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LIBERAL ARTS Courses and Events | May–June 2013 With daytime offerings for adults 55+


COURSES AND EVENTS AT A GLANCE REGISTRATION OPENS THURSDAY, APRIL 18 AT 10 AM 55+

Daytime courses for adults 55+ only

Van

Courses and events at SFU Vancouver

All

Courses and events for all adults

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Courses and events at Surrey City Centre Library

TOPIC

PAGE

AUDIENCE/ LOCATION

The Great Courts of Europe, 1500–1800 11:30 am–1:20 pm

History

5

55+ Van

Small Revolutions: Responding Creatively to Overconsumption and Environmental Damage 1:30–3:20 pm

Environmental Studies

5

55+ Van

Six More Divas 9:30–11:20 am

Music

6

55+ Van

Alternatives to War: Peace and Conflict in the Contemporary World 11:30 am–1:20 pm

Political Science

6

55+ Van

Wicked Spirits: Three Gothic Novels for the Serious Minded 1:30–3:20 pm

Literature

6

55+ Van

Discovering Form: Your Second Draft and Beyond 6:30–8:20 pm

Writing

7

All

Poet Among Composers: The Music of Robert Schumann 9:30–11:20 am

Music

8

55+ Van

Dressing Amazons: A History of Women in Trousers, 1700–2000 11:30 am–1:20 pm

Fashion

8

55+ Van

The Way We Build: Architecture Throughout History and Our Homes Today 1:30–3:20 pm

Architecture

8

55+ Van

COURSE TITLE/TIME

MONDAYS

TUESDAYS

Van

WEDNESDAYS

» Instructor biographies on page 15

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Discover something new | May–June 2013


TOPIC

PAGE

AUDIENCE/ LOCATION

From the Celestial Empire to Canada’s Shores: Chinese-Canadian History 9:30–11:20 am

Culture

9

55+ Van

Stargazers in Petticoats: The Romance of Astronomy 11:30 am–1:20 pm

Astronomy

9

55+ Van

Where Did English Come From? (And Where It’s Gonna Go) 1:30–3:20 pm

Linguistics

9

55+ Van

Women and Power 6:30–8:20 pm

Political Science

10

All

From Factotum in Karachi to Ambassador in Beijing: 50 Years 9:30–11:20 am

Political Science

11

55+ Van

Italian Opera from Monteverdi to bel canto 11:30 am–1:20 pm

Opera

11

55+ Van

Breaking Up is Hard to Do: Creative Partnerships 1:30–3:20 pm

Culture

11

55+ Van

COURSE TITLE/TIME

THURSDAYS

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FRIDAYS

SATURDAYS Heroes and Villains of the Middle Ages 10:30 am–12:20 pm

Myth and Folklore 12

All

Van

Rogues, Cads, and Scoundrels: Jane Austen’s Literary Scamps 10:30 am–12:20 pm

Literature

12

All

Van

Great Composers of the 17th and 18th Centuries 10:30 am–12:20 pm

Music

13

All

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Democracy in the Middle East 10:30 am–12:20 pm

Political Science

13

All

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This is Your Life: A Guide to Writing Your Life Story 1–3:10 pm

Writing

13

All

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FREE Saturday Forum “Ready For My Close-Up”: The Making of Wilder and Brackett’s Sunset Boulevard 1:30–3 pm

Film

14

All

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» Instructor biographies on page 15 www.sfu.ca/liberal-arts | 778-782-8000

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!

NEW

SUMMER WRITES: URBAN TALES Lectures and Workshops on Writing Join us to celebrate summer, writing, and the excitement and imaginative challenges of city life with award-winning writers.

• August 7 Vancouver’s poet laureate Evelyn Lau in conversation with Daniela Elza • August 14 Short-story writer Marina Sonkina in conversation with Alan Twigg • August 21 Poet George Bowering in conversation with Wayde Compton

All conversations take place from 7-9 pm at SFU Vancouver’s Harbour Centre campus. Four hours of workshops will follow the lectures. For further details and registration, see www.sfu.ca/summer-writes

SUPPORT THE SENIORS 55+ PROGRAM Your gift to the Seniors Program will help to

maintain the outstanding quality of our courses and events and ensure that they remain affordable and accessible to all members of our community. Make your gift today! Call 778-782-5212 for more information.

You can choose where your contribution goes: 1. The Seniors Endowment Fund ensures that our programs continue to thrive by supporting program operations. 2. The Annie Watson Student Bursary provides support for those who cannot otherwise participate in the Seniors Program. Online giving is both easy and secure: www.sfu.ca/seniors/donate Or send a cheque payable to Simon Fraser University Seniors Program to the following address: Seniors Program SFU Vancouver

2300-515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

The university will mail you a tax receipt.

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Discover something new | May–June 2013


MONDAYS The Great Courts of Europe, 1500–1800 Marlene LeGates

6 Mon, May 13–Jun 24 (no class May 20) 11:30 am–1:20 pm SCFC749 | Room 1800 $104

55+ Van

Between the Renaissance and the French Revolution, Europe’s great courts probably had more influence on the continent’s politics and culture than any other institution. We’ll visit the courts of papal Rome and ducal Florence; Philip II’s Madrid and Escorial; the Whitehall of Elizabeth I and her successors; Louis XIV’s Versailles; Frederick the Great’s Potsdam and Berlin; the St. Petersburg of Peter the Great and Catherine the Great; and Austria-Hungary’s Schönbrunn and Schloss Esterházy. How much did the rulers’ personalities influence court ritual and relationships? What roles did tradition, the Roman Catholic Church, or other noble families play? What was the court’s impact on politics and society? Above all, we’ll examine the cultural life of these courts—their painting, sculpture, and architecture; their music and dance; and their pageantry, tapestries, precious objects, and even firework displays.

Small Revolutions: Responding Creatively to Overconsumption and Environmental Damage

Without waiting for governments to act for them, people world over are taking their lives into their own hands and quietly changing the way they live in order to reduce damage to our shared eco-system. We’ll explore several current trends toward more eco-friendly lifestyles and environmentally sound food production.

6 Mon, May 13–Jun 24 (no class May 20) 1:30–3:20 pm SCFC750 | Room 1415 $104

We will focus on small-scale initiatives that aim to ensure our collective future. In particular, we will consider the so-called transition (“grow your own food”) movement; the permaculture movement, which designs self-maintained agriculture modeled on natural ecosystems; and the small house movement. These creative solutions to today’s problems might help to lessen environmental destruction and overconsumption and lead to future sustainability and environmental sanity.

Amy Li

55+ Van

The Great Courts of Europe, 1500-1800 Left: The Palace of Whitehall in London, England. Right: Sanssouci Palace in Potsdam, Germany.

www.sfu.ca/liberal-arts | 778-782-8000

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TUESDAYS Six More Divas Neil Ritchie

6 Tue, May 14–Jun 18 9:30–11:20 am SCFC751 | Room 1800 $104

55+ Van

Diva is an Italian word for “goddess.” In the opera world, it describes a prima donna, and its use has now extended to pop music icons. Diva has some negative connotations, and these artists were all demanding because they wanted to give their audiences the very best night after night. The pressure to excel was enormous, and often called for diva-like tactics. We will explore the talents and temperaments (mostly the talents) of six grandes dames of the opera and pop stage. We’ll consider the achievements of Sarah Vaughan, Nina Simone, Marlene Dietrich, and Aretha Franklin, as well as the vocal pyrotechnics of coloratura sopranos Beverly Sills and Joan Sutherland. This course springs from a similar course called “Six Divas” that we offered in 2011.

Alternatives to War: Peace and Conflict in the Contemporary World Lealle Ruhl

6 Tue, May 14–Jun 18 11:30 am–1:20 pm SCFC752 | Room 1800 $104

55+ Van

Wicked Spirits: Three Gothic Novels for the Serious Minded John Whatley

6 Tue, May 14–Jun 18 1:30–3:20 pm SCFC753 | Room 1415 $104

55+ Van

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This course will introduce you to the field of peace and conflict studies. We will examine some of the competing reasons for the behaviours and policies of warring nations and groups in violent conflict, and explore several related topics: the psychological aspects of war; the political economy of conflict; and the structural causes of, as well as the support for, violence as a means of resolving conflict. We will survey ongoing efforts to transform conflict through nonviolent social change and the strategic use of non-violence. We will also look at contemporary international efforts to resolve conflict without resorting to arms. You will have opportunities to relate the perspectives we discuss to current events in order to understand world conflicts and peacemaking as they unfold today.

Since Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto (1764), many gothic works have used stock machinery that include moving portraits, figures flitting over bedroom floors, unexplained groans, and bleeding nuns. But their apparitional status is usually forced upon us, we think, by simple trickery. More interesting gothic works take up the question of what makes an apparition believable. Our job as readers is to uncover whether the uncanny is counterfeit, the result of a hallucination, a deception concealing a crime, or, indeed, a mystical experience. We will take on this detective role in reading three gothic fictions: Oscar Wilde’s almost-gothic The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890), Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw (1898), and Fumiko Enchi’s Masks (1958).

Discover something new | May–June 2013


TUESDAYS Discovering Form: Your Second Draft and Beyond

You know that you enjoy writing, but you’re unsure what form best suits your style—or maybe you’re not sure you have a “style.” This experiential course will take you and your texts through the stages of the drafting process in order to uncover the heart of your writing.

6 Tue, May 14–Jun 18 6:30–8:20 pm AHCP170 | Room 2280 $160 ($104 for 55+)

Redrafting is a complex but exciting creative process that builds gradually, and often reveals what lies hidden behind the freight of the words that have found their way onto paper. You will learn to read your texts with new and wide-open eyes, line by line, image by image, and with attention to detail. In the end, you’ll be able to help your writing take on the form it requires.

Ingrid Rose

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Six More Divas Clockwise from top left: Aretha Franklin, Marlene Dietrich, and Beverly Sills.

www.sfu.ca/liberal-arts | 778-782-8000

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WEDNESDAYS Poet Among Composers: The Music of Robert Schumann Nicolas Krusek

6 Wed, May 15–Jun 19 9:30–11:20 am SCFC754 | Room 1800 $104

Robert Schumann (1810–1856) was one of the most significant German composers between Beethoven and Brahms; his music was a vital link between the works of those two masters. A bookseller’s son, his early interests included literature and music, and he eventually chose the latter for his career. A prolific music critic and journalist in his day, he is now best remembered for the spontaneous lyricism of his compositions. His piano music and songs have always been admired, but his symphonic and chamber work is equally appealing.

55+ Van

Our survey of Schumann’s career and work will focus on several major compositions, including the Phantasie in C, the song-cycle Dichterliebe, the symphonies, the piano and cello concertos, and the string quartets.

Dressing Amazons: A History of Women in Trousers, 1700–2000

In the fashionable world, women were forbidden to wear trousers until the mid-20th century. Prior to this, there had been repeated attempts to include trousers in the respectable woman’s wardrobe, but any bifurcated garments—even undergarments hidden under layers of skirts—were suspicious, and viewed as appropriating male dress in an affront to the laws of Nature and God.

Ivan Sayers

6 Wed, May 15–Jun 19 11:30 am–1:20 pm SCFC755 | Room 1800 $104

55+ Van

The Way We Build: Architecture Throughout History and Our Homes Today Vicki Lingle

6 Wed, May 15–Jun 19 1:30–3:20 pm SCFC756 | Room 1415 $104

55+ Van

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In the 17th and 18th centuries, respectable women almost never wore trousers. In the mid-19th century, Amelia Bloomer and her friends made the first major effort to popularize the once-offending garment. But only after women achieved a political voice in the 20th century did women’s trousers came out of the closet, both literally and figuratively. Slides and actual 19th- and 20th-century garments will illustrate these lectures.

What style is your home, or your neighbours’? Is there a single “contemporary” style? And is there room for anything new? We will consider these and other questions as we explore domestic architecture and identify past styles and relate them to what we see around us today. We will begin our survey in Ancient Greece, and then look at Rome, the Renaissance, Palladianism, the Victorian Age, and Frank Lloyd Wright’s work. Each era develops its architectural styles affected by the characteristics of its time, climate, and available technology. We will organize history, identify patterns, and make sense of the details. By the end of the course, you will be able to identify, understand, and discuss knowledgably the wide variety of style elements we see in today’s homes.

Discover something new | May–June 2013


THURSDAYS From the Celestial Empire to Canada’s Shores: An Introduction to ChineseCanadian History Judy Lam Maxwell

6 Thu, May 16–Jun 20 9:30–11:20 am SCFC757 | Room 1800 $104

55+ Van

Stargazers in Petticoats: The Romance of Astronomy Bill Burnyeat

6 Thu, May 16–Jun 20 11:30 am–1:20 pm SCFC758 | Room 1800 $104

55+ Van

Where Did English Come From? (And Where It’s Gonna Go) Antone Minard

6 Thu, May 16–Jun 20 1:30–3:20 pm SCFC759 | Room 1415 $104

55+ Van

Since the mid-1800s, Canada has been a popular destination for Chinese migrants, an ethnic group with a long and significant history and a strong presence in the country today: Chinese Canadians comprise the largest non-European ethnic group in Greater Vancouver and account for some 17 percent of the city’s population. We will foster an understanding of people of Chinese ancestry by focusing on arrival and settlement; oppression and social justice; isolation and inclusion; and assimilation and retention of culture. We will also look at popular livelihoods, the effects of world events on Canada’s Chinese population, festival, and celebrations, and success stories. Our last class will feature a guided tour of Vancouver’s Chinatown—its people, streetscape, businesses, and heritage buildings.

A little-known genre of astronomical writing, which was published from about 1850 to 1950, was written by women. These now-forgotten writers imaginatively and creatively treated astronomical facts for a popular audience and wrote some of the best, most wonderful, and lucid words ever penned about the nighttime sky. During the last 30 years, this kind of nature writing has come back into vogue. Our lectures will highlight these fascinating women and their work, review the astronomical ideas of their eras, and look at contemporary scholarly ideas about the structure of nature writing. Along the way, we should gain an enhanced appreciation of the wonders of the night sky and the universe.

Currently the most widely spoken and influential language on earth, as well as the most dominant in business and science, English enjoys high prestige. This is a relatively recent phenomenon, however. Five hundred years ago, hardly anyone outside England spoke the language. Each corner of the world had its own international language used for education and diplomacy (Arabic or Chinese, for instance). In Europe, that language was Latin. Even as recently as a century ago, English was in serious competition with other colonizing languages such as French. We’ll explore the history of the English language in both linguistic and social terms, from its early medieval origins in Low German dialects to its dominance on the Internet. We will also speculate about its near and long-term future.

www.sfu.ca/liberal-arts | 778-782-8000

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THURSDAYS Women and Power Eva Sajoo

6 Thu, May 16–Jun 20 6:30–8:20 pm AHCP171 | Room 2540 $160 ($104 for adults 55+)

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There have been more female heads of state in the last 50 years than in the last 200. What impact do women in power have? Are the policies of female heads of government recognizably different from those of their male counterparts? What, if anything, does the election of a woman to national leadership indicate about a society? And how have women fared in countries where a woman holds the highest political office? We will explore these questions by looking at six different countries in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia that have each had a woman president or prime minister. Examining the impact and influence of female leaders across geographic and cultural lines will provide us with opportunities for comparison and analysis.

Breaking Up is Hard to Do: Creative Partnerships Clockwise from left: John Lennon and Yoko Ono; Bud Abbott and Lou Costello; Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera.

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Discover something new | May–June 2013


FRIDAYS From Factotum in Karachi to Ambassador in Beijing: 50 Years of Changes and Challenges in Canada’s Foreign Service Earl Drake

6 Fri, May 17–Jun 21 9:30–11:20 am SCFC760 | Room 1800 $104

55+ Van

Italian Opera from Monteverdi to bel canto Harvey De Roo

6 Fri, May 17–Jun 21 11:30 am–1:20 pm SCFC761 | Room 1800 $104

55+ Van

Breaking Up is Hard to Do: Creative Partnerships Donald Brackett

6 Fri, May 17–Jun 21 1:30–3:20 pm SCFC762 | Room 1800 $104

55+ Van

This course offers unique insights into Canada’s international relations and impact on world affairs during the 20th century’s turbulent closing decades as Asian economic power was rising. We will survey shifting power politics and intercultural understanding and you’ll hear of firsthand encounters with major Canadian political figures in a series of lectures that gets at the complex realities behind the headlines. Sharing a wealth of personal experience, Ambassador Drake will provide glimpses of the individuals who created and shaped recent history in Karachi and Paris, Beijing, and Jakarta. In recounting his long career, he’ll also explain how the nature of the Foreign Service changed, as did Canada’s role in the world.

Italian opera is the quintessential expression of the art form. It was the Italians who invented dramma per musica (“drama through music”) at the turn of the 17th century and exported it throughout Europe and beyond. For the Italians, opera was a vehicle of the voice, and song was its most important element. So influential was this concept that during the 17th and 18th centuries, Italian opera became the dominant international style, whether Italians composed it or not. We will examine the origins and development of Italian opera from its very beginnings in the 17th century to 19th-century bel canto.

Many great films, musical compositions, and even works of art were created by a team of talented partners who, although they did not get along personally, succeeded in melding their artistic temperaments into a working relationship. Such conflicts may even have produced better shared work. We’ll examine the mysteries of the cooperative process in a variety of famous 20th-century creative partnerships, including those in music, film, popular comedy, dance, and art. We will discuss concepts that help to explain how opposites not only attract, but also merge into a single highly functional creative unit, allowing them to achieve together something superior—sometimes far superior—to what either participant could have managed alone.

www.sfu.ca/liberal-arts | 778-782-8000

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SATURDAYS Heroes and Villains of the Middle Ages Antone Minard

6 Sat, May 11–Jun 22 (no class May 18) 10:30 am–12:20 pm AHCP172 | Room 1425 $160 ($104 for adults 55+)

All

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Rogues, Cads, and Scoundrels: Jane Austen’s Literary Scamps Charles Carroll

6 Sat, May 11–Jun 22 (no class May 18) 10:30 am–12:20 pm AHCP173 | Room 1800 $160 ($104 for adults 55+)

All

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These days, everybody knows who Bilbo Baggins and Harry Potter are, but what about the great heroes of medieval literature that gave rise to them? Bilbo is directly modeled on a minor character in the Anglo-Saxon Beowulf, while Harry’s entire world was shaped by the romances about King Arthur. While Beowulf and King Arthur still occasionally appear in modern popular culture, a number of medieval heroes and villains—secular, sacred, and non-human—will intrigue us. Our heroes and villains have deep roots in the Bible, Greek and Latin literature, and further afield, as well as deep within northern Europe’s oral traditions. We will look closely at a broad range of figures that appear in multiple stories in several languages.

We all remember the dashing and almost superhumanly perceptive Mr. Darcy in Pride and Prejudice, but how often do we talk about his erstwhile friend, the unctuous George Wickham? We celebrate the quiet charm of Edward Ferrars of Sense and Sensibility, but cannot quite get around Willoughby. Do we condemn William Elliot of Persuasion for social-climbing, but let the ambitious Lady Susan off the hook? We will look at some of the most important forgotten characters of Jane Austen’s novels—the fascinating yet maddening gentlemen, would-be gentlemen, and one lady rogue who are her anti-heroes. Using selections from the novels and clips from the Austen films, we will review, discuss, and examine the words, actions, and visual images of Jane Austen’s immoral characters. Regency economics and early feminism will provide contexts for our explorations.

Rogues, Cads, and Scoundrels: Jane Austen’s Literary Scamps Left: Sense and Sensibility Illustration Right: Pride and Prejudice Illustration

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Discover something new | May–June 2013


SATURDAYS IN SURREY Great Composers of the 17th and 18th Centuries Nicolas Krusek

6 Sat, May 11–Jun 22 (no class May 18) 10:30 am–12:20 pm AHCP167 | Room 401 $160 ($104 for adults 55+)

All

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Democracy in the Middle East Mohamad Rachid

6 Sat, May 11–Jun 22 (no class May 18) 10:30 am–12:20 pm AHCP168 | Room 402 $160 ($104 for adults 55+)

All

Sur

This is Your Life: A Guide to Writing Your Life Story Ingrid Rose

5 Sat, May 11–Jun 15 (no class May 18) 1–3:10 pm AHCP169 | Room 401 $160 ($104 for adults 55+)

All

We will explore the lives and music of some of history’s greatest musical minds, including Handel, Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven. Each class will provide an overview of the career, musical development, and major works of a particular composer. The works we will discuss include popular favourites as well as a selection of lesser-known but equally appealing masterpieces. We will also seek to understand each composer’s role in the history of classical music, especially his musical influences and relationship to other composers. We will likewise consider the similarities and differences between composers who worked in the same geographical area during the same time period or who enjoyed a close personal relationship, such as Haydn and Mozart.

After a brief survey of the history of the region, we will examine the question of democracy in the Middle East as it is being posed today in the street and in the corridors of power. We will explore the internal, external, political, economic, and social factors that have kept the region (Israel apart) undemocratic for a long time. What roles have Islam and Arab culture played in this? And what has the West done to support or undermine the democratization process? We will also study the recent democratic movements that have swept many countries in the region, the “Arab Spring” of newspaper headlines, and explore their influence on regional and global affairs. We will give special attention to Tunisia, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Syria.

We will focus on developing the skills and tools you need to write autobiographically at a point when you have started—or are just about to start—putting your life story down on paper. Where do you begin? How do you continue? What’s the ending? Writing autobiographically is very different from “making up” a story. In this life-writing course, you will explore how to coax your story onto the page and come to terms with that skilful trickster: memory.

Sur

www.sfu.ca/liberal-arts | 778-782-8000

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E FRE DAY R U T SA RUM FO

“Ready For My Close-Up”: The Making of Wilder and Brackett’s Sunset Boulevard Donald Brackett

Saturday, April 27 1:30–3 pm | Room 1900

All

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In this forum we will explore the dynamics behind the creation of the 1950 film noir classic Sunset Boulevard, and the highly competitive partnership between director Billy Wilder and writer/producer Charles Brackett. We will also examine the film’s large social impact on popular culture― in particular, the fascination with fame that saturates our contemporary social networks and the film’s prophetic nature in showing the dangers of unbridled star-adulation and self-absorption. This film has such an intuitive prescience into the human condition that it seems as fresh and insightful today as when it was produced. Admission to this forum is free and open to adults of all ages. We require reservations as space is limited. We’ll hold your seat until 15 minutes prior to the event, at which time we’ll release it to the wait list.

www.sfu.ca/reserve or 778-782-8000 Top: Gloria Swanson and William Holden in Sunset Boulevard

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Discover something new | May–June 2013


OUR INSTRUCTORS Donald Brackett is a culture critic specializing in the history, theory, and practice of art, design, music, and architecture. He has taught at Ryerson Polytechnic, the Ontario College of Art and Design, and Toronto’s Centennial and George Brown Colleges. » See pages 11, 14 Bill Burnyeat, a writer, producer, and presenter on astronomy, teaches at the British Columbia Institute of Technology Planetarium. He is the education coordinator for the Vancouver Centre of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada. » See page 9 Charles Carroll, PhD, a specialist on the literature of the long 18th century, has an MBA and a master’s in creative writing. He is currently an adjunct instructor at Fairleigh Dickinson University—Vancouver. » See page 12 Harvey De Roo, PhD, taught for many years in SFU’s Department of English, and was the founding secretary of the board of City Opera Vancouver. » See page 11 Earl Drake, a former Canadian diplomat in Asia and Southeast Asia, is the author of A StubbleJumper in Striped Pants: Memoirs of a Prairie Diplomat (1999). » See page 11 Nicolas Krusek is a professional musician, conductor, and speaker on music-related topics. He has performed with and directed numerous professional, amateur, and youth orchestras throughout BC and Central Europe. » See pages 8, 13

Marlene LeGates, PhD, is the author of Making Waves: A History of Feminism in Western Society (1996). She has taught women’s studies and history at SFU, Capilano University, and the University of British Columbia. » See page 5 Amy Li is the founder of Freewill International Learning Centre, an online learning platform that focuses on independent thinking, core humanistic knowledge, and contemporary issues. » See page 5

Neil Ritchie, a former CBC Radio music producer, has been sharing his love of music with SFU Continuing Studies students since 1998. » See page 6 Ingrid Rose has taught creative writing, reading, and languaging through the body for over 30 years in Belgium, Canada, France, the US, and the UK. She also teaches in the Continuing Studies Program at Emily Carr University of Art + Design. » See pages 7, 13

Vicki Lingle, BID, BFA, is an interior designer who has run her own design firm for more than 20 years, completing a wide variety of interesting projects. She currently teaches at Vancouver Community College’s Interior Design Program. » See page 8

Lealle Ruhl, PhD, teaches political science at Langara College, where she also coordinates the Peace and Conflict Studies Program. She has taught many courses in political theory, contemporary ideology, and international relations for SFU Continuing Studies. » See page 6

Judy Lam Maxwell, MA, specializes in the history of Chinatowns and Chinese transnational migration. She is a member of the Vancouver Chinatown Revitalization Committee, the Chinatown Society Heritage Buildings Association, and the National Historic Site Committee. » See page 9

Eva Sajoo, MA, is a research associate in SFU’s Centre for the Comparative Study of Muslim Societies and Cultures. She specializes in gender and development. » See page 10

Antone Minard, PhD, is a specialist on folklore and mythology. He is a member of SFU’s Centre for Scottish Studies and the Vancouver Welsh Society. » See pages 9, 12 Mohamad Rachid, has served as an imam in Canada and the United States. He has degrees in civil engineering and political science and has lectured at the University of Colorado and the University of British Columbia. » See page 13

Ivan Sayers, a historian and lecturer on women’s fashion, owns one of the finest private collections of period clothing and accessories in Canada. » See page 8 John Whatley, PhD, is an associate member of SFU’s English and criminology departments and a program director in the Centre for Online and Distance Education. He has taught courses on literature and crime and has published on the relations between Romantic and gothic literature. » See page 6

www.sfu.ca/liberal-arts | 778-782-8000

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DID YOU KNOW? • Find full week-by-week course descriptions, recommended readings, and full instructor biographies by visiting www.sfu.ca/liberal-arts • Watch the Free Saturday Forums you’ve missed on the liberal arts playlist on our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/user/ SFUcontinuingstudies • Keep up to date on our news, activities, and events on our blog: www.sfu.ca/liberal-arts-blog • Follow us on Twitter at @CS_SFU • Like us on Facebook at facebook.com/sfucontinuingstudies

PHILOSOPHERS’ CAFÉ

The glow of Lifelong Learning has no age limit A way of life for the 21st-century senior The SFU Seniors Lifelong Learners Society provides an important opportunity to become involved in seniors' learning.

www.sfu.ca/seniors/ssociety

SENIORS ADVISORY COUNCIL In June 2011, a Seniors Advisory Council was established. Members were solicited as volunteers. The Council: • Serves as a way for students to provide guidance and knowledge. • Provides a way for students to get and share program information with other students. • Helps to promote the 55+ program in the community. • Welcomes 55+ students in the first week of classes.

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Discover something new | May–June 2013


NON-CREDIT CERTIFICATE IN THE LIBERAL ARTS WHY NOT TAKE YOUR LEARNING TO THE NEXT LEVEL? To learn more, please call 778-782-5212 or visit us online: www.sfu.ca/seniors/certificate Join the many students who have found the certificate program adds a new dimension to their learning experience.

SFU awards the Non-Credit Certificate in the Liberal Arts to seniors (adults 55+) who complete a minimum of 128 contact hours. For example, non-credit courses in the Seniors Program are 6-weeks long, and meet once per week for two-hour sessions; this would result in 12 contact hours—per course—that you can apply toward the 128 contact hours needed for the certificate. There are no grades or examinations. Instead, students enrolled in the certificate program are required to complete a short, typed (double–spaced) essay between 4 to 6 pages (1000–1500 words). Your essay should be a thoughtful and personal response to either or both of the following questions, rather than an overview of what the course covered: 1.

How did the course contribute to your appreciation and knowledge of the subject?

2.

How, and in what way, did the course change or alter your way of thinking?

AUDIT UNDERGRADUATE COURSES ALL CLASSES RUN FOR 13 WEEKS STARTING MAY 6 Visit us online: www.sfu.ca/liberal-arts

Here’s your opportunity to audit a wide selection of undergraduate university courses.

Mandarin Chinese I

Great Cities in Their Time

History of Philosophy II

Psychological Explanations of Criminal and Deviant Behaviour

Wealth and Poverty of Nations

Introduction to Political Philosophy

You’ll get the benefits of engaging lectures, discussions, and debates at half the cost and without the pressure of assignment deadlines and exams.

Contemporary Health Issues

www.sfu.ca/liberal-arts | 778-782-8000

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REGISTRATION HOW TO REGISTER Online

Registering online is simple, secure, and convenient. It’s also the quickest, easiest way to secure your seat.

Registration opens Thursday, April 18, 10 am

Payment

Payment for all courses and programs is required at the time of registration. Once your registration and payment is received, we’ll send your confirmation and receipt by email. We accept payment by cash, cheque, or credit card (Visa or MasterCard).

Non-Credit Certificate

Register online at

http://register.cstudies.sfu.ca

All students 55+ are eligible to apply for the Seniors Program Non-Credit Certificate in the Liberal Arts. An additional $20 administration fee per fee-based course is required.

Phone

Tax Benefits

Call us at 778-782-8000. We’ll be happy to talk to you.

Fax or mail

Complete the registration form. Fax it to 778-782-5238 or mail it to us with your payment: Continuing Studies Simon Fraser University 2300-515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

In Person

Visit us at the Registrar and Information Service desk on the main floor (street level) of SFU Vancouver at 515 West Hastings Street.

If your SFU tuition fees exceed $100 in one calendar year, you may claim them as a tax credit. The payment receipt that we’ll email you after you register is your official tax receipt.

Course Cancellation and Instructor Substitution

We reserve the right to cancel courses or substitute instructors without liability. If we do cancel a course, we will make every effort to give adequate notice.

Continuing Studies Non-Credit Cancellation/Refund Policy

• We issue refunds in the original method of payment and to the original payee only. Please include your payment receipt when you request a refund. • Send your written refund request to csreg@sfu.ca at least seven business days before the course start date. All refunds are subject to a 20 percent administrative charge per course, to a maximum of $75 per course. The same applies to a request to transfer. • If you submit a request less than seven business days before the course begins, you will not receive a refund. It is also too late to request a transfer. • If SFU Continuing Studies cancels a course you have registered and paid for, you will receive a full refund.

COLLECTION OF PERSONAL INFORMATION The University collects your personal information under the authority of the University Act (RSBC 1996, c. 468, s. 27(4)(a)). The information is related directly to and needed by the University to administer and operate non-credit programs, workshops and courses. The information will be used to register you in the appropriate non-credit program, monitor your academic progress and send you information about University programs. It will also be used to issue certificates and diplomas for eligible students. If you have any questions or requests about the collection and use of this information please contact Continuing Studies, 2300–515 West Hastings Street, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3, 778-782-8000, csreg@sfu.ca.

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Discover something new | May–June 2013


REGISTRATION FORM Name and Contact Information

Payment Information

Date of Birth (MM/DD/YYYY)

My total payment of $

o Female o Male

Name (first)

or:

(middle)

(please comment)

(last)

is enclosed by:

o cheque (made payable to Simon Fraser University) o VISA o MasterCard Card number

Expiry Date

Signature (mandatory if paying by credit card)

Address

City

Province Postal code

Cardholder’s name (if different from registrant)

Telephone

Address (if different from registrant)

Email

City

Please complete this form and return with total payment to: Continuing Studies Simon Fraser University 2300-515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

Registration

Province Postal code

Phone: 778-782-8000 Or return by fax to 778-782-5238 Or register securely online at www.sfu.ca/liberal-arts

SAMPLE ONLY

The Great Courts of Europe, 1500-1800

SCFC794 Code

Fee $

Course Title

Code

Fee $

Course Title

Code

Fee $

Course Title

Code

Fee $

Course Title

Code

Fee $

Course Title

Code

Fee $

Course Title

Code

Fee $

Total # of Courses

x $20 each

Course Title

(Optional) Non-Credit Certificate in Liberal Arts fee (please see page 17)

For additional courses, use a separate sheet of paper.

104

Total payment $

www.sfu.ca/liberal-arts | 778-782-8000

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CONTINUING STUDIES 2300-515 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

Left to right: Paul and Linda McCartney, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater (exterior), Robert Schumann (1839)

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SUMMER WRITES: URBAN TALES LECTURES AND WORKSHOPS ON WRITING

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SATURDAYS IN SURREY

Visit our website: www.sfu.ca/liberal-arts Front cover Top row, left to right: Chinese dragon on temple, solar-powered home in Québec City, Marlene Dietrich Middle row, left to right: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart , vintage telescope Bottom row, left to right: Occupy Vancouver rally participant, The Palace of Whitehall in London

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Discover something new | May–June 2013

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SFU Continuing Studies Liberal Arts Courses and Events Summer 2013