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Learning objectives refer to a set of statements identifying the results you want to achieve during your internship. Ask yourself, “What do I want to be able to do at the end of the internship that I cannot do now?” or “What do I want to know at the end of the internship that I don’t know now?” Objectives should be specific, reasonable, achievable and measurable. Each learning objective should be stated in measurable terms and describe an accomplishment, skill, knowledge or behavior that will be an outcome of successful participation in this structured work experience. In short, each learning objective should answer the following questions:  What is the task to be completed?  How will the objective be accomplished?  What skills and abilities are to be demonstrated?  How will the objective be measure and evaluated?  When will the objective be completed? Your learning objectives should be specific rather than vague in order to give your site supervisor and faculty advisor an understanding of your needs or direction. For example:  Vague: I am interested in counseling troubled teenagers.  Specific: I plan to research teenage alcoholism and identify five factors that contribute to the problem.

Types of Learning Objectives There are four types of learning objectives applicable to internship:  Career-Oriented Objectives: These relate to your career growth goals and can include career exploration through informational interviewing, observation and special topic research.  Skills Acquisition Objectives: These relate to developing new on-the-job skills or learning new tasks.  Skills Application / Development Objectives: These relate to improving or developing your current skills, including aspects of the job that can be improved or specific problems in the work area to be solved.  Human Relations Objectives: These relate to improving communication and interpersonal skills, possibly with supervisors, fellow workers, customers, etc. or by improving communication skills through public speaking, one-to-one dialogue or listening to others.

How to Write a Learning Objective Step One Decide what you will attempt to accomplish. Use action words which will communicate what you intend to do; examples of action words and ideas are “analyze data”, “assume responsibility for”, “compile statistical data”, etc. Use the attached list of Bloom’s Taxonomy Verbs to find the verb that most effectively describes what you hope to be learning. Step Two Decide how you will accomplish it. Explain how you plan to do what you said you would do. Examples are:  Observe the task being performed by others  Research / Ask questions related to work or task  Consult or interview outside specialists  Maintain a daily journal of activities Step Three Decide how the results can be measured. Explain how your learning will be demonstrated and evaluated. Examples of action words and ideas are listed below:  Performance will be observed and evaluated by my supervisor.  I will produce a final product (report, journal, notebook, etc.) for evaluation.  My supervisor will evaluate my knowledge through questioning.

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Learning Objectives Plan With the assistance of the faculty advisor, the intern should establish several learning objectives for the internship. After completion, a copy of the learning objectives should be maintained by the intern and faculty advisor, as well as given to the site supervisor for training and activity development. The Evaluation Method can include items such as a journal, presentation, project, reading, paper, class discussion, online threaded discussion, etc. At the end of the semester, the faculty advisor and the site supervisor should utilize the following scale to rate the degree of success the intern had in achieving each objective: 1: Failed to meet minimum requirements 2: Limited accomplishment 3: Average or expected accomplishment 4: Exceeds average performance 5: Unique or outstanding performance Learning Objective 1:

Evaluation Method(s): Faculty Advisor Rating:

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Evaluation Method(s): Faculty Advisor Rating: Learning Objective 3:

Evaluation Method(s): Faculty Advisor Rating: Learning Objective 4:

Evaluation Method(s): Faculty Advisor Rating: Learning Objective 5:

Evaluation Method(s): Faculty Advisor Rating:

Rusk Building, 3rd Floor  936.468.3305  careerservices@sfasu.edu  www.sfasu.edu/careerservices


Bloom’s Taxonomy Action Verbs Blooms Taxonomy (1956) is a classification system of educational objectives based on the level of student understanding necessary for achievement or mastery. Educational researcher Benjamin Bloom and colleagues have suggested six different cognitive stages in learning. Blooms cognitive domains are, in order, with definitions and verbs: Bloom’s Definition

Knowledge

Remember previously learned information.

Comprehension

Demonstrate an understanding of the facts.

Application

Apply knowledge to actual situations.

Analysis

Break down objects or ideas into simpler parts and find evidence to support generalizations.

Synthesis

Evaluation

Compile component ideas into a new whole or propose alternative solutions.

Make and defend judgments based on internal evidence or external criteria.

Arrange Define Describe Duplicate Identify Label List Classify Convert Defend Describe Discuss Distinguish Estimate Explain Apply Change Choose Compute Demonstrate Discover Dramatize Employ Analyze Appraise Breakdown Categorize Compare Contrast Criticize Diagram Differentiate Arrange Assemble Categorize Collect Combine Comply Compose Construct Create Appraise Argue Assess Attach Choose Compare Conclude Contrast

Verbs Match Memorize Name Order Outline Recognize

Relate Recall Repeat Reproduce Select State

Express Extend Generalized Give examples(s) Identify Indicate Infer Locate Illustrate Interpret Manipulate Modify Operate Practice Predict Prepare Discriminate Distinguish Examine Experiment Identify Illustrate Infer Model

Paraphrase Predict Recognize Rewrite Review Select Summarize Translate Produce Relate Schedule Show Sketch Solve Use Write Outline Point out Question Relate Select Separate Subdivide Test

Design Develop Devise Explain Formulate Generate Plan Prepare Rearrange

Reconstruct Relate Reorganize Revise Rewrite Set up Summarize Synthesize Tell Write Interpret Relate Predict Rate Select Summarize Support Value

Defend Describe Discriminate Estimate Evaluate Explain Judge Justify

Rusk Building, 3rd Floor  936.468.3305  careerservices@sfasu.edu  www.sfasu.edu/careerservices


Learning Objectives