The Banner, Fall 2020

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THE BANNER

Seoul Foreign School Magazine, Fall 2020


The Elementary School Pre-K 4 buddied up with Middle School Grade 6 students and held a “Cardboard Challenge� as part of the Imagination Day of Play, an international initiative to celebrate the creativity of kids.


Features

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COVID-19 Silver Linings We asked our faculty and staff for their stories: what unintended positive outcomes did you gain from the pandemic?

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Freshman Year and COVID-19 Our latest graduates tell us about what it’s like to start university when you can’t go to class. Creative solutions to virtual learning SFS teachers demonstrate outside the box thinking when it comes to lesson planning for a virtual classroom.

Departments 4

From the Head of School and Board Chair

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School Happenings Community Service/Mission in Action, Summer Camp, New High School Principal, Architecture Award, Parent Association, Sports, Arts

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Student Voices

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Eric De Haan, new Director of Alumni Relations Class Notes

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Advancement


From the Head of School Dear SFS Community, What a year! As 2020 draws to a close, I cannot help but reflect on what our community, our host country of Korea, and the entire world have endured. Globally, we’ve seen sadness, pain, and loss of life owing to the COVID-19 pandemic. But through it all, there are glimmers of hope and resilience. Locally, we’ve benefited from and celebrated the efforts of the Korean government, whose forward-thinking approach to controlling and containing the virus spared us from lockdown and other stringent methods seen in other countries around the world. We continue to applaud their efforts and are grateful for their perseverance. At SFS, our teachers demonstrated their ability to take on massive changes to schedules and teaching strategies—often on very short notice. Their creativity in lesson planning, including virtual swimming lessons to creative artwork has been held up as an example to other schools overseas. This flexibility and resilience of our faculty demonstrates why they are among the best in the world. I am thrilled with this issue of The Banner, including the wonderful articles and stunning photos. Please let me introduce you to our new Director of Communications and Marketing, Liz Allen, who is responsible for this issue. Her photo is at the bottom right of this page.

THE BANNER Seoul Foreign School Magazine, Fall 2020 Team Published by: Seoul Foreign School External Relations Team Assistant Head of School - External Relations: Dawn M. Stark Editor: Liz Allen Designer: Juhie Suh Collaborators: Yoojin Um, Eric De Haan, Angie Won, Judy Raine Photographers: Juhie Suh, Daniel Hahm Address Seoul Foreign School 39 Yeonhui-ro 22-gil Yeonhui-dong, Seodaemun-gu Seoul, South Korea, 03723 www.seoulforeign.org Unless otherwise noted, articles may be reprinted without permission - as long as they are not edited or revised - with appropriate credit given to “The Banner, the magazine for Seoul Foreign School.” *All efforts have been made to check details and consistency. Please contact us with any questions. Cover: William Shakespeare’s The Tempest, this year’s high school play. Staged in Korea, this production was enhanced with symbolic cultural elements and interpretations of traditional costumes, such as hanbok, and music. This otherworldly yet grounded production seemed particularly poignant set on a stage that had been dark for months owing to COVID-19. As we look ahead to whatever the future holds in this new global reality, we hope for Miranda’s positivity: “How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world, that has such people in it!” Photography: Juhie Suh

We have learned from the pandemic, and are using those lessons to strategize plans for an uncertain future. I am confident that our shared experience and expertise will continue to place SFS at the forefront of education in Seoul, Korea, Asia and beyond. God bless, Colm Flanagan Head of School 4

The BANNER | From the Head of School

Liz Allen Direcctor of Communications and Marketing


From the Board Chair Dear SFS Community, I’m pleased to be writing to you in The Banner for the first time as the Chair of the Board of Governors. It is an honor to lead such a committed group of parents who each bring individual talent and expertise to their roles on the Board, and are helping to steer and shape the future of SFS for generations to come.

effective strategy to contain the spread and reduce the disease burden. We are fortunate to be living in a country whose effective control of the virus has allowed us to live relatively normal lives, particularly when compared with other countries around the world.

This year has been a challenging one for everyone. In March, my older daughter (Alessandra Kim, a 2017 SFS alumna) came back to Korea to follow classes virtually as many universities in the US closed in-person classes, and my younger, Anastasia, was following virtual classes at SFS. As a senior at SFS, there were so many unknowns: from IB exams to college acceptance and in-person vs virtual choices together with so much trepidation on how to reconnect with SFS classmates and finally graduate together. We were blessed that SFS administration was able to bring together the seniors and their families in a safe and secure outdoor graduation ceremony that many described as beautiful and the best in recent memory. The ceremony was a testament to the creativity of our wonderful faculty and staff, who found a way to celebrate our seniors at a time when many other schools were unable to do so in person.

I want to leave you with the verse of a praise song, which has been of comfort for me through these uncertain times. For those who do not know me, I have a passion for singing and I am an active member of SFS Psalms Choir, which I am happy to report started rehearsing again this fall. This song is one of my favourites, titled “O Lord, My Rock and My Redeemer.”

As an immunologist, I have also experienced the pandemic through the lens of the scientific community. The Korean government has been an example to countries around the world, demonstrating that using epidemiological data to dictate decision making for a population fighting a devastating virus can be an Collage created by PreK 4 students in the Elementary School, inspired by a print by Andy Warhol

My song, when enemies surround me My hope, when tides of sorrow rise My joy, when trials are abounding Your faithfulness, my refuge in the night As we move forward into a new year, I thank you for your continued support of our school. Together, we are riding out a tumultuous period in history—we are stronger together and will see this through. - 2 Corinthians 13:11 (NIV) Sincerely, Dr. Silvia Ratto Kim Chair of the Board of Governors

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Photo taken by Edie Moon from the SFS Campus looking West to Yeonhuidong and beyond.


COVID-19 SILVER LININGS We asked the faculty and staff of SFS for their “silver linings:” what have been positive results of the COVID-19 cloud?


Left: Meagan Mathews with her scuba diving instructor. Right: Meagan Mathews at the seaside.

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he COVID-19 pandemic has tested our patience, our humility, and our camaraderie. COVID-19 has taken much from us: most significantly, the tragic loss of life for those who have fallen victim to the disease. Additionally, many have suffered loss of financial stability, have been isolated from loved ones, had travel plans cancelled, and haven’t been able to leave their homes. But through the darkness, there have been glimmers of hope, and even joy. For some, staying home has formed stronger familial bonds over game nights and shared meals. Others have reconnected with friends around the world for birthday parties, pub quizzes and happy hours thanks to online connectivity tools like Zoom being normalized. Home cooking has become an art, with amateur bakers and chefs honing their skills, and kitchen cupboards incubating sourdough starters and kombucha. With these kinds of stories in mind, we asked the faculty and staff of SFS for their “silver linings:” what have been positive results of the COVID-19 cloud?

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Meagan Mathews, Elementary School Grade 2: I was able to finally accomplish a lifelong dream of getting my scuba diving license and even went on to get the advanced certification (bonus!) And it was my first time visiting Jeju which was really neat. Calvin Kamphuis, High School Business & Economics: I had the opportunity to solo travel around South Korea on my new motorcycle. I had spent all summer looking for a motorcycle, and ended up buying a Honda CBR 650R. For those of you who know, this is definitely not a "touring" motorcycle. I learned that quickly when my saddlebags exploded after coming in contact with my back tire at the first intersection of my trip! After a day's delay, and a new topbox to carry all my stuff, I was off. The plan was to circumnavigate South Korea, so I started on my 15 hour route down the west coast. Some good food on Daebu-do, and inhaling some bugs while speeding over bridges led me to my first guesthouse in Gunsan. The next day I continued to Busan, driving past some flower fields in Jeollanamdo, and the Dinosaur Museum in Goseong. I spent two days relaxing and eating seafood with a few friends near Haeundae Beach, and then headed on my 12 hour trip back to Seoul up

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Calvin Kamphuis, traveling around South Korea on his new motorcycle Bottom left: Calvin's helmet at the end of the day during the trip. Bottom right: Daebu-do.

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Jusangjeollidae in Jeju Island visited and photographed by Edie Moon.

Hanok village in Seoul visited and photographed by Caroline Law.

the east coast. Staying the night in Pyeongchang in some of the Olympics housing helped me feel well rested for the final hours back to Seoul.

people and Korean women in particular. Whether it was visiting art museums, exploring beaches on the eastern shore of Korea, finding new neighborhoods in Seoul, or taking writing tours of nooks and crannies in the city, each experience led me to artistic, spiritual, and cultural renewal. Right now, I have maps that are worn in the best way possible from regular use during travel. They have been taped and retaped, and I hope to continue to use them in the months to come. The days passed so quickly and so beautifully. Though I missed my family in the US desperately, the time here in Korea was about as inspiring as a vacation could be. Yes, I fell in love again with a country that has been my home almost my entire life. There are still so many more layers that I hope to peel back in the future, but how grateful I am for the month and a half I had.

Over this trip, I was able to experience South Korea in a way I haven't before. I saw many beautiful mountains, rivers, and seasides, and met many kind people, with one even giving me red bean ice cream shaped like a fish, and bae pears at a rest stop. I learned a lot about Korea and motorcycles, and look forward to doing it again. Edie Moon, Drama Director: I had no idea how much I had missed in Korea over the past years. This summer, with no travel, few if any tourists, less traffic and clear air, the Korea of my childhood came to life for me in a way that I could not have foreseen. I fell in love again with Korea. Our trips to Jeju opened my eyes to a history that I had largely not understood growing up here. It is true that some of that history was covered up by the government for many decades, but visiting the Jeju 4.3 Peace Park and Museum unearthed history in a way I could never have expected. Seeing the Haenyo (women divers of Jeju) in person as they took their daily dives for their catch of sea life reminded me again of the strength of the Korean 10

Caroline Law, British School Year 9/Key Stage 3 English: One of the main reasons why my husband and I wanted to move back to Korea is the potential for travel. We used to live in Busan, and didn’t think that we could find a better transport hub than that (weekends in Tokyo, anyone?) - until we moved to Seoul. The global pandemic and resulting restrictions may have put a stop to our long-distance travel plans for a while,

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Hanok village in Seoul visited and photographed by Caroline Law.

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The Rader family traveling to Seoraksan before the arrival of Francis Roy Ki-Sung Rader, 2020.

The Han/Chi Family.

but we have found there to be plenty of options available for local exploration, both right on our doorstep and a little further afield. From hidden coffee shops to hanok villages, Seoul and its surroundings have so much to offer, and our ‘pandemic silver lining’ is that we have been able to see just a little of this beautiful country without putting ourselves, or others, at risk.

June, we were able to go on a trip to Seoraksan and Sokcho, a part of Korea I had never even visited despite living here in Korea for 12 years! Korea is an amazingly beautiful country, and we were in awe of the mountains and the coastal area the whole time. The air quality has been incredible this year, and we spent every moment we could in the great outdoors! Our little boy, Francis ("Frankie") was born at the end of the summer, and we couldn't be more thankful. He has brought us so much joy and hope during these times. While it's been a difficult year in many ways, we realize just how much we have to be thankful for.

Hannah, Middle School Individuals & Societies/Language & Literature 7, and Paul Rader, Director of Sports: As it turns out, we had been planning on staying in Korea this past summer before we knew COVID-19 would be an issue. We were expecting our third child in late July, so we knew flying back home to the US in the summer wasn't really an option. We haven't been back in the US to see our families since the summer of 2018, and while we were sad at the thought of not being able to see and reconnect with our loved ones back home, we were also so excited about the new little addition to our family coming soon. Once the complications of a pandemic become a reality, an added bonus was that instead of spending the summer here alone, we were surrounded by our amazing school community. Our two older sons were able to partake in the incredible summer camp here at SFS (they did seven weeks!), and they had a blast! Additionally, in 12

AhYoung Chi, High School Head of College Counseling and Dave Han, High School Mathematics: We weren’t in Korea this summer because we were moving [to Seoul], but we did not travel home like we normally do. Besides saying farewell to friends, we got to say farewell to Hong Kong, which we wouldn't have had the time to do if COVID-19 didn't get in the way. Definitely a silver lining! 19 12

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A recent International Middle Years Curriculum (IMYC) unit in the British School is Curiosity. During virtual learning, students used a computer aided design (CAD) program to design hinged boxes. Once they completed their designs, they brought their creation to life on campus using the tools in the Middle Years Design Lab. FALL 2020 | School Happenings

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Freshman year and COVID-19: HOW THE CLASS OF 2020 IS NAVIGATING COLLEGE LIFE IN A PANDEMIC

Class of 2020 at Graduation in June, 2020. Photo taken by Edie Moon from the SFS Campus looking West to Yeonhuidong and beyond.


COVID-19 SILVER LININGS We asked the faculty and staff of SFS for their “silver linings:” what have been positive results of the COVID-19 cloud?


Anna Castagnaro in Seoul, enrolled online at Northwestern University, Illinois, US.

Junwon Jeong, at the University of Glasgow, Scotland.

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he final semester of senior year is bittersweet: students celebrate their accomplishments and enjoy their last weeks together as a class, but also prepare to say goodbye to friends and family to start a new chapter. This year’s class, however, did not get to experience being “second semester seniors” in the way that many students before them have. Instead, the class of 2020 went through a series of pivots, living week-to-week. Clarity around plans for the school year, the summer, and their future in college were all thrown up in the air in the wake of a global pandemic. Even commencement, the ceremonial completion of years of education and a rite of passage for SFS graduates, was in flux. Fortunately, SFS was able to hold an in-person graduation ceremony, complete with cap and gown procession. Everyone was socially distanced and wearing masks, but families were able to gather together and celebrate their graduates. Many other schools around the world were unable to celebrate in this way, and had to hold virtual ceremonies and celebrations. With their time at SFS behind them, the class of 2020 was faced with uncertainty yet again: what does starting college in the middle of a global crisis look like? These newly minted SFS alumni were faced with ambiguity around freshman year, virtual classes or a hybrid model, moving to a new city and managing quarantine. We got in touch with a few of these students to hear about their experiences navigating the “new normal.”

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For some students, travel to their new university has not even been an option. Jamie Park is a student at University of the Pacific in California, but is not yet physically on campus. “I have been living night-and-day flipped since college started at the end of August,” says Jamie, who is living in Seoul for the time being. “Currently in Korea physically but living in PST!” Anna Castagnaro has had a similar experience. She’s still in Seoul, but is enrolled at her university and is in online classes. “It has been weird starting college online while still living in an environment where the places and people from high school are still around me,” says Anna. “I take the opportunity every day to get out of my house and walk to quiet spaces...and I study there because it gives me the feeling that I'm physically "going to school" to do my homework.” Anna is also juggling time zones, and has had to adapt her sleep and work schedule. “My classes are around 12:00 am to 3:00 am, so my bedtime is pushed back to around 4:00 am and I wake up at around 12:00 pm.” Fortunately for Junwon Jeong, who is studying at the University of Glasgow as a second-year Mechanical Engineering student, travel was possible but tricky. “The journey from Korea to Glasgow in itself was a challenge, as there was no direct flight from Seoul to Glasgow,” Junwon explains. This summer, the UK travel corridor allowed for transfers through Helsinki without a self isolation requirement, so a layover there proved vital. “The...

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Anna Baik, at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, US.

Jason Whang, at Dartmouth, New Hampshire, US.

exemption made me choose this miserable route to Glasgow. As a result the journey lasted me 19 hours.”

For some, 2020 has been an opportunity to look at the world from a completely different perspective. “I am definitely more flexible and open-minded than I was ever before,” says Jason Whang. “Blessed for all that I have and thankful for the smaller things in life that I took for granted.”

Anna Baik was able to travel to Emory University in Atlanta, GA, and start classes as well, albeit a hybrid of in-person and online instruction. “It has been great so far,” Anna says. “My college has been Where are you living, Class of 2020? prioritizing the freshman so my college life is as great as it can be considering the crisis we are going through.” Geo Yoo, at the University of Chicago, is At home with also in a hybrid model. Geo explains, At college or university family/friends “Intense academic environment, but 54% 46% meeting world-class minds inspired How are your classes held? my intellectual curiosity!” SFS has prepared our students well for the academic rigour of college life. Online In person Junwon had a direct entry to year two 45% 9% at the University of Glasgow, and has been managing the intensity of the coursework thus far. “Thankfully everything that I am studying are slight extensions from the HL subjects that I took. I realized how well the IB prepared me and I'm currently enjoying the fruits of my labor from SFS.”

Hybrid

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Other

9%

Navigating life after SFS for the class of 2020 is different from any seniors who have gone before them. Anna Castagnaro explains: “My days are spent engaging in a college community that I've never physically been to.” She’s still connected to her SFS classmates, but "feeling a bit left out from everything happening at SFS as the school year continues without the Class of 2020. Everything feels so close, yet so far!”

Overall, it sounds as though our most recent graduates are learning to balance the highs and lows of an unpredictable year, and making the best of an unexpected and challenging situation. Special thanks to the members of the Class of 2020 for contributing to this story. 19 12

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In High School Mathematics class, Haydn Kneeshaw linked his computer to a bigger screen and a speaker to create a more closer to normal classroom environment to draw more engagement from students and himself. Photo taken by Edie Moon from the SFS Campus looking West to Yeonhuidong and beyond.


COVID-19 SILVER LININGS We asked the faculty and staff of SFS for their “silver linings:” what have been positive results of the COVID-19 cloud?

CREATIVE SOLUTIONS TO VIRTUAL LEARNING

2020 has been a year unlike any other, challenging us all in new ways. SFS has been subject to several changes and adaptations as the government has advised different safety measures. At the start of this school year, we went from expecting to welcome all of our students back to campus to quickly needing to change and offering much of our instruction virtually.


Opposite top row: SFS Aquatics team conducting virtual swimming classes. Opposite bottom: a swimming lesson involved watching video materials and action inside the pool demonstrating safety rules to the Grade 3 students.

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020 has been a year unlike any other, challenging us all in new ways. SFS has been subject to several changes and adaptations as the government has advised different safety measures. At the start of this school year, we went from expecting to welcome all of our students back to campus to quickly needing to change and offering much of our instruction virtually. SFS faculty have shown incredible resilience when challenged with these multiple pivots. Just days before school was set to open with all students on campus, teachers were faced with the challenge of completely shifting their plans from in-person instruction to a hybrid model. The excitement of a new school year was quickly replaced with the disappointment of not being able to meet students and welcome them into classrooms. Faculty members flexed their creative muscles and quickly developed teaching strategies that would engage students when they couldn’t be in the classroom. This often involved students engaging in activities at home that would normally be done at school, modifying their living spaces into makeshift learning spaces. Home kitchens became science labs, suitable for conducting experiments. Living rooms became sound stages, a place for students to record videos of their reactions and assessment assignments. Laptops served as collaboration spaces, where students could connect in Zoom breakout rooms, replacing hallways and communal gathering spots. In virtual learning, some courses and disciplines are more easily adapted to the online format than others. However, courses that rely heavily on facilities and equipment can be a real 20

challenge: what student has a private six-lane swimming pool, or their own personal 700-seat performing arts theatre? This challenged our faculty and staff to find new and innovative ways to engage and educate SFS students who were unable to be on campus. When schools in Seoul were restricted to fewer students in August, access to our swimming facility mostly ceased. The Aquatics team was faced with a tough challenge: how can you teach swimming and water safety when you can’t have students at the pool? This required a clever approach. “The inspiration came from spitballing some ideas one morning around the office as to how to get kids back in the pool,” explains Cailen McNair, Schoolwide PHE Department Head. “The PE teachers and Swim instructors made it happen.” Sean Cary, Aquatics Coordinator, along with aquatics instructors Emily Daniels and Kirsten Gray, teamed up with PHE teachers Stephanie Mitchell and Caleb Hill to deliver lessons that were both relevant and informative. “When you can’t bring the students to the pool, you bring the pool to them!” says Caleb Hill. Instructors set up screens to conduct water safety lessons from the pool deck via Zoom to students at home. As restrictions have loosened, more students are now back on campus, albeit on a rotating basis. This on/off campus schedule has provided opportunities for aquatics instructors to enhance their already rigorous approach to water safety instruction, as students spend two days on campus and then two days off. “Students spend less time in the water overall, so we have more time for in-depth instruction on water safety,” explains Kirsten Gray. The teachers have created more visual displays promoting water safety that they built with student collaboration over

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Opposite top left: British School Parent Association hosted a virtual Short Story Competition on Zoom.

Top right: Inspire Citizens has facilitated interdisciplinary collaboration between science and language and literature teachers in the high school, virtually launching a service in action project. Second row: Home kitchens became science labs as High School Grade 9 students experimented.

Third row: Middle School teachers utilize a number of different tools and softwares in virtual learning with the help from SFS Digital Learning Coaches. Opposite bottom row: John Black, SFS Theater Manager, giving backstage tours in his Virtual Theater Tour video.

Zoom, and are posted poolside when the students rotate back on to campus. This hybrid approach has allowed them to enhance their safety lessons, because they don’t need the pool to provide this type of instruction. Kids are practicing self-survival skills in addition to swimming strokes when they are at the pool in person. Focusing on self-survival principles, including those from the American Red Cross, like “Think So You Don’t Sink” prepares students to be more safety conscious, especially as they become more independent. Virtual learning has impacted performing arts as well. The Lyso Center was silent for months while students were unable to come to campus. This was a challenge not only for on-stage performers, but for the behind-the-scenes crew who learn the tricks of the backstage trade. Before COVID-19, John Black, Theater Manager, gave backstage tours to Middle School and High School drama classes. The tours focus on showing and teaching students the "unseen" areas of a theatre. John explains, “I cover theatre architecture, major mechanical systems, the control booth, stage directions, and more, providing insight into how all of these elements support and create the magic for the performance that is happening.” This year, John recreated these tours in a video format, allowing students to learn the vocabulary while seeing, in short segments, the facility, systems and equipment. Additionally, John built the video lightboxes into an interactive webpage, which allowed a student to understand where the video topic "fit in" to the overall facility. “The initial idea was for me to give a tour live via Zoom, but decided to go this route as I could visually provide much more detail through integrating graphics and other media content,” said John. These videos will be available for reference

into the future, and John plans to continue to add to the project. “I've also shared these resources around the region to my network of theatre managers, technicians and educators, who have been able to use them in their context as well.” Visit the interactive site yourself at www.crusaderlive.com/theatreterms. Technology has been the foundation upon which much of this new educational approach has been built, facilitating connections between teachers and students and “in person” interactivity. Tools like Zoom and other video conferencing software have become integral to providing virtual learning opportunities during the pandemic. SFS has the advantage of having in-house Digital Learning Coaches (DLCs), who are experts in coaching and training teachers and students on the latest technologies. Our DLCs, Heather Breedlove, Janet Hahm, Tanya LeClair, and Jillian Zappia, create authentic, engaging learning experiences for students and provide consistent, embedded professional development for teachers. With so many digital tools and platforms available, DLCs support the meaningful use of these tools to facilitate positive outcomes. Together with our teachers, they create opportunities for students to learn in ways that help them push forward and be creative in their own learning. They close the gap between the IT department and the user by translating technology into easy to understand language, creating “how tos,” infographics, resources, workshops, and more. Our teachers and coaches have done outstanding work during the pandemic and resulting pivots to continue to deliver robust educational programming - even when students can’t be on campus. 19 12

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Camp SFS, 2020. Photo by Daniel Hahm.

Camp SFS

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his past summer, Camp SFS celebrated its 10th birthday! In spite of the pandemic and resulting circumstances, Camp SFS was able to host a full, energetic, and enriching summer program, which saw more than a 100% increase in registrations, from 1337 last year to 2761 students this year. Camp staff consisted of the highest number of SFS alumni

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to date, with many returning from previous years to work as counselors and managers. At its peak, our summer program was responsible for approximately 700 staff and students across campus, and we are proud and thankful to say that we had zero cases of COVID-19. Camp 2021 registration opens soon. Join us next summer!

The BANNER | School Happenings


Seoul Foreign School Wins International Architecture Award

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his August, Seoul Foreign School (SFS) High School was honored with an International Architecture Award. The school and the building’s architects, Ennead Architects, were recognized by the 2020 Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design with an International Distinguished Building, Landscape Architecture, and Urbanism Award. Since 2004, The Chicago Athenaeum: Museum of Architecture and Design, together with The European Center for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies and Metropolitan Arts Press, Ltd., have organized The International Architecture Awards to honor “the best, significant new buildings, landscape architecture, and planning projects designed and/or built around the world’s leading architects, landscape architects, and urban planners practicing nationally and internationally.” As a winner of the program, our building will be included in the 2020 book: Global Design + Urbanism XX: New International Architecture. "The design of the High School building has allowed us to transform the student learning experience at Seoul Foreign School,” said Colm Flanagan, Head of School. “Not only has it

created collaborative spaces and flexible classrooms to give our Grade 9-12 students new ways to pursue academic and creative excellence, but it is a beautiful and bright environment in which our whole community can gather, work, and socialize.” “We were excited to have the opportunity to work with Seoul Foreign School on a building that truly supports and advances their vibrant culture of learning and collaboration,” said Peter Schubert, Design Partner at Ennead Architects. “This is a very environmentally expressive building, one that prioritizes wellness, daylight, natural materials, and the links between the built and natural world. We looked to the balance between openness and privacy that is typical of traditional Korean architecture as we designed a space that draws the landscape into the building and draws the classroom into the landscape through multiple outdoor learning areas.” Below: High School Principal Jeff Holcomb and Head of School Colm Flanagan hold the Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design with an International Distinguished Building, Landscape Architecture, and Urbanism Award, awarded to SFS in August 2020. The winning High School building is in the background.

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Dr. Nancy Le Nezet Named as the New Principal of Seoul Foreign School High School

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n October, Dr. Nancy Le Nezet was named as the new principal for Seoul Foreign School High School following a world wide search. She will assume the post at the start of the 2021-2022 school year. Dr. Le Nezet holds a PhD in Philosophy and taught Philosophy, Psychology and Theory of Knowledge in IB schools before becoming a full-time administrator. Originally from France, Nancy has been living internationally for 23 years. Currently, she is the Interim Head of School at the Swiss International School in Qatar, an International Baccalaureate (IB) continuum school she helped found in 2017. She was previously at the International School Bangkok in Thailand. Nancy has worked for the IB Organization as a Principal Examiner and workshop leader, and she was the lead author of the IB Philosophy textbook published by Oxford University Press in 2014. Nancy’s extensive experience in IB education, combined with Seoul Foreign School’s commitment to pedagogical excellence made her the ideal candidate for the role. “Not only did Nancy impress us with her deep pedigree in quality teaching and

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learning,” says Colm Flanagan, Head of School, “she also has a clear vision for supporting the professional development of our excellent faculty.” “I am delighted to join SFS in 2021,” says Nancy. “I am particularly happy that the school offers the full IB continuum as it is where my passion lies. I know I will be able to make significant contributions to the consolidation of the MYP and DP programmes at SFS.” SFS has 40 years of IB experience, and Nancy will continue to develop the strong educational program on offer. Nancy believes in a strong partnership between individuals in all levels of an educational institution. “I look forward to building strong relationships with teachers, students and parents, as I believe in leadership based on listening, understanding, trust and transparency,” she says. In her free time, Nancy loves reading, writing, running and dancing. She is accompanied by her husband, Adam, who teaches Art, and her two children Selena, 15 and Anton, 12. Nancy says she is “excited to discover a new country and a new culture with my family.”

The BANNER | School Happenings


Parent Association

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arents are the cornerstone of the Seoul Foreign School community. Our Parent Association (PA) volunteers lend their skills and talents to support the efforts of students, teachers, administrators and our community. The PA has continued to serve our school, as well as the larger community, even during the pandemic! Hats off to these fantastic volunteers who attended online parent chats and meetings to keep things running. The British School Parent Association organized the 2020 Short Story Competition. A big thank you to Professor Sian Stickings, lecturer at Ewha Womans University and University College London, who spoke with our Foundation to Year 4 students about the elements of a great story. With this as inspiration, 45 British School students entered the competition and we were delighted reading their great stories!

Community service Nanumi Homeless Project: Director Kim says, “thank you for your time, muscles, smiles, and generosity SFS!� The SFS community came together and supported Nanumi as the COVID-19 crisis has pushed more and more people out of work. Since March, SFS staff, faculty, families and community have contributed, including volunteering and supplying funding. If you feel compelled to help, contact dawn.stark@seoulforeign.org.

The "QuaRUNtine Together" Project aimed to build a virtual community in which all can find joy and encouragement through exercise, and do their part as citizens in making a positive contribution towards battling the outbreak. Four SFS students, Kenzo, Youbin (Esther), Leon and Joanne initiated the project, and collected 2,200,000 KRW to support immigrants in Korea who cannot receive affordable healthcare owing to their foreign status. Encouraged by the success of this event, the students plan to extend their mission to future projects and seasons.

Team QuaRUNtine presenting their collected donation to support immigrants in Korea.

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(Top row from left to right) Sebastian Hart, Lydia Hanson, Edward Najafi, (middle row) Ihan Jin, Jeneve Lee, (bottom row) Kyubin Kim, Emily Han.

Grade 6 students, future global leaders!

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iddle School Grade 6 students study innovations and their impact on societies in their Individuals and Societies (I&S) class within the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme. Inspire Citizens and the I&S teachers gave students a four hour challenge: explore the sustainable development goals they care deeply about. Using their research skills and knowledge from I&S class, students took action and designed theoretical

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innovations to help the world overcome its sustainability challenges. 1st place winners: Jeneve Lee, Edward Najafi, Ihan Jin 2nd place winners: Lydia Hanson, Kyubin Kim, Emily Han, Sebastian Hart

The BANNER | School Happenings


SPORTS at SFS

"COVID-19 has obviously disrupted the world in so many ways, and may do so for years to come, however as we live out this new reality in our school we will always try to find ways to create as much normalcy as possible for our students, so that they can have the most amazing education here at SFS." - Paul Rader, Director of Sports FALL 2020 | Sports

Virtual Cross Country Meet, Fall 2020.

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Sports Recap By Paul Rader Director of Sports

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he journey from last February to today has felt like a lifetime. In January we heard the first word of the virus, and then by early February we were forced to cancel all sports competitions due to the growing threat of COVID-19. The seasons ended abruptly, especially for our seniors who felt it most acutely knowing there would be no 'next season.' As we tried to process the disappointment and the reality of the situation, we started to wonder when we might be able to resume some normalcy, to be able to do things again. And as I was asked by our students constantly, when will we start sports again. To be honest, I didn't know, and things didn't look super hopeful at the time, but as Korea started to flatten the curve the possibility of coming back to school for in-person learning became a reality again. And with a return to in-person learning there was the glimmer of hope that we would be able to resume sports and activities. During the summer, the COVID-19 situation was as good as it had been since the early days of the pandemic, and so the KAIAC Board, which includes the Athletic Directors from the KAIAC

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schools, decided to create a plan for the resumption of interschool competition for high school sports in the fall semester. It took a lot of collaboration and work amongst the schools to research, to ask questions, and to find solutions to new safety challenges, but in the end we created a plan that we felt would allow us to move forward with inter-school competitions in as safe a manner as is possible. We presented the plan to the Heads of School in July, and were given the green light. And then COVID-19 gave us the red light, and threw us for a loop the day before school restarted. We planned to re-open in August with the full cohort of students only to watch the cases rapidly spike forcing the school to reduce the number of students on campus each day. This change was incredibly disruptive to the start of the academic year on many fronts, and it made the resumption of the fall sports of tennis, cross country, and volleyball very difficult. Our normal tryouts process of three days turned into weeks, and with all of the uncertainty we didn't know whether to just select our teams as normal or try and run an

The BANNER | Sports


intramural league in-house. We were still holding training sessions each day, but with the reduction of students it wasn't uncommon to go by the tennis or volleyball court and see only two athletes and a coach practicing. After six weeks we were finally able to finalize our rosters, and conclude the longest tryouts in school history. Despite the difficulty and uncertainty of that time, there were bright spots during the start of the year. We were able to participate in two virtual cross country races against strong international schools like Taipei American that we normally never compete against, and we did really well. These were the first sports events that we'd had on campus since last February, but as great as it was to be 'back', we hoped for the possibility of inter-school competition. As the situation slowly but surely improved the possibility and reality of inter-school competition grew and the dates of competition on the calendar were coming closer and closer. And finally, the weekend after Chuseok the day finally arrived when

we were able to host a cross country race and tennis matches on campus, as well as send our volleyball teams to SIS for games. Fittingly it was a beautiful day, and everything felt quite simply, perfect. The results of the competitions were sweet, but more than anything it was the amazing feeling of happiness seeing our students in uniform again brimming with the excitement of competition and the joy found in the company of your teammates. COVID-19 has obviously disrupted the world in so many ways, and may do so for years to come, however as we live out this new reality in our school we will always try to find ways to create as much normalcy as possible for our students, so that they can have the most amazing education here at SFS. I have been really proud of our school's response to the virus, particularly its unwavering commitment to the students, and its commitment to doing everything possible to give them the best educational experience possible.

FALL 2020 | Sports

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The ARTS at SFS

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As I sat on the Lyso steps holding my laptop filled with eager Grade 5 beginner band students’ Zoom boxes, I felt alone. In previous years I sat on those same steps with the entire class, all squished close together as we posed for the annual Beginner Band Day photo.

The BANNER | Arts


Opposite: Sophie Holbrook on the Lyso steps.

The Arts at SFS: Three Perspectives on Resilience in Challenging Times MAKING MUSIC MATTERS By Sophie Holbrook

Band Director (Grade 5 and Middle Years)

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sk any music teacher what they did in virtual teaching and they will respond, “We still made music!” With the disruption to music education as we knew it, the choir, band, and orchestra teachers all became more creative, flexible, and yes, RESILIENT! The idea that we now had to teach a performance based ensemble class via the internet initially seemed impossible. How would we create music as a whole made of individual parts? How would we work as a team to make artistic phrases? How would we communicate with our voices and instruments as we do in the classroom but now in our individual Zoom cells? These questions kept me up at night as I pondered how to make the virtual learning experience as close as possible to the real thing. For many weeks I tried my best to pretend nothing was different… we were still making music, after all, and I saw my students every day. But something was lacking. Something at the true core of all musicians, and that’s the idea of togetherness. Togetherness through music, and more importantly the togetherness that comes through beautiful and meaningful connections. Sitting in a musical ensemble and being a part of something greater than you is a feeling that simply cannot be re-created online. It was important to not lose sight of that and to stress its importance with our students who may have wondered “what’s the point?” All of our online lessons had one common

long-term goal - to help us improve so that when we get together again, we will be better! We will be stronger musicians and more impactful communicators. Everything we did over virtual learning helped to promote individual musicianship, instrumental and vocal skill development, and a deeper understanding of our ensemble repertoire. These were accomplished through a variety of lessons and projects, most of which had never been taught before. Like much in this era, each day was a trial! The flexibility that comes with the territory of being a virtual teacher is a necessity to creating and delivering new lessons on a daily basis. All of us were first-year teachers again, but it didn’t get us down! As I sat on the Lyso steps holding my laptop filled with eager Grade 5 beginner band students’ Zoom boxes, I felt alone. In previous years I sat on those same steps with the entire class, all squished close together as we posed for the annual Beginner Band Day photo. This year, as I felt alone in that moment, I realized that not only was I holding the students in my laptop, but that we were all working towards the day when we could come together again. Making music matters, not just for music’s sake to play nice melodies, but for the human connection that it brings us. If nothing else, this year has reinvigorated my love for one of life’s greatest joys...the gift of music.

FALL 2020 | Arts

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The ARTS at SFS

The Arts at SFS: Three Perspectives on Resilience in Challenging Times MAKING MUSIC MATTERS By Sophie Holbrook

Band Director (Grade 5 and Middle Years)

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sk any music teacher what they did in virtual teaching and they will respond, “We still made music!” With the disruption to music education as we knew it, the choir, band, and orchestra teachers all became more creative, flexible, and yes, RESILIENT! The idea that we now had to teach a performance based ensemble class via the internet initially seemed impossible. How would we create music as a whole made of individual parts? How would we work as a team to make artistic phrases? How would we communicate with our voices and instruments as we do in the classroom but now in our individual Zoom cells? These questions kept me up at night as I pondered how to make the virtual learning experience as close as possible to the real thing. For many weeks I tried my best to pretend nothing was different… we were still making music, after all, and I saw my students every day. But something was lacking. Something at the true core of all musicians, and that’s the idea of togetherness. Togetherness through music, and more importantly the togetherness that comes through beautiful and meaningful connections. Sitting in a musical ensemble and being a part of something greater than you is a feeling that simply cannot be re-created online. It was important to not lose sight of that and to stress its importance with our students who may have wondered “what’s the point?” All of our online lessons had one common

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long-term goal - to help us improve so that when we get together again, we will be better! We will be stronger musicians and more impactful communicators. Everything we did over virtual learning helped to promote individual musicianship, instrumental and vocal skill development, and a deeper understanding of our ensemble repertoire. These were accomplished through a variety of lessons and projects, most of which had never been taught before. Like much in this era, each day was a trial! The flexibility that comes with the territory of being a virtual teacher is a necessity to creating and delivering new lessons on a daily basis. All of us were first-year teachers again, but it didn’t get us down! As I sat on the Lyso steps holding my laptop filled with eager Grade 5 beginner band students’ Zoom boxes, I felt alone. In previous years I sat on those same steps with the entire class, all squished close together as we posed for the annual Beginner Band Day photo. This year, as I felt alone in that moment, I realized that not only was I holding the students in my laptop, but that we were all working towards the day when we could come together again. Making music matters, not just for music’s sake to play nice melodies, but for the human connection that it brings us. If nothing else, this year has reinvigorated my love for one of life’s greatest joys...the gift of music.

The BANNER | Arts


Opposite: The Tempest.

THE RESILIENCE OF ART IN SFS THEATRE By Edie Moon

Schoolwide Drama Director

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he theatres of SFS were closed for over ten months including our summer. Walking onto the stages is a very strange phenomena as the sounds of buzz saws making sets, students chattering, directors giving instructions, music playing were silenced. As one kindergarten student said on a recent tour of the theatre, “Mrs. Moon this is sad and a little scary.” She was right. Theatres are not meant to be silent and dark. They are meant to be filled with artists and audience members and crews doing what it takes to bring stories to life. At the beginning of this year, we were optimistically looking forward to starting in August with a musical production in the high school. Auditions began and just as the final auditions were being completed, a mandate went out in Seoul that no singing would be allowed. This was the beginning of a multitude of road blocks that were inevitably a part of adapting to the COVID-19 epidemic. There was no way, however, that we were not going to move forward with our vision to “open the doors” of the theatre at SFS. Rather than cancelling the musical, we moved it and flipped the high school winter play forward. When told we could not have an audience of over 20 or less in the theatre, we moved the play outside so that we could have an audience of at least 100.

There have been myriad adjustments since school began but theatre is resilient, students are resilient and we as the theatre directors are also resilient. It is not about having all the answers or finding an easier path. In most cases and even today, it is challenging us in every way. However, it has been about adaptability, and faith in the process whether it is directing on Zoom or in person or half and half! It is about kids dedicated enough to leave home after a full day on Zoom and come to school for a two hour rehearsal. It is about re-visioning what the play might look like in an outdoor found-space setting rather than in a conventional theatre, and then changing course yet again to move back indoors when the weather takes a turn. Most of all, it is about believing in the rich value of the process of creating theatre which makes the experimentation and trial and error worthwhile. Happily, we staged our performance of Shakespeare’s The Tempest on October 29, 30 and 31. Our resilience comes from passion and faith in the students and what they bring every day to the dramatic experience. This same resilience has been evidenced all over the world as artists have found any way possible to keep creating through lockdown and beyond. The results have been astounding artistic creations. Join us in our journey!

FALL 2020 | Arts

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The ARTS at SFS

The Arts at SFS: Three Perspectives on Resilience in Challenging Times MAKING MUSIC MATTERS By Sophie Holbrook

Band Director (Grade 5 and Middle Years)

A unity quilt inspired by the quilts of Gee’s Bend on display in the elementary school lobby; the piece is a collaborative effort by students in PreK 3 up to Grade 5.

RESILIENCE IN THE ARTS By Jessica Bonnell

Elementary School Art Teacher

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isual art can be a powerful outlet for students to explore ideas and express themselves. At school, art class is often a safe place for students to take risks and be creative. In my role as the elementary school art teacher, I’ve seen how making art can be therapeutic for some students. Art can help students cope with stress, develop social skills and build self-confidence. What does this actually look like in the art room? Now more than ever, I try to plan lessons that spark students’ sense of wonder and joy. For example, elementary students have learned about surrealist artists, painted with glow in the dark paint and created imaginative monsters out of clay. Simple explorations like

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swirling different colors of paint together and modeling shapes with clay can delight and fascinate students. Students may even experience the state of flow as they become totally immersed in creating art. Overall, I’m extremely proud of how my students have adapted to the changes this school year has brought. In more ways than not, art class still feels like a ‘normal’ art class. Even during virtual art classes on Zoom, students are creating meaningful artwork that they are proud of. Despite all of the changes, the simple joy of creating art has stayed the same.

The BANNER | Arts


Student Voices

SFS is privileged to serve exceptional students hailing from all corners of the globe. Here’s a small sample of their school accomplishments and experiences, straight from the students themselves! The Banner invites all SFS students to submit their recent achievements and experiences to the editorial team. Please contact marketing@seoulforeign.org for further details.

to serve for the 2020-2021 academic year. Student Ambassadors lead with love and compassion, model self-control and integrity, accept and serve everyone in the community, and bring positivity to every situation. Throughout the year, they assess the needs of the students and then plan and implement projects to meet those needs. Students who serve on this team will grow as leaders and as individuals as they work together to positively impact the school community.

PA British School Short Story Competition Winners

in the UK. Since arriving in Seoul, he has become the youngest member of Seoul Philharmonic's Baty brass. His achievement at the Seoul Arts Concours was announced in The Monthly Classical Music Magazine (음악춘추) Vol 302 (Oct 2020).

Christian Ministries Logo Design Competition Winner

The Student Ambassadors in Action

Thank you to the British School Parent Association and Professor Sian Stickings for organizing and judging this competition! 45 British School students entered the competition and we were delighted reading their great stories! Congratulations to the winners: Key stage 1: 1st: Yena, 2nd: Leo, 3rd: Ashley Year 3-4: 1st: Drew, 2nd: Poppy, 3rd: Dael Year 5-9: Seoyeon, 2nd: Mirim, 3rd: Katherine

Congratulations to Anna Yeseong Park from Year 8 in the British School who won the Christian Ministries logo competition for her "human" design. Anna's design was chosen via a very closerun race from 285 total votes. Anna's design will be in place throughout the academic year for our Christian Ministries events. Thank you to all of the designers who submitted such amazing designs.

2020 Nancy Rothwell Award Winner

British School Student Takes 3rd Place at Seoul Arts Concours The Student Ambassadors are the official leadership team of the Elementary School. The team consists of 16 members–two representatives from each of the Grade 4 and 5 homerooms–all of whom were nominated by their peers

Congratulations to British School student David Oh who participated in the 17th Seoul Arts Concours at Samik Art Hall on September 12th. David won the 3rd place playing "Exsultate Jubilate - Alleluia" by W.A. Mozart on his trumpet and became the youngest ever Brass winner at the Concours. David has been studying the trumpet since November 2017 and was the youngest member of the City of Oxford Silver band FALL 2020 | Student Voices

The Royal Society of Biology in the UK granted MS student Ji Yoon Park (Kate) with the 2020 Nancy Rothwell Award for her beautiful drawing of a hummingbird. Her Science teacher, Lauren Teather is so proud of her, “Her artwork is absolutely amazing - as a "scientist," I'm just in awe 37


at the detail and her talent. It is certainly a deserving honor!” Congratulations Kate!

Heewon Hwang’s Achievement in Dance

FOBISIA Writing Competition Award Winner

The FOBISIA COVID-19 Silver Linings Writing Competition was open to all FOBISIA schools in Asia, and asked students to share their positive stories around the difficulties that students faced during the COVID-19 pandemic. There were more than 600 entries, and we are pleased that Logan Kim, Year 7 from SFS British School was the recipient of a Highly Commended award. Congratulations!

Please congratulate Heewon Hwang (Grade 6) for his recent achievement of receiving the ‘Excellence Award/2nd Prize’ at The Korea Association of Dance Leaders Competition and a Gold medal at The Korean Male Dancers Forum Competition.

Kevin Chung Receives Silver Award at WICO 2020

Yeram Lee's (Ella, Grade 8) Achievement in Viola

of Fine Art in Insadong. Through this exhibition, titled ‘Nanum (‘sharing’ in Korean)’, So Yeon and So Jeong wish to share the joy of life through their colorful and dynamic art works in the midst of the present status quo inflicted upon us by the COVID-19 pandemic. The two students cordially invite all members of the SFS community to take part in this exhibition of sharing joy through art.

Congratulations to SFS High School Academic Quiz Teams!

In Grade 3, Yeram Lee (Ella, Grade 8) fell in love with the sound of the viola and since then, she has won numerous competitions: Singapore International Music Festival, Osaka International Music Competition, the American Protege International Strings Competition, Ewha & Kyunghyang Music Concours, and many others.

Congratulations to Kevin Chung (MS, Grade 8) for receiving the silver award at the World Invention Creativity Olympic 2020! Despite all the organizational challenges due to COVID-19 restrictions, 1,500 people from 25 countries participated. SFS is very proud of Kevin having impressed the judges with his “simulation of a loop station using pygame and raspberry pi”! For another example of Kevin's creativity, see his audio challenge video at bit.ly/3nHmeWK.

So Yeon and So Jeong Han's 5th Art Exhibition

Grade 11 High School students So Yeon Han and So Jeong Han held their 5th art exhibition, this time in Kyung-in Museum 38

The BANNER | Student Voices

Three HS AQTs represented SFS at the first tournament of the school year, the Seoul International Fall Invitational, an authorized KAIAC event. A special congratulations to our SFHS A Team (Mathilde Doherty G12, Kate


Choi G10, Claire Haigh G9, and Kevin Chung G9) for winning 1st place in the tournament against SIS with a final score of 390-275. Another Great Success at the 7th Korea Business Competition (KBC):

With multiple teams representing SFS, a team of five sophomores beat 26 other teams and won The Grand Award (top prize), Best Q&A Award, and Best Speaker Award for William Kim. Congratulations to Kate Choi ‘23, William Kim ‘23, Dohyun Kim ‘23, Erin Lee ‘23 and Winston Lee ‘23!

Lucy Lee And Ina Choe Awarded at International University Dance Competition

Lucy Lee (Grade 12) and Ina Choe (Grade 8) who won the Silver Prize and Bronze Prize respectively by performing ballet at the 2020 International University Dance Competition. This prominent international competition has judges and participants from many different countries and backgrounds. They have been training hard under Ms. Shin, the SWEP ballet instructor, and we are very proud of their accomplishments. Please join us in congratulating Lucy and Ina!

three preliminary rounds and successfully finished the final rounds as the winner.

2021 National Merit Semifinalists Announced

Congratulations to SFS Seniors Claire Kim, Michael Suh, Lynn Lee, Justin Oh and Jiah Choe for being named National Merit Semifinalists by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. Over 1.5 million Juniors took the PSAT that qualifies them for the National Merit Scholarship and only about 16,000 students advanced to the Semifinalist stage. Our Seniors will move on to the next phase of the scholarship competition through a rigorous application process.

2021 National Merit Commended Students Announced

International History Bee Winner

Congratulations to Claire Haigh, Grade 9 - she has just become the 2020 History Bee Asian Champion. The International History Bee is a buzzer-based history quiz competition for individual students. Claire was the highest scorer from the combined FALL 2020 | Student Voices

Congratulations to SFS Seniors Christine Yun, Daniel Park, Doh Hyun Dennis Kim, Ana Park, Rebecca Kim, Jeremiah Shim, Clara Kim, Rachel Kahng and Jonathan Myong for being named National Merit Commended Students by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. Over 1.5 million juniors took the PSAT that qualifies them for the National Merit Scholarship and about 34,000 students were recognized as Commended Students for their exceptional academic promise.

Kate Choi, 2021 National YoungArts Foundation Finalist in Writing

Kate Choi (Grade 10) has been named a 2021 National YoungArts Foundation Finalist in Writing. The annual YoungArts’ National Arts Competition awards artistically talented high school students and grants them the opportunity to attend regional and national programs to continue developing their craft. The competition includes ten disciplines across the visual, literary, and performing arts. This year, 144 finalists were named (approximately 2% of all applicants). As a finalist, Kate is invited to participate in National YoungArts Week, which will be held virtually this year. Students are eligible for further prizes up to $10,000 USD and can be nominated to become U.S. Presidential Scholars. The students will have the chance to learn from notable artists and mentors, who have included Salman Rushdie, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Frank Gehry, Winston Marsalis, and Mickalene Thomas. 19 12

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Introducing Eric De Haan, Director of Alumni Relations

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lease welcome Eric De Haan to the position of Director of Alumni Relations at Seoul Foreign School. An experienced and impactful leader, Eric comes to SFS with an extensive background in alumni relations and international education. Early in his career he held administrative roles at international schools in Europe, including Black Forest Academy in Germany and Riverside School in Prague; his most recent experiences were as the inaugural Director of International Alumni Relations and AVP for International Development, both at Indiana University in the US. Eric was drawn to the mission of SFS and the focus on inspiring a passion for learning and academic and creative excellence. He sees the School’s commitment to investing in its alumni as an extension of that care, an interest that doesn’t end with graduation but is a lifelong link with its students. Eric is excited to join SFS and connect with the larger alumni community around the world. Contact Eric at eric.dehaan@seoulforeign.org.

Class Notes The Banner always welcomes your Class Notes and submissions. To submit, please reply to our Wavelength emails or email notes to alumni@seoulforeign.org.

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Horace "HH" Underwood: There were only four of us who graduated in June, 60 years ago, forming the smallest SFS graduating class in its post-WWII history. We were of course the best graduating class before my children graduated from SFS. The entire class, in alphabetical order: Betty DeCamp (Schuur), daughter of Presbyterian missionaries, is retired in Indiana. Raymond Ku, whose parents were from Taiwan, disappeared from our knowledge sometime after graduation. David Moore has just retired for the third or fourth time, finishing 15 years as a Methodist pastor in New Hampshire. My wife and I retired in 2004 after 30 years of teaching in Korea and live in South Carolina doing volunteer work, looking at our lake and admiring our grandchildren.

(literally) by walking us into the hills around the school - especially when the springs were iced over. Of all the teachers and administrators, he left a lasting impression. Then, in 1965, I was a senior at Taipei American School in Formosa. Who should appear in the middle of the year as our new PE teacher...Mr. Brougham. Instant recognition & we had some great conversations. I also used to marvel at the size and color of the moths that would sun themselves on the front of the school building. Have not seen that elsewhere. J. Bernard (Ben) H. van Lierop III: Living through the COVID-19 pandemic has presented challenges to everyone with personal and family plans in 2020. Our oldest son, Johan, and Erin, his high school sweetheart, had planned on getting married on May 1st, 2020. Rather than postpone the wedding, Johan and Erin decided to get married on May 1st, and say their vows in a neighborhood park in Minneapolis with only the immediate family attending. It turned out to be a very special occasion, one that will be remembered long after the pandemic. Ben and Chris, Leif, Christiaan, Johan and Erin, and Erin’s parents Jim and Bridgid.

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Roland Keller: In 1958-59, we had a PE coach named "Brougham" - a.k.a. "Bro-me-o" - as he was courting his wife to be. He used to take us on "field trips"

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The BANNER | Class Notes

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Beth Urquhart: Retired!!!! After 39 years as a financial advisor, I am looking forward to new opportunities provided by retirement. A new challenge!

David A. Cummings

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David A Cummings: David attended SFS from 1960-1970 when his parents served as missionaries in Korea. Although he was in the class of 1974, his family moved back to the US before he graduated high school. During the years since then, Dave has had many fond memories of his years at SFS. After college, he worked with the international accounting and advisory firm of Price Waterhouse from 1978 to 1990, and spent two years from 1984-1986 in the


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Peter Dorow: 2020 has been a big year! I retired from Delta Air Lines after a 35-year career in sales management, got married on July 11, and purchased a new home with my wife in Lake Elmo, Minnesota. I am privileged to serve on the Board of Friends of Seoul Foreign School, and look forward to visiting SFS again in the next year or two.

80 Karin Holm Price. My most recent trip, before COVID-19, visiting organizations that provide care for children in Vietnam.

Seoul office, during which time he visited the SFS campus and got reacquainted with several faculty members and former students. When his son John graduated from college in 2011, Dave took John and his dad Malcolm back to Korea for a week-long intergenerational visit. Dave is retiring at the end of 2020 after a long career in financial management. He was most recently the CFO of a large law firm headquartered in Richmond, Virginia. Dave and his wife Caren live in the Richmond area, where they plan to stay. They have two married children and three grandchildren close by. You can reach Dave on LinkedIn at: http://linkedin.com/in/ dave-cummings-a884ab36

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Karin Holm Price: It has been too long since I have touched base. My granddaughter is getting married this month. Class of 1975 - we are aging nicely. I continue to work with nonprofit organizations providing humanitarian aid for children and under resourced families.

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Wendy (Pamela at SFS) Lee Williams: Hi Class of 1976. My name then was Pamela. I remember quite a few friends I met and managed to keep in touch with a few overseas. I rarely meet up with any alumni in Korea. Everyone has their own thing to do, I suppose. I am into dog rescue, volunteering for Korean, US and Canadian rescue groups. We are constantly looking for flight companions to SFX, Seattle and LAX. Contact me for details. Thank you.

Charles Choi: Met up with Chul Pak and Sam Lim for some golf at Bethpage, NY last month. Great to be able to catch up and maintain meaningful friendships that started over 40 years ago at SFS.

our increasingly divisive times where there has unfortunately been a rise in anti-Asian hate crimes in the US due to the coronavirus pandemic, I have been honored to work on my latest book about the 1980s Vincent Chin case - the first federal civil rights trial for an Asian American. "FROM A WHISPER TO A RALLYING CRY: The Killing of Vincent Chin and the Trial That Galvanized the Asian American Movement" will be published this April 6th, 2021 from Norton Young Readers (W.W. Norton & Co.). It is a Young Adult narrative non-fiction book chronicling the controversial case that paved the way for Asian American and Pacific Islander activism for the next generation. Vincent Chin's legacy reminds us that we must always fight back against hatred and racism. My book is for high school students, teachers, and also adult readers. For more information: paulayoo.com. I am forever grateful for the values SFS taught me growing up. I hope everyone remains in good health and spirits during this unprecedented time. Sincerely, Paula

Charles Choi, Chul Pak and Sam Lim.

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John Kim @seoulfoodpatrol

Paula Yoo: I attended SFS from 197782. I'm grateful for reconnecting with many friends over the years. Having suffered racism as one of the very few non-white children/teens in a conservative town in Connecticut in the 1970s & 80s, it was empowering and life-changing to attend SFS where diversity and inclusion were valued. In

John Kim: Having moved back to Seoul in 2010 from the boondocks of Philadelphia, PA, I have been amazed by the variety of new restaurants opening in Seoul. There are talented young chefs having trained and worked all over the world bringing innovative French, Italian, Japanese, Chinese, American, Middle Eastern, etc., food to Seoul. The food scene in Seoul is vibrant and amazing. I

Book cover for "FROM A WHISPER TO A RALLYING CRY: The Killing of Vincent Chin and the Trial That Galvanized the Asian American Movement" (Norton Young Readers/W.W. Norton & Co., April 6th, 2021 release)

Wendy Lee Williams. "Everyone's Chuseok holidays have come and gone and we anticipate Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas and the New Year. May everyone be and stay healthy."

FALL 2020 | Class Notes

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work for a multinational company that employs a lot of expats. Everyone started asking me "Where should I go to eat [INSERT CUISINE]?" What started with an Excel spreadsheet in 2017 that was circulated via e-mail eventually migrated to the www.seoulfoodpatrol.com platform. [Website was hacked and therefore currently not updated. I am in the process of updating it soon]. I am active on Instagram @seoulfoodpatrol where I post restaurants that are noteworthy and one should visit if you live in or visit Seoul.

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Alfie Sulaiman: After 15 years as a journalist (eight as a features writer and seven as a business news journo under the byline Alfean Hardy ("Alfie Sulaiman" is a shortened version of my full name)), I opted for a relatively quiet life as a senior editor with a Malaysian bank's research unit. Seven years on, I'm still there. Part of a team of six who edit research notes from four countries. I like to think that my short time at SFS (Grades 6 and 7) helped me grow as a person and taught me lessons both good and bad. I certainly miss the people I met when I was there, having to return to Malaysia abruptly without getting a chance to say my goodbyes. Biggest lesson from SFS? The people you meet and share your life with are the catalyst for who you will be in the years ahead. Stay safe in this crazy world, Class of 1990, and everyone else out there.

posting, serving as Canada's chargé d'affaires in Vientiane until mid-2021. Our family of four love exploring everything Laos has to offer, including caves, waterfalls, and elephants. I play piano and guitar in a couple of bands (one rock, one jazz) and on occasion still inflict my "Godspell"trained singing voice on unsuspecting members of the public! Have fond memories of SFS hiking and skiing trips, and would love to be posted back to Seoul someday. 1993 Magali Filipuzzi Chuffart: From August 2020 the class of 1993 has their Zoom get together once a month. It's fun catching up with everybody. This is one of the good things about COVID-19 and this weird situation around the world: even if the borders are closed, it's never been this easy to talk to people around the world!!!

<Make a Wish> produced and acted by Edward Hong.

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Edward Hong: Produced and acted in a horror comedy short film called "Make A Wish" that is currently in 75+ film festivals, most of them virtual. For more info, go to makeawishshortfilm.com/screenings.

Class of 93 at Zoom Reunion.

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Richard Lim: I went to SFS from K-12 and have so many great memories. I also started sending my child to SFS from kindergarten. SFS will always be a part of my life.

Alfie Sulaiman. "My workplace Monday-Friday from 6:00 am to 4:00 pm where I get to save the English language from being misused in interesting ways."

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Paul Rader: We are excited to share with our wider SFS family the birth of our third son, Francis Roy Ki-Sung Rader. He was born at Severance Hospital in Seoul on July 29th, 2020. He is growing, eating, and sleeping well! Francis Roy Ki-Sung Rader, at about six weeks old.

John Sweetman (former Faculty, 2005-2009).

John Sweetman (former faculty, 2005-2009): After returning to Canada after 4 amazing art filled years at SFS (2005-2009) I have been teaching Art & Design at two independent schools in Ontario. I currently teach IB MYP Design at Upper Canada College in Toronto. I keep in touch with many of the exceptional people I taught at SFS; many of whom are making a big difference in the design world! Barbara and I and the boys miss Seoul and hope to visit again soon.

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Lindsay Boersma: In my spare time, I compete with my three dogs at dock jumping competitions. This is the 6th year in a row we've qualified for the championship event! (Photo at top left on page 43).

Timothy Edwards

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Timothy Edwards: After my graduate studies in Toronto, I joined Canada's Foreign Service in 2003—keeping the family business alive! Following stints in Hong Kong and The Hague, I'm on my third overseas

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LKoketso Mashingaidze: I can’t help but smile when I think about my four years at Seoul Foreign School. Not only did I meet incredible people that I’m

The BANNER | Class Notes


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Bailey Baker: After graduating with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Graphic Design at Concordia University, I freelanced for the British School 2015-2016 yearbook, and interned at International School of Busan (formally Busan International Foreign School). Then I got a job at a family owned printing company in Omaha, Nebraska called Printco Graphics as a graphic designer. I’m happy to say that I’ve been in charge of a few design projects, including a quarterly magazine.

14 Lindsay Boersma and her dog at a dock jumping competition.

still in contact with, it was a time where I grew tremendously in my faith. For the past decade (I can’t believe it’s been that long!), a lot has happened. After my graduation, I went back home, to South Africa, where I completed my Psychology degree at Monash University South African Campus. Though I have a Psychology Degree, I am currently in the business field, specifically the small business development field. I started my career as a Business Analyst and I am currently a manager at our Johannesburg office. Work aside, the best part of the past decade was marrying my husband, Kudzai, in 2015 and giving birth to our first baby girl, Neo, in May 2019 and our second baby girl, Keeya, in July 2020. I can’t thank God enough for His mercies. In the next year or two, I am trusting God to enroll for my master’s degree in business, possibly an MBA. The road hasn’t been easy trying to balance work and family but through the Grace of God, all is well.

Madeleine Craig: I did IGCSE geography at SFS and have now found myself working as an Urban Planner in Melbourne, Victoria (one of the world's most liveable cities)! Without question, Ms. Denis (2010-2012) left an impression and I love what I do. Melbourne has been a fantastic city to explore over the last 5 years, albeit their public transport is lacking when compared to Seoul's, and I'm excited for my future working in the development of cities. I will ultimately be pursuing further studies in the northern hemisphere (travel restrictions permitting) and am eager to be geographically closer to those I've stayed in touch with over the years - you know who you are! Emma Sheldrick: I'm very excited to have had the opportunity to work as a Researcher and Production Manager on this Great Big Story film about Korean Hanbok designer Kim Young Jin for the production company I work for called 'Borderless film'. I can honestly credit Mrs. Moon and my time at SFS for sparking my interest and appreciation for Korean arts and culture, and I feel very lucky to be doing what I love and get paid for it. I am currently working on some extremely

Emma Sheldrick

exciting projects that I believe will be on most people's radars in the next year or so. I feel so very lucky to be in the position I am, (particularly with the state of the world), and that only motivates me to take advantage of my position and share more stories that I believe need to be told and heard. To watch the film about Korean Hanbok designer Kim Young Jin, please visit this link: bit. ly/2zdrCgO.

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Andrew Kim: Vogue magazine featured Andrew Kim's creations for his thesis collection in a piece titled, "6 Designers To Watch From Rhode Island School of Design's Class of 2020." Andrew says, "for me, creativity starts with simple curiosity, grows with reaction, and takes form as a response." Read the full article here:: bit.ly/33SU5p8. 19 12

Andrew Kim in Vogue magazine.

Koketso Mashingaidze with her husband Kudzai, and daughters Neo and Keeya.

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Letter from Advancement Dear SFS Community,

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In the midst of uncertainty and challenges with COVID-19, we are grateful for your continued generosity and support. Our community coming together and overcoming the challenges during this pandemic has demonstrated commitment to the world-class education that Seoul Foreign School provides. Annual Fund dollars raised last year offered additional resources to enhance the educational experiences of our students. Investment in Zoom software for virtual learning, faculty professional development, upgrades to facilities such as the High School design lab, Middle School kitchen, British School safety measures and other maintenance and operational costs are a few of the many projects we completed in the last school year.

and I hope you will take this opportunity to help support our school to invest in our Annual Fund and make a meaningful impact on the school.

We are off to a great start to the 2020-2021 Annual Fund with 100% participation from the Board of Governors and more than 65% of our faculty and staff. We have raised $147,573(USD) as of November 30, 2020 showing a commitment to the outstanding educational opportunities at SFS. The Annual Fund bridges the gap between the amount of tuition and the actual cost of educating an SFS student. It gives the school more opportunities to enrich every aspect of campus life by enhancing our academic and extracurricular activities with strong and innovative programs, facility upgrades, and outstanding faculty and staff professional development. Our goal this year is $200,000(USD)

One of the goals of the External Relations team is to reach out and build meaningful relationships through a variety of events. While we are challenged to organize events at this time, we want to stay connected with you and hope to bring the community together. Please stay tuned for future opportunities.

Last spring, in honor of our beloved faculty member Jack Moon, we established the Jack R. Moon Biology Scholarship and have surpassed our endowed goal of $25,000(USD). We are now able to award the first scholarship in the spring of 2021. Thank you to our alumni and SFS community for your generosity. As we continue to seek contributions, we hope you will help us to continue Jack’s legacy and to inspire and support passionate SFS students in the future.

With great appreciation for your continued support, Yoojin Um Director of Advancement yoojin.um@seoulforeign.org

The BANNER | Advancement


Donor Story

The Chae Family The Chae family generously donated hand sanitizer for every member of the SFS community, as well as large bottles for the classrooms and common spaces. We are grateful for their gift in kind that has benefitted the entire SFS community and saved the cost to the school of providing sanitizers.

T

he COVID-19 outbreak impacted upon us globally and our community. I was inspired by the tireless work of every member of the SFS community and their devotional outreach to who needed support. As one of the faculty members and a parent of two children, our couple thought about what we can do more to support SFS. We learned that the most effective preventive measure against the COVID-19 is to practice good hand hygiene with frequent hand washing and hand sanitizing. Seungho and I were thrilled to be able to donate the hand sanitizers to every member of SFS and to the classrooms.

British School Year 5 and 6 Origami paper sculptures decorated on School staircase.

It is certainly a very difficult time of our lives and many members of SFS were unable to visit their home overseas due to the pandemic. I do believe only continuously working together and supporting each other will allow us to safely overcome this difficult time. "Arise, shine, for your light has come, and the glory of the Lord rises upon you. See, darkness covers the earth and thick darkness is over the peoples, but the Lord rises upon you and his glory appears over you." - Isaiah 6:1-2

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2020 - 2021

Donors As of November 30, 2020

Faculty and Staff (F/S), Alumni (A) (USD 1 = KRW 1,191)

Annual Fund THE MILLENNIUM CLUB (Donated $10,000 - $49,999)

Anonymous Subin ’23 and Stacy ’28 Jang Josephine ’22 and Jeneve ’27 Lee The Striffler Family (F/S)

THE RED AND BLACK CLUB (Donated $5,000 - $9,999)

Colm and Sinead Flanagan (F/S) Caleb ’18 and Caden ’21 Jang The Kahng Family Grace Eunbin ’22 and Joseph Jisub ’25 Kim Daniel Park ’34, Sophia Park, Jae Hong Park and Catherina Yoon (F/S)

THE CREST CLUB (Donated $1,000 - $4,999)

Anonymous Derek Burney ’80 Elizabeth ’22 and Katherine ’25 Chung Minsoo Choi and June Kang Ella ’24 and Gwyneth ’25 Chun Siwoo ’24 and Hyunwoo ’28 Chung Jeff, Marieke, Mathilde '21 and Hugo ’26 Doherty The Feitosa Family (F/S) Jeffrey and Jennifer Holcomb (F/S) Yune Hur ’27 Maryclaire Seo Yeon Kelly ’35 Anna Kim (F/S) Eileen Yerin Kim ’31 and Juhie Suh ’92 (F/S) (A) Gee Soo Lauren Kim ’25 Paul Kim (F/S) Silvia and Jerome Kim Steven Kim Tabitha ’17, Luke ’21 and Jordan ’23 Kim Yeonjae Lee ’23 The Jarvis Lucchesi family (F/S) Microsoft Sakhar Nair (F/S) Chaewon (Molly) Park ’22 Dean (Chang) Park ’89, Jisoo Shim, Stephanie Park ’22 and Sylvia Park ’24 (A) The Park Family 46

Dongchae (Edward) ’22 and Eunchae (Jessica) ’24 Shin Irene Shin ’24 Family Dawn M. Stark (F/S) Eulho Suh and KyungEn Kim ’90 (A) Chloe Lee ’31 and Yoojin Um (F/S) Nathan, Megan, Adam ’32 and Anna ’34 Walker (F/S)

CENTENNIAL CLUB (Donated $100 - $999)

Anonymous (9) Heather Adkins (F/S) Ethan James Albano ’24 (F/S) Liz Allen (F/S) Melissa J. Brabon (F/S) Makayla Choi (F/S) Andrew Chung ’97*, Soo Youn Nam, Farrah Chung ’29 and Micah Chung (A) Steven and Julia Church (F/S) Soojin Cho (F/S) Bryan, Jacquie and Lincoln Coogan (F/S) Harrison ’05 and Kristen ’06 Creech (F/S) Eric and Jillian De Haan (F/S) Nathan and Julie Doelling (F/S) Rob and Lauren Elliott (F/S) Michael Farrant and Tsira Gabelia (F/S) Kai, Jade and Chris Friesen (F/S) Kelly, Tu Anh, Autumn ’24, Kaden ’26 and Cash ’27 Gilmore (F/S) The Greenhalgh Family (F/S) Grace and Young Han Hahm (F/S) Caroline Hahn (F/S) Ryan and Sophie Hammerberg (F/S) The Han/Chi Family (F/S) James Hopkins (F/S) The Gibault Family (F/S) Grand Canyon University Philip and Kathe Hart (F/S) Choong Pyo Hong (F/S) Jamie ’09 and Jonathan ’11 Jun (F/S) Byeong Guk Jeon (F/S) Ahyeon Jung (F/S) Doyeon Daisy Kim (F/S) Hannah Kim (F/S) Jean Kim (F/S) Kyubin Kim ’27 Michael and New Knox (F/S) Nancy Rothwell Award 2020 Soora Koh (F/S) The Koscina Family Tanya LeClair (F/S) Andy and Joannna Lee (F/S) Dante Yongsun Lee ’30 Marcus Li ’26 and Leo Malik ’31 (F/S) The BANNER | Advancement

Piotr, Marta, Jonasz ’27 and Aurelia ’31 Mazowiecka-Kocyk (F/S) Mayo and Callaghan Family (F/S) Elizabeth McGarroch (F/S) Michael, Jiangjiang, Cooper ’28 and Ellia ’33 Busbee/Chen (F/S) Marina Miroiu (F/S) The Munce Family (F/S) Katherine ’19, Jonathan ’21 and Xander ’24 Myong Megumi Ono ’29 The Prest Family (F/S) The Raine Family (F/S) Soomin Seo and Kang Won Lee The Shim Family Hyesoon Shin (F/S) Shannon and Justin Smith (F/S) Angela, Shin, Emery ’29 and Calvin ’31 Son Grace Song (F/S) Prema Thomas and Elish Pangiraj (F/S) Kelly Yuan Tian (F/S) Ryan, Lauren, Meredith ’27 and Joel ’29 Walker (F/S) Mike and Yana Welch Jessica ’15, Michael ’18 and Stephanie ‘25 Woo (F/S) Ryan Ying-Chie Wu ’25 The Yap Family (F/S) Paula Yoo ’87 (A) Judy Yoon (F/S)

THE LEGACY CLUB (Under $99)

Anonymous (6) Young Bo Bae (F/S) Lychelle Bruski (F/S) Junhee Cho (F/S) Hana Choi (F/S) Jayong Choi (F/S) Youngwoo Choi (F/S) Xin Ding (F/S) Kang Hoe Do (F/S) Jee Hye Ha (F/S) Seung Hoon Hong (F/S) Chris Horan and Julie Ly (F/S) Michelle Hwang (F/S) Woo Tak Jeon (F/S) Rafael Jimenez (F/S) Jinhyuck Joo (F/S) Byung Sik Jung (F/S) Cho Long Jung (F/S) Jiyoung Jung (F/S) Dong Suk Kang (F/S) Sang Oh Kang (F/S) Yoon Kang (F/S)


Benjamin and Rachel Kask (F/S) Yong Jin Kee (F/S) Catherine Kim (F/S) Chul Hoi Kim (F/S) Crystal Kim (F/S) Esther Kim (F/S) Esther J. Kim (F/S) Hyung Gil Kim (F/S) Jinny Kim (F/S) Nam Pil Kim (F/S) Yerin Amy Kim ’32, Yhu-Bin Lee and Seong Dong Kim (F/S) Haydn and Sarah Kneeshaw (F/S) Eunha Ko (F/S) Dongwook Koh (F/S) Haejin Koh (F/S) Hong Seo Koo (F/S) Nami Kwon (F/S) JaeEun Lah (F/S) Caroline Law (F/S) Byung Joo Lee (F/S) Choong Hwan Lee (F/S) Eunjoo Lee (F/S) Hugh Heungsang Lee (F/S) Jae Hun Lee (F/S) Jinju Lee (F/S) Jung Yong Lee (F/S) Kyoung Jae Lee (F/S) Moonjin Lee (F/S) Seulgee Lee (F/S) Seung Jae Lee (F/S) Seung Woo Lee (F/S) Younghi Lee (F/S) Arabella Lespine (F/S) Yanghee Lim (F/S) Vasile Lozneanu (F/S) Grace Miller (F/S) Moon Ki Min (F/S) Dong Hoon Moon (F/S) Youngsik Moon (F/S) Seung Min Nam (F/S) Jay Park (F/S) Brigitte Parr (F/S) David and Julia Robinson (F/S) Woo Chul Seol (F/S) Jany Shim (F/S) Dongjin Shin (F/S) Ben ’65 and Chris van Lierop (A) Kwang Il Won (F/S) Hye Sun Woo (F/S) Joshua and Mia Yaniw (F/S) Jean Yoo (F/S) Joanna Yoo (F/S) Kara ’27, Judah ’33 and Jonah ’33 Yoon (F/S) Soyool, Jihye and JB Yoon (F/S)

Building for the Future Fund THE CREST CLUB

Jack R. Moon Biology Scholarship

Anonymous (2)

THE CREST CLUB

(Donated $1,000 - $4,999)

CENTENNIAL CLUB (Donated $100 - $999)

Anonymous (1) Jessica Bonnell (F/S) Young Woo Cho (F/S) Scott Day (F/S) Tom and Faith Ford (F/S) Kirsten Gray (F/S) Janet Hahm (F/S) The Holbrook Family (F/S) James Hopkins (F/S) Caden ’35 and Kaya ’36 Johnson (F/S) Jina Lee (F/S) Cailen and Anna McNair (F/S) Adam, Lauren, Jade ’18 and Ella ’21 Teather (F/S) Nathan Park ’24, Ana Park ’27 and Angie Won (F/S)

THE LEGACY CLUB (Under $99)

Anonymous Yoosoo Cho (F/S) Chan Kun Chung (F/S) Dae Woon Kim (F/S) Soo Yeon Lim (F/S)

Endowment THE LEGACY CLUB (Under $99)

Anonymous (2)

(Donated $1,000 - $4,999)

Gil S. Pak ’90 (A) Paul ’04 and Hannah Rader (F/S) (A)

CENTENNIAL CLUB (Donated $100 - $999)

Anonymous Ron Busroe Charles Haspels (A) The Jugant Family (A) Esther Gweon ’03 (A) Yul Huh ’03 (A) Celine Jin (F/S) Nancy Kim ’91 (A) Ki-Teh Kim ’99 (A) Alice Kimm ’82 (A) Jennifer Koenig ’92 (A) Chuck Krugler (A) Yuna Lee Lyons ’90 (A) Jack and Edie ’77 Moon (F/S) (A) Katherine ’19, Jonathan ’21 and Xander ’24 Myong Student from the 80s (A) David Tarlow ’92 (A) Richard Underwood ’45* (A) Victoria Jheesun Yu ’04 and the Yu Family (A)

THE LEGACY CLUB ($1-$99)

Anonymous Jong Chul Choi (F/S) Chris Een-Soo Kim (F/S) Lee-Ellen Strawn ’85 (A) Chang Kun Yang (F/S)

Gifts in Kind Seungho Chae, Ahyeon Jung, Ian ’26 and Ethan ’30 Chae (F/S) The Douma Family

FALL 2020 | Advancement

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The Elementary School celebrated their annual Korea Day, honoring our host country. Students wear Hanbok, a traditional Korean dress, or other clothing representing Korea. They spend a portion of the day playing Korean traditional games and making crafts.

Seoul Foreign School

39 Yeonhui-ro 22-gil Yeonhui-dong, Seodaemun-gu Seoul, South Korea 03723 www.seoulforeign.org For the digital version of this issue, scan the QR code or visit https://sfscom.page.link/banner2020fall