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eNewsletter for Indiana Soccer Club

FEBRUARY-MARCH

2013

Directors of Coaching By: Steve Franklin, Director of Coaching Education


Table of Contents 1. Editorial From the DOCE Desk 2. US Youth Soccer Releases Latest Coaching Manual: 3. UEFA B Coaching – Defend to Counter Attack 4. Implementation of 2013 “D” License Protocols 5. New US Soccer “D” License Implementation 6. INDIANA SOCCER ANNOUNCES ALLOWABLE CONTACT DATES FOR 2013-2014 TRYOUTS

7. Rene’ Meulensteen’s – 4v4 Skills and Moves Games 8. ELITE Soccer: Harry Redknapp: How to Beat the Champions Lague Winners.

9. ELITE Extra Time: Mick McCarthy 10.

Photo of the Month

WANTED: Soccer Articles from You! The Indiana Soccer Association membership, especially YOU as DOC’s are encouraged to submit articles/editorials for consideration. Subject matter that is important to one club is very likely important to several others and can help to initiate discussion and/or facilitate resolutions. Human interest stories involving individuals, players or teams are greatly appreciated. The Heads Up; Ripples; Kid’s Corner Kicks; and What’s Up DOC? eNews Magazines are statewide publications (circulation = 65,000) full of information and resources for players, parents, coaches, team managers, club administrators and referees. All articles will be reviewed for usefulness and relevance and are subject to available space. The more input you provide us, the better we can make our publication.To submit content for future publications, simply email them to me at the Indiana State Soccer office at: steve@soccerindiana.org .


Editorial from the Director of Coaching Education – Steve Franklin I recently had the opportunity to take a trip overseas to Manchester, England as part of the NSCAA’s Special Topics Course with Manchester United’s First Team Coach – Rene’ Meulensteen. This NSCAA Special Topics Course at Manchester United’s legendary Cliff Training Ground included presentations by Meulensteen, the Manchester United Youth Academy. Attendees had the opportunity to observe a Manchester United Youth Academy training, tour Old Trafford Stadium and the National Football Museum in Manchester. The tour ended with the Manchester United vs. Everton match at Old Trafford Stadium. As we sat on the bus outside the hotel, NSCAA CEO Joe Cummings made a special announcement: we are heading to Carrington, home of Manchester United first team. NO ONE gets inside Carrington for first team training! It is an amazing facility with the most perfect grass fields I have ever seen. As we exited the bus onto a viewing area, Rene Meulensteen introduced the first team to the coaches, describing what he was going to try to achieve during the training session. As the players came out on to the training field, we were honored to watch Manchester United legends like Ferdinand, Scholes, Carrick, and De Gea train – and even a glimpse of Sir Alex Ferguson. After what can only be described as amazing and insightful session by Rene, we watched the youth coaches in action training the top U-6 to U-9 players in the Manchester United system. While some coaches watched the training session, others spoke with Rene’s guest Wim Suurbier, a Dutch legend. Suurbier relayed stories and answered questions about his amazing carrier with Ajax (1964-1977) and the Dutch National team (1966-1978). The final day we departed for the afternoon game at Old Trafford between Manchester United and Everton. The game was also the anniversary of the 1958 Munich Air Disaster, so a special ceremony occurred before the game. The game kicked off in lively spirits with Van Persie hitting the post 10 minutes into the game. Only three minutes later, a long, straight ball finds Van Persie, he gets around Heitinga and finds Giggs and he scores! He took it onto his right foot and finished it. The goal that Giggs scored makes him the only person to have scored in every single Premier League season. The game went on to produce two goals with great chances on both ends that made for a great end to an amazing trip.


US Youth Soccer Releases Latest Coaching Manual September 11, 2012 10:25 AM

Download How to Write a Training Session Plan [link] Training Session Template [link] FRISCO, Texas (Sept. 11, 2012) – The US Youth Soccer Coaching Department introduced the latest coaching resource with How to Write a Training Session Plan. The manual will help guide coaches in conducting the most efficient and effective training sessions for their team and compliments previous US Youth Soccer coaching resources such as the Player Development Model, Vision document and Skills School technical manual.

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"This resource on how to design a training session plan, coupled with the many other coaching resources from US Youth Soccer, will help any coach through a soccer season," said US Youth Soccer Director of Coaching, Sam Snow. "The US Youth Soccer Coaching Department resource center, coaching articles, lesson plans, DVD’s, books and documents such as the Player Development Model offer a wealth of ideas for appropriate soccer experiences. How to Write a Training Session Plan will help coaches organize that information into an effective session and season. This manual is useful to any coach, but especially those beginning their formal coaching education in the courses given by their US Youth Soccer State Association." How to Write a Training Session Plan is ideal for coaches of all age groups and abilities. Download How to Write a Training Session Plan below, as well as other useful resources from the US Youth Soccer Coaching Department. How to Write a Training Session Plan [link] Training Session Template [link] Coaches Document Center [link] Includes the Player Development Model, Vision Document, Skills School and Coaching Manual Sample Training Sessions [link]

U-10’s from Carmel receiving their green “Sportsmanship Cards” to pass out to their parents on the sideline. The effort is to help educate, inspire and recognize sportsmanship acts.


UEFA B Coaching – Defend to Counter Attack Jake Cleary February 19, 2013 I had another question from a Grassroots Coaching fan regarding a key UEFA B Coaching topic: “What is the difference between Coaching a team to defend to counter attack compared to coaching a team to defend deep to counter attack?” In this article, we look at how to Coach a team to defend to counter attack. OVERVIEW The first thing to think of is that your team is defending and the opposition are attacking. So you want the opposition to commit players forward, so if the defending team gain possession and break forward quickly they have the opportunity of an equal number or numerical advantage and the opposition have players’ briefly on the wrong side of the ball. The defending team for this topic will look to be organized defensively, with the team behind the ball. They will be higher up the pitch, with the GK sweeping behind for any balls that are player over the top. This will enable them to put pressure on higher up the pitch, so if they win the ball there is less distance for them to attack the goal. Imagine a game like situation where the opposition are playing out from the back. The defensive team are organized and behind the ball. They have squeezed up and compacted play, but are in defensive positions to deal with a long ball over the top. They are encouraging the opposition to pass the ball in their own half. They are giving the opposition enough rope to hang themselves. Typically, this might be a home team who are 0-0 or winning 1 –0. The team will need to be patient with their pressure and if the opposition have good possession, not to chase the ball and become disorganized, allowing the opposition to play through them. TRIGGERS The defending team are waiting for TRIGGERS that they react to as a team to go and pressure and hunt the ball, trying to win it and counter attack. The triggers might be: A poor back pass to the GK that could be pressured and force the GK to hurry: A loose throw or kick from the GK: A poor cross field pass that forces the receiver backwards to control it or might result in a poor touch: Square passes into tight areas, for example a full back passing square into a midfield player: A straight pass from a defender into a midfield player who has a closed body position: Any poor control or lose control. The defending team will be looking to identify these triggers early. The nearest player will look to try and intercept or pressure the ball aggressively. The rest of the team then work together to hunt as a pack and put pressure on and around the ball, looking to win the ball and counter attack. They will have to be careful that as they pressure the ball, they don’t push to high up the pitch and leave themselves vulnerable for one ball over the top that beats them all. The key is discipline, organization, communication, and patience. Once they have quickly identified the trigger, they react quickly and as a team to flood the area around the ball. If they win the ball, they are in a position to counter attack quickly. This might take the form of a player quickly running with the ball into space or directly at an opponent to commit them to the ball: A player dribbling past an opponent and taking them out of the game: A quick through pass or cross behind the opposition for timed forward runs: A direct shot on goal. They will also need to commit players forward quickly to counter attack, but be careful they don’t all commit forward and leave themselves vulnerable for a counter attack.


This video might help you understand the principle of defending as a team in an 8 v 8 game. If the team wins the ball, then they look to counter attack.

UEFA B Coaching – Small Sided Game – Defend as a Team Click on the field to see the video

Implementation of 2013 “D” License Protocols State Soccer Associations will be provided a 6-month period (January 1 to June 30, 2013) to transition from the 2012 “D” license protocols to the 2013 “D” license protocols. One of the main changes to the “D” license course is the implementation of a minimum of one (1) active coaching season or deliberate coaching phase between the instructional weekend and the performance review phase (testing). Until July 1, 2013, State Associations may offer “D” license courses under the current 2012 protocols with the following two exceptions: • “D” license candidates are required to complete a minimum of two (2) assigned training sessions • All materials and resources that are released in January 2013 are for immediate integration (power points will be available at the January 16 workshop) After July 1, 2013, State Associations will need to comply with the following protocols: • Preparation Phase  Candidates are required to complete five (5) pre-assigned training sessions • Instructional Phase  Candidates meet face-to-face with instructors • Deliberate Practice Phase  Candidates are required to complete five (5) pre-assigned training sessions over a minimum of 10 weeks • Performance Review Phase  Final on-field exam Theory and Content • All materials and resources that are released in January 2013 are for immediate integration. • All course materials are the property of U.S. Soccer and should not be altered or revised.


Instructor Field Sessions • Format: Instructor field sessions should be structured in the current 4-stage format: (1) Technical-Physical Warm-up (2) Small-sided Activity (3) Expanded Activity (must include game orientation – attack and defend opposite directions) (4) Game (7v7 to 9v9) • Topics: Instructor field sessions must remain consistent. It is recommended that you present the sample sessions provided by U.S. Soccer. Instructors may include some variation based on personal preference. • Presentation: Instructor field sessions should be presented using the provided U.S.Soccer template, which is consistent with the candidate’s field session template. Instructors may be asked to submit field sessions for review. Please maintain a copy of your practical sessions. • Field Session Preview / Review: Instructors schedule previews (2-3 minutes) of each field session. In addition, instructors should allow time following the field session to debrief and review key components with the candidates. • Course expectations are broken into the following three categories: • Ideal • Practical • Minimum Protocols

I. “Preparation Phase” Ideal • “D” candidates pre-register for a course two (2) to three (3) months in advance. • Each candidate is provided a mentor or instructor who will observe one (1) or more training sessions in the candidate’s home environment. The mentor or instructor will complete a performance review for each session. • Two (2) weeks in advance of the instructional phase candidate submits the following documents to the appropriate administrator:  “E” License performance review  “D” practice performance review (submitted by mentor or instructor)  Pre-assigned practical coaching sessions (5) • One (1) week in advance of the instructional phase instructor receives a copy of candidate’s pre-assigned five (5) field sessions and performance reviews. • The Instructor reviews and marks each candidate’s project. Practical • Two (2) weeks in advance of the instructional phase candidate submits the following documents to the appropriate administrator:  “E” License performance review  “D” practice performance review (submitted by mentor or instructor)  Pre-assigned practical coaching sessions (5)


• One (1) week in advance of the instructional phase instructor receives a copy of candidate’s pre-assigned five (5) field sessions and performance reviews. • The Instructor reviews and marks each candidate’s project. Minimum • Candidate submits a hard copy of the following documents at check-in:  “E” License performance review  Pre-assigned practical coaching sessions (5) • Each instructor executes an individual review of the submitted documents with assigned candidates.

II. Instruction Phase (face-to-face) • Instructor executes an individual review of the submitted documents with their assigned candidates. Instructors then return the documents to the candidate for revision and planning. • Instructor completes a performance review form and verbally explains the results with each candidate. Prior to the conclusion of the instruction phase:  Identify and assign an appropriate deliberate practice coaching theme  Retain a copy of the candidate assessment form  Provide a copy to the candidate

III. Deliberate Practice Phase Ideal • Each candidate is provided with a mentor or instructor who will observe one (1) training session in the candidate’s home environment.  The mentor or instructor will complete a performance review for each session Practical • Two (2) weeks in advance of the performance review phase candidate submits the following documents to the appropriate administrator:  Performance review from practice coaching and deliberate phase • One (1) week in advance of the performance review phase instructor receives a copy of candidate’s five (5) field sessions and performance reviews. • Instructor reviews candidate’s packet. Minimum • Candidate submits a hard copy of the following documents during check-in:  Performance review from instruction phase and deliberate phase • Instructor executes an individual review of the submitted documents with their assigned candidates.

IV. Performance Review Phase Testing:  Final on-field exam

V. Course Completion Post Course • Two (2) weeks following the completion of the performance review each candidate receives a copy of their course results. • State Soccer Associations print certificates. • Candidates are directed to take U.S. Soccer’s course survey.


VI. Grading Standard Grading Policies U.S. Soccer will continue to grade candidates under the current format: • National “D” License.  Candidate must wait a minimum of one year before attending a U.S. Soccer “C” License course • State “D” License. • Not Ready (NR).

INDIANA SOCCER ANNOUNCES ALLOWABLE CONTACT DATES FOR 2013-2014 TRYOUTS Indiana Soccer has changed the date of allowable player contact for all clubs to adhere to when preparing for travel tryouts this upcoming June for the 2013-14 seasonal year. The change is the direct result of club requests after the state announced that the 2013 State Cup Finals would be held earlier this year than in past years. The cup final dates of June 1-2 would mean that cup finals would not have ended prior to the current allowable contact date for clubs to contact players in order to invite them to tryouts. Club directors of coaching contacted the competition department with requests to change the date of allowable contact to a date after the conclusion of the Indiana Cups. The Competition Department was in agreement with this request and communicated this request to the rest of the Indiana Soccer Staff. The result of this communication is that the Registration Rules have been officially changed to reflect the new contact date policy effective beginning in June 2013 for the 2013-2014 season. The actual section in the Indiana Soccer Registration Rules that was changed and updated is Section 5.5-2 Allowable Contact and the section is printed here for your information. SECTION 5.5-2 ALLOWABLE CONTACT A player(s) may not be contacted by a coach, parent, team manager, or other club affiliate, for the purpose of recruiting until the first Monday following the conclusion of the Indiana State Cups or until such player(s) has committed to another club for the upcoming seasonal year.

This year, the first Monday following the conclusion of the Indiana Soccer State Cups is Monday June 3, 2013. This actual date may change each year, but will never be prior to the conclusion of Cup play. Should you have any questions about the above policy change, do not hesitate to call Indiana Soccer for further clarification at 317-829-0560.


Rene Meulensteen’s Approach to teaching U-9’s the Skills and Moves – “4v4 Games”


PHOTO OF THE MONTH On 6 February 1958, a charter plane carrying 44 people crashed after refueling at Munich Airport. The accident claimed 23 lives, among them eight Manchester United players and three club officials. I took this photo (February 10th) during my trip to Manchester. The photo was snapped during the Everton – Manchester United match at Old Trafford. The banner was a fitting tribute to the young United side many believe would have gone on to dominate European football - the Busby Babes. We will never forget.


2013 Feb - March - What's Up DOC?  

enewsmagazine for Indiana Soccer DOC's

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