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Pg.22ON H LIVING THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009 Hurricane Ridge

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Hoh Rain Forest

Supplement to the Sequim Gazette and Port Townsend & Jefferson County Leader 1


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15 20

28 30

DEPARTMENTS Recreation 8 Summer Oh my — Ozette! Food & Spirits 26 ’Round the campfire recipes

48 Events Calendar

Heart & Soul

Living End 50 The A vision is just the beginning

Good Gardening

& Then 52 Now Photographic journal

36 Living in the Thou 41

New Life 46 Your Great teachers and life lessons

The sensibility of succulents

SPOTLIGHT 10 User-friendly with beautiful views

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a glimpse of puffins 15 Get on summer cruises

to the end 30 ANeahdrive Bay

Worden: 18 Fort Joys beyond the car

Push 32 La A long way, but worth it

20 A narrated guide to the backroads

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to the top 22 Right Hurricane Ridge

An architect of democracy 37 Profi le of diplomat, internationl scholar

Fort Flagler:

Quilcene auto tour

Exploring the Hoh Rain Forest

and author James R. Huntley

Duc 24 Sol Chill out at hot springs

41 42

Community building — Jefferson County-style

On the cover: Bodyboarders come in from riding small summer waves at First Beach near La Push. Cover photo by Chris Cook

the 10th year 42 Celebrating of “Art on the Town” The outdoor sculpture gallery of Port Angeles

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009

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Contributors!COLUMNISTS Patricia Morrison Coate is the award-winning editor of Living on the Peninsula magazine. She has been a journalist since 1989 and earned degrees in Spanish from Eastern Michigan University and Indiana University. Coate joined the Sequim Gazette in 2004 as its special sections editor and can be reached at patc@ sequimgazette.com.

Jerry Kraft

is a playwright, poet and theater critic. His poetry collection, “Rapids,” was published in 2004. He reviews Seattle theater productions for SeattleActor.com and the national theater Web site AisleSay.com. In addition to his writing and photography, he teaches memoir writing at the YMCA in Port Angeles where he lives with his wife, Bridgett Bell Kraft, and their daughters, McKenna and Luxie.

Viviann Kuehl has been a landowner and resident of Quilcene since 1982, although her family ties go back to homesteading in Jefferson County in 1905. She has written about the Quilcene community and Jefferson County over the past 20 years.

Wayne Chimenti has had 30 years of experience as a tall ship sailor, rigger and sailmaker, and makes his home at the Sailor’s Rest on Marrowstone Island. He spent 13 years as captain of the Port Townsend schooner Adventuress. Now he is a “Jolly-Jack-Tarof-all-trades” working as an educator with the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding, a longboat skipper for the Wooden Boat Foundation and is involved in other traditional boat activities.

Ruth Marcus, M.A., Ph.D., has a private counseling practice in Sequim. Visit www.wideawakepublishing.com to view her book, “Inspiration.” Her Sequim Gazette column appears the fourth Wednesday of each month. She can be reached at 360-681-2205 or via e-mail at rmarcus@olypen.com.

Chris Cook is the editor and publisher

Kelly McKillip always has loved writ-

of the Forks Forum and a resident of Forks. He is the author of “The Kauai Movie Book” and other regional bestsellers in Hawaii. His book “Twilight Territory: A Fan’s Guide to Forks and LaPush” was published in May 2009. Cook is a graduate of the University of Hawaii and a veteran surfer who is attempting to adapt to the cold water waves of the Olympic Peninsula.

ing and the arts and recently has forayed into combining the two in freelance articles. She has a bachelor’s degree in biology from Marylhurst College in Marylhurst, Ore., and a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Hayward State University in California. She works as a nurse at Olympic Medical Center and volunteers at The Dungeness Valley Health and Wellness Clinic.

Karen Frank received her master’s degree in transforming spirituality from Seattle University. She is a writer and spiritual director in Port Townsend. Reach her at kdf1404@olypen.com or www.yourlife assacredstory.org.

Beverly Hoffman

writes a gardening column for the Sequim Gazette that appears the first Wednesday of each month. She is an enthusiastic longtime gardener and she can be reached via e-mail at columnists@sequim gazette.com.

Contact us P.O. Box 1750, Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-3311 Patricia Morrison Coate patc@sequimgazette.com

226 Adams St. Port Townsend, WA 98368 360-385-2900 Fred Obee fobee@ptleader.com

Vol. 5, Number 2 • Living on the Peninsula is a quarterly publication. © 2009 Sequim Gazette • © 2009 Port Townsend & Jefferson County Leader 6

Leif Nesheim was an award-winning reporter and hiking columnist with the Sequim Gazette from 2003-2006. He has a master’s degree in journalism from the University of WisconsinMadison and is the editor of the Montesano Vidette. Christina Pivarnik is a freelance writer and marketing consultant who lives in Port Townsend. Cathy Van Ruhan moved to Sequim in 1991 from Portland, Ore. She likes to dance, fly-fish and spin, weave and knit with wool. She also is learning to play the fiddle. She has two grown daughters. As Cathy Van, she wrote the Chasing Trails hiking column for the Sequim Gazette in the 1990s. She has been the Gazette’s copy editor since 1993.

Design Melanie Reed is the award-winning lead designer for Living on the Peninsula. She has been a graphic designer for the Sequim Gazette since May 2004. She has a bachelor’s degree in drawing from Western Washington University. Reed can be reached at production@sequimgazette.com. LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009

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Summer RECREATION

Oh my — Ozette! here is something magical about watching the sun’s golden orb melt into the endless vista of the Pacific Ocean. Slowly the horizon fills with honey orange that spreads across the glowing sea. The warm afterglow lingers long after the sun has hidden below the world’s rim and one by one the stars’ white pinpricks flicker to life in the deepening dark as twilight’s blue is replaced by velvety black. I’d backpacked to the westernmost point in the lower 48 states with a pair of visiting friends and we built a small driftwood fire that smoked and flickered on the beach to warm our evening reverie as the sun rested its weary head beneath the ocean waves. The 3.3-mile hike to the campground at Cape Alava sounds easy: a short jaunt on a boardwalk to the ocean shore. The stroll along the beach to the pictograms at Wedding Rocks to the south is equally enchanting. Don’t be fooled. The boardwalk can be treacherous in spots. It is quite slick when wet and the beach is an anklebending jumble of rock and gravel. The trail starts at the Ozette Ranger Station with a bridge crossing the tranquil, tannin-stained water of the

T

Cape Alava, Ozette Loop How long: 3.3 miles to Cape Alava; 9.3 mile loop. How hard: Moderate. How to get there: Take U.S. Highway 101 west to Sappho, turn north on Highway 113 to Highway 112. Take Highway 112 past Clallam Bay and Sekiu. Turn left on Hoko-Ozette Road. Road ends at the Ozette Ranger Station. Trailhead is at the station. Other information: Camping reservations and a backcountry permit are needed to camp at Sand Point or Camp Alava. Make reservations by calling the Olympic National Park Wilderness Center, 3002 Mount Angeles Road in Port Angeles behind the Visitor Center, at 452-0300.

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Ozette River. The path soon splits in the woods, one branch heading west toward Cape Alava, the other southwest to Sand Point. Each trail forms a leg of a triangle loop hike, with a 2.9-mile stretch of beach forming the third leg. My camping companions and I planned to hike just the leg to Cape Alava with a slight excursion to see the pictograms. We hoped to meet up with other friends hiking the loop. We arrived late for the trailhead rendezvous so we expected to meet them headed the other way somewhere along the trail. The path traverses an up-and-down path through young spruce and hemlock packed tightly with ferns and other greenery. Partway through the hike, the trail enters a clearing that once was the site for homesteader Lars Ahlstrom. Remnants of his cabin lie to the north near a rest area bordering the bright clearing and gnarly fruit trees stand mute testament to the pioneer past. After the prairie, the boardwalk plunges into the dark heart of an engulfing forest of Sitka spruce and fern. The sound of ocean surf and the fresh whiff of ocean air soon spur weary legs to a scenic overview of the rocky coast: the many weather-beaten rock formations and the several tree-capped islands near the shore draw the eye’s attention. The nearest to shore of these — Tskawahyah Island — is a hilly, tree-covered hump that is connected to shore at low tide but is part of the Ozette Indian Reservation and should not be trespassed. Larger Ozette Island loomed straight ahead and the Bodelteh Islands to the north must have provided a haulout for sea lions as their barking calls echoed over the gentle swell of the surf. We soon picked a campsite among the twisted spruce and shoulder-tall grass just north of the trail. Our tents pitched, we shunned our heavy packs in favor of light daypacks with our lunch and cameras for the one-mile trek south to Wedding Rocks and the hoped-for rendezvous. Although we met many denizens of the ocean tidepools — tiny purple shore crabs, mussels and barnacles, black snails, and ochre sea stars — we did not meet my friends. Apparently they passed the trailhead while we were in the

Story and photos by Leif Nesheim

Above: Ocean waves crash into rocks near Wedding Rocks on the Ozette Loop trail.

Middle: The boardwalk of the Ozette Loop trail wends its campground. way through a forest of young After a strenuous Sitka spruce and cedar. Carebeach hike hopping tide- ful, those boards can be slick pools and avoiding shift- when wet and sometimes ing rocks, we made it to boards are missing. Wedding Rocks — named Left: The evening sun melts after a pictogram depict- into the Pacific behind the ing a man and a woman Bodelteh Islands. with a sexual symbol of a bisected circle. Though there are many dozens of carved pictograms, I have found just a few. The carvings are estimated to be some 300 to 500 years old: one depicts a two-masted sailing schooner and the style is identical to 500-year-old art found at a Makah village site excavated just north of Cape Alava. Ozette Village was excavated for 11 years beginning in the late 1960s; the artifacts are stored the Makah Cultural and Resource Center in Neah Bay. The site had been occupied for some 2,000 years until being abandoned in 1913. We dallied and napped in a breezy glen beneath the boughs of spruce behind the large rock at Wedding Rocks. Had we continued south, the going would have continued its laborious way across wave-tossed stones past a headland to Sand Point, where stately spires jut out of the sea. A circular sign just past the point marks the trailhead back to the ranger station. The beach here, true to the name, is quite a bit sandier and the campsites are located just off the beach among the trees. The return boardwalk has many steps both up and down but is less up-and-down than the first leg as it wends its way through spruce and several old cedars and an understory of brushy, many-hued greens. Eventually, we all headed back to our camp and whiled away the afternoon watching tranquil deer that nibbled grasses or napped just a short distance away. As evening progressed, we built a fire from driftwood gathered on our return from Wedding Rocks and roasted brats. As the sun set, we watched the silhouette of a raccoon as it toddled along the water’s edge and cracked mussels on the rocks. We slept soundly and left the next morning long after the sun had risen.

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Fort Flagler: user-friendly with

beautiful views Story and photos by Viviann Kuehl etting away from it all and getting into nature is as easy as getting out to Fort Flagler. Located at the north end of Marrowstone Island, the fort originally was part of a triad designed to stop enemy craft from entering Puget Sound at the turn of the 19th century. Decommissioned in 1953, now it’s an interesting place to explore, with its old artillery emplacements, nature trails, museum, old buildings, beaches and even some resident goats and chickens to look at through a fence. The old fort invites imagination of its former days. What would it have been like to live here? How loud were those guns? The museum (open daily from 11 a.m.-4 p.m.) gives some clues, with its displays on the domestic arrangements of the fort’s occupants and its pictures of soldiers in action. Coastal artillery and hospital tours (conducted Wednesdays and Sundays, 10:30 a.m. for artillery and 2 p.m. for the hospital) also help to get a clearer idea of the fort’s scope and function. Volunteers are happy to help answer questions. Outdoors, the concrete forms used to contain the huge guns and ammunition remain as crannies and caverns inviting exploration. The rooms echo spookily and the interior darkness is complete. Two guns remain to give an idea of the size and the scale of the operation, which is still impressive. Beyond the fort proper, there is a forest for exploration, complete with trails and campgrounds. Trails crisscross the mixed species forest, leading to ruins, the beaches or the fort and back. Since Fort Flagler extends across the entire northern end of Marrowstone, there are plenty of choices. The beaches are user-friendly, with sand to walk on, rocks and more gun emplacements to explore and the sight of boats passing by. There is driftwood to make your own fort and sea creatures to find at low tide. Campgrounds and rentals of some Left: The trails at Fort Flagler include this of the former officers’ housing are availsection of boardwalk. able for overnighters. The flat, beach Top: The decommissioned campground on the Port Townsend side guns still have the has a panoramic city view across the wapower to awe. ter and a playground for small children.

G

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LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


Right: This group found a sea star or starfish on the beach at Fort Flagler.

the camping areas but c not no in the buildings. Reservations for all are accepted at 888R Port Townsend 226-7688 or www.parks.wa.gov but are not required if space is available. Boaters will find two launches, seven mooring buoys and 256 feet of moorage Fort Flagler dock in Kilisut Harbor. Daily launching State passes are $7, moorage is $10 or 50 cents Park per foot. Special events include six summer concerts. Scheduled are Hank Cramer on co June Jun 27; Deadwood Revival, July 4; Danny Schmidt, July 18; Jason Harrod, Aug. 1; Navy Schm Northwest, Aug. 15; and the Port Townsend Band N Summer Band, Aug. 29. Summe From Port Townsend, take Highway 19 south F The forest campground has the thrill of nature all to Highway 116 (Ness Corner Road). Follow Higharound. There are a couple of group campgrounds way 116 and turn on Flagler Road and follow it into and primitive sites for bicyclists. Nightly rates are the park. It’s about 10 miles and 20 minutes from $14 for walk-in sites, $19 for standard, $22 for the QFC in downtown Port Hadlock. Jefferson premium and $25 for utility sites. Retreat and va- Transit’s closest bus stop is about six miles from cation housing rentals are also available in the old the fort, on Fort Flagler Road. The park is open fort buildings. Well-behaved pets are welcome in from 6:30 a.m. to dusk.

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LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


Get a

glimpse of

puffins on summer cruises By Christina Pivarnik hether you’re an avid birder or you simply enjoy being out on a boat in Puget Sound on a summer evening, Puffin Cruises, hosted by the Port Townsend Marine Science Center and Puget Sound Express, have something for everyone in the family. Colorfully marked tufted puffins herald summer in the sound. Most of the year they live in the ocean, far from land, but for a few brief weeks in the summer, they come ashore to breed and raise their chicks. A favorite nesting place for them is on Protection Island — a National Wildlife Refuge — and the primary destination of the cruises. Roger Risley, a local naturalist, accompanies the cruises aboard the comfortable 65-foot motor yacht Glacier Spirit. He’s been providing educational and entertaining commentary for more than 15 years about the wildlife, geology, weather patterns and natural environment of the island. As for bird watching, puffins are always the favorite. They love to pose for photos, “hamming” it up and aren’t the least bit camera-shy. “A lot of folks think puffins are endangered, but when I tell them there are over 2.5 million, they’re pleasantly surprised,” Risley says. Puffins nest on islands covered with grass and soft soil, like Protection Island, so they easily can dig a long tunnel in the ground with their beaks. They loosen the dirt and then with their feet, kick it out the burrow entrance. At the far end, the female lays one egg. Both parents share the job of keeping the egg warm and feeding the chick when it hatches. When it’s time for the chick to leave the nest, its parents simply fly away. The hungry baby learns to fly and feed itself in true “sink-or-swim” fashion by diving off the cliff toward the sea in search of its next meal.

W

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009

Above: A Puffin Cruise affords a unique opportunity to see the birds in their natural habitat. And, of course, the cruises also encounter innumerable other bird and mammal species in wild Discovery Bay. Photo courtesy Puget Sound Express

Top: Puffins have heavy bodies to help them dive as deep as 200 feet below the surface. Their short wings are better for “flying” underwater than flying in air. Photo by Steve Mullensky

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puffin

Cruises

Puffin Cruises are offered on Saturday evenings July 11, 18, 25, Aug. 1 and 8. They depart from the Point Hudson Marina in downtown Port Townsend at 6 p.m. and return at 9 p.m. Cost is $55 per person ($50 for Port Townsend Marine Science Center, Burke Museum, Audubon or Washington Ornithological Society members). Reservations are required for each trip and may be made by phone at 360-385-5582 or 800-566-3932 or e-mail: cruises@ptmsc.org. Please note that PTMSC can’t guarantee you’ll see puffins, but they promise to give it their best. All proceeds for the cruises and sail will benefit the PTMSC’s educational programs.

The name puffin originally meant eant “fatling.” In the last half of the 1800s 0s the puffin was given the scientific Protection name of Fratercula arctica, which Island means “little brother of the north” in Latin. That could also be interpreted as “little friar,” alluding to the puffin’s black and white plumage, reminiscent of a friar’s robes. Another thought is that the little friar was derived from the puffin’s habit of holding its feet together when taking off, suggestivee of hands clasped together in prayer.. People used to claim that a puffin actually was a cross between a bird and nd a fish because of its excellent ability to swim im underwater. Puffins have heavy bodies to help them dive as deep as 200 feet below the surface. Their short wings are better for “flying” underwater than flying in air. A Puffin Cruise affords a unique opportunity to see the birds in their natural habitat. They may be the star of the show this summer, but don’t discount the wild, natural beauty of Protection Island or the many populations of other birds and marine species. As Risley eloquently sums it up, ”Protection Island is a sample of the real world. Every animal seen is a member of a population. It isn’t a trip to the zoo; it’s a window into a world we never get to see any other way.”

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Approximately 70 percent of the nesting seabird population of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca nest on Protection Island, which includes one of the largest nesting colony of glaucouswinged gulls in Washington. Photo by Steve Mullensky

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Fort Worden: Joys beyond the car Story and photos by Viviann Kuehl

hen you think of Fort Worden, what comes to mind may be a blend of history, arts and nature, all next to a charming Victorian seaport. This is all very well, but if you make it past all the distractions you can see from your car, you will find the joys of walking, running or bicycling the trails of Artillery Hill. At the turn of the 19th century, military operations groomed this hill overlooking the Strait of Juan de Fuca into a fortified military installation with tons of concrete. All told, 41 big guns occupied a dozen batFort teries. Worden What remains today is the spare elegance of the concrete structures with some huge iron rings, doors and railings. All the guns have been removed, for fighting elsewhere in World War I or for scrap. The electric generators, wiring and the machines to manage and maneuver the big guns and their artillery all are gone now. In the intervening century, the Port woods have grown up again around the Townsend emplacements, Fort Worden has become a state park and there are trails to enjoy that thread through the woods and the remaining concrete forms, luring your imagination to recreate scenes of the past. To help with that, the Coast Artillery Museum (open daily from 11 a.m.-4 p.m.), Friends of Fort Worden and the park have erected signs with detailed descriptions and historical photos among the batteries. The Vault of Memory, once a home to the Army Corps of Engineers at the fort, has become a tribute in poetry. Of the original building,

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Above: The bunkers at Fort Worden are fun for everyone, but a real joy for young children who love to climb on them and explore their dark and spooky inner chambers. Most of Fort Worden’s trails take you past old military installations that once supported large cannons.

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Top: Views stretch in every direction from atop the hill. Here, hikers look down on the buildings below and the beach that stretches toward Port Townsend.

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


only the outline of the foundation, the concrete vault that housed their plans and some pillars remain. You can find some fitting and melancholy works of poet Sam Hamill mounted on pillars. Or you can take the poems to heart and just join the deer in enjoyment of the forest for itself, with wildflowers, quiet, woodland scents and occasional echoing cries from visitors and gulls. At Battery Tolles you’ll find spectacular views of the strait and beyond from a meadow white with English daisies, a perfect place for a picnic or summer reading. The park boasts 12 miles of hiking and biking trails, including five miles that are ADA compliant; you can loop through them to make as long a trek as you like. For all of Fort Worden’s other ongoing and special events, including kayaking, concerts, crafting workshops, lectures and readings, check out the full calendar online at www.parks.wa.gov/ fortworden/events.aspx. To find Fort Worden State Park, coming into Port Townsend on Highway 20, take a left on Kearney Street, right on Blaine Street, left on Cherry Street and follow signs into the park. The park and its trails are open from 6:30 a.m. to dusk. Jefferson Transit Route 12 Fort Worden runs hourly from 8:35 a.m.-5:35 p.m. daily from the Haines Place Park & Ride. To find the park office and lots of information, turn right at the first park stop sign, go to the fourth building on the left (next door to the Coast Artillery Museum). The park office is open daily at 8:30 a.m., closing Sunday through Thursdays at 4:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays at 7 p.m.; phone 360-344-4400 for the central desk or 344-4412 for a trails ranger. Information also is posted on a reader board outside the office.

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19


Quilcene Auto Tour A narrated guide to

the backroads Story and photos by Viviann Kuehl

Left: Come around the bend and suddenly you are rewarded with amazing vistas. Pick up a free tour packet at the Quilcene Ranger Station. Included are a tape and CD option for listening while driving. Below: Lords Lake, the source of Port Townsend’s water, is one of the sights on the Quilcene Forest Service auto tour.

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you’ve ever wondered what’s going on in the mountains in the heart of the peninsula, the U.S. Forest Service’s Quilcene Ranger District offers the chance to get up close and personal through a pair of self-guided tours of the northeast corner of the Olympic Peninsula. If you are heading toward Sequim from Quilcene in no particular hurry, the tours make a nice alternate route, but be prepared. This is life in the slow lane, on gravel roads with turnouts and a few potholes, so be careful. Pick up a free tour packet at the Quilcene Ranger Station. Included are a tape and CD option for listening while driving and at designated stops, a day pass and a booklet with additional information, activities, historical photos and a map. You’ll hear dialogue between two Forest Service employees, Scott and Emily, supplying facts about the area, along with a bit of drama, as you take in the scents, sights and sounds of the forest. Like a treasure hunt, spotting the markers takes you through a range of habitat and ecosystem changes in the 155,000 acres of the Quilcene Ranger District. The two tour choices are based on ecosystem issues (Tour A) and history (Tour B) and their impacts on forest management practices. For both tours, the recording is about an hour and a quarter, and the tour drive is about 35 miles. At the end, you turn in your tour materials and continue on. Tour A ends at the lovely Palo Alto valley, where you can spot crumbling buildings of the pioneers in the grassy fields on your way back to U.S. Highway 101 near Sequim. At its midpoint, Tour A offers the option of a hike up to Mount Zion, the Quilcene District’s most accessible hiking trail to a spectacular scenic overlook of the Strait of Juan de Fuca. On a clear day the area around Port Townsend, from the Olympics out to the Cascades, is spread out before you like a living map, with the blues of sky and water fading into the distance. You easily can see all the way to Canada.

If

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


Sequim This trail to the summitt viewpoint is 1.8 miles, rising 1,323 feet, to the 4,273-foot summit. Popular with families with young children, the trail Olympic is suitable for all ages and National takes about three hours Forest round trip. If you opt for Quilcene the hike, be sure to bring a water bottle, as there is no water source on the trail. Tour B follows the Snow now Creek watershed to highlight ght the history of the area and explore ore the impact of wildlife, fisheries and watershed issues on forest management practices. Pick up your tour packet with booklet, tape and CD and free trail pass at the Quilcene Ranger Station, on the north end of town at 295142 Highway 101 in Quilcene, where you also can find additional information, maps, books, clothing and other items. Hours are 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. daily. The phone number is 360-765-2200.

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A beautiful view of Mount Zion is part of the package on the Quilcene backroad auto tour. If you are heading toward Sequim from Quilcene in no particular hurry, the tours make a nice alternate route, but be prepared. This is life in the slow lane, on gravel roads with turnouts and a few potholes. Photo by Leif Nesheim

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21


RIGHT TO THE TOP

Hurricane Ridge Story and photos by Jerry Kraft Port Angeles

Sequim

Hurricane Ridge Olympic National Forest

Above: Hiking around Hurricane Ridge is a delight for everyone from the most casual stroller to the serious hiker. It really is like standing on top of the world.

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Top: The drive up to Hurricane Ridge is only 15 miles from Port Angeles, but ascends nearly a mile in elevation. It’s a breathtaking trip.

The

45-minute drive from Port Angeles to Hurricane Ridge, the gemstone in the crown of mountains within Olympic National Park, really does feel like a climb to the top of the world. Although only 15 miles, you climb to a mile in elevation. At several points as you ascend the winding road, not always open in winter, you can pull over and look out on the expanding world beneath you. Half-way up you can see clearly all the way down to Port Angeles, to Sequim and the Dungeness Spit, and across the water to Vancouver Island and Victoria. On a clear day, a snowcapped Mount Baker is visible to the east. Farther along, the views become more removed from the coastal lowlands and transform into the alpine meadows and towering mountains of the Olympic range. Distances become abstract and the mountainside just beyond the valley immediately beneath you may be miles away. Similarly, the peaks that seem just beyond your grasp would take days of strenuous hiking to reach. What becomes obvious as you climb in elevation is that these landscapes are vast, the forests and valleys and rivers and mountain peaks all achieving a scale that is truly monumental. When you arrive on the summit, get out of your car and walk to the path lining the edge — the view is literally breathtaking. This vantage point draws visitors from around the world and no one is disappointed by the view, winter or summer. The National Park visitor center offers orientation to all the attractions that begin from here and information about all that is visible from here. You also can have a beverage or a light lunch in the snack bar or eat your picnic on the tables outside. This also is the starting point for a wide range of hiking trails to further explore the park or to find a special place to eat your sandwiches and potato salad. One of the best things about Hurricane Ridge is its accessibility to all. For those with mobility challenges, simply

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


The high mountains are only accessible to the most experienced and expert climbers and hikers, but they are visible to any sightseer.

the destination of the visitors center provides extraordinary vistas. Deer and even elk, as well as smaller animals and birds, gather comfortably in the presence of visitors. A short, relatively undemanding trail to the Hurricane Ridge meadow leads people around the summit area, opening onto views back toward Port Angeles or from a higher vantage point into the mountains. It is handicapped accessible. More fit or experienced hikers can set off from a trailhead a couple of miles before the visitor center on the Hurricane Hill trail. Also handicapped accessible, it is a more strenuous hike. For the serious hiker, the Klahane Ridge Switchback Trail climbs nearly 1,500 feet past waterfalls and open meadows and takes you to amazing views of the rocky peaks and distant forests. The vegetation and wildlife that can be seen here is abundant. Hiking deep into the park, other trails will take you to lakes, rivers and forests where you can camp for days or even weeks. Expert climbers with professional guides can climb the glaciers and snow-capped mountains.

During the winter, Hurricane Ridge is the premier spot on the Olympic Peninsula for downhill and cross-country skiing, as well as snowshoeing treks. A sunset from Hurricane Ridge is an inspiring sight and on summer evenings local astronomy enthusiasts often gather to look through the crystal clear skies to distant planets and stars. Bird watchers love these trails for finding rare and enchanting birds, and the variety of plant life makes it a perfect spot for amateur botanists. Families can explore with children of all ages and one of my favorite sights is a family heading out hand in hand down one of the trails, picnic basket at the ready. Admission to the park is $15 per carload for seven days or $30 for a one-year pass that gives you entrance to any of the national parks on the peninsula. Extended hiking and camping must

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be pre-arranged with the NPS. But for the casual visitor, the easy drive to the park center is an exceptionally easy and pleasant journey into a landscape unrivaled anywhere in the world. Standing on the ridge, looking out on the enormity of the natural beauty, one can’t help but feel grateful for being alive and for being at such a glorious place on earth.

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23


Sol Duc Hot Springs Chill out at the

Story and photos by Patricia Morrison Coate

hen driving from Sequim to Sol Duc Hot Springs, it’s a two-hour trip that’s over before you realize it. Shortly after leaving Port Angeles, U.S. Highway 101 meanders, through emerald forests and past teal blue Lake Crescent, for 27 miles to the turn-off for Sol Duc Hot Springs Road. Within a mile or so is the entrance to Olympic National Park — pay $15 per carload for seven days or buy a yearlong park pass for $30. After you’re waved through, you enter a green Lake Crescent cathedral that grows more lush with each bend Port Angeles in the road. The greens and the blue from forest and sky cast a relaxing frame of mind. From time to time, the frothy Sol Duc River runs near the roadway and there are several turn-outs to pause Olympic National Sol Duc and experience its power. Farther down the road, a Forest Hot Springs sign on the right announces the Salmon Cascades. A one-minute hike brings you to a lookout over the rushing river that tumbles up and down, over and through an obstacle course of boulders before returning to calm again. In good salmon years, adults will jump these cascades, migrating upstream to spawn. The 12-mile trip from the highway ends at Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort, open from May 1-Oct. 24. With your swim suits, towels and flip-flops in hand, pay the entry fee, shower, change and luxuriate in natural mineral springs from morning until twilight. The water is warm, warmer and warmest — 99 to 104 degrees Fahrenheit — and turns tight muscles into gelatin. The largest pool is ADA-compliant and there’s a wading pool, too. A Quileute legend has it that the pools are dragon tears. In the Quileute language, Sol Duc translates as “sparkling water.” According to the resort’s Web site at www.visitsolduc. com, water from rain and melting snow seep through sedimentary rock deep within the earth, mingling with hot water and gasses from cooling volcanic rock. The water, now mineralized, rises back up into the three pools. When the water is drained daily, the process refills the pools. Cool off with a dunk in an ample freshwater pool. Chaise lounges for tanning are provided but they’re claimed quickly, so you might Above: Visitors enjoy the view above the want to bring an easily collapsible one. Toss your beach towel Salmon Cascades on the Sol Duc River. Top: The river churns where adult salmon jump the cascade to spawn up stream.

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W

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


in a grassy area and unwind. The resort has a poolside deli and an indoor restaurant that serves breakfast and dinner. Even in summer, because you are in the Olympic Mountains, it’s recommend to bring your shorts, sweaters, long pants, long-sleeved tops and jackets, rain gear, comfortable shoes and hiking equipment. Lovers Lane Loop, a six-mile trail beginning at the west end of the resort’s parking lot, takes you through old-growth forest to Sol Duc Falls, three roaring, spraying cascades. When you leave the resort, turn right on Sol Duc River Road and follow it to a shorter hike to the falls. If you plan on making it more than a day trip, the National Park Service operates Sol Duc Campground with 82 sites in old-growth forest near the resort. Staying in the resort’s one- and two-bedroom cabins requires advance reservations. Call 866-476-5382.

Above: From May into October, the Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort is a destination for relaxation.

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Above: Nearby hiking trails are carpeted with draping moss and table-sized ferns.

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&

FOOD Spirits

Hobo Dinner

Ingredients: Hamburger patties person 1 medium-sized potato per 1/2 an onion per person Butter or cooking oil er Salt, pepper and garlic powd

t the food Add butter or oil to preven the meal ap Wr from sticking to the foil. h wit a second up tight and then re-wrap sheet of foil. or directly Place over the grill or fire 30 minutes or on hot coals. Bake for about ked. until hamburger is fully coo

Preparation: Helpful tips: ut 10-14 into patties Lay a sheet of tin foil, abo Making the hamburgers r rge bu ham a ce Pla at. fl wn g them in a inches long, do ahead of time and placin to son sea and l foi the of in tin foil saves patty in the center plastic baggie or wrapping er. wd po lic gar and taste with salt, pepper o and place time later. ? Throw in Thinly slice a washed potat Want to spice up the recipe the same Do r. rge bu ham of choice. s the ble of eta on top some corn or other veg l Mililler ke Mi ike . n. M Mi o io ion d n on a an ley an le th an shhle Assh with wi wit by A ed by tted bute ibu ribu ntri nt Co Contr

’Round the Campfire Recipes It’s difficult to improve on s’mores, that quintessential camper’s dessert. But when you need a meal with a little more substance to fuel your camping activities, try one of these delicious campfire dinner recipes.

C hick e n Fajit a s

Ingredients 12 fajita-sized fl our tortillas 1 Walla Walla sw eet onion, sliced 2-3 cloves of garl ic or equivalent garlic powder 2 10-ounce cans chicken 1-2 red bell pepp ers 1 yellow wax pe pper 1-2 green pepper s 1 jalapeño (optio nal) 1 16-ounce jjar of f saals lsa soour ur ccrre reeaaam m, ol o iv ives e aan ndd ggrra n rat ateed ed ch che hee eesee

eds 4) fe ( l ia c e p S e n o st w o ll Ye

spatula turning with a Cook potatoes, nning to til they are begi un lly s: na io nt ie as ed oc Ingr brown and crisp. d Spam cooking oil d ce di d an ed el onions with cube pe d , ce es di to ta in ir po t St se rning 4 Rus htly browned, tu ig sl d til be un cu , ok co am and 1 can Sp uently. with spatula freq pep4 eggs gs, milk, salt and ilk In a bowl, stir eg rn Tu . 2 tablespoons m et skill g mixture into er eg pp pe ur & Po lt a r. sa ul pe at sh sp da a d (optional) gg mixture with /e ce m di pa n, /S io to on ta te po hi 1w gs are set. Enjoy! ashiell oking until eg co gh ou tsene and Mike D en Pa t by ea ed H ut n: ib tr io at on C Prepar bottom. illet to cover the oil in a heavy sk

W hit e Chili

26

Preparation: Saut é onion until tr ansparent; add garl ic and cans of ch ic ken. Sauté until liqui d from chicken almost has evaporated . Add peppers, stir for a minute, redu ce heat and co ver for 5 minutes. Add al l of salsa or leave it on the side. Spoon chic ken mixture into warm tortilla. Top with salsa, sour cream , sl iced black olives, grat ed cheese. Contribbu ut uteedd by by Cheery ryl Reeeeedd

(Qu ick an d Ta sty)

Ingredients: Preparation: Sauté shallots and garlic Olive oil cloves in a soup pot with olive oil. Cook 3 chopped shallots until fragrant. 3 garlic cloves Add rest of ingredients except lime and 2 10-ounce cans chicken heat thoroughly. Stir in the lime’s juice. 16 ounces canned green salsa Season to taste with salt 10 ounces diced tomatoes and pepper. 10 ounces chicken broth Contributed by 2 15-ounce cans cannellini beans, drained . Cheryl Reed 1 lime Salt and pepper LIVING ON THE PENINS PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009

27


y t i n u m m Co ng

i d l bui son County-style — Jeffer

With W 30 years in sail training vessels, including 13 years as skipper of the By Wayne schooner Adventuress, Chimenti knows the sea, Chimenti working with youths and maritime education. Chimenti and Van Cleve put together the first maritime program for Jefferson County in 1993 — hey gather evPuget Sound Explorers. It continues today, sponery Thursday sored by the Wooden Boat Foundation. — high school“They call Port Townsend ‘Sailorstown.’ We ers of all grades, shipwrights, are a maritime town. These classes build the next teachers, sailmakers riggers, generation of craftsmen that will keep the skills and young and old, and those just looktraditions alive,” says Van Cleve. ing to give a hand. They get together to build our community a boat. But really, The idea the boat builds our community. The idea of the “Voyaging” class came while on a This is the “Voyaging” class, brainchild journey last summer in which two boats of youths of Marci Van Cleve and Capt. Wayne Chi- accompanied the New Old Time Chautauqua for menti. Van Cleve is a teacher with Chimacum’s a 20-day tour of the San Juan Islands and North Partners in Education program and Port Puget Sound. NOTC is an all-volunteer traveling Townsend’s Independent Contracted Education performance group that brings entertainment and program, two exciting unique programs within social messages to rural communities. the public school system. Students get high school “That experience of youth on a long voyage and credits for this class. Van Cleve received a 2008 two boats side by side was amazing,” Chimenti American Red Cross “Hero” award for 25 years of says. “We came away from that trip saying ‘Let’s innovative education and excellence and “Voyag- take what we have learned and design the ultimate ing” is her latest stroke of genius. Youth Expedition Ship. And let’s build it ourselves. Students not only learn with their heads, but their No, even better, let’s teach the youth to build it hands, while meeting and working one on one with themselves!’” mentors and elders of the community. Together they That was mid-August. “We had no money, no are creating a usable gift for Port Townsend. boat builder, no shop and one month until school Chimenti is the project coordinator. started. What could go wrong?” they laughed.

T

The critical moment was when Chimenti and Van Clev Cleve presented this notion to the Northwest School of W Wooden Boatbuilding’s board, Chimenti remembers bers. “As soon as I finished telling them our idea, Jeff Ham Hammond, the lead instructor, jumped up and said, ‘Hel ‘Hell, I’ll loft that boat for you!’ Then Bill Mahler, the exec executive director, said, ‘I can’t see why anyone, given the chance to do this, would say no to this.’ And the boa board chimed in, ‘If Jeff and Bill are in, we’re in!’ At that moment I knew a dream was launched.”

Money and materials Mo ail plan rneyman s

Right: Jou

spar. rs makes a e g d o R a u q Above: Che menti him r Wayne C allace to a in rd o o tC t Ray W Top: Projec and studen

28

Local businesses, individuals and foundations ste stepped forward with wood, sailcloth, glues an and screws, as well as cash to keep the project m moving forward. This is a community volunteer

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009

Photo

s cou

project with very low overhead and administration costs, where every dollar goes to the front lines of education. At present, “Voyagers” has been the beneficiary of $20,000 worth of donations, 1,500 volunteer hours and 30 different tradesmen volunteering. “It’s the best day of my week.” says Jim Peacock, one of the great-granddaddies of Port Townsend shipwrights. Now retired, he comes to guide students through the art of oar making.

The boat The vessel is a 24-foot dory-style vessel that rows eight sweeps, carries 10-11 Voyagers and has a traditional gunter yawl sailing rig. The boat is uniquely designed so as to be virtually unsinkable, yet light enough for the crew to carry onto a beach. “You could probably drop this boat from a 747 and it would bounce,” jokes local designer Kit Africa. He and Jim Franken originally designed the hull for Mick Bird’s attempt to row around the world in 1997-1999. Bird, Africa and Peacock built the boat in Port Townsend. Starting on the West Coast, Bird made it across the entire Pacific and then from Australia to Indonesia — more than 10,000 miles under oars alone. This is a proven seaworthy design! “Mick Bird’s story was one of our inspirations,” said Chimenti. “He had a dream and made it happen. As he said, ‘You just get started and the rest follows.’” Mick jokingly called it the “Flying Sawdust Project” when he first started with nothing, but by the end he had rowed solo across the Pacific, was hooked by satellite to 32,000 schools and had Jackson Brown helping with his music video.

The greenest on the blue The vessel, called the Journeyman (a nod to the craftsmen who go through the professional stages of apprenticeship, then journeyman, then master) will be an “eco-appropriate” and low-impact vessel using sails and oars with a solar recharged state-of-theart electric outboard. The paints are sponsored by E-paints of Falmouth, Mass. They are environmentally friendly paints — even the bottom paint has no copper. “If you want to talk sustainable boat construction, it is hard to beat WEST (Wood Epoxy Saturation Technique) system,” says boat builder Russell Brown. “No rust, no electrolysis, minimum materials, a renewable resource, and if properly maintained, lasts longer than any other type of construction.”

rtesy

of Wa

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himen

ti and

Marci

Van C l

eve

The big vision It st ar te d with students sailStu ing their own boat whe dents ta through “sea trials” in re sh k Jessie Peterson la e’s me the Jo May. Then those student eant urne a full-size drawingys out of the to be yman Journeyman. boat builders took Journey. man on her first overnight voyage in June. By summer, Jefferson Who: New Old Time Chautauqua County youths, many of whom sailed What: “A Vaudeville Extravaganza” with Chautauqua in 2008 when the idea When: Saturday, June 27 at 7 p.m. of the “Voyaging” class was born, will Where: McCurdy Pavilion, Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend become Journeyman’s crew rejoining for Why: To fundraise for local youth education programs, community the 2009 Chautauqua show “Eau Canada.” gardens and land/sea stewardship. Then the young voyagers head off with Chimenti for further explorations of North Sound, including a stop at Langley, which was on the 2008 tour. By Joannie Murayama Suzie Richards of Langley works with youths on the water with SEA (Service, Education, AdThe New Old Time Chautauqua’s mission is to nurture and build venture). They have come over to watch progress community through laughter, entertainment and education. The on the Journeyman. “We love the whole idea of troupe presents family-orientated events in diverse communities, it,” she said. They are thinking of being the next especially rural and underserved populations. Chautauqua partners community to build a YES craft. with local organizations and service groups with the intention of “It all about community,” says Joannie Muinspiring creativity and supporting community. rayama, Chautauqua’s director, “We make connec“Chautauqua” was a cultural and social movement founded in the tions, then help to hold strong. This is the perfect 1870s that flourished until the time of radio in the 1920s. Hundreds example of it.” of touring groups provided entertainment, news and social messages The dream is to have youth groups from shorethroughout America. New Old Time Chautauqua was founded in side communities up and down the Puget Sound 1981 by a group of entertainers and educators, including the Flying building and voyaging in these YES craft — comKaramazov Brothers, Utah Phillips and Dr. Patch Adams. munity to community, up and down the sound, This summer’s tour, Eau Canada, will travel by boat and biodiesel exploring and studying, voyaging together or bus to maritime communities in Canada and Washington. Like last visiting each other’s “safe harbors.” year’s Aqua Chautauqua, most of the boats, captains and crews are Journeyman was launched before the school from the Port Townsend area. year was out and the students will be sailing their Th e merry band of 60-plus Chautauquans (ages 6-93) will create craft this summer. Next September, Journeyman community events with colorful parades, creative and informative starts her work in earnest — a weekly marine workshops. Chautauqua will partner with and fundraise for local science class with high schoolers, middle school youth education programs, community gardens and land/sea stewrowing, seamanship training with Boat School ardship. students, trips for all ages and whatever the people Because the Community Boat Building Project and NOTC are need — a true community boat. kindred spirits, a partnership seems natural. You are invited to an “And the best part,” says Van Cleve with a grin, evening of family-friendly music, juggling, magic, acrobatics and “is next year we build another one!” comedy. This show is a fundraiser for the Community Boat Building Project and Aqua Chautauqua II. Come support your community and see a vaudeville circus at its best.

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009

New Old Time Chautauqua

29


y t i n u m m Co ng

i d l bui son County-style — Jeffer

With W 30 years in sail training vessels, including 13 years as skipper of the By Wayne schooner Adventuress, Chimenti knows the sea, Chimenti working with youths and maritime education. Chimenti and Van Cleve put together the first maritime program for Jefferson County in 1993 — hey gather evPuget Sound Explorers. It continues today, sponery Thursday sored by the Wooden Boat Foundation. — high school“They call Port Townsend ‘Sailorstown.’ We ers of all grades, shipwrights, are a maritime town. These classes build the next teachers, sailmakers riggers, generation of craftsmen that will keep the skills and young and old, and those just looktraditions alive,” says Van Cleve. ing to give a hand. They get together to build our community a boat. But really, The idea the boat builds our community. The idea of the “Voyaging” class came while on a This is the “Voyaging” class, brainchild journey last summer in which two boats of youths of Marci Van Cleve and Capt. Wayne Chi- accompanied the New Old Time Chautauqua for menti. Van Cleve is a teacher with Chimacum’s a 20-day tour of the San Juan Islands and North Partners in Education program and Port Puget Sound. NOTC is an all-volunteer traveling Townsend’s Independent Contracted Education performance group that brings entertainment and program, two exciting unique programs within social messages to rural communities. the public school system. Students get high school “That experience of youth on a long voyage and credits for this class. Van Cleve received a 2008 two boats side by side was amazing,” Chimenti American Red Cross “Hero” award for 25 years of says. “We came away from that trip saying ‘Let’s innovative education and excellence and “Voyag- take what we have learned and design the ultimate ing” is her latest stroke of genius. Youth Expedition Ship. And let’s build it ourselves. Students not only learn with their heads, but their No, even better, let’s teach the youth to build it hands, while meeting and working one on one with themselves!’” mentors and elders of the community. Together they That was mid-August. “We had no money, no are creating a usable gift for Port Townsend. boat builder, no shop and one month until school Chimenti is the project coordinator. started. What could go wrong?” they laughed.

T

The critical moment was when Chimenti and Van Clev Cleve presented this notion to the Northwest School of W Wooden Boatbuilding’s board, Chimenti remembers bers. “As soon as I finished telling them our idea, Jeff Ham Hammond, the lead instructor, jumped up and said, ‘Hel ‘Hell, I’ll loft that boat for you!’ Then Bill Mahler, the exec executive director, said, ‘I can’t see why anyone, given the chance to do this, would say no to this.’ And the boa board chimed in, ‘If Jeff and Bill are in, we’re in!’ At that moment I knew a dream was launched.”

Money and materials Mo ail plan rneyman s

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Local businesses, individuals and foundations ste stepped forward with wood, sailcloth, glues an and screws, as well as cash to keep the project m moving forward. This is a community volunteer

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009

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project with very low overhead and administration costs, where every dollar goes to the front lines of education. At present, “Voyagers” has been the beneficiary of $20,000 worth of donations, 1,500 volunteer hours and 30 different tradesmen volunteering. “It’s the best day of my week.” says Jim Peacock, one of the great-granddaddies of Port Townsend shipwrights. Now retired, he comes to guide students through the art of oar making.

The boat The vessel is a 24-foot dory-style vessel that rows eight sweeps, carries 10-11 Voyagers and has a traditional gunter yawl sailing rig. The boat is uniquely designed so as to be virtually unsinkable, yet light enough for the crew to carry onto a beach. “You could probably drop this boat from a 747 and it would bounce,” jokes local designer Kit Africa. He and Jim Franken originally designed the hull for Mick Bird’s attempt to row around the world in 1997-1999. Bird, Africa and Peacock built the boat in Port Townsend. Starting on the West Coast, Bird made it across the entire Pacific and then from Australia to Indonesia — more than 10,000 miles under oars alone. This is a proven seaworthy design! “Mick Bird’s story was one of our inspirations,” said Chimenti. “He had a dream and made it happen. As he said, ‘You just get started and the rest follows.’” Mick jokingly called it the “Flying Sawdust Project” when he first started with nothing, but by the end he had rowed solo across the Pacific, was hooked by satellite to 32,000 schools and had Jackson Brown helping with his music video.

The greenest on the blue The vessel, called the Journeyman (a nod to the craftsmen who go through the professional stages of apprenticeship, then journeyman, then master) will be an “eco-appropriate” and low-impact vessel using sails and oars with a solar recharged state-of-theart electric outboard. The paints are sponsored by E-paints of Falmouth, Mass. They are environmentally friendly paints — even the bottom paint has no copper. “If you want to talk sustainable boat construction, it is hard to beat WEST (Wood Epoxy Saturation Technique) system,” says boat builder Russell Brown. “No rust, no electrolysis, minimum materials, a renewable resource, and if properly maintained, lasts longer than any other type of construction.”

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The big vision It st ar te d with students sailStu ing their own boat whe dents ta through “sea trials” in re sh k Jessie Peterson la e’s me the Jo May. Then those student eant urne a full-size drawingys out of the to be yman Journeyman. boat builders took Journey. man on her first overnight voyage in June. By summer, Jefferson Who: New Old Time Chautauqua County youths, many of whom sailed What: “A Vaudeville Extravaganza” with Chautauqua in 2008 when the idea When: Saturday, June 27 at 7 p.m. of the “Voyaging” class was born, will Where: McCurdy Pavilion, Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend become Journeyman’s crew rejoining for Why: To fundraise for local youth education programs, community the 2009 Chautauqua show “Eau Canada.” gardens and land/sea stewardship. Then the young voyagers head off with Chimenti for further explorations of North Sound, including a stop at Langley, which was on the 2008 tour. By Joannie Murayama Suzie Richards of Langley works with youths on the water with SEA (Service, Education, AdThe New Old Time Chautauqua’s mission is to nurture and build venture). They have come over to watch progress community through laughter, entertainment and education. The on the Journeyman. “We love the whole idea of troupe presents family-orientated events in diverse communities, it,” she said. They are thinking of being the next especially rural and underserved populations. Chautauqua partners community to build a YES craft. with local organizations and service groups with the intention of “It all about community,” says Joannie Muinspiring creativity and supporting community. rayama, Chautauqua’s director, “We make connec“Chautauqua” was a cultural and social movement founded in the tions, then help to hold strong. This is the perfect 1870s that flourished until the time of radio in the 1920s. Hundreds example of it.” of touring groups provided entertainment, news and social messages The dream is to have youth groups from shorethroughout America. New Old Time Chautauqua was founded in side communities up and down the Puget Sound 1981 by a group of entertainers and educators, including the Flying building and voyaging in these YES craft — comKaramazov Brothers, Utah Phillips and Dr. Patch Adams. munity to community, up and down the sound, This summer’s tour, Eau Canada, will travel by boat and biodiesel exploring and studying, voyaging together or bus to maritime communities in Canada and Washington. Like last visiting each other’s “safe harbors.” year’s Aqua Chautauqua, most of the boats, captains and crews are Journeyman was launched before the school from the Port Townsend area. year was out and the students will be sailing their Th e merry band of 60-plus Chautauquans (ages 6-93) will create craft this summer. Next September, Journeyman community events with colorful parades, creative and informative starts her work in earnest — a weekly marine workshops. Chautauqua will partner with and fundraise for local science class with high schoolers, middle school youth education programs, community gardens and land/sea stewrowing, seamanship training with Boat School ardship. students, trips for all ages and whatever the people Because the Community Boat Building Project and NOTC are need — a true community boat. kindred spirits, a partnership seems natural. You are invited to an “And the best part,” says Van Cleve with a grin, evening of family-friendly music, juggling, magic, acrobatics and “is next year we build another one!” comedy. This show is a fundraiser for the Community Boat Building Project and Aqua Chautauqua II. Come support your community and see a vaudeville circus at its best.

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009

New Old Time Chautauqua

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AtoDrive the End Story and photos by Jerry Kraft

day’s travel to the Makah village of Neah Bay provides a wonderful excursion along the northernmost coastline of Washington state. Winding along Highway 112, the narrow road that hugs the Strait of Juan de Fuca, every curve seems to reveal a new perspective on the water or the beaches or the forests. Allowing for several stops on the way, this is a full day’s travel and, especially if you want to hike Olympic National Park, you may want to spend the night in Clallam Bay, Sekiu or Neah Bay and return the next day. The North Olympic Peninsula has such a wealth of natural beauty and scenic variety that the most difficult part of planning a day trip is simply limiting the range of your travel. This particular trip has as definitive a destination as you could hope for. Tatoosh Island, off Cape Flattery, is the last piece of land between Cape Flattery and Asia. At Cape Flattery, you come to the end of the Northwest, the top corner of the continental United States. Getting there is a marvelous adventure. After leaving Port Angeles, the towns become smaller and more intimate, from Joyce to Clallam Bay, Sekiu and finally Neah Bay, the cultural center of the Makah Nation and the last town before Cape Flattery. A brief stop at the Elwha River viewpoint is a great place to stretch and appreciate the beautiful river and deep forest it flows through. About half an hour further west, the Salt Creek Recreation Area and County Park offers a beautiful sandy beach, a variety of tide pools formed in rocky areas and a starting points for hiking trails. Many kayakers use Salt Creek as a launch for exploring the shores of the strait and families picnic near the playgrounds or

A

Above: Tatoosh Island is the only piece of land between Cape Flattery and Asia.

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Top: Breathtaking views lie around every corner, such as the magnificent rocks that line the coast.

toss Frisbees on the playing fields. Like all of the open beachfront along the strait, weather dramatically changes the temperament and character of the scenery and many feel that a stormy winter day is even more beautiful than a sunny summer one. In the little town of Joyce, the General Store and Depot Museum is not only the main commercial center, it’s also a bit of a time capsule, harkening back to a time when everyone came to the general store to get their mail or to buy milk and eggs. Especially in this part of the world, it’s also a meeting place for the distinctive people who live in this area, many of whom have roots deep into the area’s history. It’s also a good place to make sure you have plenty of gas, because the distances between stations now get much greater. This may be a good spot to stock up your picnic basket. You also may want to be sure you have plenty of bait and tackle. Pillar Point, off Pysht River Road, is an excellent spot for fishing or crabbing. There you also can camp at about the halfway point to Cape Flattery. Another beautiful park with an inviting beach is Clallam Bay County Park. At Whiskey Creek, a privately operated resort offers rustic cabins, RV parking and access to more beautiful beaches. The next town you’ll come to is Clallam Bay and one of the best kept secrets there is a lovely, warm and hospitable bed and breakfast called the Winter’s Summer Inn. A beautifully maintained old home, it sits right to the side of the main road through town. From its back deck the view is of the mouth of the Clallam River and a spit between the river and the strait. Only a couple of curves farther down the road is the exit to Sekiu, a thriving fishing area where sportsmen and

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


women can charter boats, launch their own or fish from the docks. Just before Neah Bay, you’ll come to Bullman Beach, another beautiful outlook on the expansive beaches and massive rocks just off-shore. A comfortable, unpretentious inn there makes it another great option for spending the night. Upon arriving in Neah Bay, you’ll see a sign welcoming you to the Makah Reservation. This community of about 900 is the site of one of the prime settlements of the Makah Nation and the location of the Makah Cultural and Research Center and its museum, one of the finest Native American museums and cultural centers in the country. In addition to displaying artifacts from the Makah’s nearly 4,000-year history in the area, it also is a research center focusing on preserving the language and archiving more than 60,000 objects recovered during decades of archeological research. To spend even an afternoon in this amazing place is to get some sense of the rich history of these remarkable whaling, fishing and forest people. The isolation of

Neah Bay has preserved d and protected Makah culture and nd the deep emotional investment ent and pride of the currentt inhabitants of Neah Bay ensures its health and survival. After Neah Bay, it’s a fairly short, winding drive to the end of the road at Cape Flattery and the start of a threequarter mile trail to five observation perches for a picturesque Pacific vista. At this northwesternernmost part of the continental inental U.S., it’s also a great placee to picnic. picnic To return to Port Angeles, you can either drive back on Highway 112 or take an alternate, equally lovely route across Highway 113 to just south of Lake Crescent. By the time you pull back into Port Angeles, you should be ready for a nice dinner and a sound night’s sleep, the end of an excellent day trip.

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La Push A Long Way,

but worth it Story and photos by Chris Cook

ummertime is a season of warm beach weather and fun activities at the Quileute Tribe’s oceanfront village of La Push. Informed visitors find much to do and experience within the boundaries of this one-square-mile coastal town. The Quileutes’ home is located about 14 miles and 20 minutes driving time west of Forks. Turn off U.S. Highway 101 at Highway 110 — better known as La Push Road — to make the drive to the coast. The forest of Olympic National Park is to the east and south of the village and the Quillayute River is along La Push’s north end. The entrance to La Push runs past the Akalat Center, where many community activities take place. This area is known as the upper village and is mostly a residential area. As you approach the p coast, a spectacular vista of sea stacks, rolling waves and a long unfo inviting you to come and explore the lower village beach unfolds, co on the coast. He Here you first pass the Lonesome Creek Store & RV Park. This i is La Push’s convenience store, with the La Push post office located in the same building. Supplies for beachgoeers and travelers are available here. At the store counter, RV permits and permits for a campfire on First Beach are sold. Beach parking at the RV park is by permit only. The office of the Quileutes’ Oceanside Resort is the next stop. Here beachfront cottages and rooms can be booked. “Twilight”-themed gifts, filling shelves and counters, c are for sale in the lobby of the booking office — all made by Quileute artisans. Moving down the road toward the Quillayute River and Quile Marina, the road makes a dogleg to the right, then Quileute left. Foll Follow it down to the riverside where a landmark totem pole stands in ffront of the River’s Edge restaurant. The restaurant opens in late spring and closes for the winter. Breakfast, lunch and dinner are served, with seafood supplied by fishing boats from the adjacent marina. Booths at River’s Edge look out on the Quillayute River estuary, which is alive with seabirds, eagles and harbor seals that poke up their whiskered snouts from time to time. The Quileutes’ legendary Akalat Island dominates the landscape. The Quileute Marina is a working commercial fishing port. Seats on day-charters are available and some charter captains now are offering whale-watching trips. Gray whales heading north pass in late spring and early summer and begin their return to warm waters off Mexico in the fall. Head toward the coast from the restaurant to a raised parking

S

La Push

Forks

Top: This sweeping scenic view awes visitors when they round a corner into La Push. Middle: Second Beach is located down a moderately easy trail and is noted as one of the most romantic beaches in the United States. Handsome oceanside accommodations are available at the Quileute Oceanside Resort at La Push.

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LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


area that overlooks First Beach. Sun lovers and surfers flock to the beach in summer. A walk along the sand and pebbles of First Beach — rain or shine — is an invigorating journey. Bald eagles soar overhead, Pacific swells roll up on the beach, piles of huge drift logs laced with jetsam and flotsam border the high-tide mark. Summertime brings spectacular sunsets drawn out for hours in the twilight of some of the longest days of the year. Visitors are requested to respect the traditions of the Quileute people who consider the beach and its elements sacred. Please do not remove beach sand, rocks or wood. The festive Quileute Days Celebration for 2009 runs July 17-19. The Saturday morning Quileute parade and street fair draws local residents and visitors. Try a plate of salmon baked Quileute-style on cedar sticks set around an alder fire. At night, fireworks light the sky and family-style street dances add to the fun. Quileute traditions are on display at the stick games and canoe races, and in the colorful tribal costumes worn by the Quileute Days royalty. On or about the Fourth of July weekend, surfers from up and down the Pacific coast and kayakers hit the First Beach waves for the annual Surfing & Traditions event. The Coast Guard’s Quillayute River Station at La Push provides water safety and safety demonstrations. The one-day event culminates in an awards ceremony with dozens of prizes for winners and a raffle with valuable prizes for contest goers. Brave swimmers and body-

Right: Riverfront dining is boarders make the available at the River’s Edge plunge into the Pacific restaurant adjacent to the at First Beach during Quileute Marina at La Push. summer months. RV campers will find a well-appointed new RV park on the coast between the Oceanside Resort and the Quileute Tribal School. The new campground is particularly popular with oceangoing boaters who fish out of La Push. Just up La Push Road toward Forks from the La Push village are two trailheads that lead to beaches located within Olympic National Park. The names are simple — Second Beach and Third Beach. A moderate hike from a parking lot on Quileute land takes you to scenic Second Beach, a beach that has been named one of the most romantic in the United States. The parking lot is just up the road from the Lonesome Creek Store at La Push where refreshments can be purchased. Then it’s back up to the intersection of Mora Road and La Push Road, where the Three Rivers store and resort are located, to head to Rialto Beach. Its parking lot is on the north side of the Quillayute River and marks the beginning of a coastal wilderness trail that runs Quileute & La Push visitor information (www.quileutenation.org), for more than 20 miles up to the lands of the Olympic National Park (www.nps.gov/olym), Makah Nation and past Cape Alava. Check a Forks Chamber of Commerce (www.forkswa.com), tide table before you go on an extended hike Surfing & Traditions (www.surfingandtraditions.com). to avoid getting caught at high tide between the ocean and piles of large drift logs.

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Exploring the

Hoh Rain Forest Story and photos by Chris Cook

lympic National Park’s Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center offers an excellent base for discovering the beauty of one of North America’s rare temperate rain forests. The Hoh River Valley is a dramatic slice of Olympic Peninsula wilderness dotted with few signs of human habitation. The Hoh River runs 50 miles from its source atop snowcapped Mount Olympus, dropping 7,000 feet along its way. This is a place of ever-changing beauty from sunny days of sparkling green forest and emerald river waters to dramatic monochrome rainfall scenes. Wild Roosevelt elk and cougars, salmon and steelhead all flourish here. Summertime is the dry season and the prime time to tour this wet ecosystem where up to 12 feet of precipitation falls each year. Various levels of rain forest experiences are available, ranging from browsing in an interpretive center and walks along short, well-marked hiking trails to overnight camping and wilderness hikes up the slopes of Mount Olympus for expert hikers. Getting to the Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center from Sequim or Port Angeles requires about a two-hour ride along U.S. Highway 101 past Lake Crescent and

O

Above: In typical weather, the Hoh River runs a milky, slate blue color and is laced with logjams vital to wild salmon habitat. Top: The Hall of Mosses

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Forks Hoh Rain Forest

Forks. Olympic National Park runs a visitor information center at the Clallam County transit center on South Forks Avenue in Forks where you’ll find information about the Hoh section of the park. Heading south of Forks, the entrance to the Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center is farther than the mileage posted on road signs tells you. You drive about 12 miles south of Forks along Highway 101 and turn at the Upper Hoh Road, which is clearly marked by both green state road signs and the distinctive light-brown Olympic National Park signs. After turning left, head inland. On the drive up to the center, the Upper Hoh Road runs parallel to the Hoh River and its side branches. In typical weather, the river runs a milky, slate blue color and is laced with logjams vital to wild salmon habitat. You pass a mix of pioneer homesteads with pastures and second-growth and third-growth forests grown to be harvested. Day activities along the river outside the park include guided river kayaking and river rafting with the Rainforest Paddlers river service located at the Peak 6 Adventure Store. Guided horseback rides also are being organized this summer. About five miles up the road is the Peak 6 Adventure Store and a little farther along are Oliver’s General Store, cabins and the Hard Rain Café. Browsing in the Peak 6 Adventure Store is an adventure in itself. The store is well-stocked with carefully selected quality souvenirs, hiking and rain gear, well-chosen shelves of books, snacks and soft drinks and much more. Look for the giant carved wooden sasquatch in front of Oliver’s. The Hard Rain Café serves tasty lunches and provides a welcome dining spot in the wilds of the Upper Hoh. Past this small settlement, it’s about seven more miles to the Hoh Rain Forest Visitor

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


Center entrance, which is open daily in summer. The upper reaches of the road often wash out in winter, so be aware that you may need to slow down for singlelane bridges and road repair areas. Fees this summer to enter Olympic National Park are $15 for a seven-day pass or $30 for an annual pass. These passes cover all the various venues in the park including the Sol Duc Hot Springs area located on the West End side of Olympic National Park. Olympic National Park was created in 1938 during the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to preserve the primeval rain forest and protect wild herds of native Roosevelt elk. Once inside the park, you drive a short distance to a sizable parking area where the paved road ends. Adjoining the parking area is an interpretive center filled with informative exhibits and a bookstore/gift shop. For day-trippers, there are picnic tables and accessible restrooms. For overnight campers, 88 camping sites are available and feature grated fire pits, potable water, restrooms and animalproof food storage lockers. Backcountry

hikers also can pick up wilderness camping permits here. No food or gas is sold at the center. There are several moderate/ easy trail options that weave out from the interpretive center. The Hall of Mosses is just under a mile, fairly flat and provides a look at many of the natural elements of the Hoh Rain Forest including walks along stands of giant Sitka spruce and western hemlock trees. The signature look of the West End rain forest comes from epiphytes — the mosses, ferns and other plants that grow on the trunks and branches of the rain forest trees such as big leaf maples and vine maples. The canopy of the rain forest shades ground littered with downed “nurse logs” that serve as an incubator for forest plants. Another choice is a one-tenth-mile wheelchair-accessible trail that loops through a stand of old-growth trees. Veteran hikers take off from the parking lot for summertime treks 18 miles up the Hoh River Trail to the Blue Glacier. Wandering in and out of the fantas-

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Herds of stately Roosevelt elk commonly are seen in the Hoh Valley, with about 400 of the animals said to be dwelling in this area.

tic floral wonders of the rain forest are the 400 or so Roosevelt elk estimated to live in the Hoh Valley. For safety, visitors shouldn’t approach the herds of Roosevelt elk that commonly are seen. Another danger is attempting a swim in the chilly waters of the fast-flowing Hoh. To experience the river first-hand, stick to guided kayak and river raft trips down the wilderness river.

Side-trip options include camping in the park for the weekend, driving south to the oceanfront Kalaloch Lodge for a meal and stopping in Forks or La Push for sightseeing, shopping or dining.

On the Web: Olympic National Park (www.nps.gov/olym/), Rainforest Paddlers (www.rainforestpaddlers.com), Forks Chamber of Commerce (www.forkswa.com).

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&

HEART Soul

Living in the Thou 36

The

first time I saw a black bear in Olympic National Park, I was standing next to my tent waiting for Dana to come back from doing the dishes by the Elwha River. I heard a thump-thump-thump from the hillside to the east. It sounded like the giant from Jack and the Beanstalk. A large black bear came into view, heading diagonally down the hill and across the meadow in which I stood. I didn’t know what to do. Not only was I bootless, I knew that I couldn’t move as fast as the bear. Also, I’d never seen a bear before and was fascinated. I shuffled backward a few steps, watching the bear’s progress. He seemed unaware of me until he reached the opposite side of the meadow and started to re-enter the forest by crossing a log bridge over a stream. He stopped in the middle of the bridge. He swung his head around and looked at me, inspecting me. Our gazes met and we communicated — something. I could not easily put it into words; we were not identical beings, but we were not separate either. Still, I was relieved when he continued his journey and disappeared into the woods. I hesitate to call his glance alien, or foreign, but it was unfamiliar to me. This eye-to-eye encounter was not with some domesticated kitty cat or dog or human being. Wild and surprising. Not in my experience. It was as if I had peered into the eyes of mystery, of a part of the Great Song of Being I could hear in the background, but could not identify. Later I was favored with that same kind of scrutiny by a bull elk shielding his mate and calf. His stare warned me off, a protective spouse watching over his family. I took the liberty of hiding behind a tree and removed myself from the vicinity. I tried to understand my relationship to the bear and the elk, these creatures whose inner lives and spirits were alien to me — although not completely. I found paradox in their eyes; a presence dwelled there that spoke to me heart-toheart, but something extra existed within them that I could not follow. Not just language separated us. If a deer spoke to me tomorrow and asked if it could chow down on my escallonia bushes, we still would be from different cultures, our foreign world views threaded through our existence. When Henry David Thoreau, the 19th-century philosopher and author of “Walden,” said, “In wildness is the preservation of the world,” he touched both fact and metaphor. Wildness brings us vitality different from our own. It wakes us up, shocks us into tasting new flavors of

reality. The flavor of bird song that makes us hunger for silence to surround it. The dry salt taste of beaches crusted on our faces. Earth — the dirt that children cram into their mouths — rich and loamy, old and glacial. When we grant the inherent worth — and dignity — of all creation, we are called to change our relationship to everything. As Robert Bly put it, “The whole world is looking at you. You must change your life.” But entering an I-Thou relationship relieves us of our loneliness. We respond to the other as ourselves, not as an object. This openness and meeting of an unfamiliar presence is a grace, a gift that enters the Thou that has no bounds. One time my friend Kate and I sat on the beach at Dungeness County Park watching the breakers and talking about spiritual growth. She loved the natural world, with a particular affinity for beaches. She told me about the last time she visited Deep Creek beach By Karen in the West End when she spotted otter tracks and Frank traced their path to the water. An owl feather drifted down by her feet. While we were talking, a seal mother and her pup swam by in the surf. “I wish she’d bring her baby ashore right here,” I told Kate. “Come here and let me see your baby,” I said to the seal. We watched as the seals turned toward the beach and swam closer and closer. I thought mama would veer off when she saw us, but she kept coming and a last wave washed them up on shore. Now she’ll spot us, I thought. I pretended to be a big blue rock (since I was wearing a blue jacket), nonthreatening and belonging to the surroundings. It worked for a few minutes, but then she focused on Kate and me and hustled her baby back into the water. “You called her to us,” Kate said. More skeptical, I attributed my close encounter to luck, but it delighted me. I wondered if I could learn how to get closer to the wild creatures without harming them. My grandfather had the knack. Birds would sit on his shoulders and squirrels took peanuts right from his fingers. I’ve continued my effort to live in the Thou. I’ve leaned up against trees, pressing my ear to their bark, trying to see if the oak tree has a different voice and presence than the cedar tree. I’ve visited the sea stacks near Hole-in-the-Wall on Rialto Beach through the years, reacquainting myself with their deep, slow, rooted voices. We don’t need a SETI program searching for extraterrestrials to find aliens. Trees, rocks, deer remain as mysterious to us as the exact nature of the Creator of all this bounty. We spot glimmers of the Creator — the great Thou in which we all exist. When I visited First Beach at La Push many years ago and all my soul opened up singing, I found the Great Mother. When I camped at Heather Park and soaked in the silent August sun, I heard our ancestors, faint voices of praise and celebration. On Mount Zion, I expected the prophets to appear, seeking their visions on that holy ground. Take off Your Shoes, I-Am-Who-I-Am commanded Moses. In other words, don’t place artifice between yourself and holiness. When we stand on sacred ground without feeling it through the soles of our feet, wiggling our toes in it, we act as though we are outsiders here. This is home. We are all together here under a Beloved Presence calling us to union.

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


An Architect of Democracy P R O F I L E O F D I P L O M AT, I N T E R N AT I O N A L S C H O L A R A N D A U T H O R J A M E S R . H U N T L E Y By Kelly McKillip

The

attainment of peace through democracy is a chord that has reverberated through James R. Huntley’s life since he was a schoolboy growing up in Seattle. Now retired to Sequim, his calling brought him to the rarified sphere of international diplomacy, where he spent many years helping shape the extraordinary events of the second half of the 20th century. As a returning doughboy from World War I, Huntley’s father did not talk much about his personal experiences, but there was plenty of discussion in those postwar years about America joining a League of Nations. The U.S. ultimately rejected the League, but the notion of unifying democracies on an international level, with a view toward peaceful resolution of problems, lodged itself permanently in Huntley’s psyche. At age 6, the Great Depression forced his family to move to a ramshackle rural home on five acres. Instead of a having a deleterious effect, this experience sparked in Huntley a lifelong love of nature. Becoming a member of the Boy Scouts furthered his regard for the out-of-doors and much more. “My character, work habits, capacity for leadership, ability to set goals and motivate and organize others was greatly influenced by the values taught in that organization,” he recalled. He went on to develop camping and nature programs for schoolchildren all around Washington. Promoting education that embraces positive values has been a recurring theme in his work and advocacies. Huntley’s parents were devout Christian Scientists. Although he did not follow their religious path, the precepts of the faith influenced his attitudes about health and initiated a lifelong habit of reading the Christian Science Monitor. As an inveterate consumer of the news from many sources, he recommends the Monitor, which to his

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009

His task was to help re-educate and reorient distrustful mind, always has employed the best international correspondents, seeks to promote a positive view of the world Germans to become democratic members of the commuand remains one of the few newspapers of record in the nity of nations. He would choose students, young adults country. He does regret that recently the Monitor replaced and civic leaders to travel and live in the United States in its daily print version with a weekend only edition, plus order to have firsthand experiences of life in America. He also had the task of running a U.S. information center in Internet coverage. At age 11, Huntley and some of his school chums began northern Bavaria. Huntley admired the great inner discipline and willtheir own newspaper called the Neighborhood News. “We didn’t just write about local events, but also ingness for self-sacrifice that enabled Germans, with the aid of the Marshall Plan, to rebuild international topics and included their own society to such a remarkpolitical cartoons. We printed the able degree. He also recognized weekly papers with home-made how their sense of duty, without a hectographs,” he recalled. personal sense of civic responsibility, During his tour in the Navy durhad played a large part in their falling ing World War II, Huntley worked into the Nazi abyss. It was difficult not for a journalist officer at Sand Point. to let go of the knowledge that many This experience convinced him that Germans stood by as the Third Reich a career in journalism was not his perpetrated its horrors. destiny. He then went on to earn a However, Huntley’s beliefs, honed bachelor’s degree at the University in childhood from his parents’ view of Washington and married. that most people are good and it The early 1950s found Huntley is better to teach by example than working in Olympia for the Washingpreaching, allowed him to look toton park and recreation system and ward the future and do his part to help raising his growing family. When the Germany remold itself into a strong, Korean War began, Huntley resigned stable democracy. his state position and returned to James and Colleen Huntley Huntley believes that the work comgraduate work at his alma mater. photo by Kelly McKillip pleted under the auspices of the High In 1952, he entered the U.S. Foreign Service as a diplomat. Four years earlier, Huntley had made Commission in Germany by intelligent and hardworking a five-month bicycle sojourn in Europe and witnessed individuals in those years, and also in Japan in the postfirsthand the devastation to the land and great unrest and 1945 period, comprised the greatest single accomplishchaos that the war had wrought. ment that America and its allies achieved. In 1955, Huntley returned to the U.S. The State DeIn his new job in Germany as an exchange of persons officer, he also saw the destruction that the Nazi regime had partment sent him to Harvard University for graduate rendered on the hearts and souls of the German citizens. work where he studied with the great academics and

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Right: Some of the many books Huntley has written on democracy. Below: The mandala that Huntley designed illustrated the concept that different countries could be included in a union, to varying degrees, without disrupting the whole. Graphics courtesy of James R. Huntley

scholars of world afd fairs who frequented ey the institution. Huntley came to realize that some me of his ideals of fostering mutual understanding would have to be es of power tempered by the realities politics. He also learnedd more about the underpinnings off the European drive for supranationalism. lism. After earning a master’s degree at Harvard, he returned to work for the U.S. Information Agency in n Washington, D.C. He helped shape State Department policy on NATO and communicated with USIA posts in Europe. In 1957, the Cold War was in full force and the USSR’s technological achievement of launching Sputnik sent shivers throughout the free world. During this time, Huntley envisioned an Atlantic Institute, a kind of independent think tank where the best and brightest could sort through the problems of the world and promote practical solutions. Later, he was able to bring the institute into being. In 1958, Huntley assumed a new post in Brussels, Belgium. In Europe he discovered there were two political camps that were vying for control. The Atlanticists called for an “Atlantic Community.” The Europeanists wanted to unite themselves and rival the U.S. Huntley believed the two paradigms could combine. He designed a mandala that graphically represented the concept that different countries could be included in a union, to varying degrees, without disrupting the whole. His bosses thought highly of the work and commissioned its translation into several European languages so it could be disseminated to their publics. Huntley, multilingual himself, continually updated the graph over the years and included it in several of his books. Huntley returned to the United States in 1963 soon after the assassination of President John Kennedy, who had been beloved in Europe and a great proponent of pro-Atlantic policy. In Washington, D.C., Huntley split his time between the Atlantic Institute, the think tank he had co-founded, and the Atlantic Council. Both groups were involved in educating the public about Atlantic affairs. His view was turning toward what was called the Third Sector, organizations that were not associated with either government or commercial enterprise. In 1965, he was invited to join the Ford Foundation in New York City. At

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the behest beh of NATO, he also penned “The Story” that year. NATO Sto His years at the Ford Foundation were busy evaluate and distribute grant money ones, helping evalu to worthy organizations. organization One of his main priorities was the establishment of the Atlantic Colleges. These schools were for selected students ages 16-18 and dedicated to the development of young, internationally minded leaders. In 1967, Huntley married Colleen Grounds and the couple moved to England. He took the job of secretary general of the Atlantic College and laid plans for a future worldwide string of schools. There are a dozen of the “United World Colleges” now, including one in Victoria, British Columbia. After two years he began to write full time on

transatlantic affairs. Still living in England in 1969, Huntley had become an “Atlantic jack of all trades.” He wrote a revision of his book on NATO. At the request of his friends at the Atlantic Council, he co-wrote “Europe and America the Next Ten Years” with former Undersecretary of the U.S. Treasury W. Randolph Burgess.

In 1971, Huntley began doing consulting work in the United Kingdom for Battelle Memorial Institute, which remains the largest and oldest not-for-profit think tank in the world. (The marine laboratory on Sequim Bay is run by BMI.) That year the first edition of his volume “Man’s Environment and the Atlantic Alliance” was published. This work was an answer to President Richard Nixon’s mandate of how NATO would address the ever-growing ecological threat to the planet. In 1974, Huntley accepted a position at BMI’s Seattle campus. As much as he and Colleen loved England, Huntley looked forward to returning to his childhood home. During his research for the book: “Europe and America the Next Ten Years,” he also had looked toward the America’s progressive western neighbors and wrote: “Uniting the Democracies: Institutions of the Emerging Atlantic-Pacific System.” Huntley laid plans for a training institution, complementing the Atlantic Institute in Paris. He wrote articles, lectured often in the U.S. and abroad and helped develop new nonprofit efforts. He was a member of the board of directors of “Federal Union,” which was begun by Clarence Streit, whose book “Union Now,” he had admired as a boy. He also helped found the Council for a Community of Democracies. In 1983, he returned to Washington, D.C., to revamp the Atlantic Council. After successfully reorganizing and pulling the council out of debt, he and Colleen returned to Seattle and a busy retirement. He undertook consulting jobs, paid and unpaid, and settled down on Bainbridge Island to write and to found still more institutions. In the years that followed, Huntley worked to raise money for a foundation dedicated to continuing efforts to unite the West. In 1989, he watched with the world as communism collapsed with the fall of the Berlin Wall. “The patient, steady work of thousands, over more than four decades, to bring down the barriers between freedom and tyranny had paid off,” he said. “Alliances for democracy would continue to be our best hope for peace.”

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


The firstt iinternational t ti meeting of the 106-nation Community of Democracies, which had been one of his long cherished ideas, took place in 2002 in Warsaw. The first edition of his book “Pax Democratica: a Strategy for the 21st Century” was published in 1998. Pax democratica means “the democratic peace.” The volume is also available in a paperback edition. Huntley and Colleen are now happily retired in Sequim. In 2001 he hired an astute local high school student, Jesse

Swingle, to help him organize his memoirs. “An Architect of Democracy” was published in 2006. In a letter to his children and grandchildren on Sept. 26, 2001, he counseled: … “Go about our daily tasks and live our lives normally as possible, do anything extra we can to help the cause … which I think is to defend freedom and make it work even better.” On a global scale, at age 85, he still subscribes to the tenet from his Scouting and mountaineering days: Leave the campsite better than you found it.

James R. Huntley’s books may be purchased through local bookstores and on the Internet. “Pax Democratica: a Strategy for the 21st Century” and “An Architect of Democracy: Building a Mosaic of Peace,” are available through the North Olympic Library System. To learn more about the Council for a Community of Democracies, a nongovernmental body that Huntley helped to found, visit on the Web at www. ccd21.org.

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LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


The sensibility of succulents

GOOD Gardening

By Beverly Hoffman Photos by David Godfrey

D

uring this time of an economic downturn, many of us are reassessing many aspects of our lives, shifting our priorities so that we once again value ideals we seemed to forget during years of prosperity. In the garden, too, I am considering a new economy — how I want to use water, how I can exert less effort and still get the results I wish, and how less is sometimes more. I have come to appreciate how succulents are masters of economy. I admit that I have underestimated them. In the past, they seemed so inconsequential that I didn’t even bother to learn their names and simply tossed their name labels in the garbage. Over the years, though, they have provided versatility, texture and whimsy to our gardens. I now love them — little orphans that they were — and I’m trying to learn their names. Succulents, a general grouping of plants that includes cactus, agaves, sedums, sempervivums and many more, are unique because they store water and, once established, need no or little additional watering. They need almost no attention. They are virtually pest-free and deer-resistant. The bigger the patch of succulents, the less work for the gardener. They aren’t invasive although they are spreaders. If your interest is piqued, walk into one of our nurseries and look for sedums and sempervivums. I’ve used both of these as fillers in a rock wall, as container plants and as ground covers. A new and interesting way they are being used is in green roofs (http://greenroofs.com). In Seattle, the American Institute of Architects has listed the Ballard Library (Architect Bohlin Cywinski Jackson), with its green roof, as one of the top 10 Green Projects in 2006. Portland, Ore., the third greenest city in the U.S., has at least three green roofs: the Jean Vollum Capital Center, the Metro Regional Headquarters and the Multonomah County Building. Green roofs act as a stormwater management as they catch 60 percent to 80 percent of rainfall, which reduces sewer systems overflow and run-off of contaminants. Green roofs also filter out air pollutants and insulate buildings. Initially they cost more than the traditional roof but they outlast them by 20 years. A Port Townsend home with a green roof is shown on the Web site www.xeroflora.com/porttownsend.html if you’d like to check out a local residence. See another one on http:// mygreenpalette.com/projects/detail/94. Most of us, however, are more interested in our little plots of land we garden. How can we use sedums and sempervivums? In our yard, we have several rock walls with various sedums and sempervivums mixed with black mondo grass (Ophiopogon plansiscapus ‘Nigrescens’). The black grass blades emerge among various shades of green sedums, a look similar to undersea worlds where seaweeds and grasses intermingle.

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009

Sedums, also called stonecrop, vary in texture and size. Most of us probably know Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ which we often see planted en masse. They are about 2 feet high and the green leaves turn pink in late summer and darken to a coppery pink in autumn. They should be pinched back in May to avoid getting leggy. I love to use ‘Autumn Joy’ in fall flower arrangements. Most sedums, however, are much shorter — usually about 4 to 6 inches and bloom in the summer with white, pink or yellow flowers. A few sedums such as Sedum album and Sedum kamtschaticum turn red in winter. To view a full spectrum of sedums, go to www.sedumphotos.net. Sedums easily can be divided and simply planted in a gritty soil in the sun. They aren’t picky about the pH of the soil. To propagate sedums, take a 3- or 4-inch tip cutting, a section with three or more leaves. Pull off the bottom couple of leaves and tap the cuttings into moistened potting soil mixed with sand. New roots will emerge in about eight weeks. Plant them directly into the garden or into pots. Sempervivums, too, look as though they belong undersea, resembling sea anemones with a myriad of tentacles. Rosettes of fleshy, evergreen leaves spread into new little plants. Sempervivum tectorum (hens and chicks) is the most common; however, there are more than 40 species. They come from southern Europe, Turkey and Iran, where they grow in crevices and near rocks. Sometimes they are covered with a soft down. Sedums and sempervivums work well together. My daughter recently told me she saw a birdbath planted with both species. I’ve also seen them planted in work boots or shoes (easily purchased at a garage sale) and then placed in a garden. I have planted several in my homemade hypertufa planter (See www. timpyworks.com and click half way down on the right side “Free copy of Hypertufa 101” for instructions.) They need gritty, loose soil and good drainage. Water only when they begin to shrivel. In large pots, plant sedums and sempervivums as underplantings or create a pot of succulents in an area where you need color but don’t have a water source. The pot will not have to be taken in during the winter, another plus. Succulents are rather inexpensive to buy and because they are spreaders, they can be divided easily. They are model plants, needing little care and little to no water. Their shapes are whimsical and fun and add textural strength to any setting. No longer are they orphans in my garden. I’ve embraced them fully as my children and have learned lots of their names now! Correction: The Chimacum park written about in the Spring 2008 edition of Living on the Peninsula is H.J. Carroll Park. The author regrets the error.

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Clockwise from above: Mixed metal weather vane sculpture “Birds of a Feather” by Shawn Marie Johnson reminds us not to take nature for granted. This view of “Avenue of the People,” welded steel sculptures by Bob Stokes, catches locals having animated conversations.

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Bob Stokes’ cast bronze and acrylic sculpture “Robert” reveals a tortured soul rising to find peace and clarity.

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


Celebrating the 10 year of on ‘Artthe Town’ th

The outdoor sculpture gallery of Port Angeles

By Kelly McKillip Photos by Harry von Stark

It

began with a seahorse. A magical creature designed from found objects that led the way for the 40-plus permanent and loaned outdoor sculptures that currently grace downtown Port Angeles. Framed by the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Olympic Mountains, the al fresco gallery invites visitors to amble and admire the stunning beauty of nature and the works of many talented Northwest artists. A good starting point for the walk is on the north side of First Avenue where the seahorse has resided for 10 years. Dan Klennert fashioned his remarkable sculpture from others’ discards, something he has had a passion for since he was a youth growing up in Minnesota in the 1960s. Klennert gleaned the metal for many of his works from piles of broken equipment that had been dumped in ravines on a Walla Walla farm. The meaning the objects had for the community they once served fills his soul with love. His greatest pleasure is transforming his vision into a sculpture that he can stand next to and then share with others. When he picked up some rusty curved plates, that had been part of Created from recycled materials, Dan Klennert’s “Seahorse” led the way for the 40-plus outdoor sculptures that currently grace downtown Port Angeles.

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009

a potato harvesting machine, Klennert knew he had the makings of a seahorse. Many of his other offspring are found on his 4-acre sculpture park en route to Paradise and Mount Rainier, and in other cities. He was especially grateful and impressed by the city of Port Angeles’ welcoming attitude and support for his work by constructing the base for his sculpture. Cross First Street and you will encounter the graceful “Sara” in three poses by Bob Stokes. A renowned artist, Stokes had laid plans to cruise in his boat from town to town working on various art commissions. When he docked in Port Angeles a few years ago, the appeal of the city, the strong art presence and the opportunity for projects convinced him to stay. With “Sara” as a prelude, he created “Avenue of the People” on North Laurel Street; 11 life-size sculptures portraying members of the community captured in the beauty of everyday activities. From many hopefuls, Stokes selected his models for their strong, animated body language. He captured their attitudes using four panels of steel, then hastened the rusting process to create a warm, even patina. A driving force in the Art on the Town events, Stokes works from his Studio Bob gallery on Front Street where he is constructing a foundry to create smaller bronze sculptures. He sees the positive energy expressed by creative people in the community reflected back on the faces of visitors who come to his studio and gallery. His focus, in conjunction

with fellow artists, gallery owners, local businesses and the city, is to expand the second weekend art events to attract visitors from Canada, the I-5 corridor and beyond by making the area a destination known for great accommodations, dining, shopping and, of course, art. Stokes’ other works on the town include an abstract “Mother and Child” on Lincoln Street and “Robert,” a privately commissioned piece that quietly watches over the waterfront. Farther north on Laurel Street is Richard Royce’s “Line Drawing in Wet Space.” Royce, an artist represented in numerous museums around the country, is a draftsman, printmaker and sculptor. He moved to Sequim three years ago, fell in love with the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center and created an outdoor sculpture for Webster Woods. The Art on the Town committee invited him to choose a wall to display his piece, which is a sculptural image reduced to a simple line in space that interprets the nautical environment of wind and water, waves and rope. Directly across Laurel Street, look for “Kings Among the Kelp” by stone sculptor Craig Breitbach. The piece reflects the artist’s lifelong love of art and the natural world, especially the illusive king salmon that like to hide in the kelp. Having grown up in Port Angeles, Breitbach has fond memories of fishing in Freshwater Bay where he caught the largest king salmon of his life. He studied stone carving at the Pratt Fine Art Center in Seattle in 1999 and has been sculpting fulltime for five years. The touchBasalt stone carving “Kings Among the Kelp” by Craig Breitbach evokes childhood memories of fishing in Freshwater Bay.

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Steel sculpture “Gandy Dancer” by Jim Mattern is a tribute to the hard working men who maintained the railroad tracks.

Above: Mixed metal and burnished sculpture “San Juan Summer Moon” by Jim Mattern is a tribute to the beauty of the islands across the strait. Below: Bronze sculpture “Elwha Tears” by Al Adams expresses his sorrow for the plight of salmon no longer able to reach the river.

able sculpture is fashioned from basalt, which is a hard stone, and Breitbach’s favorite for large works because of the contrast between its natural and polished state. Against the brown skin of the stone, he created grey designs with a pneumatic chisel and then revealed the shiny black salmon relief carving by extensive polishing with diamond pads and water. Breitbach currently is building a studio in Fall City. Make tracks to Railroad Avenue and you will happen upon a “Gandy Dancer.” The artist, Jim Mattern, constructed this tribute to the double-fisted, hammer-slinging, hardworking men who maintained the railroad tracks using tools from the Gandy Tool Company. Heading west to Cherry and Front streets, you’ll discover “Storm Watch,” Mattern’s bell and weather vane sculpture. This imposing work was constructed from recycled metal to catch the sound and fury of the kinetic energy of the wind off the water. Two smaller burnished stainless steel and bronze works, “San Juan Summer Moon” and “San Juan Get Away” were inspired by the natural beauty of the islands across the strait and are displayed on Laurel Street and at City Hall. Another kinetic weather vane with a very different feel is Shawn Marie Johnson’s “Birds of a Feather,” located midway

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between Oak and Laurel streets on Front Street. Johnson seeks to help us remember not to take nature for granted. She loves the energy that positive artwork inspires. As an elementary school art teacher for 10 years, she especially is attracted to children’s art. The peninsula’s marine environment reminds her of her childhood home in Connecticut and the water is a favorite theme in her pieces. Her sculpture of mixed metals, which was galvanized to withstand the elements, employs negative and positive shapes such as a jig-saw puzzle and pays homage to “the cormorants and blue herons, forests and salmon, camping and hiking, and stopping along the way.” A 15-inch shaft allows the three-piece structure to rotate easily and quietly in the wind. The bottom section may be used as a lantern. Johnson favors recycled materials that lend themselves to Old World craftsmanship and the remaining shapes or spaces generally find their way into another sculpture. Head west a few paces and you will encounter Gray Lucier’s light and easy going sculpture, “Fair Winds,” a flag in the breeze that he fashioned from cast and welded mixed metals. Lucier has had a respect and appreciation for art since childhood, creating his first metal sculpture in a high school shop class. He further honed his metal working skills by studying gunsmithing in college but then pursued a different career path in the military. In 1993 his wife died, leaving him as the sole caregiver

for their young daughter. As a grieving spouse and new stay-at-home dad, he found solace in putting metal together once again. He favors salvaged materials and always is looking for the beautiful castoff that curves and catches the light just so. His abstract sculpture, “Salish Moon” located farther east on Front Street, was made from such a found orb and is named as a tribute to Native American tribes. A beautiful natural scene Lucier encountered as he happened around a corner one day inspired “North by Northwest.” The work, located on First and Oak Streets, is sculpted of welded steel. In addition to his love for the natural world and local family ties, the appeal of a warm and accepting community persuaded Lucier to take up residence in Port Angeles in 2005. During

second weekend art events, his large warehouse studio on West Second Street is transformed into a venue for dancing, wine, food and fun. Al Adams grew up in Port Angeles, graduating from Roosevelt High School in 1947. His three cast bronze sculptures downtown are a tribute to the wild salmon that he has spent working to preserve for nearly four decades.

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


Five years before he retired from dentistry, Adams began carving wood. His first subjects were birds and frogs, then eventually salmon. Western red cedar, felled by the wind, is a favorite medium for his carvings from which he makes the molds for his bronzes. Adams has a strong spiritual feeling for his work and often adds subtle elements that have a personal meaning. “Elwha Tears,” located on First and Lincoln streets, is Adams’ gesture to share the sorrow he feels for the spring chinook salmon that used to run up the Elwha River but no longer can get past the dams. The salmon trio “The Brothers,” at Laurel and Front streets, is named after the most prominent mountain in the Olympics that is visible from the east side of the Hood Canal where Adams now resides. The wood carving for the “The Dance,” that graces Front Street near Oak, was carved from 800-year-old cedar and depicts two salmon with Mount Rainier as a base. He also included the route he once hiked on the mountain. Adams seeks to remind us with his art that what is good for salmon is ultimately good for people. His works will be leaving Port Angeles in August to be on permanent display with his wood carvings at The Pacific Northwest Salmon Center in Belfair — a fulfillment of Adams’ lifelong dream of a place for research and education about salmon. There are many more fabulous works in the outdoor sculpture gallery with new ones appearing all the time. The admission is free and the doors never close. Come

Welded steel sculpture Moon” by Gray with family and friends to “Salish Lucier was named as experience the meaning that a tribute to Native fine works of art have for you. American tribes. The seahorse would love it. Second weekend art events begin every second Friday of each month around 5 p.m. Local indoor galleries, with art for sale, open their doors, offer refreshments and entertainment. For a guided tour, meet with professional photographer and director of The Long Gallery, Harry von Stark, at The Landing mall on Railroad Avenue at 11 a.m. on second Saturdays of the month. Brochures for a self-guided tour of the outdoor sculpture gallery are at the Downtown Association office, 208 N. Laurel St., 4579614. Learn more about Art on the Town online at http:// portangelesdowntown.com. Click on “Art on the Town.” Help keep your favorite sculpture in town by casting a vote for $1 each. Ballots are available at many downtown businesses.

Art on the Town is a volunteer group sponsored by the Port Angeles Downtown Association. Its mission is to create an inviting and changing presence of art work in the downtown area. Contact chairman Bob Harbick and his wife, Jan, owners of Five SeaSuns B&B at 452-8258 for more information. Artists interested in contributing to Art on the Town may e-mail director@portangelesdowntown.com for more information.

Welded metal sculpture “Line Drawing in Wet Space” by Richard Royce portrays the nautical environment in a simple line.

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YOUR NEW Life

Great Teachers & life lessons

By Ruth Marcus

W

edged safely between the screen door and the front door, I shouted a very offensive word at a neighbor boy. I must have been no more than 4 or 5 years old and definitely angry about something. In a flash, my mother picked me up, tucked me under her arm, marched to the kitchen sink, and before I could say “boo,” she had a bar of soap in my mouth. “Don’t you ever say that word again,” she said with a force I still remember today. I did learn that the taste of soap is terrible — not something I would ever want in my mouth again. But I can’t say that the soap completely cured me of ever using certain words when angered. What I definitely learned is that I wouldn’t want to be within earshot of my mother if I ever decided to use that particular word again. Our lessons begin the day we’re born and continue throughout life. Some are more painful to learn than others. When I was a college student in southern Wisconsin, a new friend from Attleboro, Mass., invited me to travel to visit her family over spring break. Arriving in Boston, the plan was that we were to rent a car and her parents would reimburse me at the end of our stay. I was the one “of age,” so I signed the rental contract at the airport. Young, innocent and trusting, I didn’t give it a second

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thought. When the five-day vacation ended, my friend’s parents said they would drop us at the airport and return the rental car. Since they were going to pay for it, I assumed there’d be no problem. Three weeks later, I received a phone call from the renta-car agent, wondering where the car was. “What?” I gasped in disbelief. I didn’t have a clue where the car was, but you can imagine how quickly I dialed my friend to find out what was going on. Her parents’ car had needed repair, she said, and they decided to keep the rental car until the repairs were made. Not to worry, she assured me. They would return the car and pay for it. The car wasn’t returned for another 15 days — 35 total rental days! — and the saga still wasn’t over. When the time came, they couldn’t pay the charges. The contract was in my name; legally I was responsible. As a college student, I didn’t have that kind of extra cash. My parents bailed me out and I made payments to them for months thereafter. My friend quit school and returned to Attleboro. It was a sad and disappointing situation, but I learned some painful lessons: Don’t assume that adults — even the parents of friends — are responsible people. Never sign a contract unless you have the money to back it up. Don’t assume that friends will help you out. Don’t assume anything. And you? What big lessons have you learned in life?

Most of us have fallen in love and suffered at least one broken heart. What was that lesson? Some say they learned never to love again and are certain the opposite sex is untrustworthy. Others learned that a partner can’t possibly meet all of one’s needs, so it’s important to have a few interesting friends to hang out with when your partner doesn’t share your interest in fishing or walking or playing bridge. And there are those who learned to work with relationship challenges, nurture each other and enjoy a meaningful, lifetime relationship. Who teaches whom when it comes to love? What about your trade, your craft? Who taught you your skills? Who taught you to appreciate art and beauty, to love music and respect nature? Mr. Meythaler taught me how to type very fast in his high school class. When I needed a job during college, I was hired by a printing firm as a typesetter. The owner said, “I’ll teach you a trade so that you will never want for work.” I had no idea at the time that the writing, graphic design and publishing skills he taught me would still, to this day, provide me with creative outlets. Rarely do we know, at the beginning, how deeply some lessons will affect our lives. The same goes for parenting. What most of us know about parenting as new parents pales to what we learn from our kids over the course of a lifetime. Children are living lessons in spontaneity. Forget plan-

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


ning. They live every uncertain moment with a spirit of wonder while we adults struggle to maintain control and some sort of schedule. Children try new things and are forever testing the waters. They don’t restrict themselves, but somewhere along the path of growing up we decided that, if we’re going to be adults, we can’t just jump in and participate unless we’re somehow “qualified.” We have to get a degree or a certificate or a license to play. Interesting how those things happen, isn’t it? I’ve learned a lot about playing from Rumi, my golden retriever. He’s a master teacher, giving me lessons on the

beaches. Then, when the bluffs erode, the water rises and the hurricanes roar in, we’re somehow surprised and stunned. Why do we need to keep repeating the class in rebuilding? Clearly, we aren’t getting a passing grade on Mother Nature’s repeated tests. All kinds of people seem to believe that our finite planet has limitless resources. If one oil field or one water well dries up, we have the notion that we can keep on drilling and moving from here to there without connecting the dots of supply and demand. How many oil fields, water tables, wells and rivers need to dry up before we learn the lesson?

YOUR NEW Life to rebuild houses, but like all living organisms, if we don’t learn the lessons Mother Nature keeps trying to teach us, we will suffer the consequences. On a smaller scale, I notice the wild blackberry branches that creep through fences from my neighbor’s yard, winding their thorny tentacles into my greenhouse. Their lesson: life can get prickly if we don’t pay attention.

Maybe it’s time that we pay closer attention to the lessons of the Earth. importance of taking lots of walks, learning to sit and stay (is that called commitment?) and expressing appreciation. I’ve yet to master the tail wagging, but it’s his unconditional love that provides me with the greatest lesson of all. No question, cats are great teachers, too — the art of sitting and gazing out the window, purring when contented, taking frequent cat naps and doing yoga stretching are among the valued lessons from our feline friends. Oh yes, there’s independence, too. It’s Mother Nature, though, that drives home lesson after lesson, repeatedly humbling us with her power and presence. Yet we seem to be slow to learn. We build houses on cliff sides, river banks, deltas and

Perhaps it’s finally dawning on us that the Earth is not a straight line that leads to infinity. She is a living sphere, an organism, that some call Earth and others call Gaia. The living body beneath our feet pulsates, belches and overflows. She trembles, shakes and cracks. She sparkles, feeds and breathes. Her soils and seas are mighty, yet fragile. We are facing serious, unprecedented lessons as toxic waste, toxic herbicides and trash flotillas in the sea are choking off the source of food for us and other creatures. And, if we keep abusing and exploiting this Being beneath our feet, bleeding her dry of natural resources, our inattention will have a staggering price. We may be able

Maybe it’s time that we pay closer attention to the lessons of the Earth. We call her Mother, but often treat her with disrespect. We say we love her, but we use up everything we can lay our hands on and then trash and burn the rest as we go. I know that it’s painful to look at our negligence. We all want to feel good and if the Earth, our home planet and greatest teacher, is telling us to pay attention, are we willing to become learned students? If not now, when? Ruth Marcus offers one-on-one and group conversations on making new choices in life. Visit www.DrRuth Marcus.com for more information.

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Events CALENDAR EC 13th Annual

Sequim Lavender Festival

July 24 June 21-Sept. 20 •Sequim City Band outdoor concerts, 3 p.m. every Sunday at James Center for the Performing Arts in Carrie Blake Park, Sequim.

June 25-28 • “Twilight Symposium” at Forks High School in Forks with featured special field trips to other locations of “Twilight” interest. Details about the symposium, how to enroll, how to get there and admission costs can be found on the Web site of twilight. litfanevents.org or www.litfanevents.org and inquiries are directed to info@Lit FanEvents.org.

July 17-19 Come celebrate the joy of lavender in Sequim, the Lavender Capital of North America™. Because of unique conditions and dedicated farmers, Sequim lavender has received worldwide recognition for its superior quality and fragrance. With seven beautiful farms on tour and one fantastic street fair, it’s eight festivals in one! Browse the street fair for quality arts and crafts, indulge in delicious local cuisine, immerse yourself in lavender fields and relax after a long day at one of the Jazz in the Alley venues. The festival is the annual fundraising activity of the Sequim Lavender Growers Association, a nonprofit tax-exempt corporation. For more information, see www. lavenderfestival.com or call 360-681-3035 or 877-681-3035.



June 26-Sept. 6 • Olympic Music Festival, 2 p.m. at concert barn, rural Quilcene, watch for signs off U.S. Highway 101. Classical music every Saturday and Sunday, no pets allowed. www.olympicmusicfestival.org, info@ olympicmusicfestival.org or 360-732-4800 for tickets and reserved seating.

June 27 • Master Gardeners Home Garden Tour, Sequim, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Seven mystery gardens in surrounding Sequim area. Tickets available at local nurseries or go through Google to www.petalsandpathways.com; • Rakers Cruz-In all day at Memorial Field, Port Townsend, sponsored by Rakers Car Club, 360-379-0638, www.rakerscarclub. com.

Due to space limitations, only activities attracting large groups of attendees are listed in the Events Calendar. For plays, concerts and readings, etc., please see your local newspaper.

June 28-Aug. 30

June 17-Sept. 2

June 28-July 5

•Concert on the Pier series, 6 p.m. every Wednesday, City Pier, Port Angeles.

•Centrum Festival of American Fiddle Tunes, Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend, various times, weeklong activities. Traditional American music with a week of workshops, dances and three days of main-stage concerts at McCurdy Pavilion. 360-385-3102 or www.centrum.org.

June 20 •Port Townsend Secret Garden Tour, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. in and around Port Townsend. Tour reveals nine private gardens in a map-provided, self-guided tour

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Worden State Park and Jazz in the Clubs, Thursday-Saturday evenings and Sunday morning in downtown Port Townsend. 800-733-3608, 360-385-5320 or www. centrum.org.

organized by the Jefferson County Master Gardeners. Tickets are limited. For tickets, call 360-7654717 or see www.jefferson.wsu.edu/; • Peninsula Model Show and Contest, Fort Worden State Park, see nopms.net.

•Port Townsend Summer Band concerts, various times and locations. For more information, call 360-344-3658 or go online to ptsummerband.org.

• Vintage Emergency Vehicles gathering, noon-4 p.m. downtown Port Townsend.

July 24-26

July 4 • 4th of July Community Celebration, 3-11 p.m., City Pier, Port Angeles. Grand parade on Lincoln Street from 5:30-6:30 p.m., fireworks display at dusk; • Fourth of July Celebration, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Sequim Prairie Grange, Macleay Road. Free admission; • Sequim City Band Concert, 3 p.m. at James Center in Carrie Blake Park. City band patriotic concert; • Forks Old Fashioned Fourth of July, various locations in Forks; • Fourth at the Fort Celebration and Fireworks Show, Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend. Family activities, band music and evening fireworks.

July 10-12

• Arts in Action, all day at City Pier, Port Angeles. Professional sand sculptures, artists, merchants and vendors, live music, car shows Saturday and Sunday. 360-4170501; • Hurricane Ridge Kennel Club Dog Show, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Carrie Blake Park, Sequim. American Kennel Club licensed all breed dog show and obedience trials. 360-681-3707.

July 28 • Forks Fly-In and Antique Car Show, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at Forks Airport. Vintage, kit and traditional aircraft “fly-in” to the Forks Airport for salmon bake with music, fly-bys and plane rides.

• Hadlock Days, all day Saturday/Sunday in downtown Port Hadlock, with salmon bake at 5 p.m. Friday at the Inn at Port Hadlock. 360-379-5380, www.hadlockdays. com; • Clallam Bay & Sekiu Fun Days, 10 a.m. in Clallam Bay/Sekiu. Fireworks on Saturday night. chamber@sekiu.com or www.sekiu.com.

July 17-19

Aug. 1

• Sequim Lavender Festival, 9 a.m. Seven farms on tour, demonstrations, agricultural history, workshops, horticultural programs, food, music, street fair. 800-681-3035 or www.lavenderfestival. com; • Sunbonnet Sue Quilt Club annual Quilt Show, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sequim Middle School gym. Admission charged. 360-683-2072; • Jazz in the Alley, 5:30 p.m. in downtown Sequim as part of the Sequim Lavender Festival.; • Quileute Days, 10 a.m. in La Push. Tribal festival with parade, canoe races, arts and crafts, softball tourney and fireworks. info@ forkswa.com.

• Joyce Daze Blackberry Festival, 7 a.m.3 p.m., Joyce. Homemade pies with local blackberries, children’s activities, a juried arts and crafts show, salmon bake and live entertainment. www.joycewa.com, photopro@ten forward.com or 360-928-2428.

July 19-26 • Centrum’s Jazz Port Townsend, Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend. Centrum’s Jazz Port Townsend features straight-ahead jazz and internationally acclaimed musicians on the grounds of Fort

Aug. 1-2 • Centrum’s Port Townsend Blues and Heritage Festival performances, Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend. A free downtown street dance, followed by Blues in the Clubs, eight bands, playing simultaneously on Friday-Saturday nights. 800-733-3608, 360-385-5320 or www. centrum.org.

August 7-9 • Hurricane Ridge Kennel Club Summer Agility Trials, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Carrie Blake Park, Sequim. 360-681-3707.

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


Aug. 8

Aug. 10-16

•Forks Family Festival, 10 a.m. in downtown Forks. Family festival with food vendors, arts and crafts, entertainment and much more. www.forkswa.com; • Taste of Hood Canal, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., downtown Belfair. Features antique car show, family entertainment, live music, local specialty foods.

• Port Ludlow Days —Kiwanis Classic Car Show at Memorial Field in downtown Port Townsend, family activities. See plvc. org.

Aug. 8-9 • Port Angeles Heritage Weekend, 10 a.m., downtown Port Angeles. Guided walking tours of historical downtown Port Angeles, tours of Elwha Dam and more. Register in the atrium of The Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad Ave., 360-460-1001 or donperry10@yahoo.com; • Port to Port Sail Race sponsored by PT Sail, Port Townsend, 360-385-7878, www.ptsail.org.

Aug. 15-16 • Makah Days, 10 a.m., Neah Bay. The 85th annual celebration focused around Makah patriotism for the U.S. with Makah war veterans taking a “high seat.” Canoe races and bone games, children’s races, royalty, salmon bake, traditional dancing, talent show and fireworks.

Events CALENDAR EC Sept. 11-13 Aug. 30 • North Olympic Land Trust’s StreamFest, noon at Ennis Arbor Farm off Lindberg Road, Port Angeles. Fun activities for all ages. Free admission. Salmon cookout fundraiser. Call 360-457-5415, 360-4171815 or go to www.northolympiclandtrust. org for shuttle service information.

• 33rd annual Wooden Boat Festival, 9 a.m. at Point Hudson in Port Townsend. An internationally acclaimed annual celebration featuring 200 wooden vessels of all kinds — dugout canoes, kayaks, classic motor boats, models and tall ships. Authentic activities and demonstrations for all ages. 360-344-3436, festival@wooden boat.org or www. woodenboat.org. Admission fee.

Port Townsend

Port Angeles

Aug. 14-16 • Jefferson County Fair, 10 a.m. at fairgrounds in Port Townsend. Free entertainment: 4x4 mud drags, barrel racing, draft horse pulls, magicians, music, 4-H and FFA exhibits. Animals and much more. 360385-1013, jeffcofairgrounds@olypen.com or www.jeffco fairgrounds.com.

Aug. 20-23 • Clallam County Fair, fairgrounds in Port Angeles. Draft horse pull, concerts, rodeo, logging show, crafts, art, 4-H and FFA animals and much more. 360-417-2551 or www.clallamcounty fair.com.

to Forks

Sequim

San Juan Islands October 5-7, 2009, Sequim, WA Join the Olympic Peninsula Audubon Society this fall for a three-day cruise through the spectacular San Juan Archipelago. Departing John Wayne Marina aboard the MV Glacier Spirit, we cruise to Roche Harbor Resort and tour various sites on San Juan Island for birding and sightseeing. On day two, we cruise on for a mid-day walk-about and picnic on Sucia Island State Park. On day three, we cruise home again by way of dramatic Deception Pass, pausing at Smith Island for birds and sea mammals. Find registration materials on our website www.olympicpeninsulaaudubon.org. For additional information, contact 360-681-4076, or email rcoffice@olympus.net.

LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009

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T END YHE OURLiving NEW Life

A vision is just the

beginning By Cathy Van Ruhan

In

the 1980s, I was living near downtown Portland, Ore., working for a nonprofit agency. From time to time, we took part in leadership training programs. At one of them, we were asked to visualize where we would be in 30 years and then draw it. I’d spent most of my life in cities. I wore suits and shoes with high heels to work and girly dresses in my free time. But, my drawing had mountains, the ocean, a house by itself on a knoll with a stream and a long curvy driveway. In the early 1990s, I first heard of Sequim when I was told about a job opening. A friend had been here and told me she thought I should check out the area, that it would suit me. I drove up Highway 101, loved it, but was surprised at how far it was from Olympia to Sequim. I took that job and began exploring the mountains, the prairie and the shore. Some days I’d load the car with things to eat and my sleeping bag, choose some back roads from the map and just drive to see what was there. Other times I’d choose a

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specific location to explore in more depth. I began to learn about the geology of the area, the plants, trees, mushrooms, birds and animals. In the summer I’d take my backpack and go into the national park for a day or a weekend or longer. I frequently imagined life here as it was for the pioneers. When I needed to restore my soul, I’d find water — a few hours by the strait or a day at La Push would put things right. I got a kayak and discovered the joy of feeling as if I were part of the sea. I gave away my suits and moved into a house by itself on a knoll, with a stream and a long curvy driveway. There have been a couple p times when I considered ed moving away from the peninsula, but I couldn’t think of anywhere that suited me better. I love knowing that in less than a hour or two I can an

be smelling the saltwater or the freshness of the moss beside a mountain stream bordered with tall conifers. I fly-fish and keep a list of streams and lakes that are promising and within a few hours’ drive. I regularly travel the Olympic Discovery Trail with its exceptional views and variety of landscapes. I try to explore Sequim, Port Angeles or Port Townsend as if I were a tourist, visiting galleries and museums and reading the landmark signs. A day trip to Victoria, walking on the Coho ferry, is an easy and inexpensive way to get my “big city” fix. In my purse is a small notebook with a perpetual list of interesting-sounding places to see and things to do, collected mostly from newspaper articles and friends’ suggestions. I take great pleasure in choosing something from the list when I have an unscheduled day. It might be as simple as revisiting the Olympic National Park Visitor Center. I’d gone there when I first moved here but went again recently and found it far more meaningful now that I’m so familiar with the area. I walked the nature trails near the parking lot and was delighted with the wilderness feel, available within minutes on a day otherwise spent running errands. Low tide walks along the beach at Jamestown, on the spit or on Miller Peninsula give me a new perspective on the landscape and on life. My vision from so many years ago came true, that I would find myself between the mountains and the sea, but it was only a glimpse of the richness readily available on this exceptional peninsula where we live.

LIVIN LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


business

DIRECTORY

Products, services and ideas from across the Peninsula. To advertise in Clallam County, call Debi Lahmeyer at 360-683-3311. In Jefferson County, call Kathy Decker at 360-385-2900.

Home & Garden Health & Wellness

Real Estate

Retail

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&

NOW Then

The Inn at Port Ludlow

T

he original inhabitants of Port Ludlow led a much different life in the early 1900s. Rows of inexpensive homes climbed the hill from the bay to house workers for the mill on the waterfront. Named for Augustus C. Ludlow, a naval officer in the War of 1812, Port Ludlow was founded in 1842 by explorer Charles Wilkes. The first lumber mill was built in 1852 and was acquired 27 years later by Andrew Jackson Pope and William C. Talbot. It was a mill town until 1935. In 1968, the Pope & Talbot development business launched the first planned resort community in Jefferson County. Today, the Inn at Port Ludlow stands on the former mill site and provides 37 guest rooms, many with views of Ludlow Bay, the Olympic Mountains and Port Ludlow Marina. It is safe to say residents usually are not laboring in a lumber mill. Instead residents and visitors take advantage of the full service marina for watercraft, kayak and bicycle rentals. An 18-hole golf course also has a golf school and lessons, with four different practice areas. Teal Lake Park is located in the woods south of town and is a great place for fly-fishing. Current photo, above, by Fred Obee, Historical photo courtesy of the Jefferson County Historical Society

Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort

S

ol Duc Hot Springs is a resort located in Olympic National Park that is best known for its soaking pools that are heated with the nearby hot springs. The resort is situated in a valley carved by the Sol Duc River. The hot springs, known to the Quileute Tribe for their therapeutic value, called the springs and the nearby river “Sol Duc,” translated as “sparkling waters.” The springs first came to the attention of settlers in the 1880s. Touted as a one of the most elegant health spas in America when it was built in 1912, it was a four-story, 165-room hotel with steam heat, electric lights, bowling alleys and a theater. Built for the well-to-do, it attracted millions during its brief life. Unfortunately, the roof caught fire and the resort burned down in 1916. It was rebuilt on a much less grand scale in the 1920s and rebuilt again in the 1980s. The resort’s famed hot springs continue to attract thousands of visitors a year. Historical photo courtesy of Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort. Current photo by Patricia Morrison Coate

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LIVING LIVINGON ONTHE THEPENINSULA PENINSULA | | SUMMER SUMMER || JUNE JUNE 2009 2009


The Olympic Peninsula Shops Here

GIFT SHOP www.jimsrx.com Locally grown, owned & operated

Local Books, Prints, Postcards, Peninsula Pretzels, Rogers Chocolates (of Victoria, BC) Jewelry, Baby Gifts, Candles, Pottery Mugs & Republic of Tea

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2010 Ross Hamilton Calendar

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LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


mpletion, includ o c o t n ing ig We take s e d m your project fro L L AT I O N!

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LIVING ON THE PENINSULA | SUMMER | JUNE 2009


Living on the Peninsula, Summer 2009