocean processes that make Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary the treasure it is. Hop into the center’s “deepwater theater” to see actual underwater videos. Before there was written history, Native Americans thrived on the ocean’s bounty. Today, fishing, transportation and recreation are the keystones to the region’s wealth. Discover what it means to have an Olympic coast way of life. Visit the Olympic Coast Discovery Center — then launch your own journey of discovery to the wild Olympic coast. ■ INFORMATION COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL OCEANIC & ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION AND OLYMPIC COAST NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


SHOPPING IN PORT ANGELES

Art Supplies for the “Traveler” Young & Old

antiques & collectibles

“The Place To Go To Get Inspired” 360-457-2759 124B West First St. Port Angeles

artsuppliesunlimited@gmail.com www.artsuppliesunlimited.com

Souvenirs

Washington & Canadian T-shirts • Jackets • Gifts Jewelry • Red Hat Accessories • Imported Clothing and gifts

What’s In Store Located in the Landing Mall

estates, consignments, booth rentals

(360) 457-7771 114 W. 1st Street Port Angeles Brian & Jenice Shaw, Proprietors

Mention this ad & receive 10% off select merchandise

Twilight Merchandise

Key chains, magnets, clothing, mugs, shot glasses

115 East Railroad Ave., Port Angeles

360-457-1427

New & consigned items for babies, kids & moms-to-be!

1006 West 11th Port Angeles,WA

360-565-1210

Baby Registry Available

F Follow us on u F ac Facebook!

Not your ordinary stationery store. You will find a delightful array of unique and useful gifts. Office and art supplies, books, maps, home décor, framed art, barware 122 E. Front St. and more. (360) 457-6111 Come in and see us today!

Olympic Stationers

612 S Lincoln St | Port Angeles | 417-0616 7 Days | 10 a.m. to Midnight

Free meteorite!!!

with purchase of $20 or more. Must present coupon. Expires May 18, 2011.

woolly mAmmoth Rock R ock Shop

255341 Highway 101 • Port Angeles

360-417-8036

VISITORS V ISI SITO TORS RS SG GUIDE UIIDE 2 UIDE 2010 01 10

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SHOPPING IN PORT ANGELES

Beads

from exotic locations around the world

BEADS

& BELLY DANCE SHASHA & MORE! 129 E. First St. Port Angeles, WA 360-417-5489

New Beads, Old Beads, Czech Glass Beads, Gemstone Beads, Seed Beads, Supplies, Ideas and Gifts

P &K

chester’s CRUISIN’ FRIED CHICKEN made fresh all day, every day

DELI MART

HOMEMADE SALADS • SANDWICHES • WRAPS • SUBS Take ake & Bake PIZZA Open 7 Days A Week!

1315 E. Front • Port Angeles • 452-3332

Closet Turn Your $$$! to ClutterN In EEN • SHOP GR GO GREE

nts

onsignme Charming C & Teens For Women Si – All zes to 5 eTu Sat 10

Clothing • Shoes Jewelry • Handbags

t St. 629 E. Fron, WA es el Port Ang -9863 m 360-452 co nments@live.

123 W 1st St • Port Angeles • 417-8097 Mon-Sat 10:00 - 5:30 • Sun 12:00 - 4:00

sig

CharmingCon

WATERS WEST

Getting Married this summer?

Fly Fishing Outfitters

The Premier Fly Shop on the Olympic Peninsula

Call us for flowers!

“We promise reliable advice, honest information and unsurpassed service” • Year-round guide service • Flies for freshwater & saltwater • High Quality fly-tying materials • Mail order service • Rentals and classes

Largest selection of hanging baskets on the Peninsula!

3931 Old Olympic Hwy Just west of McDonnell Creek

Beautiful Ivy Geranium, Begonia, Fuchsia & mixed large 12” baskets are waiting for YOU at the best prices.

Enjoy our FRESH VEGGIES All Summer!

4” Starter Plants Dahlia Tuber SALE! Beautiful Dahlia Bouquets All Summer $6

417-6710

(360) 417-0937 140 W. Front St., • Downtown Port Angeles • 9:30-6:30 Mon.-Sat., 11-5 Sun.

Mobuilt RV

Largest Parts & Accessories Store on the Peninsula

“Serving you since 1962”

• Parts & Supplies • Awnings & Hitches • Damage & Fiberglass Repair • Propane & Electrical • Free Estimates

Open M O Mon.-Sat. S 10 10:30-6:00pm 30 6:00pm 6 00 108 EAST 1ST STREET T PORT ANGELES LES

417-8978 788

Factory Authorized Service for Most Major Brands! 2372 Highway 101 E. • Port Angeles (1/2 Mile East of McDonald’s) 360-457-4101 • www.mobuiltrv.com

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An independent Full-Service Bookstore Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sundays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

NEW & USED BOOKS • GREETING CARDS TOYS • GIFT ITEMS • JOURNALS • CDs Special Orders & Phone Orders Welcome

360-457-1045 114 West Front Street, Port Angeles

Everything you need for Biking & Kayaking • Sales • Repairs • Daily Tours • Bike & Kayak Rentals

360-457-1240 120 E. Front St • Port Angeles Mon.-Sat. 10 am-6:00 pm • www.soundbikeskayaks.com

VISITORS VISI SITTORS SI TO S G GUIDE UID UI DE 2 2010 010

Salt Creek Recreation Area

Photo by Robert S. Morris

SALT CREEK RECREATION AREA is one of Clallam County’s most popular camping sites for families. The 196-acre county park has upland forests, rocky bluffs, rocky tide pools, a sand beach, Salt Creek access, campsites, and panoramic views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Crescent Bay and Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Park amenities include picnic shelters with fireplaces, play equipment, basketball, volleyball and horseshoe courts and a softball field, plus several trails. How to get there: U.S. Highway 101 west to state Highway 112, about 13 miles west of Port Angeles. After three miles on Highway 112, turn right on Camp Hayden Road and follow it directly to the recreation area. Camping info: 39 utility sites ($22 for county residents, $24 for non-county) and 51 standard sites ($16 for county residents, $18 otherwise) are open on firstcome, first-served basis; three bathrooms are available, two with showers; limit six people per campsite; pets allowed on leashes; firewood available for fee; no water or electricity hookups, but water available at several park locations. Because Salt Creek is very popular with locals, campsites need to be reserved by mail well in advance. However, one-third of the campsites remain available on a first-come. first-served basis. All utility sites may be reserved. For more information, see clallam.net/CountyParks/html/parks_saltcreek; or call 360-928-3441.

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Arts in Action . . . TRANSFORMS THE P.A. WATERFRONT A SANDY BEACH is an invitation to build a sandcastle. It brings out the child in everyone. For some, it also is an invitation to create something much more, an actual sculpture. A few international artists are dedicated to creating these unique works of art that are intended to last for a very brief time. The hope is that many will see them, appreciate their beauty and invention and remember them when the shapes have tumbled back into sand. The Arts In Action program, sponsored by the Nor’Wester Rotary Club in Port Angeles, brings this distinctive art to Hollywood Beach in downtown Port Angeles every summer for a celebration of creativity, whimsy, community involvement and fun on the waterfront. Since 1965, Arts in Action has grown more popular, partly due to the inclusion of sand sculptures that began in 2000 and the North American Masters Invitational that started in 2003. Now the Windermere Masters Sand Sculpture Classic, it is the only North American master sand sculpture invitational. In this much sought-after competition, the sculptors are selected from around the United States and other parts of the world and within the small fraternity of “master” sand sculptors. This year’s competition from July 23-25 will include sculptors from Washington, Ohio, Illinois and Tennessee, as well as British Columbia and Turkey. Each year a theme is selected from public submissions solicited through a newspaper. The winner is given a cash prize and has his or her name published. In past years, the themes have been: 2009 — Wonders of the World 2008 — Great Inventions 2007 — The Circus Comes to Town 2006 — Fun on the Farm 2005 — Legends, Fantasies and Myths 2004 — Under the Sea 2003 — Fairytale Characters 2002 — World’s Tallest Sand Castle (29 feet 3.5 inches) 2001 — King Kong vs. Godzilla 2000 — Sand Castles Arts in Action features a juried arts and crafts show with live demonstrations, live music, a food court, car shows, an affiliated wine tasting, and this year a 3-D chalk art display by Ian Morris, a sidewalk artist from Victoria, British Columbia. Arts in Action is free; however, there is a $1 admission for those over 12 for a day pass to the sand sculpture gallery. An adult must accompany children under 12. ■ JERRY KRAFT

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“Chicken Itza” sculpted by DeLayne Corbett of British Columbia at the 2009 Arts in Action.

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


MILEAGE CHART FROM PORT ANGELES All miles are approximate. Driving times may vary depending on weather, traffic and road construction. East: Sequim — 15 miles/22 minutea • Port Townsend — 50 miles/1 hour Hood Canal bridge — 50 miles/1 hour Edmonds/Kingston ferry — 59 miles/1 hour 15 minutes Bainbridge Island ferry — 70 miles/1hour 30 minutes Silverdale — 63 miles/1 hour 15 minutes • Bremerton — 72 miles/1 hour 30 minutes Olympia — 100 miles/2 hours Sea-Tac International Airport — 125 miles/ 2 hours 30 minutes West: Lake Crescent — 21 miles/25 minutes Sol Duc Hot Springs — 44 miles/1 hour 5 minutes Forks — 57 miles/1 hour 20 minutes • Hoh Rain Forest — 88 miles/2 hours Clallam Bay — 60 miles/1 hour 35 minutes • Neah Bay — 80 miles/2 hours 30 minutes

Thai Peppers Restaurant

VOTED BEST THAI FOOD IN CLALLAM COUNTY.

Mission Statement

Jim McEntire

John M. Calhoun

George Schoenfeldt

2010

PORT

COMMISSIONERS 338 W. First St., Port Angeles

(360) 457-8527 Fax: (360) 452-3959 Email: info@portofpa.com Website: www.portofpa.com

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

The Port’s Mission is to be the primary leader in economic development in Clallam County by marketing and developing properties and facilities for the long-term benefit of our stakeholders while fulfilling the Port’s environmental stewardship role.

As honor honored guests of our Thai family we want you to enjoy the authentic Thai speau which we ccialties ia to re-create sstrive tr ffor or your dining pleassure ure and excitement. Our O ur hhome country of TThailand hailand was formerly known as Siam and the regal treatment and tradition of reg royal service run deep in our Thai culture. Thai heritage of leaving no stone unturned in order to please one’s guests is reflected in Thai food. If this is your first experience with Thai food or if you have the adventurous spirit to try the range of specialties we would encourage you to ask questions. Surprisingly many dishes that are traditionally served spicy hot can be spicy not! We think you will agree that our Thai food is light and fresh with a delicate balance between herbs and spices, succulent meats and fresh vegetables to produce a harmony of dining pleasure. At Thai Peppers our family has only one family we seek to please….yours!

COCKTAILS BEER • WINE Hours: Mon.-Sat. LUNCH 11 am-2:30 pm DINNER 4:30-9:00 pm Closed on Sunday Please call for winter hours

222 N. Lincoln Street #1 • Port Angeles, WA One Block From Ferry Terminal

360-452-4995 99




Museum at the Carnegie

THE CLALLAM COUNTY Historical Society’s building at 207 S. Lincoln St. in Port Angeles is a piece of history its Built as one of 2,500 libraries funded by philanthroitself. pi Andrew Carnegie between 1883 and 1929, the library pist wa completed in 1918 for $13,000 in the Arts & Crafts was sty of classic brick with large arched windows, golden oak style be beams and tandem fireplaces. After a $1 million restoration to undo modern renovations, the Museum at the Carnegie op opened in 2004. The Historical Society decided early on that the main floor of the Museum at the Carnegie would house its permanent ex exhibits while a large room in the basement would be home to temporary ones rotated on an annual basis. The professionalism in the library’s restoration and historica cal exhibits is readily apparent — the museum has the look an and feel of a well-funded state project. Visitors are greeted in th the main gallery by the museum’s theme — Strong People: Fa Faces of Clallam County — and are directed in a logical fas fashion through the seven, carefully designed and informative ex exhibit areas. They are: • Our Ancestral Heritage — Early explorers and Clallam Co County’s four Native American tribes; • Body, Mind, Spirit — Education, performing and vis visual arts; • This Land Is Your Land — The history of Olympic N National Park; • Homegrown — The history of local industries; • Our Strategic Coastline — The county’s naval and sh shipbuilding legacy; • Creating Communities — Tidbits about former villages an and an ongoing slide show of photos from the early 1900s; • Charting the Last Frontier — Explorations and settlem ments. The Historical Society’s current exhibit in the lower galler lery is titled “Home Sweet Home” that features many items fro from the society’s collection that never have been exhibited an and memorabilia from several pioneer Port Angeles families. This exhibit explores domestic life in the early 1900s. The Museum at the Carnegie is open 1-4 p.m. Wednesday-Sat day-Saturday and special tours can be arranged by calling 45 452-2662. The Historical Society also maintains exhibit exhibits at the Federal Building, First and Oak streets (8 a.m. a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday) in Port Angeles. Beh Behind Lincoln School at 933 W. Ninth St., is the society’s research library and the Clallam County Genealogy Society Library Library. Visitors are welcome.

Photos by Patricia Morrison Coate

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VISITORS GUIDE 2010


RV PARKS & CAMPGROUDS ON THE PENINSULA

Jefferson County Fairgrounds

• 28 sites, 19 pull-thru • Full hookup • FREE DSL • Paved pads & roads • Clubhouse, laundry, showers 400 S. Brown Rd., Sequim (behind Econo Lodge, across from QFC)

www.gilgaloasisrvpark.com 360-452-1324 • 1-888-445-4251

Campground Year-round campground RV Group camping with building available 80 Campsites • 18 Full Hookups • 40 Power/Water Campsites • 22 Dry Campsites Full Hookups, $20 • Partial $17 • Dry Camping $15 (per night)

CAMPING, TENTING, RV SITES ROCK HUNTING, SEAL WATCHING

Port Townsend, Washington jeffcofairgrounds@olypen.com • 4907 Landes St. 360-385-1013 • www.jeffcofairgrounds.com

Harrison Beach (360) 928-3006

Olympic Peninsula RV Parks “Relax & Enjoy Nature At Its Best!” Bear Creek RV & Motel Harrison Beach Campground Salt Creek RV & Golf Dungeness Recreation Area Log Cabin Resort Sequim Bay Resort Elwha Dam RV Park Rainbow’s End RV Park Sequim Bay State Park Forks 101 RV Park Sam’s RV Park Shadow Mountain Campground Gilgal “Oasis” RV Park Salt Creek Recreation Area Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort www.olympicpeninsularvparks.com

Crescent Beach & R V Park EVERCHANGING SURF • AWESOME SUNSETS • SAND DOLLARS AGATES • EAGLES • SEASHELLS DAY • TENTS • RVS (w/e/s)

15 miles west of Port Angeles off Hwy 112

LAUNDRY • HOT SHOWERS

HALF MILE SAND BEACH

www.olypen.com/crescent • E-mail: crescent@olypen.com

(360) 928-3344

299 Harrison Beach Rd. Port Angeles, WA 98363 5 miles West of Joyce – off W. Lyre River Rd.

Elwha Dam RV Park Port Angeles, WA

On beautiful Scenic By-way Highway 112

• Conveniently located for exploring the Olympic National Park • 10 minutes to quaint downtown shoppes • 10 minutes to Victoria ferry • Quiet wooded setting

1-877-435-9421

www.ElwhaDamRVpark.com

Dungeness & Salt Creek Recreation Areas Both parks offer camping, hiking, playgrounds, picnicking, wildlife viewing, full-service accessible restrooms, and easy access to beaches on the Strait of Juan de Fuca. 360-417-2291 parks@co.clallam.wa.us

Campsite reservations are being accepted

www.clallam.net/countyparks Prettiest Park on the Peninsula

• Next to Hwy. 101 just west of Sequim • FREE Cable TV with full RV Hookup Rainbow’s End RV Park • Propane, Laundry & Showers 1-877-683-3863 • Large Fenced Doggy Play Yard www.rainbowsendrvpark.com VISITORS V VI SIITTO S ORS RS G GUIDE UIDE UI E2 2010 01 0 10

• FREE Wi-Fi 101 10 01


WEST END

Tatoosh Cape Island Flattery Lighthouse

Cape Flattery Rd Rd

Cape

Northewesternmost point in the contiguous U.S. Cape Flattery

Makah Bay

Pacific Ocean

UN Neah Bay

Makah Nation Reservation

Strait Juan de Fuca

112

? Sekiu

Shi-Shi Beach Point of Arches r

Riv e

Ozette Indian Reservation

112

Pysht 112

Ozette Rd. Hoko-

Cape Alava

Ozette Islands

Pillar Point

Clallam Bay

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Bodelteh Islands

C D S ANAD T A of ATES

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East & West Twin Beach 113

Lake Dickey

Sandpoint

Lake Ozette

Sappho

Lake Pleasant

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Sol D uc Rive r

Beaver

State Park Olympic National Park

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101

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Olympic National Forest

Quileute yute Rd Quilla

Rialto Beach

Indian Reservation

LaPush Quileute Indian Reservation

City Area

LaPush Rd

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Forks

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National Wildlife Refuges

Quillay ute River

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Hoh Rain Forest Visitors Center hR

Street Map Rd Oil City

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Ruby Beach

E St SE G St SE Gun Club Rd

Destruction Island

101 Beach 6

Forks Timber Museum

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Beach 4 Forks Chamber of Commerce Visitors' Center

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5th Ave SW

Russell Rd

To Hoh Rain Forest

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A St SE

Beach 3

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Division St A St SW B St SW

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Page Rd

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Ranger Station Shelter Public Camp ? Information Marina Hospital Boat Ramp Viewpoint Airport

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eets River


The West End: THE WEST END OF THE OLYMPIC PENINSULA is rugged and rural as its logging heritage; spectacularly scenic from towering Mount Olympus to the Quillayute Prairie on down to the sea stack-lined Pacific Coast and Strait of Juan de Fuca. The West End is home to descendants of Old West pioneers who homesteaded the West End in the late 1800s and to indigenous Pacific Coast tribes. Neah Bay is the home of the Makah and oceanfront LaPush to the Quileute, with the Hoh and Quinault tribal lands all south of Forks along U.S. Highway 101. Friendliness is a common trait in the community-minded towns. Extremes of geography highlight the wilderness environment: the northwest tip of the lower 48 states is found at Cape Flattery near Neah Bay; Forks has the highest annual rainfall of any town in the continental United States; towering spruces here are among the tallest trees in the world. No shopping malls nor multiplexes are found in the rural communities of the West End. That’s a distinctive plus for those seeking an outdoors experience as an escape from the complex world of the 21st century buzzing in Seattle and cities beyond. Clallam Bay, Sekiu and Neah Bay dot the north coast along the Strait of Juan de Fuca. West of Lake Crescent a string of former logging towns and villages line Highway 101 on the way to Forks (pop. 3,500), the West End’s largest town, and also run south of town into western Jefferson County. Forks is proud to be the self-proclaimed “Logging Capital of the World.” The town provides a great base for exploring the region, with a variety of restaurants, a large grocery store with a deli, camping supplies, clothing and shoe departments. Forks Community Hospital, a pharmacy and banks, fishing supply shops, an Olympic National Park information center plus a wide range of visitor accommodations are in Forks, too. Hikers, surfers, ocean and river anglers, bird watchers, outdoor photographers, campers, beach explorers and other outdoor enthusiasts enjoy the West End wilderness experience. The peaks and forests of Olympic National Park are accessible at the Hoh Rain Forest with its towering mosscovered trees, along trails leading to incredibly scenic Second and Third beaches, and by car at Rialto Beach, and through the emerald forest leading to the hot springs at Sol Duc. The United Nations has named the park a World Heritage site and its temperate climate rain forest is one of a few in the continental U.S. The best-selling “Twilight” series of books is set in Forks and “Twilight” fans from across the globe become ecstatic when they find their way to the West End. Stop by the Forks Chamber of Commerce for a “Twilight” visitors’ packet. Accommodations range from oceanfront cabins and bed and breakfast operations with a local touch, to motels and nd RV camps. Local seafood and game highlight West End te te menus and a wide variety of dining options cover every taste ng ng and pocketbook. For information and advice on planning ce a West End visit, call the Forks Chamber of Commerce de at 800-443-6757 (www.forkswa.com). For the north side of the West End, call the Clallam Bay-Sekiu Chamber of Commerce at 877-694-9433 (www.sekiu.com). ■ CHRIS COOK OK OK

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

wild ... ...wonderful 103

Photo by Chris Cook


ONE OF NORTH AMERICA’S temperate rain forests can be explored easily at the Olympic National Park’s Hoh Rain Forest campground and hiking trail terminus located at the end of the Upper Hoh Road. The park’s Hoh Rain Forest center is set in a pocket of deep forest easily accessible to visitors. Drive south of Forks for about 12 miles along U.S. Highway 101 and watch for the Upper Hoh Road. Take a left turn there and head another 12 miles up the scenic road. For casual hikers, a look at the interpretive exhibits mounted inside the Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center, a walk through the Hall of Mosses (just under a mile with little change in elevation) and a snapshot of yourself answering the pay phone with the moss-covered roof near the visitor center adds up to a complete visit that takes about a half day to complete. A wheelchair-accessible one-tenth-mile trail provides an up-close look at the old-growth forest and its ethereal, moss-covered bigleaf maple and vine maple trees. For veteran hikers ready for a challenge, a sum-

Hoh Rain Forest General Store • Gas • LP The only RV Park with Full Hook-ups on the Hoh River. Showers Boat Ramp Centrally located between the Hoh Rain Forest and Ruby Beach.

(360) 374-5566 175443 Hwy. 101 South • Forks

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mertime trek 18 miles up the Hoh River Trail to the Blue Glacier in the upper reaches of the Olympic Mountains begins at the visitor center here. Campers will find 88 year-round campsites decked out with everything but a grocery store or gas station. The park provides fire pits, picnic tables, restrooms, clean drinking water, animal-proof food lockers and even an RV dump station. In all, camping in the Hoh Rain Forest campground is an amazing convenience considering a walk of 100 yards in any direction takes you into a primitive wilderness of first-growth forest of giant Sitka spruce and western hemlock trees. There is a park fee for permits needed for both the campsites and for wilderness camping. The road out to the park’s visitor center runs along a section of the 50-mile-long Hoh River. Hard-fighting steelhead live in the misty, opaque

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

bluish-green glacial waters of the river and bald eagles often are seen soaring over the fast-moving river. On the way into the park you’ll find an outfitting shop, a gas station with a drink and food shop, a casual restaurant plus cabins and vacation home accommodations. You also pass homesteads cleared more than 100 years ago, some with period frontier homes and barns still standing. Herds of stately Roosevelt elk are commonly seen in the Hoh Valley, with about 400 of the animals said to be dwelling in this area. There is a fee of $15 per vehicle to enter Olympic National Park, with an annual pass costing $30. Make sure you bring wet weather gear along, as the rain forest usually lives up to its name. ■ CHRIS COOK

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Twilight

phenomenon growing strong

THOUSANDS OF ADOLESCENT GIRLS are heading to Forks and LaPush this year. They are coming from across Washington, the nation and the globe with moms, dads and siblings tagging along. The rural “Logging Capital of the World” and the scenic Quileute village are now international travel destinations thanks to the phenomenon known as “Twilight.” Local residents sometimes feel they are living in two worlds, their own everyday community and what some jokingly call the Twilight Zone. Author Stephenie Meyer’s mega-best-selling Twilight book series lit this fire and the release of Summit Entertainment’s film version of “Twilight” in 2008 spread the blaze. The Twilight followers often are spotted taking snapshots of each other all over town, following a guide map produced and handed out by the Forks Chamber of Commerce. You’ll see them (or join them) in front of the brick-faced Forks High School, at LaPush’s First Beach and in front of the rural town’s welcome signs. Merchants in Forks and local residents have rolled out the welcome mat. All over downtown Forks, which has become the epicenter of Twilight shopping, Forks Outfitters has its own Twilight store. Dazzled by Twilight on North Forks Avenue, and in Port Angeles, probably stocks the most extensive collection of things Twilight in the world and Leppell’s Flowers & Gifts on Spartan Avenue offers Twilight products infused with West End rural charm and style. “Twilight” is the title of the first book in the series. The film brought in about $400 million following its release in November 2008, and a second film, “New Moon” is now on DVD. A third installment, 108 10 08 “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse,” is scheduled for release early this summer. The four-book series has been ➤ 1

Two Forks residents painted red this early 1950s Chevy pickup. The pickup is parked in front of the Forks Chamber of Commerce’s Visitor Center on U.S. Highway 101 south of Forks and is a must photo stop for visiting fans.

Twilight fans trace the footsteps of Bella Swan at First Beach at LaPush. The Twilighters often use pieces of campfire charcoal to leave messages on huge drift logs.

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“Twilight Territory – A Fan’s Guide to Forks and LaPush” is the Forks Forum newspaper’s insider guide to the Twilight phenomenon on the West End. Featured are more than 150 local Twilight-related photos and a detailed look at all things Twilight in Forks and LaPush. The book is available at www. forksforum.com/Twilight and at stores on the West End. At left: Hundred of Twilight fams toured Forks High School during the Bella’s Birthday-Stephanie Meyer Day celebration in September 2008. Below: More than 1,000 Twilight fans flocked to Forks in September 2008 for the Bella’s Birthday-Stephenie Meyer Day celebration, which was based at Tillicum Park. These visitors belong to the TwilightMoms.com organization.

on Amazon.com’s top 10 overall best-sellers book list for more than a year with no downturn in sight. National news broadcasts claim Meyer’s saga of the life, loves and adventures of Forks High School student Bella Swan are eclipsing the wildly-popular Harry Potter books among teenage female readers. In the books, 17-year-old Bella, the daughter of the Forks chief of police, moves to Forks from Arizona to live with her father. At Forks High School she is attracted to Edward Cullen, a mysterious classmate who turns out to be an ageless member of a vampire clan that has settled on the West End. Adding to the mystery is werewolf Jacob Black, a Quileute Tribe youth who lives at LaPush and is attracted to Bella when Edward mysteriously leaves town. About a 20-minute drive down Highway 110 to the coast takes Twilighters to the Quileute coastal village of LaPush, the domain of Jacob Black and his werewolf clan. A walk along First Beach takes fans past a huge drift log that serves as Jacob’s learning tree. Jacob is Bella’s leading man in the film “New Moon.” Quileute-styled Twilight souvenirs and gifts are available in the lobby of the Oceanside Resort. The Forks Chamber of Commerce, located just south of Forks, across U.S. Highway 101 from the Forks Municipal Airport, is providing Twilight packets to interested visitors who stop in. Chamber greeters know their Twilight trivia inside and out. The Forks Chamber is scheduling its annual Stephenie Meyer Day celebration for midSeptember 2010. Check the Forks Chamber Web site at www.forkswa.com for updates on the growing number of Twilight events staged in Forks and LaPush. ■ CHRIS COOK

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West End Thunder drag r a c in g THE WEST END THUNDER drag racing club is staging races on four weekends during the 2010 summer season. The races are held at the Forks Municipal Airport on the south side of Forks. A runway at the airport is used as a oneeighth-mile track. The drag races are colorful, well-attended events with racers trailering and driving their cars and motorcycles in from West End towns and across the Olympic Peninsula and Puget Sound region. Adding to the fun at the West End Thunder drags are “Show and Shine” vintage car shows with vehicles on display ranging from restored 1920s logging trucks to 1960s-style rail dragsters and contemporary hot rods. The summer 2010 season kicks off on Saturday-Sunday June 26-27, with additional race weekends on July 24-25 and Aug. 21-22. The season finale is set for Sept. 25-26 with Northwest

... DRAWS RACERS, SPECTATORS Nostalgia Top Eliminator Association competition added to the card. Racing starts at 10 a.m. and runs throughout the day. Parking is located at the south end of the airport. Camping and RV facilities are available nearby. Enjoy a “Burnout Burger” at the concession

stands, which are run as fundraisers by community and school organizations. There is an admission to attend. For more information and a look at race photos, go to www. westendthunder.com. ■ CHRIS COOK

ALL DINNERS served with

ED BREAD and SWAN SALAD (love at first bite!) Porta “Bella” Mushroom Ravioli Apple of Edward’s Eye Pie Doctor Cullen’s Choice Bella-sagna Black Angus Gorgonzola Black Angus Tuscan Style Black Angus & Potato Bella & Edward’s Wedding Soup also served weekly

See extensive regular menu

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VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Located in the center of downtown

FORKS

Kayaking and rafting the North Olympic Peninsula KAYAKING IS MUCH MORE than a river running experience for kayakers paddling the North Olympic Peninsula. Incredible backdrops of snow-capped mountains, the misty Strait of Juan de Fuca coastline, the alpine lake environment of Lake Crescent and the sea stack-lined Pacific Coast provide a majestic setting for kayakers. Paddling experiences range from a novice ride paddling along with an experienced guide, to taking a solo run down a Class III river and the challenge to experts who head out into the Pacific in ocean-going kayaks, which requires strong paddling strength, a knowledge of the sweeping tides and currents found on the coast, and skill in handling a kayak in varying wind and wave conditions. Kayaking the smooth waters of pristine Freshwater Bay near Port Angeles and Dungeness Spit and Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge near Sequim offers up-close looks at the wondrous natural environment found along the strait. Ocean kayaks are designed long and sleek for stowing gear and providing glide. Paddles are longer, too. River kayaks and paddles are stubbier, enabling a paddler to make quick moves to avoid ➤ 112 VISITORS GUIDE 2010

Twilight Central Leppell’s Flowers & Gifts 130 S. Spartan Ave. 360-374-6931 myspace.com/leppellsflowers tif@centurytel.net

Unique Hand Designed “Twilight” Inspired Merchandise Licensed Merchandise

Free Self-Guided Tour Maps Twilight Bus Tour Headquarters

T-shirts • Sweatshirts • Scrapbook Supplies • Journals • Jewelry • Book Bags • Umbrellas • Mugs • Posters • Hats • and new designs and items all the time.

We can also take care of your flower, gift & tuxedo needs.

Openn 7 days dayys a w week Seasonally

• 35 Rooms • Suite Available • Handicap Rooms Available • Queen Beds • Fully Air Conditioned • 37” Flat Screen TVs • Refrigerators

• Microwaves • In-Room Coffee • Wireless Internet • On-Site Laundromat • Next door to the In Place Restaurant

www.pacificinnmotel.com

For reservations and information call:

1-800-235-7344

or Forks Area: (360) 374-9400 P.O. Box 1997 • 352 Forks Ave. Forks, Washington

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Kayak Outfitters • Adventures Through Kayaking 4821 S. Dry Creek Road, Port Angeles, 888-900-3015 • Dungeness Kayaking 5021 Sequim-Dungeness Way, Sequim, 360-681-4190 • Olympic Raft and Kayak 123 Lake Aldwell Road, Port Angeles, 800-452-1443 • Kayak Center at Port Townsend Outdoors 1017-B Water St., Port Townsend, 360-379-3608 or 888-754-8598 • Sound Bikes and Kayaks 120 E. Front St., Port Angeles, 360-457-1240 • Sport Townsend 1044 Water St., Port Townsend, 360-379-9711 • Azimuth Expeditions 901 S. Jefferson St. #103, Tacoma, 253-474-8155 • Rainforest Paddlers 4883 Upper Hoh Road, Forks, 360-374-5254 • Olympic Outdoor Center 18971 Front St., Poulsbo, 360-697-6095

rocks and steer through narrow gorges and down rapids. Kayak camping trips are easily outfitted. With the proper camping permits, kayakers can explore out of the way sites such as Lake Ozette, which is tucked away just off the Pacific Coast between LaPush and Neah Bay. Kayak guides, rentals, accessories and sales are offered in Port Townsend, Sequim, Port Angeles and along the Hoh River on the road to Olympic National Park. Kayaking in summer provides a quiet getaway from the often-crowded nature trails for which the North Olympic Peninsula is well known. ■ CHRIS COOK

West-End

Bed & Breakfasts Magnificent view of the Sol Duc Meadows, tree-lined river & elusive elk

Miller Tree Inn Bed & Breakfast

(800) 943-6563 654 E. Division St. • Forks www.millertreeinn.com

360-374-5693 62 Steelhead Ave, Forks

www.fishermans-widow.com

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1-877-374-9389

194894 Hwy 101 Forks www.mistyvalleyinn.com

813 Kilmer Rd., Forks

360-374-6295

www.manitoulodge.com

A river runs beside it...

360-374-5453 888-265-1043 440 Brightwater Dr., Forks www.brightwaterhouse.com

CALL FOR RESERVATIONS (360) 374-6526 Guided fishing & float trips available 2596 Bogachiel Way, Forks

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Waves, wildlife and ‘werewolves’

Photos by Chris Cook

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

The homeland of the Quileute Tribe is a coastal area of one squ square mile commonly known as LaPush (the plac place name LaPush comes from the tr onc traveled the coast and derives traders who once om the French llanguage-inspired Chinook trade from onn word “la bbouche” or river mouth). jargon Auth thor th ho Steph Author Stephenie Meyer discovered the Quilehe ute’s rich heritage when she chose the West End of C allam County Cl Counnty as the setting for her mega-selling Clallam “T Twi wililght” saga books. Fictionalizing their wolf “Twilight” hheritage, erit er itage, M it clann herit Meyer pictured the Quileute as wer werewol ereewol o ve and made Jacob Black, a fictiheroic werewolves tiou ti o s Quileute ou tee yyouth, yo tious a love interest and savior of “Twilight’s ililigh ght’ts” leadi gh “Twilight’s” leading lady Bella Swan. The series’ i ’ ppopularity among teens is drawing thousands of visitors to LaPush leading to year-round activities and building upon the busy summer tourism season. Visitors also can spend hours sitting on the end of a jetty at LaPush watching eagles, osprey, brown pelicans, seals and whales (that spout and breach just offshore in March and April). Surrounded by Olympic National Park, with nearby trails to Second Beach and Third Beach, the Quileute Tribe has hosted visitors quietly here for years, allowing campfires and camping on their beautiful crescent beach facing the Pacific Ocean. They now offer luxury cabins with whirlpool spas and gas fireplaces at the Quileute Oceanside Resort. The Quileute Marina serves as home for a commercial fishing fleet and recreational boats. Watch catches being moved to a fresh seafood processing plant adjacent to the River’s Edge restaurant, which is open seasonally. The Quileute Tribe continues to support economic development at LaPush and is promoting the 26-room Thunderbird Hotel and 24 new RV spaces in response to a significant number of people choosing to vacation at LaPush.

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SUMMERTIME IS THE SEASON for most surfers traveling out to First Beach at LaPush. Huge winter waves and especially frigid ocean water temperatures deter wintertime paddles out, while warm weather brings more inviting small waves breaking over near-shore sandbars and water temperatures above 50 degrees F. Surfers and other beachgoers will find parking at several areas along the coast at LaPush, however vehicle access is limited at the Quileute Tribe’s Lonesome Creek RV campground located on the south, and more popular for surfing, side of the beach. Comfortable, modern beach cottages located just a short walk from the beach are available for vacation rental at the LaPush Ocean Park Resort (www.oceanpark.org). Surfboard and wet suit rentals for those wanting to try out surfing are available at the Three Rivers Resort located about half way between the beach and U.S. Highway 101 on LaPush Road. Custom surfboards and a full range of pro surfing gear are found at West End Surf shop on Division Street in downtown Forks and at North By Northwest Surf Company on Highway 101 in Port Angeles. North By Northwest provides surfing rentals and a mini-surf shop out of a trailer parked in the Lonesome Creek RV area. The annual Surfing & Traditions surfing competition and gathering is scheduled to be held at First Beach in July on a weekend after the Fourth of July. There are no lifeguards at First Beach nor anywhere else along the West End’s Pacific Coast.

Surfing the Pacific

■ CHRIS COOK

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Olson’s Resort brims with boats during a fishing tournament at Clallam Bay. Photo by Donna Barr

Visiting Clallam Bay and Sekiu CLALLAM BAY AN CL AND SEKIU’S fishing resorts, ccamps, ca amps, s motels and res restaurants are traditional North O Olym l mpic Peninsula destinations. Located along Olympic sstate tatee Highway 112 where it follows the Strait of JJuan of uan de Fuca com coming from Port Angeles, the adjo ad djo j in iniing ing to town wnss pr prov oviide visitors with a look at an authentic Northadjoining towns provide west waterfront. Weekends when a fishing derby is staged at the resorts’ wharves or when halibut and sa salmon runs are on, the towns are hubs of activity.

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

Olson’s Resort and the Straitside Resort are located right on the waterfront in Sekiu. The comfortable, strait-front fishing resorts are run by local families. Here salmon and bottom fishermen, as well as visitors, gather, staying at the motel and cabin accommodations. Vacation cabin rentals and bed and breakfast accommodations such as the Winter Summer Inn in Clallam Bay offer a stay along the strait along with lots of local hospitality. The cozy Chito Beach Resort is a great getaway spot located between Sekiu and Neah Bay. ➤ 116

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The Lost Resort at Lake Ozette is located off state Highway 112 on the Hoko-Ozette Road, across the north tip of the Olympic Peninsula from Clallam Bay and Sekiu, near the Pacific Coast. The area offers great beach hiking, a nature wonderland of sea birds and native plants and more. Restaurants in Clallam Bay and Sekiu serve 1950s-style diner and comfort food, with fresh fish and chips and other local seafoods listed on menus. Bars like the Spring Tavern offer great views of sea birds, passing ships and the south coast of Vancouver Island on the horizon to the north. Local art is on display at The Three Sisters of Clallam Art Gallery in Clallam Bay with local paintings, cards and jewelry, as well a warm spot around the ornate antique wood stove. Call 360- 963-2854 for more information. Clallam Bay’s Sunset West co-op is a place to pick up staples and delicacies including local raw comb honey and organic farm products such as beef and eggs from the Triple Nickel Ranch and lamb from the historical Cowan Family Ranch. No matter how far from metropolitan Seattle one gets on the North Olympic Peninsula, cell phone and Wi-Fi connections still are available. Visitors wanting to check their e-mail will finds Wi-Fi hot spots in Clallam Bay. Be sure to stop at the Clallam Bay/Sekiu Visitors Center at 16795 Highway 112 for more to see and do — the center is open daily from May-September — or call 877-694-9433 or visit the Web site at www.sekiu.com. The sign into Sekiu displays a whimsical touch.

Photo by Donna Barr

■ DONNA BARR

Dew Drop Inn 22 Air Conditioned Rooms Complimentary Breakfast Direct TV • Phone Microwaves & Refrigerators In-Room Coffee Makers Restaurant Nearby

Bella’’s Suite Bella

Full Service Restaurant Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Now Serving Beer & Wine! Take out available, most items. Sack lunches available. Catering available.

5% Discount

Twilight Specials: Jacob’s Blackberry Cobbler Bella’s Biscuits & Gravy

Not valid from June thru August

Ask the locals . . . this IS the place to eat!

Bring in this ad

The Best Food and Service in Town! Open 7 days a week from 5:00 a.m. to 9 p.m.

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www.dewdropinnmotel.com

(360) 374-6769

360-374-4055 • 888-433-9376 100 Fern Hill Rd., Forks, WA

241 S. FORKS AVE., FORKS WWW.FORKSCOFFEESHOP.COM VISITORS GUIDE 2010


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Cape Alava, Ozette Loop Cape ape Alava, Ozette Loop How ow long: 3.3 miles to Cape Alava; 9.33 mi mile le lloop. oopp oo How hard: Moderate. How to get there: Take U.S. Highway 101 west to Sappho, turn north on Highway 113 to state Route 112 and take it past Clallam Bay and Sekiu. Turn left on Hoko-Ozette Road. Road ends at the Ozette Ranger Station. Trailhead is at the station. Other information: Camping reservations and a backcountry permit are needed to camp at Sand Point or Camp Alava. Make reservations by calling the Olympic National Park Wilderness Center, 3002 Mount Angeles Road in Port Angeles behind the Visitor Center, at 360-565-3100.

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TTHERE THER TH HER ERE IS SS SOMETHING O MAGICAL about watchinng the thhe sun’s sun’ su n’ss golden n’ gold go l ld ing orb melt into the endless vista of the Pacificc Ocean Pacifi Ocean. Sl Slowly the horizon fills with honey orange acro the glowing sea. The warm afterglow that spreads across afte the sun has hidden below the world’s lingers long after rim and one by one the stars’ white pinpricks flicker to life in the deepe deepening dark as twilight’s blue is replaced by velvety black black. Backpackers to the westernmost point in the lower tate ta tess wi willll w a to build a 48 sstates want driftwood fire on the beach to warm the evening as the sun rests its weary head beyond the ocean waves. The 3.3-mile hike to the campground at Cape Alava sounds easy: a short jaunt on a boardwalk to the ocean shore. The stroll along the beach to the pictograms at Wedding Rocks to the south sounds equally dreamy. Don’t be fooled. The boardwalk can be treacherous in spots. It is quite slick when wet and the beach is an ankle-bending jumble of rock and gravel. The trail starts at the Ozette Ranger Station with a bridge crossing the tranquil, tannin-stained water of the Ozette River. The path soon splits in the woods, one branch heading west toward Cape Alava, the other southwest to Sand Point. Each trail forms a leg of a triangle loop hike, with a 2.9-mile stretch of beach forming the third leg.

The path traverses an up-and-down path through a young spruce and hemlock forest, packed tight with ferns and other greenery. Part way through the hike, the trail enters a clearing, once the site of a 1920s homestead. After the prairie, the boardwalk plunges into the dark heart of a lovely forest of Sitka spruce and fern. The sound of ocean surf and the fresh whiff of ocean air soon spur weary legs to a scenic overview of the rocky coast: the many weather-beaten rock formations and the several tree-capped islands near the shore draw the eye’s attention. Rather than carry heavy backpacks any farther, hikers can pick a campsite among the twisted spruce and shoulder-tall grass just north of the trail. Then unburdened, they can head off with light daypacks for the one-mile trek of hopping tide pools and avoiding shifting rocks south to Wedding Rocks — named after a pictogram depicting a man and a woman with a sexual symbol of a bisected circle. The carvings are estimated to be 300-500 years old. Continuing south, the going makes its laborious way across wave-tossed stone past a headland to Sand Point, where stately spires jut out of the sea. A circular sign just past the point marks the trailhead back to the ranger station. ■ LEIF NESHEIM

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


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Carol Schultz 963-2122 Website: www.carolschultz.biz • Email: carolschultz@wildblue.net • Cabin Rentals • General Store • Espresso • Deli with Dining Area • Camp Sites & Camping Supplies • Microbrews • Ice • Showers WIFI - wireless internet access

at Lake Ozette

20860 Hoko-Ozette Road Clallam Bay, WA 98326 (360) 963-2899 1-800-950-2899 E-mail: lostresort@hotmail.com Web: www.lostresort.net

Enchanting cabins, suites and studios by the sea. This unique guest lodging is the perfect romantic getaway for those who seek nature, comfort & charm. Great fishing, moorage available. No smoking • No pets • Computer Friendly

(360) 963-2100 • www.straitsideresort.com

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Makah Nation hosting

Tribal Journey 2010

Photo by Chris Cook

THE M MAKAH NATION is the host this summer for the annual Trib Tribal Journey canoe paddle. Northwest tribes and Nation peoples from Canada, including many youths, First Nations will journey to Neah Bay from the PaciďŹ c Coast, the Strait of Juan de F Fuca, Puget Sound, British Columbia and other tribal region regions with sea access to Neah Bay. Hundre Hundreds of tribal canoes and thousands of spectators

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are expected to attend. The Makah Tribal Council and the Makah Canoe Society has been planning the event since 2005 when they announced their decision at the Tribal Journey Paddle to Elwha. The canoe journey is a youth-oriented drug- and alcohol-free event held to encourage positive living plus

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


perpetuate canoe making, canoe paddling, dancing and drumming and other ancient tribal cultural practices. The setting for Tribal Journeys is nearly perfect: Makah territory includes an ideal beach located in the center of scenic Neah Bay where the canoes will land and ask permission of the Makah Nation to come ashore. Go to www.paddletomakah.org for more information.

Whaling has been central to Makah culture for centuries. Above, the skeleton of a gray whale floats above two hand-carved cedar canoes in the Makah Cultural and Research Center museum. Photo by Joan Worley

MAKAH DAYS The 87th annual Makah Days celebration is scheduled for Friday-Sunday, Aug. 27-29 at Neah Bay on the northwest tip of the Olympic Peninsula. Enjoy watching canoe races and bone games and youth races, the pagentry of the Makah royal court and traditional dancing, a talent show, fireworks and feast at a salmon bake. The event is free, however there is a $10 recreational use permit fee for recreational activities, such as hiking, camping at Hobuck Beach, fishing from the Neah Bay shore or taking the short hike to picturesque lookouts at Cape Flattery. ■ CHRIS COOK

STEP BACK 500 YEARS... NEAH BAY also is the site of the Makah Cultural & Research Center and its museum has a national reputation for its arrangement of 5,500 tribal artifacts. In the 1970s, a 500-year-old Makah village partially buried by a mudslide was unearthed by a storm, eventually yielding some 60,000 artifacts. On display from the Ozette site at Cape Alava are whaling, sealing and fishing gear, basketry and many other items the Makah used in their daily lives. Within the museum is a full-size replica of a longhouse where families lived communally. Four hand-carved cedar dugout canoes and the skeleton of a gray whale show how these ancient peoples used forest and ocean resources for their livelihoods. Dioramas show villagers going about their daily lives in this top-scale museum. The gift shop sells traditional carvings, basketry and jewelry made by Makah artists. On Highway 112 and B View Avenue, the Bay m museum is open daily 1 a.m.-5 p.m. from 10 M Memorial Day-Sept. 15 a Wednesday-Sunday and f from Sept. 16-Memorial D Admission is $5 for Day. a adults, $4 for children a seniors and free to and c children age 5 and und For more informader. t tion, call 360-645-2711, g to www.makah. go c com or e-mail makah m museum@centurytel. n net.

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NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA SERVICES DIRECTORY FERRIES Black Ball Ferry Line MV Coho: passenger and vehicle ferry, 101 E. Railroad Ave., Port Angeles. 98362, 360-457-4491. Proof of citizenship required for entry into Canada and the United States. See Page 82 for new requirements. Victoria Express: passenger ferry between Port Angeles and Victoria (55-minute crossing time) and Victoria and Friday Harbor (2.5-3 hours crossing time). Port Angeles, 360-452-8088; Canada, 250-361-9144; www.victoriaexpress.com, online reservations available. Washington State Ferries to/from Olympic Peninsula: daily runs between Port Townsend and Keystone on Whidbey Island; Bainbridge Island to/ from Seattle; Kingston to/from Edmonds. www. wsdot.wa.gov/ferries. Call 888-808-7977 or 5-1-1 for Port Townsend- Keystone ebb-tide cancellations, Bainbridge-Seattle schedules, Washington and Vancouver Island callers. 206-464-6400. Schedules for all ferries available on the ferries and at visitors centers.

CAR RENTAL Budget Rent-a-Car of Port Angeles: 111 E. Front St., Port Angeles, 360-452-4774. Dan Wilder Auto Center: 95 Deer Park Road, Port Angeles, 360-452-9268.

AIRPORTS/CHARTERS Forks Municipal Airport: 500 E. Division St., Forks. 360-374-5412. www.forkswashington.org/ edo/forksairport.htm. Jefferson County International Airport: General aviation airport. Airport Cutoff Road, Port Townsend, 360-385-2323. www.portofpt.com. Kenmore Air Express: Land-based airline, offering scheduled flights and charter service from Seattle and William Fairchild International Airport in Port Angeles. 866-i.fly.kah, 866-435-9524, kenmoreair.com.

Quillayute State Airport: A former Naval Auxiliary air station approximately 10 miles west of Forks. Location of the Quillayute weather station. 360-374-5412. www.forkswashington.org/ edo/quillair.htm. Rite Bros. Aviation Inc.: Scenic flights, air charters, plane rentals, aerial photography, flight instruction, aircraft fueling facility, maintenance. 1406 Fairchild International Airport, Port Angeles. 360-452-6226 or 800-430-7483, www.ritebros. com. Sekiu Airport: 2,100-foot lighted runway with a visual approach indicator. Facility is about a mile from Sekiu. 360-457-1138. www.portofpa.com/ airports/sekiu-airport.html. Sequim Valley Airport: Privately owned but designated as a public-use airport, Mountain High Aviation’s charter operation based out of the airport, aircraft maintenance and repair facility. 468 Dorothy Hunt Lane, Sequim. 360-683-4444. www.sequim valleyairport.com, sva@olypen.com.

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION Clallam Paratransit: provides specialized, Americans with Disabilities Act door-to-door transportation for persons who are unable, due to disability, age or access, to get to Clallam Transit System’s fixed-route buses. For ADA transportation needs, call 360-452-1397 or toll-free 800-436-3950. For Medicaid transportation needs, call toll-free 800-756-5438, ext. 711. Clallam Transit System: Serves all of Clallam County with Jefferson Transit connections in Sequim and Forks; 360-452-4511 or 800-858-3747 for schedules and information. www.clallamtransit. com. Jefferson Transit Authority: Serves Jefferson County and offers connections to transit systems in Clallam, Grays Harbor, Kitsap, Island and Mason counties. Online schedules and fares available at www.jeffersontransit.com. 360-385-4777 or TTY at 800-833-6388 for schedules and information. Olympic Bus Lines/Dungeness Line: Daily bus service to/from Seattle, Sea-Tac International Airport, Seattle hospitals and Seattle Amtrak. Greyhound bus tickets sold. 111 E. Front St., Port Angeles. 360-417-0700. www.olympicbuslines.com. Reggie’s Limousine/Airport service to Sea-Tac International Airport for parties up to 10. Olympic Peninsula winery tours. Town car sedan service available. 360-457-3706. Rocket Transportation: Door-to-door shuttle service by reservation to Sea-Tac International Airport serving Port Angeles, Sequim, Port Townsend and other locations on the Olympic Peninsula. Call 877-697-6258, 8 a.m. Monday-Friday or go to www. GoRocketMan.com for reservations.

SPECIAL TOURS & SERVICES Advantage Charters of Westport & Neah Bay: P.O. Box 1991 Westport, WA. 800-689-5595. Fishing trips. advantagecharters.com.

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Adventures Through Kayaking: Guided tours, sea, river and inflatable rentals, classes and sales. 360-417-3015, 888-900-3015. www.atkayaking. com. All-Ways Fishing Guide Service: Ocean fishing through September, river fishing in spring, fall and winter. 360-374-2052. www.allwaysfishing.com. Bosun’s Locker: Boat rentals and kayaks. 2577 West Sequim Bay Road, Sequim. 360-683-6521. www.bosunslocker.com. Fishing Northwest: Fly-fishing, conventional fishing, steelhead, cutthroat, salmon. Year-round, fishing depends on the season. 360-374-6300. www. fishingnorthwest.com. Guided Historical Sidewalk Tours: Hour of snooping and gossiping in the historical district. Port Townsend. Call 360-385-1967 for reservations. John Wayne Marina: Permanent and guest moorage, marine services, showers, laundry and banquet facilities, restaurant, boat launch ramps, fuel facilities, public beach access, picnic areas. 2577 West Sequim Bay Road, Sequim. 360-417-3440. Kingfisher Enterprises: U.S. halibut trips, Canadian halibut trips, salmon, bottom fish, marine tours, bed and breakfast, quilting and scrapbooking retreats. 888-622-8216. Mike’s Bikes: Sales, repair, accessories. 150 West Sequim Bay Road, Sequim. 360-681-3868. www.mikes-bikes.net. Norrie Johnson Guide Services: Fall tours of Olympic Peninsula rivers, steelhead and fall salmon. 360-582-9962. Olympic Game Farm: Walking tours during summer and driving tours open year-round. Entrance fee. Snack bar, petting farm, gift shop open during summer. 1423 Ward Road, Sequim. 360-681-4443. olygamefarm.com. Olympic Raft & Kayak: Raft trips down the Elwha/Hoh rivers; guided kayaking tours in and around Olympic National Park. 123 Lake Aldwell Road, Port Angeles. 360-452-1443 or 888-452-1443. www.raftandkayak.com. Port Angeles Boat Haven: Moorage space for more than 520 pleasure and commercial boats, including 75 boathouses. Marine services, adjacent to boat repair and retrofit services, haul-out services, restaurants and more. 360-457-4505. www. portofpa.com. Port Angeles Underground Heritage Tours: Twice daily at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. during the summer. Buy tickets at the Port Angeles Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center, 121 E. Railroad Ave., next to the ferry dock. 360-452-2363. 360-460-1001. Sound Bikes and Kayaks: Sales, service, rentals, instruction. Bike and kayak day trips; weekend and weeklong kayak tours available. 360-457-1240 for reservations. 120 E. Front St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.soundbikeskayaks.com. Three Rivers Resorts and Guide Service: Regular fishing, bait casting, fly-fishing. Fishing VISITORS GUIDE 2010


packages. 360-374-5300. www.northolympic.com/ threerivers. Tommycod Charters: Fishes out of Neah Bay; halibut, May and June; kingfishing, June and July, bottom fishing, year-round, no salmon fishing. 800-283-8900, 360-963-0759. Venture Charters: Diversified charter service specializing in social events, private parties, fishing, scuba diving and meetings. 360-895-5424 or www. venturecharterboats.com. Waters West Fly Fishing: Fly-fishing specialty shop, year-round guide service, fly-tying materials, flies for fresh and saltwater. 140 W. Front St., Port Angeles. 360-417-0937.

VISITORS CENTERS Clallam Bay/Sekiu Visitors Center Information on local businesses, area events and attractions, tides, area history, local parks and beaches and recreational activities in Sekiu, Clallam Bay, Lake Ozette, Neah Bay and within Olympic National Park. 16795 Highway 112, Clallam Bay. 360-963-2339, 877-694-9433. Open daily MayOctober. www.clallambay.com, www.sekiu.com. Forks Visitors Center Information on Cape Flattery, Clallam Bay, Forks, LaPush, Neah Bay and Sekiu, Hoh Rain Forest, Kalaloch beaches, Makah and Quileute tribes, Lake Ozette wilderness hike to Cape Alava, the westernmost point in the lower 48 states, Indian petroglyphs near Wedding Rocks, Lake Crescent, Sol Duc Hot Springs and area waterfalls. 1411 S. Forks Ave., Forks. 360-374-9253, 800-443-6757. Mon.Fri. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. www.forkswa.com. Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center 24-hour recorded information about Hurricane Ridge snow, road and weather conditions. Concessions hours: Weekend operation in winter, daily operation in summer, closed spring and fall. 17 miles south of Olympic National Park Visitor Center on Race Street in Port Angeles, 360-565-3131. North Olympic Peninsula Visitor Bureau Offers North Olympic Peninsula travel VISITORS GUIDE 2010

planner. 338 W. First St. Suite 104, Port Angeles. 800-942-4042, 360-452-8552, www.olympic peninsula.org. Olympic Peninsula Gateway Visitor Center Information on Port Ludlow, Port Hadlock, Marrowstone Island, Hood Canal communities, Olympic National Forest, western Jefferson County and the Hoh Rain Forest. Near junction of Highways 104 and 19, Port Ludlow, 360-437-0120. Call for hours. www.heartoftheolympics.org. Olympic National Park Visitor Center, Port Angeles Nature trails begin at parking lot to the west of the visitor center and behind it. Picnic area. Exhibits highlight the park’s natural and cultural history, hands-on discovery room just for children, information desk, award-winning film shown on request, bookstore. 3002 Mount Angeles Road, south of Park Avenue. 360-565-3130. www.nps. gov/olym. Hours vary according to season, daily in summer, Thurs.-Mon. in winter. Olympic National Park Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center Open daily during summer, Fri.-Sun. remainder of the year. Exhibits, information desk, bookstore. Nature trails start at the visitors’ center. Picnic area. Go 32 miles south from Forks on U.S. Highway 101 and Upper Hoh Road, take Hoh River Road east for 18.5 miles. 360-374-6925 Olympic National Park Kalaloch Information Station Open daily during the summer. Exhibits, information desk, bookstore, short nature trails and beach access nearby. At the ranger station on U.S. Highway 101, about 40 miles southwest of Forks. 360-962-2283, www.fs.fed.us/r6/olympic Olympic National Park & Olympic National Forest information Center Open daily in summer, Fri.-Sun. remainder of the year. Exhibits, information desk, bookstore, bear cannisters, wilderness information and overnight wilderness use permits. At Forks Transit Center, 551 S. Forks Ave., Forks Olympic National Park Wilderness Information Center, Port Angeles Open daily in the summer, intermittent hours in the winter. 3002 Mount Angeles Road, south of Park Avenue, behind the park’s visitors’ center, 360-565-3100. For reservations in high-use areas, call 360-565-3100. Park wilderness overnight permits (required for all overnight stays in park back-country), bear canisters and wilderness information.

Olympic National Forest/Olympic National Park Quinault Ranger Station U.S. Highway 101 south to Amanda Park, left turn to Quinault Ranger Station, approximately three miles. Open May-September. Call for hours. 360-288-2525, www.fs.fed.us/r6/olympic/. 353 S. Shore Road, Quinault. Olympic National Forest/Olympic National Park Quinault River Ranger Station, 908 N. Shore Road, Amanda Park. 360-288-2444, www.nps.gov/olym/wic. Open Memorial Day-Labor Day. Call for hours. Port Angeles Visitor Center Information on Port Angeles, Hurricane Ridge,

waterfalls in western Clallam County, Hoh Rain Forest, Olympic National Park/Olympic National Forest, Olympic Coast Discovery Center, Native American culture, Strait of Juan de Fuca, Victoria, British Columbia, and ferry schedules. 121 E. Railroad Ave., Port Angeles, 360-452-2363 or www. portangeles.org. Port Townsend Visitor Information Center Provides brochures, maps and information on accommodations, dining and activities in Port Townsend, East Jefferson County and the Olympic Peninsula. 440 12th St., Port Townsend. 360-385-2722, 888-365-6978, www.enjoypt.com. Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Quilcene/Brinnon Visitor Center Information on Hood Canal, Olympic National Park, Olympic National Forest, seafood harvesting and Dosewallips River estuary. 295142 S. Highway 101, Quilcene. 360-765-4999, www.emeraldtowns. com. Summer: Daily 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Winter: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sat.-Sun. Quileute Tribe Visitor Center Visitor information center, gift shop and information for Oceanside Resort. 196281 Highway 101, Forks. 360-374-2460. Call for hours. Sequim-Dungeness Valley Visitor Information Center Information on Sequim-Dungeness Valley, Lavender Festival and all of the Olympic Peninsula. 1192 E. Washington St., Sequim. 360-683-6197, 800-737-8462. Open May-Sept. Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct.-April, Mon.-Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. www.sequim chamber.com.

FESTIVALS MAY May 28-31 Juan de Fuca Festival, check schedule for events, Vern Burton Community Center, Port Angeles. This four-day Memorial Day weekend festival features more than 125 performances of music, dance and theater from around the world. 360-457-5411 or www.jffa.org. May 29-30 Olympic Art Festival, 11 a.m.- 6 p.m., Olympic Art Gallery, Washington Street and U.S. Highway 101 in Quilcene. A dozen artists from the gallery will exhibit additional artwork and do demonstrations. Thirty artists are featured in the gallery. See www.olympicartgallery.com for listing of artists attending and their artwork. 360-765-0200 or info@ olympicartgallery.com. May 29-30 Shrimpfest, Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sunday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. in downtown Brinnon. Celebrates Hood Canal spot shrimp and other local seafood. Crafts, food, music, children’s activities. East side of U.S. Highway 101, north side of Dosewallips River. 360-796-4809 or www.emeraldtowns.org/ shrimpfest.htm.

JUNE June 26-Sept. 25 West End Thunder, Forks Municipal Airport, Forks. Monthly drag races. Gates open at 7 a.m.,

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general admission $10. See www.westendthunder. com for schedule.

JULY July 3-4 Centrum Festival of American Fiddle Tunes, Fort Worden State Park near Port Townsend. Traditional American music with a week of workshops, dances, three days of main-stage concerts at McCurdy Pavilion. 360-385-3102, 800-773-3608 or info@ centrum.org. July 4-Aug. 22 Olympic Music Festival, 2 p.m. at Concert Barn, 7360 Center Road, Quilcene, watch for signs off U.S. Highway 101. Classical music every Saturday and Sunday, no pets allowed. www.olympicmusic festival.org, info@olympicmusicfestival.org or call 206-527-8839 for tickets and reserved seating. July 4 Forks Old-Fashioned Fourth of July, various locations in Forks. Contact info@forkswa.com. Fourth of July Community Celebration, 3-11 p.m., City Pier, Port Angeles. Food and craft vendors and live music. Grand parade on Lincoln Street to First Street from 5:30-6:30 p.m., fireworks display at dusk (around 10 p.m.). vanessa@portangeles.org. Fourth of July Celebration, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Sequim Prairie Grange, Macleay Road, Sequim. Museum’s annual event; entertainment, old cars, children’s games. No admission, food for modest fee. 360-681-2257 or www.museumandartscenter.org. July 1-4 Hoodsport Fourth of July Celebration, street fair 9 a.m. Thurs-Sat., fireworks at dusk Sunday. www. hoodsport.com. July 9-11 Clallam Bay & Sekiu Fun Days, 10 a.m. in Clallam Bay/Sekiu. Parades, races, games, food, fun, craft vendors, music and entertainment. Fireworks on Saturday night. www.sekiu.com. July 16-18 Sequim Lavender Festival, 9 a.m., various locations in and around Sequim. Three-day summer celebration of the joys of lavender. This 14th annual festival includes six farms on tour. The street fair features more than 140 craft artists of hand-made items and vendors of lavender and other Olympic Peninsula specialties. 800-681-3035, www. lavenderfestival.com. Sunbonnet Sue Quilt Show, 10 a.m. at Sequim Middle School gymnasium. Hundreds of traditional and art quilts under one roof. 360-683-2072, www. sunbonnetsuequiltclub.org/. July 16-18 Quileute Days, 10 a.m. in LaPush. Tribal festival with parade, canoe races, bone games, arts and crafts, softball tourney and fireworks on First Beach. www. forkswa.com. July 25-August 1 Centrum’s Jazz Port Townsend, Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend. Centrum’s Jazz Port Townsend, the West Coast’s finest summer jazz festival, features straight-ahead jazz and internationally acclaimed musicians on the grounds of Fort Worden State Park and Jazz in the Clubs, Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings and Sunday morning in 10

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downtown venues. 800-733-3608, 360-385-5320 or visit www.centrum.org. July 23-25 Arts in Action, Friday 2-8 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m.-5 p.m., City Pier, Port Angeles. This event hosts professional sand sculptors. Also artists, merchants and vendors. Enjoy live music on the pier and car shows all weekend with a street dance on Saturday night. 360-417-0501. July 30-August 1 Port Ludlow Funfest, 9 a.m.-8 p.m. at Port Ludlow Marina. Live music from local performers, arts and crafts, food, silent auction, golfing, radiocontrolled model hydroplane demonstration races on the marina pond. Most events located just off Oak Bay Road near the Port Ludlow Marina and resort. Call 360-437-9798.

AUGUST August 1-8 Centrum’s Acoustic Blues and Heritage Festival, Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend. Centrum’s Port Townsend Blues and Heritage 15th year with a free downtown street dance, followed by Blues in the Clubs, eight bands, playing simultaneously in eight downtown Port Townsend venues on Friday and Saturday nights. 800-733-3608, 360-385-5320 or www.centrum.org. August 7 Joyce Daze Wild Blackberry Festival, Joyce. The 28th annual event kicks off at 7 a.m. with a pancake breakfast and lasts until 3:30 p.m., when raffle winners take home prizes. Highlights of the festival include homemade pies with the much-heralded local blackberries, a parade, children’s activities, a juried arts and crafts show, salmon bake, vendors’ booths, demonstrations and live entertainment. www.joycewa.com. August 14-15 Port Angeles Heritage Weekend, 10 a.m., downtown Port Angeles. Guided walking tours of historical downtown Port Angeles, including parts of the interesting underground on Saturday and Sunday. Tours of other historical and Civil War-era homes throughout uptown Port Angeles, clock tower tours of the historical county courthouse and tours of Elwha Dam. Register in the atrium of The Landing mall to sign up for tours. 360-460-1001 or donperry10@yahoo. com. August 13-15 Jefferson County Fair, 10 a.m. at fairgrounds in Port Townsend. An old-fashioned country fair for the whole family. Free entertainment: 4x4 mud drags, barrel racing, draft horse pulls, magicians, music, 4-H and FFA exhibits. Animals and much more. 360-385-1013, www.jeffcofairgrounds.com. August 19-22 Clallam County Fair, fairgrounds in Port Angeles. Draft horse pull, concerts, rodeo, logging show, crafts, art, 4-H and FFA animals and much more. 360-417-2551 or www.clallamcountyfair.com. August 27-29 Makah Days, 10 a.m. Neah Bay. The 87th annual celebration focused around Makah patriotism for the United States with Makah war veterans taking a high seat. Canoe races and bone games, children’s races, royalty, salmon bake, traditional dancing, tal-

ent show and fireworks. August 29 North Olympic Land Trust’s StreamFest, noon at Ennis Arbor Farm, Port Angeles. Fun activities for all ages, focusing on enjoying and caring for the area’s natural assets. Free admission. Salmon cookout fundraiser. Shuttles provide transportation from 11:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. from parking area at north end of Ennis Street to event entry on Lindberg Road, opposite Peninsula Golf Club. Contact 360-457-5415, 360-417-1815, www.north olympiclandtrust.org.

SEPTEMBER September 4 Olympic Art Festival, 11 a.m.- 6 p.m., Olympic Art Gallery, Washington Street and U.S. Highway 101 in Quilcene. September 10-12 34th Wooden Boat Festival, 9 a.m. at Point Hudson in Port Townsend. An internationally acclaimed annual celebration of wooden boats and the people who travel aboard, build, own, sail, row and share a passion for their beauty, craftsmanship and cultural heritage. Authentic activities and demonstrations for all ages. 360-344-3436, www.woodenboat.org. September 11-12 Stephanie Meyer Days, in honor of the “Twilight” series author. Forks. www.forkswa.com. September 18 Quilcene Community Fair, Parade & Classic Car Show, all day at Quilcene School District on U.S. Highway 101. Vendors, entertainment, food, arts/ crafts and fun! Lisa Hames, Quilcene Fair Board. 360-765-3361. September 24-26 Port Townsend Film Festival, 10 a.m. on Taylor Street, Port Townsend. More than 40 art-house, foreign-language, classic, documentary and short films from around the world. Contact 360-379-1333, www.ptfilmfest.com. September 25 Incredible Edible Festival, 10 a.m. At Boys & Girls Club, Sequim.Variety of activities, including vendor exhibits and sales, samples, classes, demonstrations, contests and much more. The focus of the event is on food, including meals, goodies, gifts, decorating, packaging/shipping food gifts and many other foodrelated items and activities. 360-683-6197.

OCTOBER October 1-3 Hickory Shirt & Heritage Days, various times in VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Forks. An event that stretches over two weekends with a host of programs and events highlighting the unique heritage of Forks and the surrounding communities. The annual Fish & Brew Contest with samples and great prizes is on Saturday. www.forkswa.com. October 1-3 North Olympic Fiber Arts Festival, 9 a.m., Museum and Arts Center, 175 W. Cedar St., Sequim. Interactive fiber arts event with a museum exhibition, educational demonstrations of fiber processes, hands-on projects with children and adults, sale of local artists’ work and information about local fiber activities, groups, businesses and instructional resources. 360-861-2257, www.fiberartsfestival.org. Fort Worden Wildlife and Nature Art Expo, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. at Fort Worden Conference Center Commons, Port Townsend. Original works of wildlife artists from around the country and Canada. 360-344-4401 or www.wildartexpo.org. October 2 Harvest Celebration & Farm Tour, call for times, at various farms in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley, Sequim. Sequim’s annual farm tour. Fun, entertainment, organic products and farm tours. Contact 360-681-0169. October 9-10 Dungeness Crab and Seafood Festival, 10 a.m., City Pier, Port Angeles. Crab feed complete with Dungeness crab, crab cakes, wild salmon, oysters, mussels, shrimp, clams, clam chowder, seafood and vegetable bisque, fresh organic salads and desserts. Live music throughout the weekend and crab derby. 360-452-6300 or www.crabfestival.org. October 15-17 Forest Storytelling Festival, Peninsula College Little Theater, Port Angeles. Spend the weekend listening to wonderful storytellers from around the world and join in workshops. Program begins Friday at 7:30 p.m. with a story concert. 360-417-5031. Other annual events between October 2010 and May 2011 that weren’t scheduled at press time are, by month: November: Passport to Autumn Wine Tour, Port Angeles

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

December: Various holiday events, Sequim Christmas Bird Count, Olympic Art Festival, Quilcene January: None noted February: Discovery Bay Salmon Derby, Sequim, Gardiner and Port Townsend March: • Soroptimist Gala Garden Show, Sequim. • Annual Victorian Festival, Port Townsend April: • Sekiu Salmon Derby, Sekiu • Jazz in the Olympics Festival, Port Angeles • Olympic BirdFest, Sequim May: • Rhododendron Festival, Port Townsend • Sequim Irrigation Festival, Sequim

ARTS/CULTURAL CENTERS Learn about the North Olympic Peninsula’s pioneer history, Native American cultures or sea life at the following places: Arthur D. Feiro Marine Life Center Port Angeles City Pier. North Lincoln Street at Railroad Avenue. Touch tanks containing North Olympic Peninsula sea creatures, aquariums and exhibits. Small admission fee is charged to support center. Call for hours. 360-417-6254. Commanding Officer’s Quarters Fort Worden State Park Conference Center, Port Townsend. Victorian furnishings from 1890-1910 provide a glimpse into the life of an officer and his family. Hours: June-Aug., 10 a.m.-5 p.m., daily; March-May, Sept.-Oct. weekends, noon to 4 p.m. Tours by appointment for groups. Adults, $2; children under 12 free. 360-344-4452. Forks Timber Museum U.S. Highway 101 on the south side of Forks. Logging and the development of the Forks area. Call for hours. 360-374-9663. Jefferson County Historical Society The Jefferson County Historical Society Museum exhibits illustrate the lively history of communities born in waterfront forests more than 150 years ago. Hours daily 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Adults $4, children 3-12 are $1. Passport to museum and Rothschild House $6. 540 Water St., Port Townsend. 360-385-1003. Joyce Depot Museum A railroad and logging history museum housed in a authentic railroad depot built in 1915 at the Joyce site, about 15 miles west of Port Angeles. Area history and memorabilia, photos of the Joyce-Lake Crescent area and old logging and railroad equipment. Daily 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct.-June or by appointment. 360-928-3568. Makah Cultural and Research Center Neah Bay. The largest collection of pre-contact Northwest Coast Indian artifacts with a full-scale replica of a longhouse, dioramas and artifact replicas from one of five traditional villages of the Makah Tribe, buried by a mudslide about 500 years ago. Summer months open daily, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sept. 16-Memorial Day, 10 a.m.-5 pm. Wed.-Sun. 360-645-2711. Museum and Arts Center in Sequim Regional museum, at 175 W. Cedar St., includes natural and cultural history displays and showcases the Manis mastodon discovered in Sequim, including a video from the excavation. Rotating exhibits feature

local artists, historical photographs, Irrigation Festival history, historical Sequim schools display and museum store. Free admission. 8 a.m.4 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, closed Sunday-Monday. 360-683-8110 for information and tour bookings. www.sequimmuseum.org. Museum at the Carnegie In the former Carnegie Library, 207 S. Lincoln St., Port Angeles. Operated by the Clallam County Historical Society. Main gallery features “Strong People: Faces of Clallam County.” Exhibits in the lower gallery rotate. Hours 1-4 p.m. WednesdaySaturday and special tours can be arranged by calling 452-2662. Old Dungeness Schoolhouse Listed as a Washington state historical site in 1972 and placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988. Used from 1893-1955. 2781 Towne Road, Sequim. Visitors welcome by appointment. Schoolhouse available for event rental. 360-683-4270. Point Wilson Lighthouse Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend. Originally built in 1879 atop the lightkeeper’s house, the light was moved in 1913 to the present tower. Ranging 16 miles, the light marks the entrance to Puget Sound. Tours during summer 1-4 p.m. on Saturdays or by appointment. 360-385-5520. Port Angeles Fine Arts Center and Webster’s Woods Art Park 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., Port Angeles.Exhibitions with a Northwest flavor displayed in the semi-circular hilltop gallery. Hours 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Thurs.-Sun., March-Oct.; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Thurs.Sun. Nov.-Feb. Webster’s Woods open daylight hours, year-round. 360-417-4590 (recorded information only) or 360-457-3532 (business line); www.pafac.org. Port Townsend Marine Science Center Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend. Touch tanks, aquariums and exhibits, gift shop, boat tours, beach walks, summer camps and educational programs. Natural history exhibit, marine exhibit. Seasonal hours. Adults, $5; children, $3, members free. Call 360-385-5582 or 800-566-3932; www. ptmsc.org. Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum Fort Worden State Park Conference Center, Port Townsend. Dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of coast artillery history with special emphasis on the harbor defenses of Puget Sound. Daily, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., extended hours July-Aug. on Fri.-Sat. $2 adults, $1 children. 360-385-0373. Quilcene Historical Museum 151 E. Columbia St., Quilcene. Exhibits feature Quilcene life, businesses and events, including logging, agriculture, hearth and home, Native Americans and school. Gift shop and research library are available. Hours: April-September, 1-5 p.m. Fri.-Mon. Tours by appointment. 360-765-3192 or 765-0688. Rothschild House State Park Museum Taylor and Jefferson streets, uptown Port Townsend. Built in 1868 by a prominent Port Townsend merchant and occupied by the Rothschild family for almost a century. Intact Greek Revival architecture and original furnishings. Managed by Jefferson County Historical Society. Open May 1-Sept. 30 daily, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. $4

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adults, $1 children. $6 passport gains entry to JCHS Museum and Rothschild House. 360-379-8076, 360-385-1003. www.jchsmuseum.org. Waterfront Art Gallery 115 Railroad Ave., Port Angeles. Local artists cooperative, selling painting, pottery, jewelry, glass, wood, cards, prints and magnets. 360-452-8165.

GOLF COURSES The following is a listing of North Olympic Peninsula golf opportunities. THE CEDARS AT DUNGENESS 1965 Woodcock Road, Sequim 800-447-6826, 360-683-6344 www.dungenessgolf.com PORT LUDLOW GOLF COURSE 751 Highland Drive, Port Ludlow 360-437-0272, 800-455-0272 www.portludlowresort.com PORT TOWNSEND GOLF CLUB 1948 Blaine St., Port Townsend 360-385-4547 SALT CREEK RV AND GOLF 53802 Highway 112 West, Port Angeles 360-928-2488 • olypen.com/scrv SKYRIDGE GOLF COURSE 7015 Old Olympic Highway, Sequim 360-683-3673

TRAILS/HIKES HIKING OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK Before hiking, you should know: Entry fees apply. Even on short hikes, be prepared for changing weather. Carry food, water, hat, gloves, layers of warm clothing and a raincoat. Use “leave no trace” techniques to help preserve the wilderness. Stay on trails to avoid trampling vegetation and use pit toilets where available or use the cat-hole method and pack out toilet paper. Pets are not allowed on park trails or beaches except on leash (up to 6 feet) from Rialto Beach to Ellen Creek (0.5 miles north), all Kalaloch beaches and Peabody Creek Trail. This helps protect you, your pet and wildlife. Leashed pets are allowed in campgrounds, parking areas and on roads. Pet rules differ on neighboring national forest and state lands. Note: Leashed pets are allowed on trails in Olympic National Forest. Entry fees apply. Pack out everything you pack in including food waste and garbage. Wheelchair accessible trails noted with * Accessible with assistance trails noted with ** Other trails are not recommended for wheelchairs. The term “accessible with assistance” means trails do not meet ADA standards but may be passable by individuals with sufficient upper body strength and balance or a friend to help.

TEMPERATE RAIN FORESTS Hoh ** Mini Trail. Paved 0.1-mile loop trail near the Visitor Center. Hall of Mosses Trail. 0.8-mile loop trail beginning near the Visitor Center.

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Spruce Nature Trail. 1.2-mile loop trail beginning near the Visitor Center. Quinault ** Maple Glade Trail. 0.5-mile loop beginning across the bridge from the Quinault River Ranger Station. Cascading Terraces Trail. 1.0-mile loop trailing beginning at Graves Creek campground. Irely Lake Trail. 1.2-mile trail beginning 0.7 mile before the North Fork campground entrance. Quinault Big Cedar Trail. 0.2-mile trail gaining 80 feet in elevation. The trailhead has minimal parking and is located 2 miles up the North Shore Road across from the Lake Quinault Resort. ** Kestner Homestead Trail. Self-guided 1.3-mile loop trail starting at the Quinault Ranger Station.

MOUNTAINS Hurricane Ridge ** Meadow Loop Trails. Begin from the parking lot. There are several quarter-mile and half-mile trails. ** Hurricane Hill. 1.6 miles one way, begins at the end of the Hurricane Ridge Road. The rough paved trail gains about 700 feet in elevation, giving panoramic views. Wheelchair accessible first half-mile only. Klahhane Ridge. Begins near the Visitor Center. First 2.8 miles brings hiker to a junction with the Switchback Trail. Hikers can continue or return to the Visitor Center. Deer Park Rainshadow Loop. Self-guided 0.5-mile loop to summit of Blue Mountain. Starts at the end of Deer Park Road, a steep, one-lane gravel road not suitable for RVs or trailers.

LOWLAND FORESTS Sol Duc Ancient Groves Nature Trail. 0.6-mile loop beginning 9 miles up Sol Duc Road. Sol Duc Falls. 0.8-mile one way from the end of the Sol Duc Road. Lover’s Lane Loop. 5.8-mile loop connecting Sol Duc campground, Sol Duc Falls and the resort. Mink Lake Trail. 2.6 miles one way from Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort. Lake Crescent ** Moments in Time Nature Trail. Flat 0.6-mile loop trail beginning at Lake Crescent Lodge.

** Marymere Falls. 0.9-miles one way from Storm King Ranger Station. The first 0.5 mile is accessible. Mount Storm King Trail. 2.1 miles one way from turnoff on Marymere Falls Trail. It climbs 2,100 feet. Pyramid Peak Trail. 3.5 miles one way, begins near the North Shore Picnic Area. Climbs 2,350 feet. Spruce Railroad Trail. 4.0 miles one way, begins near the North Shore Picnic Area on the east side of the lake. A designated bike trail. Heart o’ the Hills Heart o’ the Forest Trail. 2.3 miles one way, starts at Loop E in Heart O’ the Hills campground. Park Visitor Center Peabody Creek Trail. 0.5 mile loop trail beginning in the Visitor Center parking area. ** Living Forest Trail. 0.4-mile loop trail behind the Visitor Center. Elwha * Madison Falls Trail. Paved 0.1-mile one-way trail to a waterfall, starts at the Elwha entrance station. Cascade Rock Trail. Steep 2.1-mile one-way forest hike or take the level 0.6-mile loop. Both begin behind the picnic shelter in Elwha campground. Upper Lake Mills Trail. Steep 0.4-mile one-way trail from 4 miles up the Whiskey Bend Road. It descends 400 feet to the Elwha River. West Lake Mills Trail. 1.9-miles one way, begins at the Lake Mills boat launch parking area. West Elwha Trail. 3.0 miles one way in oldgrowth forest near the river; starts at Altaire Campground. Geyser Valley Loop. 6.0-mile loop trail beginning at the end of the Whiskey Bend Road. The trail can be broken down into shorter loops. Staircase Shady Lane Nature Trail. 0.9 mile one way and begins across the bridge from the ranger station. Staircase Rapids Loop Trail has a bridge out, but two 0.9-mile trails explore both banks of the river from near the ranger station. Dosewallips Terrace Nature Trail is a 1.2-mile loop trail from near ranger station. Coast Be aware of tides when hiking the coast. Pick up a tide chart at a ranger station or visitor center. Ozette Cape Alava Trail. 3.3 miles one way mostly on boardwalk from near the ranger station to the coast. Sand Point Trail. 2.8 miles one way mostly on boardwalk from near the ranger station to the coast. A 2.9-mile beach walk connects the two trails making a 9-mile loop. Mora-La Push Rialto Beach: 1.5-mile hike to arch and tide pools at Hole-in-the-Wall. Use caution if continuing north. Second Beach: 0.7-mile hike to tide pools and sea stacks from LaPush Road, 14 miles west of U.S. Highway 101. Third Beach Trail. 1.4-mile hike to a sandy beach from LaPush Road, 12 miles west of U.S. Highway 101.

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James Pond. 0.3-mile loop to a shallow beaver pond. Kalaloch ** Beach 4. 0.2-mile one-way walk from U.S. Highway 101 to a beach and tide pools, only viewpoint accessible. ** Ruby Beach. 0.2-mile one-way hike from U.S. Highway 101 to the coast and sea stacks, only viewpoint accessible. Kalaloch Nature Trail. 0.8-mile loop through coastal rain forest from near Kalaloch campground. For more information about fees or trails in Olympic National Park, visit www.nps.gov/olym/ planyourvisit/brochures.htm and click on the destination of choice.

DAY-USE PARKS JEFFERSON COUNTY PARKS For more information, call 360-385-9160. H.J. Carroll Park In Chimacum, head north on Highway 19 from the stoplight at Chimacum Road intersection, travel approximately 1.5 miles, turn right on H.J. Carroll Park Road. Picnic area, trails, sports fields, shelter, sports courts, playground, native plant gardens. Larry Scott Trail Trailhead in the Port of Port Townsend. Traveling east on Sims Way, turn right on Haines Street at the Safeway stoplight, follow road around into port, turn right, park near heavy haul-out area. Trailhead on Mill Road; coming into Port Townsend on Highway 20, turn right at the stoplight at Mill Road, approximately one-quarter mile to where trail crosses road, park on left. Picnic area, trails. North Beach North on San Juan Avenue, follow road to the left, 49th Street, turn right on Kuhn Street, follow to end in Port Townsend. Picnic area, shelter.

SEQUIM-AREA PARKS For more information, call 360-683-4905. Carrie Blake Park (city) On Blake Avenue at east end of Sequim. Turn north on Blake Avenue, travel about 1.5 blocks to park on right. Picnic, ponds, playground equipment, meeting hall, skateboard park, bandstand. Sequim Dog Park at Carrie Blake Park Located on the east side of the Guy Cole Center on Blake Avenue. Fenced, off-leash park. Separate small and large dog areas; water, on-site pet waste bags and trash receptacles. Restrictions apply. Cline Spit (county) Near Sequim. Take Sequim-Dungeness Way north from Sequim. Follow as it becomes Anderson Road to Marine Drive. About seven miles from town. Boat launch, beach access, windsurfing. Dungeness Landing (county) North on Sequim-Dungeness Way past Old Dungeness Schoolhouse, half a mile off SequimDungeness Way to Oyster House Road. Take the straight road going right and the park is at the bottom of the hill. Boat launch, birding site, picnicking. Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge (U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service) VISITORS GUIDE 2010

West of Sequim on U.S. Highway 101, turn right on Kitchen-Dick Road. Continue three miles to Dungeness Recreation Area. Go through the recreation area to the refuge parking lot. Open yearround. Hiking, wildlife watching and photography are popular activities in the refuge. Some portions are closed seasonally or permanently to protect sensitive species. Fee to access refuge and Dungeness Spit. Dungeness River Audubon Center at Railroad Bridge Park 2151 Hendrickson Road, Sequim. Take River Road exit from U.S. Highway 101 west of Sequim, turn north on Priest Road and west on Hendrickson Road to Railroad Bridge Park. 360-683-5847 for information. Tues.-Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun. noon-4 p.m. Nature center, restored historical railroad bridge across the river, hiking, picnicking, bicycling, fishing. Bird walk, 8:30 a.m. every Wednesday. Natural history exhibits, classes and presentations all year. (A partnership of the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, River Center Foundation, Olympic Peninsula Audubon Society and Audubon Washington.) Marlyn Nelson Park (county) Near Sequim. Turn north on SequimDungeness Way and then take a right east on Port Williams Road. Follow road to the end. Picnic area, boat ramp, beach access. Master Gardeners Demonstration Garden 2711 Woodcock Road, Sequim. Demonstrations of grasses, herbs, fruits, native plants, shade plants, wetlands, color garden, water-wise gardening. Pioneer Memorial Park (city) 387 E. Washington St. Picnic area, historical tombstones, re-created Indian canoe and homesteader’s cabin, meeting hall. Hall rented through garden club. Water Reuse Park (city) North of Carrie Blake Park at 202 N. Blake Ave. Walking path connects to the Olympic Discovery Trail. Band shell with open air amphitheater for musical/cultural performances. Interpretive center serves as a focal point for educating the public about reuse of water. Robin Hill Farm (county) Halfway between Sequim and Port Angeles. North on Dryke Road off U.S. Highway 101, park entrance is a quarter mile on the right. 195-acre park offering pedestrian and equestrian trails among forests, meadows and wetlands.

PORT ANGELES PARKS For more information, call 360-417-4550. City Pier North end of Lincoln Street on the waterfront. Views of the harbor and Port Angeles, Arthur D. Feiro Marine Life Center; beach access, park benches, picnic tables, playground, public restrooms, walking paths, running water, viewing tower. For a complete schedule of events, fee information and hours of center operation, call 360-417-6254. Harborview Park Located at the end of Ediz Hook. Views of Port Angeles, the inner harbor and the Olympic Mountains. Picnic tables, wind shelters, public restrooms, barbecue pits, beach access. Lincoln Park West Lauridsen Boulevard, east of Fairchild International Airport. Fishing available for youths 14 and younger. Playground, public restrooms, picnic tables, tennis courts, open fields and trail, youth baseball. Waterfront Trail Follows the waterfront of Port Angeles, extending from the Coast Guard station entrance gate on Ediz Hook to just west of the old Rayonier mill site. Five continuous miles of trail, walking path, park benches, public restrooms, beach access. Webster Park Third and Eunice streets, behind Swain’s General Store. Meeting place for the local Camp Fire organization provides rental space for community gatherings and meeting space, picnic tables, walking paths. William Shore Memorial Park 321 E. Fifth St. Indoor pool offers six lap lanes, a dive tank, several floating devices. Pool rentals, swimming lessons, exercise classes available throughout the year. 360-417-4595.

WESTERN CLALLAM COUNTY Bogachiel State Park U.S. Highway 101, six miles south of Forks. Six picnic tables in day-use area with restroom nearby, one-mile hiking trails, 36 standard campsites, six sites have power and water, dump station, restrooms with showers, kitchen shelter without electricity. First come, first served. Group camp for 16-20 people reservable at 360-374-6356. East Beach (ONP) About 15 miles west of Port Angeles off U.S. Highway 101 at East Beach Road. Picnic area, swimming. No lifeguard. Hurricane Ridge (ONP) Drive south on Race Street from downtown Port Angeles for 19 miles. Picnic, self-guided nature trails, hiking, winter sports, viewpoint, visitor information. Lake Pleasant (County) Located on U.S. Highway 101 about 10 miles north of Forks. Boat launch, beach, playground (no lifeguards). North Shore (ONP) Located on the north shore of Lake Crescent. Go around Lake Crescent on U.S. Highway 101, turn at Fairholme General Store and resort. Picnic, lake views. Pillar Point Park (County) North of Highway 112 at Pillar Point, about 10

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miles east of Clallam Bay. Open year-round. Launch for small boats, beach area, picnic shelter, tables. Quillayute River Park (County) From U.S. Highway 101 just north of Forks, turn west onto LaPush/Mora Road. Follow to Mora Road and turn right. Follow to River Park Road and turn left. River and fishing access. Rialto Beach (ONP) Take LaPush Road just north of Forks and drive eight miles. Take right at Three Rivers Resort and continue another three miles to the beach. Picnic, ocean beach, hiking, nature trails.

CAMPSITES The following is information on a variety of campsites on the North Olympic Peninsula. $$/ per night charge. 2010 State Park Fees: Standard campsite $19-$24*. A designated campsite served by nearby domestic water, sink waste, garbage disposal and flush comfort station. Utility campsite $25-$33*. A standard campsite with the addition of electricity. May have domestic water and/or sewer. Primitive campsite $12-$14*. Campsite does not include a nearby flush comfort station. Primitive campsites may not have any amenities of a standard campsite. Sites accessible by motorized/nonmotorized vehicles and water trail camping. *Higher prices include an additional fee for popular destination parks and select premium campsites. Maximum eight per site. Extra overnight vehicle fee $10 Camping at Department of Natural Resources campsites is free. To reserve a campsite, visit www. parks.wa.gov or call 888-CAMPOUT.

EAST PENINSULA Chimacum (county), on Rhody Drive in Chimacum. Picnicking, camping, vault toilet, recreational vehicles. Fallsview (ONF), four miles south of Quilcene on U.S. Highway 101 on Quilcene River Trail. Five tent, 30 RV campsites. Picnicking, camping, recreational vehicles, hiking, garbage cans. Fort Flagler State Park, eight miles northeast of Port Hadlock, on the northern tip of Marrowstone Island. 101 standard tent sites, 14 utility spaces, one dump station, four restrooms (one ADA) and eight showers (two ADA). Saltwater shoreline, picnic facilities, hiking and bike trails, water activities, military museum. To arrange guided tours of historical buildings, call 360-385-3701. Fort Worden State Park, Highway 19 to Port Townsend, left on Kearney Street, right on Blaine Street, left on Cherry Street, follow brown park signs.

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Full-service conference center, dormitories and 80 hook-up campsites (50 beach, 30 upper woods area). Dining facility and meeting rooms. A museum, two miles of beach, marine science center. Point Wilson Lighthouse and miles of trails leading to bunker and batteries. 360-902-8844. Jefferson County Fairgrounds, Port Townsend. North on San Juan Avenue, follow road as it bends to the left (49th Street), turn left on Jackman Street. 80 campsites, 18 with full hookups, 40 with power and water, 22 tent campsites. Restroom/shower facilities, picnic areas, dump station, sports field, shelter. Leashed pets welcome. 360-385-1013 Lake Leland (county) off U.S. Highway 101 on Leland Valley Road, seven miles north of Quilcene. Campsites: 22 primitive sites. Picnicking, camping, recreational vehicles, swimming, fishing, boat launch, outhouse; no drinking water. Oak Bay (county), off Oak Bay Road, two miles east of Port Hadlock. Campsites: 24 in upper park and 24 in lower. Picnicking, camping, recreation vehicles, hiking, play area, clamming, boat ramp, beach access. Old Fort Townsend State Park, about four miles south of Port Townsend. 40 campsites first come, first served; one dump station, two restrooms, one shower. Saltwater beach, forest, miles of trails; kitchen shelter may be reserved, large area available for group camping by reservation. 360-385-3595. Quilcene (county), U.S. Highway 101 south of Quilcene. Campsites: 13. Picnicking, camping, recreational vehicles, cookhouse, shelter. Rainbow (ONF), U.S. Highway 101 at Mount Walker Pass, five miles south of Quilcene. Campsites: nine, group campground by reservation only. Picnicking, camping, hiking, vault toilets. No drinking water. Seal Rock (ONF), on U.S. Highway 101, two miles north of Brinnon. Campsites: 19 tents, 16 RV. Picnicking, camping, recreational vehicles, clamming, oysters, swimming, fishing, boating, wheelchair beach-viewing area, interpretive natural trail, beach access, flush toilets, drinking water.

EAST CLALLAM COUNTY Deer Park (ONP), 18 miles south of U.S. Highway 101 on Deer Park Road, six miles east of Port Angeles. Last 13 miles is dirt, one-lane road. Not suitable for RVs or trailers. Campsites: 14 (tents only). Picnicking, camping, hiking, drinking water, restrooms. Dungeness Forks (ONF), off U.S. Highway 101, 4.5 miles south on Palo Alto Road, three miles southwest of Forest Service Road 2958. Campsites: nine tent sites. Picnicking, camping, hiking, fishing, drinking water and rest areas. $10. Dungeness Recreation Area (county). From U.S. Highway 101, take Kitchen-Dick Road north to the entrance. A 216-acre county park located at the headlands of the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge at Dungeness Spit. Camping, hiking, beachcombing and picnicking. 67 campsites, picnic tables. Fee for camping, entrance fee collected at trailhead of Dungeness Spit. Sequim Bay State Park, three miles east of Sequim on U.S. Highway 101. RV and tent camping, beach access, restrooms with showers, boat launch.

One overnight group site for 60 people, picnic shelter and campfire facilities. Reservations.

CENTRAL PENINSULA CAMPSITES Altaire (ONP), west of Port Angeles, follow U.S. Highway 101 to Olympic Hot Springs Road and south to campground. Campsites: 30. Catch and release fishing. Elwha (ONP), west of Port Angeles, follow U.S. Highway 101 to Olympic Hot Springs Road and south to campground. Campsites: 40. Picnicking, fishing. Catch and release for all species except nonnative Eastern brook trout. Fairholme (ONP), off U.S. Highway 101 west of Port Angeles at west end of Lake Crescent. Campsites: 88. Fishing, boat launch. Catch and release only. Heart o’ the Hills (ONP), south on Race Street in Port Angeles, 5.9 miles on the way to Hurricane Ridge. Campsites: 105. Picnicking, camping, RVs, hiking, trails, handicap access, restrooms. Sol Duc (ONP), follow U.S. Highway 101 west from Port Angeles around Lake Crescent, turn south at top of Fairholme Hill and follow road to hot springs. Campsites: 82. Hot springs, trails.

WEST PENINSULA CAMPSITES Bear Creek (DNR), on U.S. Highway 101, two miles west of Sappho on Sol Duc River. Picnicking, camping, RV, trailers, fishing, water access to river, restrooms, no drinking water. Bogachiel State Park, six miles south of Forks on U.S. Highway 101. Six picnic tables in day-use area, first come, first served, with restrooms nearby; one-mile hiking trails, 30 standard campsites, five sites have power and water, dump station, restrooms with shower; kitchen shelter without electricity. One site ADA compliant. Group camp for 16-20 people reservable at 360-374-6356. Coppermine Bottom (DNR), take U.S. Highway 101 south of Forks for 14 miles, follow HohClearwater Mainline for 12.6 miles, then turn right on C1010 Road. Picnicking, camping, RVs, fishing, hand boat launch, restrooms. Cottonwood (DNR), 16 miles south of Forks on U.S. Highway 101, 2.5 miles off Oil City Road on Hoh River. Campsites: seven. Picnicking, camping, trailer, boat launch, river access, fishing, restrooms, no drinking water, hiking. Falls Creek (ONF), south of Forks on U.S. Highway 101 and east at Lake Quinault Road past Lake Quinault Lodge. Campsites: 15 tent and 16 trailer sites. Picnicking, camping, kitchen shelter, trailers, water access, hiking, boat launch, fishing (subject to Quinault Tribe regulations), restrooms. Gatton Creek (ONF), south of Forks on U.S. Highway 101 and east at Lake Quinault Road past Lake Quinault Lodge. Campsites: five tent, eight trailers. Picnicking, camping, water access, hiking, fishing, swimming, self-guided tours, restrooms. Hoh (ONP), south of Forks on U.S. Highway 101 to Hoh Rain Forest Road. 19 miles to campground. Campsites: 88. One loop open all year long. Full opening July 1. Picnicking, camping, trailers, hiking, water, fishing, wheelchair access, trails, trailhead for Hoh River Trail, visitor center, restrooms. VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Hoh Oxbow (DNR), south of Forks on U.S. Highway 101 just south of Hoh Rain Forest Road. Campsite: seven forested campsites. Picnicking, camping, trailers, fishing, restrooms, RV facilities. Kalaloch (ONP), 35 miles south of Forks on U.S. Highway 101. Campsites: 169. Picnicking, camping, trailer, beach access, hiking, fishing, wheelchair access, summer ranger station, nature trail. To reserve a campsite, call the National Recreation Reservation Service at 877-444-6777 up to six months in advance of the day before your arrival date. Klahowya (ONF), off U.S. Highway 101, eight miles east of Sappho. Campsites: 30 tent sites, 14 RV sites. Picnicking, hiking, water, boat ramp, fishing, restrooms. Lyre River (DNR), on Highway 112, 4.5 miles west of Joyce. Picnicking, camping, hiking, water, fishing, restrooms, group, shelter, drinking water, wheelchair access for bank fishing. Mora (ONP), on the Quillayute River, 12 miles west of U.S. Highway 101 on Rialto Beach Road. Full opening July 1. Picnicking, camping, trailers, self-guided trail, hiking, beach access, water, fishing, wheelchair access, summer ranger station, restrooms. Ozette (ONP), at Lake Ozette southwest of Sekiu. Campsites: 15. Open year-round, may close in winter, ranger station, camping, picnicking, trailers, water, boat launch, beach access (only with six-mile round-trip hike), swimming (no lifeguard), hiking, fishing, wheelchair access. Trailhead for Cape Alava and Sand Point trails. Salt Creek Recreation Area (County), about 12 miles west of Port Angeles on the Strait of Juan de Fuca. From Highway 112 about 12 miles west of Port Angeles, turn north on Camp Hayden Road. Follow about 3.5 miles and park will be on the right. Has 92 campsites, including 39 RV hookup sites, marine life sanctuary and hiking trails. Beachcombing, camping, fishing and picnicking, park and main gate closed at dark. 360-928-3441 for reservations. South Beach (ONP), on U.S. Highway 101, 2.8 miles south of Kalaloch. Picnicking, beach access, recreational vehicles. South Fork of the Hoh (DNR), north side of U.S. Highway 101, camping, hiking at trailhead two miles from camping area. Tumbling Rapids (Rayonier), 11 miles northeast of Forks on U.S. Highway 101. Park borders Sol Duc River, picnicking, camping, covered kitchen, outdoor fireplaces, water, restrooms. Upper Clearwater (DNR), north side of U.S. Highway 101 at milepost 147, South Fork trail. 360-374-6131. Willoughby Creek (DNR), from U.S. Highway 101 east on Rain Forest Road between mileposts 178-179, right-hand side. Three campsites for tents or trailers up to 16 feet long. Picnic tables, fire grills, tent pads, vault toilets available, no drinking water. Leashed pets are permitted. 360-374-6131.

RV PARKS Cape Motel and RV Park, 1510 Bayview Ave., Neah Bay, 866-744-9944, 53 units, 14 motel units, 50 RV hookups, open space for tenting, restrooms, shower and laundry. VISITORS GUIDE 2010

Conestoga Quarters RV Park, 40 Sieberts Creek Road, Port Angeles. 800-808-4637, RV park, full hookups, pavilion, walking trails, washer/dryer facilities, volleyball net, shower rooms, Internet hookup, www.conestogaquarters.com. Crescent Beach and RV Park, 2860 Crescent Beach Road, Port Angeles. 360-928-3344, RV full hookups, tent camping, hot showers, clean restrooms, horseshoe pits, 0.5 mile private beach, www.olypen. com/crescent. Elwha Dam RV Park, 47 Lower Dam Road, Port Angeles, 360-452-7054, full service, full hookup, secluded tent sites, RV park sites, restrooms, laundry, www.elwhadamrvpark.com Forks 101 RV Park, 901 S. Forks Ave., Forks, 800-962-9964, free wireless Internet service, full hookups, 50-/30-amp service, large rig pull-throughs, free cable TV, wi-fi, showers, restrooms, botanical gardens, natural history displays, Good Sam Park with Quality 4-Star service. Close to Hoh Rain Forest, Rialto Beach, Cape Flattery and Sol Duc Falls, www.forks -101-rv-park.com. Forks Mobile Home Park. 621 Calawah Way, Forks. 360-374-5510. RV parking, full laundry, streetlights, some sidewalks, vending machines. Gilgal Oasis RV Park, 400 S. Brown Road, Sequim. 360-452-1324, 888-445-4251, 28 sites, 19 pull-throughs, some up to 87 feet long, full hookup, 50-30-20 amp, with free high-speed DSL Internet and cable TV, paved pads, clubhouse, laundry, showers and phones, www.gilgaloasisrvpark.com. Hard Rain Café and RV Park, 5763 Upper Hoh Road, Forks. 360-374-9288, six water and electric sites, seven full hookups, rafting and kayaking, gift shop, hamburgers, groceries. Harrison Beach, 299 Harrison Beach Road, five miles west of Joyce off West Lyre River Road, Port Angeles, 360-928-3006, camping, tenting, RV sites, rock hunting, seal watching. Hoh River Resort & RV Park, 175543 Highway 101, Forks, 360-374-5566, full hookups, power and water, tents and cabins, showers, full grocery store, propane and gasoline, www.hohriverresorts.com Lake Pleasant RV Park, 7 miles north of Forks, U.S. Highway 101, 360-327-0714. Open all year, 28 full hookup sites with showers, bathrooms, Laundromat, 30-amp power, pull-throughs, fishing and tent sites.

Log Cabin Resort Inc., 3183 E. Beach Road, Port Angeles. 360-928-3325, full hookups, RV and tent sites, boat rental, restaurant and gift shop, grocery store. Located on Lake Crescent, www. logcabinresort.net. The Lost Resort at Lake Ozette, 20860 HokoOzette Road, Clallam Bay, 360-963-2899 or 800-950-2899, primitive camping, cabins, small general store, deli, www.lostresort.net. Mike’s Beach Resort, 38470 N. Highway 101, Lilliwaup, 800-231-5324, cabins, campsites, private beach, kayaking, scuba, pet friendly. Port Angeles KOA Kampground. 80 O’Brien Road, Port Angeles, 360-457-5916, full hookups up to 70-foot pull-through sites, 50-amp service, LP gas, and Wi-Fi available, RV, tent, and Kamping Kabins, full hookups, electric and cable access, pool, hot tub. portangeleskoa.com. Quileute Lonesome Creek RV Park, PO Box 250, LaPush, 360-374-4338, 360-374-4333, full hookups, showers, restrooms, convenience store, groceries, post office, gas/diesel. Quileute Oceanside Resort, PO Box 67, LaPush, 98350, 360-374-5267, 800-487-1267, cabins, motel units, hike trails, marina with moorage, woodcarving/basketry-making classes, seafood in season, sea animals, tribal celebrations, www. ocean-park.org, www.quileuteoceanside.com. Rainbow’s End RV Park, 261831 Highway 101, Sequim, 360-683-3863 or 877-683-3863, 8 pull-throughs, 60-foot long, Wi-Fi, full hookups, laundry, cable, clubhouse, showers, camping, large dog play yard in fenced area, stream, www. rainbowsendrvpark.com. Salt Creek RV Park & Golf, 53802 Highway 112, Port Angeles, 360-928-2488, full-service park, www.olypen.com/scrv. Sequim Bay Resort Waterfront RV Park & Cabins. 2634 West Sequim Bay Road, Sequim, 360-681-3853, cable TV, Wi-Fi, laundry, showers, full hookups, sequimbayresort.com. Sequim West Inn & RV Park, 740 W. Washington St., Sequim, 360-683-4144, 800-528-4527. In-room coffee, microwave and refrigerator, fully furnished and equipped cottages available for weekly and monthly stays, www.sequim westinn.com. Shadow Mountain General Store & RV Park, 232951 Highway 101, Port Angeles, 360-928-3043, 40 full hookups, 13 tent sites, laundry, mini-golf, showers, gas, propane, diesel, Wi-Fi, some 50-amp spaces, www.shadowmt.com. Whiskey Creek Beach, PO Box 130, Joyce, 360-928-3489, Campsites, RV sites, cabins.

MARINAS/LAUNCHES JEFFERSON COUNTY Anderson Lake State Park: 8 miles south of Port Townsend on Anderson Lake Road. No motors. Call 360-385-9444 for current information. Bogachiel River: 8 miles south of Forks, Dowans Creek Road.

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Crocker Lake: 21 miles southeast of Sequim off U.S. Highway 101. Discovery Bay/Gardiner Boat Launch: 12 miles east of Sequim, 0.5 mile north on Gardiner Beach Road. Lake Leland: 6 miles north of Quilcene on U.S. Highway 101. Mats Mats Bay: 0.5 mile north of Port Ludlow, turn right on Basalt Beach Road. Mystery Bay State Park: East side of Marrowstone Island at Nordland. Port Townsend Bay/Hadlock Boat Launch: 8 miles south of Port Townsend at Lower Hadlock. Port Townsend Boat Haven: South end of downtown Port Townsend. Quilcene Bay/Quilcene Boat Haven 2 miles south of Quilcene on Linger Longer Road. Tarboo Lake: 12 miles south of Port Townsend at southeast end of lake.

CLALLAM COUNTY Bogachiel Rearing Pond: From Forks, take Bogachiel Road west 3 miles, northeast side of river. Bogachiel River: Access #1: From Forks, 2 miles north on U.S. Highway 101, 3 miles west on Quillayute Road, 2.5 miles southwest on LaPush Road. Access #2: From Forks, 6 miles south via U.S. Highway 101, site east of highway on west bank of river. Bogachiel River/Sol Duc River - Leyendecker Park: 7 miles west of Forks off U.S. Highway 101 and LaPush Road Calawah River: Access #1: From Forks, 0.7 mile north via U.S. Highway 101, west of highway on south bank of river. Access #2: From Forks, 1.5 miles on U.S. Highway 101, 3.5 miles east on county road, site on east bank between north and south fork. Dungeness Bay: U.S. Highway 101 to KitchenDick Road. Follow Kitchen-Dick to Lotzgesell Road. Take it to Cays Road, turn left, follow Cays to Marine Drive, turn right and the boat launch area is 0.5 mile on the left. Freshwater Bay: 10 miles west of Port Angeles off U.S. Highway 112, 2 miles north on Freshwater Bay Road. Hoh River: Access #1: 12 miles south of Forks, U.S. Highway 101. Access #2: 15 miles south of Forks on U.S. Highway 101.

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Lake Aldwell: West on U.S. Highway 101, right on Lake Aldwell Road just past Elwha River. Lake Crescent: Fairholm Campground: 28.4 miles west of Port Angeles on U.S. Highway 101. Lake Pleasant: West on U.S. Highway 101 to Beaver, turn north on Lake Pleasant Road. LaPush Marina: North on U.S. Highway 101, past Forks, turn left onto LaPush Road, left at Quileute Airport. Sol Duc River - Soleduck Hatchery: U.S. Highway 101 to 3 miles southwest of Sappho, then 10 miles north of Forks. Iverson Access: From Forks, 6 miles north U.S. Highway 101, 0.25 miles east on county road. Access #1: From Forks, 1.5 miles north on U.S. Highway 101, 3 miles west on Quillayute Prairie Road. Access #2: From Forks, 2.5 miles north on U.S. Highway 101, 1 miles east on county road on southeast bank of river. Sequim Bay - John Wayne Marina: U.S. Highway 101, turn at Whitefeather Way, turn left onto West Sequim Bay Road. Sequim Bay State Park: 4 miles east of Sequim off U.S. Highway 101.

WINERIES Artisan wineries located on the Olympic Peninsula welcome visitors year-round to enjoy their award-winning wines. Most of the wineries listed below are members of Olympic Peninsula Wineries. Information and driving directions for its members are available at 800-785-5495 or at www.olympic peninsulawineries.org. Black Diamond Winery: 2976 Black Diamond Road, Port Angeles. Hours: March-Dec. Open Thurs.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun.-Mon. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 360-457-0748, www.blackdiamondwinery.com Camaraderie Cellars: 334 Benson Road, Port Angeles. Open Fri.-Sun. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. May-Sept. 360-417-3564, www.camaraderiecellars.com Harbinger Winery: 2358 W. Highway 101, Port Angeles. Hours: Mon.-Sun., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. 360-452-4262, www.harbingerwinery.com Olympic Cellars: 255410 Highway 101 East, Port Angeles. Hours: May-Dec. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. daily, Jan.-April, Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. 360-452-0160, www.olympiccellars.com FairWinds Winery: 1984 W. Hastings Ave., Port Townsend. Hours: Memorial Day-Labor Day, noon-5 p.m. daily; Sept.-June Noon-5 p.m. Fri.Mon. 360-385-6899, www.fairwindswinery.com Sorensen Cellars: 274 S. Otto St., Port Townsend. Hours: March-Nov., noon-5 p.m. Fri.-Mon.; JuneAug., noon-5 p.m. daily. 360-379-6416, www. sorensencellars.com Hoodsport Winery: 23501 Highway 101, Hoodsport. Hours: Gift shop and wine tasting. Open daily 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Located just south of Hoodsport on U.S. Highway 101. 800-580-9894, www.hoodsport.com Finnriver Wines and Cider: 62 Barn Swallow Road, Chimacum. 360-732-4084, www.finnriver farm.com.

FARMERS MARKETS Forks Open Aire Market, Forks: Every Saturday 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Late May to mid-October next to Forks Chamber of Commerce Visitors Information Center. 360-374-6789 or contact@forksopenaire market.com. Gertie’s Farmer’s Market of Clallam County: every Saturday March-December. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at 1016 E. First St., Port Angeles. Jefferson County Farmers Market: uptown Port Townsend. Every Saturday through mid-November, 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; every Wednesday 3:30-6:30 p.m. June 13-Sept. 26. 360-379-9098. www.ptfarmersmarket.org. Port Angeles Farmers Market: Every Saturday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. year-round and during the summer, every Wednesday 3-6 p.m. June-October, at the Gateway Transit Center on Front Street, Port Angeles. Sequim Open Aire Market: 9 a.m. on Cedar Street, Sequim. Every Saturday from mid-May to mid-October. 360-683-0164. www.sequimopenaire market.com.

PET BOARDING

Aardvarks to Zebras Pet Care, Port Angeles, 360-452-1099. All Animal Boarding, Por t Angeles, 360-452-4551. Angeles Clinic for Animals, Port Angeles, 360-452-7686. Aunt Harriet’s Bed N’ Biscuit, Sequim, 360-683-5683. Country Paws Resort, Sequim, 360-582-9686. C o z y C a re Pe t B o a rd i n g , S e q u i m , 360-681-0113. D o g To w n s e n d , P o r t To w n s e n d , 360-379-3388 Dragonfire, Port Townsend, 360-385-1365 Dungeness Ranch Pet Resort, Sequim, 360-681-0939, www.dungenessranch.com. Family Veterinary Clinic, Port Angeles, 360-452-9682. Frog Mountain Pet Care, Port Townsend, 360-385-2957 Greywolf Veterinary Hospital, Sequim, 360-683-2106. Pampurred Pet Care, Forks, 360-374-7710. Paw Prince, call for appointment, Port Angeles, 360-452-9555 Rompin’ Room, Forks, 360-374-9329 Sequim Animal Hospital, Sequim, 360-683-7286 T h e C a t ’s Pa j a m a s , Po r t A n g e l e s , 360-565-1077. The Dog & I, Port Hadlock, 360-385-4116. Westside Grooming and Pet Sitting, by appointment only, 360-457-6997

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


ADVERTISER INDEX HOOD CANAL CORRIDOR Green Mountain Lavender ...........11 Hadlock Building Supply .............10 Harrison Medical Center ............133 Hood Canal Lodging Charters .......9 Hoodsport Winery .......................10 McKay Shrimp .............................11 Mike’s Beach Resort .......................9 Olympic Art Gallery ....................11 Olympic Music Festival ..................9 Pedro’s Fiesta Jalisco .....................11 Port Gamble Visitors Center ........10 Wildwood Antiques .....................11

PORT TOWNSEND & EAST SIDE Artisans on Taylor ........................15 Candle Store, The .........................15 Cheri Raab’s Body Shop ...............15 Clam Cannery Hotel ......................4 Cobalt Mortgage ..........................21 Connie Segal Natural Skin Care ...15 Diva Yarn .....................................21 Eaglemount Wine & Cider ..........21 Earthenworks Gallery ...................21 Elevated Ice Cream.......................21 Far Reaches Farm .........................21 Fountain Café ..............................15 Gallery 9 ......................................14 Gardens at Four Corners ..............21 Green Eyeshade, The ....................21 Madrona Hill Urgent Care ...........17 Northwind Arts Center ................18 Perfect Endings ............................15 Port Townsend Aero Museum ......20 Port Townsend Art Walk ..............18 Port Townsend Food Co-Op ........20 Renaissance Rags ..........................15 Sea Hag, The ................................15 Silverwater Café ...........................15 Slather ..........................................20 T’s Restaurant ..............................20 Vagabond Arts ..............................15 Wandering Angus .........................20 Wandering Wardrobe ...................15 Wild Sage .....................................15 William’s Gallery ..........................20 Wine Seller, The ...........................20 Wooden Boat Festival ..................20 Wynwoods Gallery & Bead Studio ...........................21

SEQUIM & DUNGENESS VALLEY A Dropped Stitch .........................56 A-1 Auto Parts..............................55 Alder Wood Bistro........................39 Banana Belt Kelly .........................57 Blue Sky Real Estate .....................61 Blue Whole Art Gallery ................55 Bosun’s Locker..............................37 Brigadoon Vacation Rentals..........48 BrokersGroup Real Estate.............35 Colette’s Bed & Breakfast .............48 Cottage Company ........................56 Damiana’s Best Cellars..................56 Discovery Memory Care...............53 Dockside Grill ..............................41 Doodlebugs ..................................50 VISITORS VI V IIS SITO SI TORS SG GUIDE UIDE UI D 2 201 2010 010 01

Dove’s Nest, The...........................56 Dungeness Bay Wine & Cheese ...54 Dungeness Courte ........................42 Dungeness Valley Creamery .........43 Dupuis Restaurant .......................39 El Cazador Mexican Restaurant....41 Estes Builders ...............................38 Fifth Avenue Retirement Center .135 Fortune Star Restaurant................40 Frick Drugs ..................................54 Galare Thai...................................39 Graysmarsh Farm .........................67 Great House Motel.......................48 Heritage Homes ...........................46 HiLine Homes .............................36 Hiway 101 Diner .........................41 Holiday Inn Express .....................49 Holiday Inn Plaza.........................49 Imagine Gifts & Boutique ............57 Islander Pizza & Pasta Shack ........39 Jardin du Soleil ...............................2 Jeremiah’s BBQ ............................41 John L. Scott Real Estate – Rita Adragna .............................43 Kim Jensen ................................44 Local Offices .............................29 Tanya Kerr.................................44 Lavender & Lace ..........................56 Lavender Connection, The ...........32 Lavender Farms Map ....................31 Les Schwab Tires ..........................66 Lipperts’ Restaurant .....................40 Lodge at Sherwood, The .............135 Lost Mountain Lavender ..............32 Lost Mountain Lodge ...................49 Mariner Café ................................40 McComb Gardens........................43 McHugh Realtors .........................44 Moon Palace Chinese Restaurant..41 Museum & Arts Center................28 Nelson’s Duckpond & Lavender ...32 Northwest Native Expressions ......54 Oak Table Café ...........................41 Old Mill Café...............................40 Oliver’s Lavender Farm .................33 Olympic Bus Lines .........................5 Olympic Game Farm....................35 Olympic Lavender Farm...............33 Olympic Peninsula Homes~Land .38 Olympic Restaurant Equipment .....3 Olympic Theatre Arts ...................35 Paradise Restaurant ......................39 Past Tyme Present Tyme ...............54 Peninsula Heat .............................47 Peter Black Real Estate .................44 Phillips’ Hallmark ........................55 Pondicherri...................................54 Primary Care Sequim ...................60 Professional Real Estate ................44 Purple Haze Lavender ..................32 QFC ............................................55 Quality Inn & Suites ....................48 Quiznos Sub Shop........................41 R&T Crystals ...............................55 Re/Max Real Estate – Liz Parks ....42 Red Rooster Grocery, The.............61 Remote Control Hobbies .............54

Riverside House ...........................49 Roji Home & Garden ..................57 Sawadee Thai Cuisine .................135 Sean Clift Mortgage .....................44 Sequim Arts .................................42 Sequim Gazette ............................38 Sequim Lavender Company .........32 Sequim Lavender Festival .............30 Sequim Retreats ...........................49 Sequim Vehicle Licensing .............43 Sequim West Inn ..........................48 Sequim-Dungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce .............28 Serenity Thrift Shop .....................57 Sergio’s Mexican Restaurant .........40 Sherry Grimes Designs…………..29 Sherwood Assisted Living………135 Sunny Farms Country Store .........53 Sunshine Café ..............................40 Sunshine Herb & Lavender Farm .33 Taco Time ....................................39 Tarcisio’s Italian Restaurant ..........41 Torres Real Estate .........................44 Treasures & Thrift ........................56 UPS Store.....................................55 Wasabi Japanese Restaurant ..........40 Windermere Real Estate – Local Offices ...............................3 Sheryl Payseno...........................44 Cathy Reed ...............................44

PORT ANGELES Adventures Thru Kayaking ...........99 Aiport Café ..................................85 Alley Cat Boutique .......................96 Art Supplies Unlimited.................95 Baskin Robbins ............................86 Bella Italia ....................................86 Blue Flame BBQ ..........................87 Brown’s Outdoor ..........................79 Café Garden .................................87 Captain T’s...................................97 C’est Si Bon .................................85 Charming Consignments .............96 Clallam County Fairgrounds ........91 CliniCare .....................................89 Cock-a-doodle Doughnuts ...........87 Cornerhouse Restaurant ...............85 Days Inn ......................................93 Drake’s Pizza & Subs ....................85 Elwha River Casino ....................134 Family Farm, The .........................96 Feiro Marine Life Center ..............92 Fiesta Jalisco Mexican Restaurant .85 Granny’s Café ..............................86 Kenmore Air ................................79 Kokopelli Grill .............................86 Landing Art Gallery, The ..............88 Maria’s Mexican Restaurant ..........85 Mobuilt RV ..................................96 Movie House, The ........................95 Northwest Fudge ..........................97 Odyssey Books .............................97 Olympic Bus Lines .........................5 Olympic Stationers.......................95 P&K Deli .....................................96 Pacific Rim Hobby .......................80

Papa Murphy’s Pizza .....................94 Peninsula College .......................132 Pettit Oil ......................................90 Port Angeles Senior Center………94 Port of Port Angeles......................99 Quality Inn ..................................81 Quiznos Sub Shop........................86 Rick’s Place ...................................86 Royal Victorian Motel ..................89 Sergio’s Hacienda Restaurant ........86 Shirley’s Restaurant.......................85 Smuggler’s Landing ......................87 Sound Bikes & Kayaks .................97 Sportsmen Motel ..........................89 Sunrise Meats ...............................88 Super 8 Motel ..............................89 Thai Peppers .................................99 Trading Post Antiques ..................95 Twice Upon A Child ....................95 Twisted.........................................96 Udjat Beads ..................................96 Unique Treasures Mall ..................95 Victoria Express............................84 Waters West .................................96 What’s In Store.............................95 Windermere Real Estate .................3 Woolly Mammoth Rock Shop ......95

FORKS & WEST END City of Forks ..............................107 Dew Drop Inn ...........................116 Don’t Tell Me What To Do.........104 Fisherman’s Widow ....................104 Forks Chamber of Commerce ....114 Forks Coffee Shop ......................116 Forks Outfitters ..........................109 Hoh River Resort .......................104 Leppell’s Flowers ........................111 Makah Museum .........................110 Northwest Coast Attractions ......119 Olympic Suites Inn ....................105 Pacific Inn Motel ........................111 Pacific Pizza ................................110 Quileute Enterprises ...................117 Quileute Oceanside Resort……..136 Rayonier.....................................115 Ron’s Food Mart.........................105 South North Gardens .................116 Sully’s Drive-In ...........................105 Washburn’s General Store ...........118 West End B&Bs .........................112 West End Thunder .....................110 Whitehead’s Auto Parts ..............120

PENINSULA-WIDE Artists...........................................62 Bed & Breakfasts ..........................75 Business Services ..........................72 Churches ................................64, 65 Clubs & Organizations ................63 Java Joints ....................................51 Nurseries ......................................73 Pet Services...................................59 RV/Campgrounds ......................101 Wineries .......................................78

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ELWHA RIVER CASINO . . . HOME OF THE HOTTEST SLOTS IN TOWN!

e r a u q S 7000 ! n u F f o Feet Featuring Over 100 Electronic Slot Machines!

River’s Edge Deli

&

Barista Bar

Coffee & Specialty Drinks, Lunch & Dinner Specials Mouth-Watering Menu Items Shuttle Bus Available 7 Days a Week!

WEEKLY EVENTS

631 STRATTON RD. PORT ANGELES, WA 360-452-3005

SUNDAYS, 12/NOON – 4:00PM: ELDERS AFTERNOON To honor all Elders, we have special events, prizes, and activities every Sunday, from 12pm-4pm. Elders earn DOUBLE POINTS every Sunday from 12pm-4pm MONDAYS, 7:00PM – 10:00PM: GUY’S NIGHT OUT Monday nights at the Elwha River Casino are all about the guys! From 7:00 – 10:00pm every Monday, we’ll be catering to the men… round up the boys and come on down to the hottest slots in town! Guys earn DOUBLE POINTS every Monday night, 7:00 – 10:00pm TUESDAYS, 7:00PM – 10:00PM: LADIES NIGHT Oh yes, it’s Ladies Night…every Tuesday night from 7:00-10:00pm at the Elwha River Casino. Bring the girls and have some fun with us! Ladies earn DOUBLE POINTS every Tuesday night, 7:00 – 10:00pm WEDNESDAYS, 9:00AM – 9:00PM: SENIOR DAY It’s on Wednesdays at the Elwha River Casino. 9am to 9pm every WEDNESDAY! Bring your friends and head to the Elwha River Casino for double points, senior deli specials and prizes for the 55 and older crowd… or hop on the shuttle bus and leave the driving to us! For shuttle bus information, give us a call at 452-3005! It’s SENIOR DAY every WEDNESDAY, 9am to 9pm at the Elwha River Casino…HOME OF THE HOTTEST SLOTS IN TOWN!

WWW.ELWHARIVERCASINO.COM Directions to the ELWHA RIVER CASINO… COMING FROM THE EAST: From Port Angeles, take Front Street to truck route, turn right onto Lauridsen Boulevard. Follow Lauridsen Boulevard, which turns into Edgewood Drive, for 3.5 miles and turn right onto the Lower Elwha Road. Continue on Lower Elwha Road for 3.5 miles and turn left onto Stratton Road. Travel to the end of Stratton Road, the Elwha River Casino will be on your left – located at 631 Stratton Road, P.A.

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COMING FROM THE WEST: From Highway 101 West, turn left onto Dry Creek Road. At the end of Dry Creek Road, turn left onto Edgewood Drive. Continue on Edgewood Drive for 1 mile and turn right onto Lower Elwha Road. Continue on Lower Elwha Road for 3.5 miles and turn left onto Stratton Road. Travel to the end of Stratton Road, the Elwha River Casino will be on your left – located at 631 Stratton Road, P.A.

VISITORS GUIDE 2010


Recommended R Reco Re eco comm mm men ende ded ed by by Nat Na tion tion nal G eogr eo grap gr aphi h c Tr rav avel eler el er National Geographic Traveler Marc Ma rcch 20 003 March 2003 Recommended by the San Francisco Chronicle 2006

Open 6 Days a Week 11 a.m.-9 p.m. (Closed Wednesdays) Special Lunch Menu 11-3 Dinner 4:30-9

(360) 683-8188 271 S. 7th Ave., Suite #31 (Behind McDonald’s)

Sequim, Washington

VISITORS GUIDE 2010

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VISITORS GUIDE 2010

Visitor Guide to the Olympic Peninsula  

The Olympic Peninsula Visitors Guide

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