Page 1

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY SANES MEDIA INC. FOR THE MIAMI HERALD

MONDAY, OCTOBER 16 , 2017

S OU T H F L OR IDA L E G A L GUIDE YOUR GUIDE T O L AW, A CCOUN T ING & F IN A N CE

JOHN LEIGHTON A CRUSADER FOR SAFETY

ALSO: BEST PRACTICES FOR REDUCING CYBERSECURITY RISKS AMIKIDS MIAMI-DADE TURNS TROUBLED LIVES AROUND

www.sflegalguide.com


2

MONDAY OCTOBER, 16, 2017

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY SANES MEDIA INC. FOR THE MIAMI HERALD

Let’s End the Dreamers’ Nightmare On June 15, 2012, then President Obama announced an executive order creating DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals). In doing this act of kindness, he was acknowledging that children brought into this country via non-sanctioned methods and raised and educated here would face an unreasonable fate if they would be deported back to their countries of origin. Having grown up here, many of the Dreamers speak only English and know only the U.S. culture. To me it would be unfair to send them back to a country they know little or nothing about for a wrong not of their creation. In the past five years, many attempts have been made to formalize President Obama’s executive order. However, our highly divided Congress was never able to reach consensus and pass a law that would resolve the Dreamers’ situation.

The result has been ongoing tension, uncertainty and fear for the approximately 800,000 Dreamers, including tens of thousands of young South Florida residents. Since the election of President Trump, they and their parents have wondered about their status. Would the new administration renew the executive order? Would Congress pass a law formalizing their status? Will they have to leave? Nothing is more disconcerting than having no clear answers. Now President Trump, in my opinion, has played a very inter-

esting and intelligent card. He announced a gradual wind-down of the DACA executive order over the following six months with no immediate deportations for those already with permits. Any deportations would theoretically start as those DACA permits expire, after the six-month deadline or within the next two years. He then asked Congress to resolve the uncertainty once and for all. I believe that Congress should act quickly to end the Dreamers’ nightmare and finally resolve this situation. We should not continue to have these children

I believe that Congress should act quickly to end the Dreamers’ nightmare and finally resolve this situation. We should not continue to have these children and their parents live in fear, uncertain about their future, being permitted to live in the country but never being able to become part of it.

and their parents live in fear, uncertain about their future, being permitted to live in the country but never being able to become part of it. If they should go, it may be better that they do so as soon as possible since the younger they are the better chance they will have to succeed in another country. If they should stay, then they should be told so without any delay; they should not be burdened with the uncertainty any longer. Now it is up to our Congress to act with courage and compassion for these Dreamers. I sincerely hope that they should be allowed to stay and make a lasting contribution to the future of our nation. In any case, now is the time for Congress to settle their situation.

JACOB SAFDEYE

Jacob Safdeye Publisher jacob@sflegalguide.com

PUBLISHER JACOB SAFDEYE EDITOR IN CHIEF RICHARD WESTLUND GUEST CONTRIBUTORS STANLEY I. FOODMAN NELCY VICENTE SOUTH FLORIDA LEGAL GUIDE - BM Volume 1, Number 6, 2017 This is an independent supplement by South Florida Legal Guide Mailing address P.O. Box 630428, Miami, FL 33163. All rights reserved. All titles registered and may not be used without permission. Reproduction in whole or in part of any text, photograph or illustration without written permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. The South Florida Legal Guide makes no guarantee regarding the accuracy of information presented, results reported, or safety of products or activities described herein. The publisher notifies readers that the hiring of a professional is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements. Before you decide, ask the professional to send you free written information about qualifications and experience. Contact: info@sflegalguide.com or call: (786) 879-7638 • www.sflegalguide.com

www.sflegalguide.com


AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY SANES MEDIA INC. FOR THE MIAMI HERALD

MONDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2017

3

[ WEALTH MANAGEMENT ]

Banking to Lawyers BY NELCY VICENTE

Sabadell United Bank dates back to 1978, when a group of South Florida lawyers founded a bank focused on the needs of professionals and we became known as “the Lawyer’s Bank.” For close to 40 years, we have served as a trusted advisor for attorneys, accountants, business owners and high-net worth individuals facing important financial decisions. On July 31, 2017, IBERIABANK Corporation, the holding company of the 130-year-old IBERIABANK, acquired Sabadell United Bank, N.A. The acquisition

brings together both banks’ exceptional talent and similar cultural values, allowing clients to continue to receive the high quality service, local decision-making and community involvement they have grown to expect. At IBERIABANK, we understand the unique needs of attorneys and their practices. We strive to provide our clients with customized financial solutions to help them achieve their professional and personal financial objectives. For lawyers, their firms and their clients, our services extend well beyond tradi-

tional business banking and include private banking and wealth management solutions. Our expertise ranges from financing startup firms to helping senior partners develop exit strategies. Additionally, we can help manage cash flow for working capital, liquidity and debt service needs. We implement your investment strategies through a disciplined portfolio construction process that seeks to grow your assets, manage your risk and minimize your tax liabilities. When analyzing our clients’ financial situation, we consider many things, like

the nature of their practice areas, the firm’s size and scope, and how they operate their business. In today’s ever-changing economic environment, our team provides the highest quality personalized service, sound advice, and access to a wide range of deposit, lending and investment products that can be tailored to meet the needs of you and your business and help pave the way to your success. We recognize that with all of the important decisions you make each day, the selection of financial partners requires special discernment.

[ INTERNATIONAL TAX COMPLIANCE ]

Here Is What You Need to Do in Order to Have Stress-Free Foreign Accounts BY STANLEY I. FOODMAN

1. You must report your worldwide income: You must report your worldwide income on your U.S. income tax return. And, if you have an interest in a foreign bank or financial account you must check “yes” (on Schedule B). This is true even if you live outside the U.S. or pay foreign taxes on your foreign income. 2. You must file your FBAR: Tax return filing alone isn’t enough. All

U.S. persons with foreign bank and financial accounts exceeding in the aggregate $10,000 at any time during the year must file an FBAR by a prescribed date of the following year. 3. You must file Form 8938: This form reports your reportable foreign accounts and financial assets. 4. There are Big Penalties: Failures to file required IRS forms can be

considered tax and reporting crimes. The criminal statute of limitations is six years. Plus, the statute of limitations never expires on civil tax fraud. 5. FBAR Penalties can be worse: The penalty for failing to file an FBAR is $10,000 for each non-willful failure to timely file. If willful, the penalty is the greater of $100,000 or 50 percent of the highest amount in the account for each viola-

tion. Each year you didn’t file is a separate violation. 6. You can go to Jail: Tax crimes can carry a prison term of up to five years and a fine of up to $250,000. Filing a false return can mean up to three years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000. Failing to file a tax return can mean a one year prison term and a fine of up to $100,000. Failing

At IBERIABANK, you will experience a personal relationship with a trusted partner who fully supports you in building, maintaining, and protecting your personal and professional financial well-being. Nelcy Vicente is Senior Vice President and Director of Private Wealth at IBERIABANK’s Downtown office. With over 30 years of experience in the financial services industry, she is responsible for providing personalized Private Banking services to business owners, entrepreneurs, and professionals. She may be

to file FBARs can also be criminal with monetary penalties up to $500,000 and prison for up to ten years. 7. Voluntary Disclosure is still an option: If you admit your failures to the IRS and say you want to make it right, and make a “voluntary disclosure,” you will pay back taxes and penalties but most likely not be prosecuted. 8. Quiet Disclosures can be risky: A “quiet” disclosure is a correction of past tax returns and FBARs without entering an IRS partial amnesty program. IRS warns against it. 9. Going forward compliance is risky: Can you start filing complete tax returns and FBARs

contacted at 305-376-2437 or nelcy.vicente@iberiabank.com. IBERIABANK is a United States-based bank that is approximately $28 billion in assets as of 7.31.17. The name ‘IBERIABANK’ is derived from the city in which it was founded in 1887 – New Iberia, Louisiana. Company stock is traded under the symbol IBKC. For more information about IBERIABANK, please visit www.iberiabank.com.

prospectively without fixing the past? Maybe, but the risk is that your past non-compliance will be noticed and then it may be too late to make a voluntary disclosure. 10. Disclosure is key: You can have money and investments anywhere in the world as long as you timely disclose your foreign accounts and financial assets. When in doubt, timely disclose. Don’t be a victim of your own making. Consult with your tax specialist. Foodman CPAs and Advisors, 1201 Brickell Avenue, Suite 610, Miami, FL 33131, (305) 365-1111, www.foodmanpa.com, info@foodmanpa.com.

www.sflegalguide.com


4

MONDAY OCTOBER, 16, 2017

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY SANES MEDIA INC. FOR THE MIAMI HERALD

JOHN LEIGHTON A CRUSADER FOR SAFETY John Leighton believes that trial attorneys play a vital role in today’s society. In addition to helping victims of negligence achieve a financial recovery, they also send a message to corporate America that unsafe products, services and practices will not be tolerated. “I am a crusader for safety,” said Leighton, who is the founding partner of Leighton Law, P.A., with offices in Miami and Orlando. “Only after losing expensive verdicts or settlements have companies invested in life-saving safety enhancements like automobile seat belts and air bags or surveillance videos and lighting at ATMs. But no one should have to lose their life or suffer a serious injury because a manufacturer, resort, bank, apartment owner, nursing home, or hospital was cutting corners in trying to minimize costs.” A board certified civil trial lawyer who focuses on representing catastrophically injured victims of negligence, crime and medical mistakes, Leighton has more than 32 years of experience in litigating and trying cases throughout Florida and other states. “As a plaintiff’s attorney, I want to see that the work I’m doing is making a difference for individuals, families and our society as well,” said Leighton.

www.sflegalguide.com

HANDLING FAR-REACHING CASES During his long career as a personal injury attorney, Leighton has handled many cases with wide-reaching social implications. In fact, several cases have resulted in policy or procedure changes by businesses or governmental entities. One example is premises security. When Leighton began litigating these cases three decades ago, shopping centers, hotels, offices and apartment complexes often didn’t hire security guards for fear of “scaring people away,” he said. “Since then, it has become safer to go shopping, stay at a hotel, enter an office building or go home to your apartment because of civil tort litigation. We have seen crime levels decrease and risky places become safer locations –a lasting benefit from personal injury litigation.” Leighton said negligence cases can also change state and federal laws, such as the passage of the state’s ban on texting while driving. The deaths of 14 elderly residents of a Hollywood nursing home following Hurricane Irma in September should push the state Legislature to require nursing homes and ALFs to install generators and require air conditioning, he added. Leighton is at the forefront of this tragedy, representing several families of the Hollywood Hills nursing home disaster. Once again,

like many of his cases, it proves that a lack of governmental regulation combined with a profit motive leads to tragedy, he said, adding, “The minute they transfer an elderly resident they stop receiving funds for that bed.” Leighton encourages South Florida residents and visitors to make safety a priority when choosing a hotel, renting an apartment, going to a club, or selecting a doctor or hospital for treatment. “As incredible as it sounds, medical mistakes are the third leading cause of death in America, almost ten times as many as those killed in car crashes,” he said. “You need to do your research and ask plenty of questions before making a decision.”

A STRONG SENSE OF ADVOCACY Leighton grew up in Hollywood. As a teen, Leighton became editor of his high school newspaper and wrote articles for the Miami Herald. He also led his high school debate team to a state championship. But rather than go into journalism, he focused on law, earning his bachelor’s and law degrees at the University of Florida. Early in his career, Leighton took up the challenge of an “unwinnable” negligent security case involving a good Samaritan who was shot in the chest after chasing down a thief who snatched a purse from

a woman in the parking lot of an Aventura shopping center. In the 1991 case, Leighton argued that if it was reasonably foreseeable for a crime like purse snatching to occur, the shopping center owed a duty of care to the rescuer. The jury agreed and awarded his client $1.5 million. As Leighton said, “He was a true hero, a man took a bullet for someone else.” He followed that recovery with two record-setting $24 million verdicts in medical malpractice and wrongful death cases, the latter of which was recognized by the Daily Business Review “Verdicts Hall of Fame.” Other corporate negligence has been the key factor in many of Leighton’s high-profile courtroom battles. In 2007, for instance, Leighton represented the family of two teenage sisters from Ocala who were parasailing off Pompano Beach when the rope snapped in high winds, throwing them into a hotel roof. Amber May White was killed and Crystal White suffered serious head injuries. “There were warnings about thunderstorms and all other businesses on the beach had closed up,” Leighton said. “But the profit motive prevailed: the parasailing operator wanted to make a little more money, with tragic results.” Drawing on his on-thescene observations and

extensive legal research, Leighton was successful in showing that the parasail operator was acting as an apparent agent of the beachfront resort hotel. After the case was settled, Leighton fought for a law to prevent future parasailing deaths. Seven years after the tragedy, the Florida Legislature finally passed parasail regulations with the “Amber May Law” in 2014, the first of its kind in the country.

A NATIONAL AUTHORITY A nationally recognized authority on inadequate security litigation and other issues, Leighton is often asked to comment for the media, including NBC’s Today show, CNN, Inside Edition, and other news programs. Several years ago, he began hosting legal education seminars on Resort Torts, a term he coined that includes cruise ship, hotel, amusement park, maritime, and violent crime/negligent premises security cases. This

October will see an update to Leighton’s two-volume treatise, “Litigating Premises Security Cases” (Thomson-West, 2006), a comprehensive text on evaluating, preparing and trying premises security cases. Professionally, Leighton serves as chair of the American Association for Justice’s Inadequate Security Litigation Group, and is chairman of The Academy of Trial Advocacy, a national invitation-only association of the nation’s leading catastrophic injury trial lawyers. He sits on the board of advisors of the National Crime Victim Bar Association, which honored him with its 2007 “Advocate of Justice” award for his work on behalf of crime victims. Reflecting on his career, Leighton said, “Our clients have experienced terrible things due to someone’s negligence. I feel very grateful to have an opportunity to provide them with the economic security that can change their lives for the better.”


AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY SANES MEDIA INC. FOR THE MIAMI HERALD

MONDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2017

5

Best Practices for Reducing Cybersecurity Risks With millions of cyber attacks occurring every day, South Florida businesses need to pay close attention to their security practices. Otherwise, they risk a data breach that could lead to the theft of confidential data, a ransomware “lockup” of their networks, regulatory penalties or exposure to lawsuits. “This is a problem that will be with us for a long time and you should understand the best practices to minimize those risks,” said Rodolfo Pittaluga, Jr., adjunct professor at FIU School of Law. He moderated a panel discussion on “Managing Security Risks in the Americas” at a September 29 seminar for corporate counsel hosted by the Morgan Lewis law firm with the University of Miami School of Law and the Juncadella Corporate Counsel Group. More than 250 corporate counsel from multinational companies in the Americas attended the session. “Cyber crime is not going away and businesses can’t rely on law enforcement to prevent attacks,” said Thomas Mellor, partner, Morgan Lewis. “If you are hacked, you can’t call 911.” Instead, businesses should try to educate employees and build a focus on security into the culture, Mellor said, adding that everyone in an organization has a role to play in cybersecurity. “What we see is a consistent approach to poke

FROM LEFT, RICHARD NOLAN, RODOLFO PITTALUGA, JR. , THOMAS MELLOR, JOSE GONZALEZ AND ALVARO QUESADA LORIA through an organization’s least protected area,” said Jose Gonzalez, CEO and co-founder, Trapezoid, Inc. “An intruder will try to gain credentials to penetrate your network and gain privileges that allow them to do whatever they want. So, from a company perspective, you have to look everywhere.”

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR REDUCING RISKS Here are 15 recommen-

dations for reducing cybersecurity risks from panel participants, as well as other legal and accounting professionals interviewed by South Florida Legal Guide. • Undertake a data inventory. “You need to know the nature and scope of your sensitive information and where it is stored,” said attorney Alfred Saikali, chair of the Data Security and Privacy Practice at Shook, Hardy & Bacon in

Miami. “If there is a cyber attack, you will be better able to tell whether your sensitive information has been affected.” • Stress-test your network security. “Conduct an assessment and test your security tools in advance,” said Angela Polania, CPA, a principal at Elevate LLC certified in risk and information systems control. “This will help you address potential vulnerabilities and provide you with a

third-party report you can show to your clients if they are concerned about their data.” • Keep your systems and applications up to date. “Make sure your IT department is installing the latest security patches,” said Polania. “If you are developing your own software, be sure you use secure coding practices to avoid any hacking of your programs.” • Know your vendors.

If your organization shares information with outside vendors or provides theme with access to your network, take time to understand their security practices, Saikali said. If there is a vulnerability a hacker could exploit, your data could be compromised, even if you have strong internal controls in place. • Stay alert for internal problems. An employee

• CONTINUES ON PAGE 6 www.sflegalguide.com


6

MONDAY OCTOBER, 16, 2017

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY SANES MEDIA INC. FOR THE MIAMI HERALD

• CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5 with a grudge, a manager seeking to embezzle funds or a supervisor who visits an illicit website and brings malware back to the network are among the potential problems. “You can have top of the line protection, but be vulnerable to the basic human errors,” said Alvaro Quesada Loria, general counsel, Florida Ice and Farm Co. “That’s what keeps us awake at night.” • Prepare for a ransomware attack. “Decide in advance if you will pay or not pay an attacker, said Richard Nolan, managing director, global cyber investigations, Citigroup. “Remember that paying money to an unknown entity can also expose you to regulatory and compliance risks, such as money laundering .” • Have a secure backup in place. In the event of a serious malware or ransomware problem, having a backup that is separate from your network lets you restore your system without paying a ransom, added Nolan. • Consider a cloudbased services provider. Many businesses don’t have the resources to invest in cybersecurity or prefer an outsourced approach. “If you don’t have the latest and greatest security tools at your company, a cloudbased provider is likely to have a stronger collective security infrastructure,” Saikali said. • Create an incidence response team. The team should include technology, legal, human resource, and

www.sflegalguide.com

ANGELA POLANIA marketing professionals, as well as a senior executive. “You may also include external people, such as an information security firm, outside

counsel and a cyber insurance provider,” Saikali said. • Engage outside security, accounting and legal professionals in advance.

ALFRED SAIKALI “Should an incident occur, you want to have go-to people in place,” Saikali said. “Otherwise, you won’t have the time to

review their suitability for the task or negotiate a contract for their services.” • Consider purchasing cyber insurance. The nature

Be Sure to Follow Data Privacy Regulations South Florida businesses that collect personal information about their customers and employees should be aware of applicable data privacy regulations, according to panelists at the Morgan Lewis corporate counsel seminar. “Today, there is no federal standard for data privacy,” said Aaron Mendelsohn, chief data privacy officer, Ingram Micro. “Instead, there is a patchwork of state laws that generally focus on protecting consumers against identity theft and financial fraud.” However, the situation is different in Europe and Latin America, where many countries

have enacted laws and regulations designed to safeguard employee and customer data. For instance, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in Europe imposes fines of up to 10 million euros or 2 percent of a company’s worldwide annual turnover for failing to comply with its provisions. “One best practice is to provide your employees with a privacy notice that defines the information you collect and how it will be used,” said Humberto Padilla Gonzalez, international partner, Morgan Lewis. “Having that in place can help you avoid fines for violating a nation’s disclosure rules.”

of your data, the extent of your operations and the risk of a breach are all factors to consider before purchasing insurance. “Some providers offer security updates and incidence readiness tools that can also help you prepare,” added Saikali. • Ensure that your legal team guides your response. While IT experts need to be part of a response team, they may not understand the legal, compliance and customer aspects of a problem, said Nolan. “Legal needs to be part of the incidence response team to develop the playbook and the scripts that teams will follow.” • Understand your disclosure requirements. If you discover a data breach, you need to know your obligations to notify employees, customers and regulatory agencies, Nolan said. The situation can be complex for a multinational company, as those regulations differ from country to country. • Be as transparent as possible in public communications. A poor public relations response could ultimately be more damaging than a data breach, Nolan said. “You should lay out what you know and what you don’t know at the time, and let the facts come out as the situation develops,” he said. • Train, train and retrain. Just as hackers are constantly trying new attack strategies, organizations need to educate and remind employees to be vigilant. “Humans are the weakest link in cybersecurity,” Polania said. “Make sure they understand what to do – and what not to do – when online.”


AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY SANES MEDIA INC. FOR THE MIAMI HERALD

MONDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2017

ANDREW ELLENBERG

MICHAEL S. KRIDEL

ANDREW NEEDLE

MEDICAL MALPRACTICE, PERSONAL INJURY

LITIGATION AND VALUATION SERVICES, FORENSIC ACCOUNTING

MEDICAL MALPRACTICE, PERSONAL INJURY

NEEDLE & ELLENBERG, P.A. 1401 BRICKELL AVE., SUITE 900 MIAMI, FL 33131 305-530-0000 AELLENBERG@NEEDLEELLENBERG.COM WWW.NEEDLEENBERG.COM

Andrew Ellenberg represents individuals and families who have suffered catastrophic loss as a result of medical negligence, defective products, auto and aviation accidents, and the abuse or neglect of vulnerable adults and the elderly. Mr. Ellenberg is AV-rated by Martindale-Hubbell, the highest rating for legal ability and ethics. He has been selected for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America©, from 2009–2018, has been selected by Florida Trend magazine as one of Florida’s Legal Elite and Florida Super Lawyers, all for his representation of plaintiffs in personal injury and medical malpractice cases. Mr. Ellenberg, has been named a South Florida Business Leader “Power Player”, is rated “10-Superb” for medical malpractice by Avvo, has been included in every edition of the South Florida Legal Guide “Top Lawyers” list and also named in Florida Monthly’s “Best Legal Eagles,”.

NEEDLE & ELLENBERG, P.A. REHMANN ROBSON 7805 NW BEACON SQUARE BLVD., SUITE 201 BOCA RATON, FL 33487 561-912-2300 MICHAEL.KRIDEL@REHMANN.COM WWW.REHMANN.COM

Michael Kridel is a Principal in the Boca Raton office of Rehmann Robson, a professional services firm with 21 offices, four of which are in Florida. He is the litigation services practice leader and has practiced public accounting in South Florida since 1974. Mr. Kridel was one of the first CPAs to achieve both the Certified in Financial Forensics (CFF) and Certified Information Technology Professional (CITP) designations offered by the AICPA. He provides litigation and expert testimony services in a broad range of matters including family law, business interruption/disaster associated damages, financial damages, fraud investigations, tax matters and accountant malpractice defense. Additionally, he is an award-winning lecturer for numerous professional organizations and universities.

1401 BRICKELL AVE., SUITE 900 MIAMI, FL 33131 305-530-0000 ANEEDLE@NEEDLEELLENBERG.COM WWW.NEEDLEENBERG.COM

Florida Bar Board certified in civil trial law, following graduation from Cornell and the University of Miami, Andrew Needle began practicing with one of the premier injury and malpractice firms in Florida. Distinguished both in and out of the courtroom as a lawyer, author, and lecturer, Needle is the author of “Post-Trial Motions” Florida Civil Trial Practice, Chapter 18, Eleventh Edition, as well as Representing Plaintiffs in Medical Malpractice Cases “Current Challenges in Handling Medical Malpractice Actions: Statutory Protections, Expenses, and Societal Misconceptions”, 2012. Named one of South Florida’s Top Lawyers in medical malpractice by the South Florida Legal Guide since its inception, and selected as a “Heavy Hitter” in healthcare law by the South Florida Business Journal in 2006, Needle has been included in Best Lawyers in America®, since 2007 in Medical Malpractice and Personal Injury.

PABLO S. QUESADA

ROLAND SANCHEZ-MEDINA, JR.

ROBERT THORNBURG

CORPORATE AND BUSINESS, SECURITIES

CORPORATE AND BUSINESS, SECURITIES

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

SMGQ LAW

SMGQ LAW

ALLEN, DYER, DOPPELT + GILCHRIST, P.A.

201 ALHAMBRA CIRCLE, SUITE 1205 CORAL GABLES, FL 33134 305-377-1000 PQUESADA@SMGQLAW.COM WWW.SMGQLAW.COM

201 ALHAMBRA CIRCLE, SUITE 1205 CORAL GABLES, FL 33134 305-377-1000 ROLAND@SMGQLAW.COM WWW.SMGQLAW.COM

1221 BRICKELL AVE., SUITE 2400 MIAMI, FL 33131 305-374-8303 RTHORNBURG@ALLENDYER.COM WWW.ALLENDYER.COM

Pablo S. Quesada, a founding partner of SMGQ Law, is a corporate, securities and real estate attorney, handling both domestic and international transactions, and also assisting with corporate and stockholder disputes. Quesada has represented Fortune 500 companies, as well as privately held businesses, entrepreneurs and high-net worth individuals. He has a broad range of experience in negotiating contracts, including, stock purchase agreements, stockholder and operating agreements, manufacturing, distribution and licensing agreements, real estate purchase contracts and leases, and employment agreements, among others. Quesada has achieved an AV® Preeminent™ Rating by Martindale-Hubbell, and has been recognized in by his peers for his ability and professionalism in various publications, including the South Florida Legal Guide’s “Top Lawyers.” Prior to forming SMGQ Law, Quesada served as regional counsel for VISA’s Latin America and Caribbean Region.

7

Roland Sanchez-Medina, Jr. is a founding partner of SMGQ who concentrates his practice in the areas of corporate law, mergers and acquisitions, securities law, divestitures, joint ventures, finance, board governance, real estate transactions, including real estate financing, tax planning and structure, and international tax planning for inbound transactions. Sanchez-Medina has achieved an AV rating from Martindale Hubbell, which is the highest rating possible regarding legal ability and professional ethics, and has been recognized in various publications by his peers as a top lawyer, including the South Florida Legal Guide, Florida Trend’s Legal Elite and SuperLawyers. He is a frequent speaker and panel member at programs and seminars on corporate, tax and real estate matters. Sanchez-Medina also serves on the Orange Bowl Committee and on the Board of Governors of The Florida Bar.

Robert Thornburg is a registered patent attorney and intellectual property litigation specialist with extensive experience in copyright, trademark, trade secret and technology-focused litigation, patent and trademark prosecution, and domain name disputes. Mr. Thornburg serves as President of the University of Florida Law Alumni Council, on the Association of Intellectual Property Firms’ Board of Directors, as well as the Copyright Society of the USA Executive Committee. Robert has been listed in Florida Super Lawyers since 2010, designated in Best Lawyers in America since 2013, and recognized as a Rising Star in the Daily Business Review’s 40 Under 40 in 2013. Mr. Thornburg is an active lecturer on IP topics and serves as a technology law expert for Miami television and radio.

www.sflegalguide.com


8

MONDAY OCTOBER, 16, 2017

AN INDEPENDENT SUPPLEMENT BY SANES MEDIA INC. FOR THE MIAMI HERALD

AMIkids Miami-Dade Turns Troubled Lives Around Angel Terrero was raised in an abusive home and spent his teen years with gangs and criminal activities. Today, he is studying psychology in graduate school and serving as a minister at his church, thanks to the life-changing support he received from AMIkids Miami-Dade. “At AMIkids, I learned many lessons, including the value of discipline and respect,” he said. “Today, I believe you can achieve anything if you are willing to work for it.” Since 1974, AMIkids Miami-Dade has been helping troubled kids like Angel discover their potential, transform their lives and embark on rewarding careers. “Before entering our program, many of our students never had anyone invest in their academic, social, or professional success,” said Corey Lee, board president. AMIkids shows young people that they can be successful and become outstanding citizens.” AMIkids Miami-Dade provides services to over 300 youth in Miami-Dade County on its north and south campuses, using an evidence-based personal growth model to address their educational, behavior, and treatment needs. Students from age 13 to 18 take classes, participate in vocational training and

www.sflegalguide.com

FROM LEFT, TERRANCE LEVELL, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, AMIKIDS MIAMI-DADE SOUTH; ENRIQUE GARCIA, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, AMIKIDS MIAMI-DADE NORTH; AND MIAMI-DADE BOARD MEMBERS LYNDALL LAMBERT; LAISE LOWACHEE; AND COREY LEE. engage in meaningful community activities. They spend an average of three to six months in the program. “We serve as ambassadors and advocates for at-risk youth, said Enrique Garcia, executive director of the North Campus. “We strive to give them the tools they need to be successful and to keep them in school, help them achieve employment, and so that they have a chance at a better life.” Terrance Levell, executive director of the South Campus, added, “What makes our program successful is the bonds

The AMIkids Miami-Dade Masquerade Party Fundraiser will be held October 21 from 6 to 10 p.m. at the Marenas Beach Resort, 18683 Collins Avenue, Sunny Isles Beach. Visit www.amikids miamidade.org for more information.

that our staff build with the youth, which encourages them to transform their anti-social behaviors. In fact, the vast majority of participants remain crime free after they graduate from our program.” Another factor in AMIkids Miami-Dade’s success rate is its focus on providing students with employment opportunities. “Our students engage in scuba diving, seamanship instruction, kayaking, and other adventures,” said Lyndall Lambert, board chair. “We teach and certify our kids in safe food handling practices so they can be employed part-time in restaurants while they attend school. We also teach our interested students safe carpentry and construction skills, which also helps with future employment.” To support its program, AMIkids Miami-Dade welcomes professionals, business leaders, and other volunteers to provide guidance, assist with fundraising, and serve as mentors. “Community outreach is very important for our students, said Laise Lowachee, board secretary. “Bonding with successful adults in a mentoring relationship helps our youth understand what they need to do to achieve their full potential.”

SFLG MHBM October 16 2017  

South Florida Legal Guide - Business Monday October 2017 Edition.