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July 10 - 16, 2013 / SFBG.com



INTELLIGENCE POLITICAL ALERTS

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WEDNESDAY 10

There was an quasi-impromptu jazz concert atop Bernal Heights last week, when a mysterious piano appeared to have been dragged up on the hill. As reported by Mission Mission blog, the organizers of the concert invited people online, only to discover that the original piano had been removed hours before the show. They procured a backup, brought it to the top of the Heights, and performed a delightful piano recital for more than 200 people. YouTube it: “The Great Bernal Heights Renegade Piano Recital.”

READ OUR (FORMER) STAFF!

SHARE ON WHEELS Bike-sharing in SF just got a bit more real: the local Bay Area Bike Share program, set to launch in August with 350 bikes, just spiffed up its online presence (www.bayareabikeshare.com) and announced membership prices (starting at nine dollars for 24 hours) — memberships themselves go on sale starting July 15. Get ready to roll, temporaneously.

THE SHOW DID GO ON It wouldn’t be the Fourth of July in San Francisco without the venerable San Francisco Mime Troupe debuting its latest subversive political musical in Dolores Park. And it almost wasn’t, due to lost grant money and other funding shortfalls this year. But “Oil & Water” did go on, albeit with a stripped down cast of four actors that were constantly stripping down themselves, to execute rapidfire costume changes throughout the show. And it was a marvelous performance in the end, spotlighting Chevron’s corporate greed and our surreal political system. Head writer Pat Moran told us the take from the hat-passing at show’s end “seems like it was pretty good,” but the show and troupe still need our community’s support. Check out its schedule at www.sfmt.org and give generously.

4 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

THAT VOODOO THAT BREW DO ... Popular local nanobrewery Triple Voodoo announced this week that it’s officially in the process of securing its own brick-and-mortar brewery and taproom in SF. Triple tweeted that it will be open before the end of 2013, adding to the growing local craftbrew landscape, including spots like Cervecería de MateVeza and soon, Magnolia’s Dogpatch brewery. Involved with the San Francisco Homebrewer’s Guild, Triple Voodoo Brewing was established in 2011, and quickly became known for a mix of Belgian and California styles and brews such as Inception Belgian Style Ale and Grand Cru. www.triplevoodoobrewing.com. EDITORIALS

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Two esteemed Guardian alumni have books out right now, and coincidentally their time here happened to overlap during the late 1990s and early 2000s. The first dot-com boom, basically. Gabriel Roth was a reporter, then the city editor (he also wrote a food column for awhile), and now he’s written a novel: The Unknowns, which came out July 2 on Reagan Arthur Books. Though Roth lives in New York City these days, he’ll be at Litquake’s July 18 Epicenter event (7pm, $5-10 suggested donation, Hotel Rex, 562 Sutter, SF; www.litquake.org) discussing the book (described as being about “the sentimental education of a nerd”) with National Novel Writing Month founder Chris Baty. Also on shelves is former Guardian culture editor and columnist (now, catch her posts on io9.com) Annalee Newitz’s Scatter, Adapt, and Remember: How Humans Will Survive a Mass Extinction, which came out on Doubleday in May. It’s a fascinating read, and just look at that title: this book might save your life!

AMERICA’S FLOP A race needs more than one contender — right? Sunday was a lessthan-spectacular opening to the 34th America’s Cup as Emirates Team New Zealand’s boat sailed alone in front of a disappointed, confused, and very small crowd, including many refugees from cancelled SFO flights, trying to make the best of two bad situations. The 11-Kiwi crew caught air mere seconds after crossing the start line and still managed to draw gasps and cheers as they dutifully rounded the marks to “win” the first point for the Louis Vuitton Cup. (The winner of the LVC takes on Oracle, who lurk in the wings until then.) The other two races scheduled this week will also be one boat shows as Luna Rossa is boycotting until an international jury hears protests about the new safety recommendations (happening Monday, with a decision due Wednesday) and Artemis, still recovering from the death of Andrew Simpson, want two more weeks to get their rig on straight. Time trials planned for July 5 were also cancelled due to wind. The way things are going, there will be more happening off the water than on, but if ETNZ keep playing the role of good sports they’ll fast become fan favorites — they already got the rowdiest welcome during the opening ceremonies and no doubt earned a few more fans this weekend for at least showing up. THE SELECTOR

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LABORFEST: CCSF’S ACCREDITATION CRISIS City College of San Francisco, Mission Campus, 1125 Valencia, SF. www. saveccsf.org. 6-8pm, free. City College serves about 85,000 students and faces threat of closure in July 2014 if its appeals to the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges, which has threatened to revoke the school’s accreditation in a year, aren’t successful. At this forum, Marty Hittelman, former president of the California Federal of Teachers, will speak on accreditation and the ACCJC. Sponsored by Save CCSF Coalition and AFT 2121.

THURSDAY 11 LABORFEST PANEL: THE PRESS AND THE POWERFUL First Unitarian Universalist Church, 1187 Franklin, SF. www.laborfest. net. 7-9pm, free. Gray Brechin, author of Imperial San Francisco, will join Westside Observer publisher George Wooding, former Berkeley Daily Planet reporter Richard Brenneman, and former Guardian reporter Savannah Blackwell for a panel talk on the erosion of investigative journalism in the face of commercialization and monopolization of the media.

SUNDAY 14

PANEL: THE CONTINUING BATTLE FOR FREE EXPRESSION Contemporary Jewish Museum, 736 Mission, SF. www.ginsbergfestival. com. 3-5pm, $12. Allen Ginsberg’s seminal poem, Howl, represented a landmark in the history of freedom of speech, obscenity issues, and the censorship of literary works. This panel talk, led by Peter Maravelis of City Lights Booksellers with panelists Rebecca Farmer of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), Mark Rumold of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), and James Wheaton of the First Amendment Project, will focus on the continuing fight against censorship today. Presented in conjunction with the Allen Ginsberg Festival and the exhibition “Beat Memories: The Photographs of Allen Ginsberg,” at the Contemporary Jewish Museum.

TUESDAY 16 GREEN RENTERS EXPO Ecology Center, 2530 San Pablo Ave, Berk. Ecologycenter.org. 7-9pm, free. Who says you have to own a home to live a green and energy efficient lifestyle? The Bay Area offers a myriad of resources for renters who wish to green their living spaces with efficiency upgrades, which can also help save money. Representatives from Rising Sun Energy Center, Community Energy Services Corps, the City of Berkeley Recycling Program, Stopwaste.org, the Ecology Center and others will be on hand to offer presentations, tips and advice, and to answer questions.

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July 10 - 16, 2013 / SFBG.com



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City College will appeal By John rizzo OPINION City College will appeal last week’s decision by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC) to revoke City College’s accreditation. The reason for the appeal is simple: Most of what ACCJC asked for has been accomplished, and the rest is well on its way towards completion within a year. First, the San Francisco City College district is financially secure. This is not a district that is close to fiscal collapse. This year’s audit was “clean,� and the budget is balanced, thanks to multiple cost-saving reorganizations, large spending cuts, reforms in practices, and the passage of Propositions A and 30. City College also has a healthy reserve fund well above that of state requirements. City College is even squirreling away money for a special “Ninth year� fund in the event that voters don’t reapprove Prop A when it expires 8 years from now. The City College budget also increases spending in areas that ACCJC wanted: there is nearly $3

million per year for new technology and building maintenance, both long deferred through the years of radical state funding cuts. City College is also paying money towards the unpaid liability in retiree health benefits. The City of San Francisco also has this kind of liability — to the tune of $4.4 billion — but has so far not come up with a plan to deal with it. City College, on the other hand, has a plan and the funds to enact it. City College has also cut costs by millions of dollars. There have been layoffs and furloughs, and salary cuts. For instance, faculty members are earning 5 percent less than they did in 2007. Department chairs are earning less, and the Board of Trustees just cut administrators salaries. Streamlined operations have resulted in other savings. Governance is another area where City College has made major changes. There have been five major management overhauls to streamline bureaucracy, increase efficiency and speed the carrying out of decisions. And many administrators have been replaced. Any one of these overhauls could ordinarily have taken a year

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City College neither ignored nor fought the reCommendations.

each to implement. There were all done in a matter of months. For instance, the job description of every dean’s position was completely rewritten; some posts disappeared, and new ones were created. Every dean had to reapply for a job, and many did not return. The same is true for other management positions. City College also replaced a decades-old department chair structure with a system that costs less and has simpler lines of authority. And last fall, the Board of Trustees acted to completely restructure the Participatory Governance system. This is a state-mandated system of getting

input from faculty and staff into management decisions. Over 40 committees were dissolved and replaced with a more streamlined system. The faculty and staff also worked hard in fixing problems identified by ACCJC, particularly in the areas of planning. One of the most important of these is in the collection of Student Learning Outcome data — a measure of how well students do. Faculty filed thousands of reports in order to fulfill this requirement, a truly enormous amount of work. The collected data will then be used to improve courses next year. This cycle of planning, data collection,

and improvement are the basis of ongoing reform effort that takes a year at minimum to prove that it’s working. There is a lot more work to be done in this area. It will take another year to complete — if City College is given the time. Not everyone at the college agrees with all of the changes that were made. People have the right to express their views, and indeed, we want the internal experts to speak up and give their best advice. And given the speed and monumental

scope of the changes, it is very likely that these changes have flaws and that improvements can be made. But regardless of what people think of the changes that have occurred, these are changes that ACCJC asked for. City College neither ignored nor fought ACCJC’s recommendations, as many people wish we had. City College’s response was to work to enact ACCJC’s will as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, the decision to revoke accreditation will harm City

College’s otherwise good financial position by causing a large drop in student enrollment for fall — and the loss of millions of dollars in state funding. Ironically, this will make it more difficult to finish what ACCJC wants done. The best course for students is to let City College retain accreditation while it finishes the job that ACCJC wants done. 2 John Rizzo is president of the City College Board of Trustees

More ill winds EDITORIAL After years of hype, the 34th America’s Cup finally got underway on the San Francisco Bay this past week — with a single boat formally winning in a match against itself, a fitting metaphor for this whole disappointing affair. Emirates Team New Zealand sailed solo while its Italian would-be competitor, Luna Rossa, stayed ashore to protest a rule change on rudder design that had been unilaterally decided by regatta director Iain Murray. The third competitor with Larry Ellison’s Oracle Racing team that is defending the cup and hosting the event, Swedish team Artemis, was still trying to rebuild its vessel after a tragic accident resulted in the death of a renowned sailor in May. It was a lame kickoff. The anticipated hordes of racegoers have yet to materialize, with the once-regal America’s Cup reduced to just another Fisherman’s Wharf tourist trap. In a display that might as well have been used to entice tourists to the Wax Museum, a barker outside the event’s sprawling Pier 27 spectator area fruitlessly tried to lure passersby: “See the fastest boats in the world!” In an interview with ABC7 news, Oracle Racing CEO Russell Coutts declared the Italians to be “acting like a bunch of spoiled babies,” adding that if they didn’t want to race, they should just leave. You could practically hear the event’s corporate sponsors burying their faces in the palms of their hands. It wasn’t supposed to be this way. In 2010, when software editorials

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tycoon Larry Ellison of the Oracle Racing Team hinted to city officials that he might want to stage the next Cup on the Bay, if not Italy or some other exotic destination, economists with the Bay Area Council trumpeted the economic gain that stood to be reaped if Ellison’s plan was realized. Since a dozen teams competed during the last America’s Cup, the authors of the study reasoned, at least as many could be expected to join this time around. Those initial projections — $1.4 billion in economic activity (like three Super Bowls!, the analysts enthused), thousands of new jobs, a tourism windfall — sounded so rosy in part because 15 syndicates were expected to compete. But in time, this optimism faded and the city is arguably on the hook for millions in racerelated costs. Fortunately, thenDistrict 6 Sup. Chris Daly scuttled an initial plan to cede vast swaths of city-owned waterfront property to Ellison in exchange for the expected economic gain, thus averting an even greater loss. Meanwhile, Oracle is weathering accusations that it cheated by slipping a design change into a list of safety recommendations, conveniently granting itself a competitive edge. An international jury’s decision on whether to honor the rule change was still up in the air at press time. While we at the Guardian find ourselves rooting for the Kiwis, we remind Ellison that it isn’t too late to right this ship — and cutting a check to the city to cover its losses would be a great place to start. 2

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July 10 - 16, 2013 / SFBG.com



NEWS

MAYOR ED LEE, SUPERVISOR MALIA COHEN, AND FORMER MAYOR WILLIE BROWN HELPED LENNAR BREAK GROUND ON JUNE 27. S.F. EXAMINER PHOTO BY MIKE KOOZMIN

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‘EVICTION FREE SUMMER’ HITS THE STREETS Activists from “Eviction Free Summer,” formed to defend tenants facing eviction, gathered July 2 outside landlord Rick Holman’s South Park office building in San Francisco to protest an eviction he’d initiated against a Missionbased activist collective. Organizer Fred SherburnZimmer said it was one of many peaceful protests the housing activists plan to stage against property owners this summer. “We’re taking it to the landlord’s homes and offices,” Sherburn-Zimmer said. “They can’t pretend they’re not ruining people’s lives by displacing them.” This past April, collective members from In The Works, an organization that rents space in what is often called the “17 Reasons” building, at 17th and Mission streets, received an eviction notice from Holman alleging illegal subletting. Holman is a managing partner at Asher Investment Group, and from the perspective of SherburnZimmer and other protesters, his move to evict the collective is helping to propel a trend of gentrification in the Mission. “We need this space, and if the whole neighborhood is high-end realty, then it’s not really helping the community,” Sherburn-Zimmer said. The In The Works Collective bills itself as an anti-authoritarian, anti-capitalist arts and events collective, which regularly hosts skillsharing workshops and other activism-oriented events. A collective member who introduced herself as Madeline said Holman has not been the most hospitable landlord. “When he first came to talk to us, he said we had bad posture and body language,” she recounted. 10 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

LENNAR FINALLY BREAKS GROUND AMID CONTROVERSIES More than five years after San Francisco voters approved a massive redevelopment plan for the Hunters Point Shipyard and much the southeast part of the city — giving Lennar Corp., the country’s biggest home builder, the largest tract of open land in the city — that project is now finally, slowly, getting underway. But activists who have been following the project say the city is getting played by Lennar because of an agreement that lacks performance standards and has allowed the company to drag its feet to maximize its profits despite an affordable housing crisis in the city. And some community members say Lennar hasn’t lived up to promises of jobs and other benefits. “The modus operandi of Lennar is bait and switch and delay,” Saul Bloom of Arc Ecology, who consulted on this development deal for the Redevelopment Agency before his contract was dropped in 2010 after publicly raising concerns, told us. Bloom and his firm have decades of experience analyzing complex development deals, and he has been tracking Lennar’s pattern of behavior around the country. Bloom thinks Lennar has intentionally delayed the project to pad its profits. “Their incentive is to wait for the property values to rise,” Bloom said. “Lennar understands how much this land is worth.” Bloom said that when Lennar cut its initial deals with then-Mayor Willie Brown and other local officials in 1997, the company said it

“The day after we got the three-day notice, the locks were changed.” When the Guardian reached Holman this past May seeking comment for a longer article about widespread evictions, he declined to comment on the matter but emphasized that he planned to keep the building as commercial office space rather than convert it into high-end EDITORIALS

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needed no external financing and that it would build housing affordable to Hunters Point residents, including rentals. Since then, the deal has gotten steadily better for the company and worse for San Francisco, and the groundbreaking date has been repeatedly pushed back. “The city was not smart enough to build in liquidated damage and a performance schedule and that kind of thing,” Bloom said. “Lennar tells them what they want and the city tends to roll over, and there’s been no pushback.” When Lennar ended up needing financing after all, the project stood by while a $1.7 billion deal with China Development Bank Corp. was structured in 2012. Despite Mayor Ed Lee personally participating in the quest for capital in China alongside the developer, the deal collapsed earlier this year. Just as we reported this story on SFBG.com last week, the Center for Investigative Reporting revealed a shady way that Lennar and its political partners are helping to fund the project and reap personal profits at the same time. It involves the San Francisco Bay Area Regional Center — a for-profit company that is arranging immigration visas for Chinese nationals who invest in the project — which is getting key help from Mayor Ed Lee and members of his staff. The company, which takes a $45,000 commission for every $500,000 investment it attracts, lists a key principal as none other than Willie Brown, who implausibly pleaded igno-

condos, and said his other tenants had expressed no complaints. Like many folks facing eviction from San Francisco rental properties, In The Works may be forced to find another space. Currently, Madeline says the collective is paying 72 cents a square foot for the 5,200 square foot place — and it’s highly unlikely that they’ll find a place FOOD + DRINK

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rance when confronted by CIR reporters. Lee did cop to the company’s financial role, although he told CIR, “The ones taking the risk and putting infrastructure into the ground, that’s Lennar. And they’ve been doing a really great job.” Neither Lee’s office nor Lennar officials would return our calls for comment on the situation, but they were all smiles at the officials groundbreaking ceremony on June 27. During the well-attended hilltop ceremony, Lee, Brown, District 10 Sup. Malia Cohen, and Cohen’s predecessor, Sophie Maxwell, joined Lennar Urban President Kofi Bonner to speak at the long-anticipated event, at which Lennar unveiled a master plan to convert the land to a brand new mixed-use community complex. The Hunters Point Shipyard occupies roughly 500 acres of southeastern San Francisco and when taken together with neighboring Candlestick Point and parts of Bayview, it is the largest single tract of land in San Francisco designated for redevelopment. Phase 1 of the project will consist of construction of 1,400 new residential units in the shipyard, approximately 30 percent of which will one day be affordable housing. At the ceremony, Brown remarked that “there is no other piece of soil that is as lucrative” as the Bayview Hunters Point peninsula and that it promises to be the “ideal place to live.” But those who live there now worry about displacement and say Lennar hasn’t delivered the jobs it promised. A group of picketers from Aboriginal Blackman United (ABU) at the ceremony was contained by SFPD at the bottom of the hill during the afternoon’s proceedings. As black town cars chauffeured officials to the event site, the protesters’ cries were drowned out by the music of Miles Davis playing from stage speakers. Job creation was trumpeted generally in the afternoon’s speeches, with Sup. Cohen applauding the public-private partnership between Lennar and Bayview organizations and Mayor Lee praising the project for “honoring labor and honoring local residents.” However, ABU’s founder and president, James Richards, said “We’re not getting the jobs or the contracts that the community people are supposed to get and that’s why we’re out here.” With both the jobs and affordable housing units that Lennar promised now years behind schedule, activists say city officials should be applying pressure on Lennar instead of doing pitches to investors on its behalf. “We remain skeptical about their commitment to getting it done,” Bloom said of the affordable housing that Lennar has promised. “What we’d like to see is some real action on the promises that were made to the public.” (Steven T. Jones and Parker Yesko)

in the Mission for a similar price. That’s why they welcomed support from the activists at Eviction-Free Summer. “I totally respect them helping us out,” Madeline said. “It’s important that we stick together. Our place has always been big on solidarity and community building.” Eviction Free Summer hasn’t MUSIC

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revealed what other landlords they might target, yet they plan to continue staging protests outside landlords’ homes and offices in coming months. “This is just the beginning of this direct action group,” Sherburn-Zimmer said. “We will do anything to prevent people from losing their homes and spaces.” (Erin Dage)

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activist Windsong at a City College rally photo by Joe Fitzgerald

By Joe Fitzgerald news@sfbg.com NEWS The day City College of San Francisco heard it would close was the same day, July 3, that 19-yearold Dennis Garcia signed up for his fall classes. With a manila folder tucked under his arm, he turned the corner away from the registration counter and strode by a wall festooned with black and white sketches of every City College chancellor since 1935, including a portrait of bespectacled founder Archibald Cloud. In a meeting room on the other side of that wall, the college’s current administrators were receiving the verdict from the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges. It was their worst fears of the past year realized: City College’s accreditation was being revoked. Accreditation is necessary for the college to receive state funding, for students to get federal loans, and for the degree to be worth more than the paper it’s printed on. Unbeknownst to Garcia, he walked out of the building just as the college received its death sentence, which is scheduled to be carried out next July unless appeals now underway offer a reprieve. In the interim, CCSF will essentially be a ward of the state, stripped of the local control it has enjoyed since Cloud’s days. Just a few blocks down Ocean Avenue is the nerve center of City College’s teachers union. Housed in a flat above a Laundromat, the scent of freshly washed clothes wafted up the staircase to an office that instantly became a flurry of ringing phones and rushed voices. Only an hour later, 10 or so union volunteers were calling their members, contacting nearly 1,600 City College faculty whose responses ranged from sad to furious. The volunteers read them bulleted factoids about accreditation and a call to join an upcoming protest march. But the woes of City College reach deeper than a three line script

Who killed City College? Loss of accreditation tied to federal push for austerity and a curriculum that feeds universities and the economy could ever cover, and can be traced back to the oval office itself, leading to a really odd question: Did President Obama kill City College?

Pressure from the top When the president trumpeted education in his 2012 State of the Union speech, he sounded an understandable sentiment. “States also need to do their part, by making higher education a higher priority in their budgets,” Obama told the nation. “And colleges and universities have to do their part by working to keep costs down.” But the specifics of how to cut costs were outlined by years of policymaking and a State of the Union supplement sheet given to the press. The president’s statement said that they will determine which colleges receive aid, “either by incorporating measures of value and affordability into the existing accreditation system; or by establishing a new, alternative system of accreditation that would provide pathways for higher education models and colleges to receive federal student aid based on performance and results.” The emphasis is ours, but the translation is very simple: College accreditation agencies can either enforce the administration’s numbers-based plan or be replaced. The president’s college reform is widely known and hotly debated in education circles. Commonly known as the “completion agenda,” with an emphasis on measurable outcomes in job placement, it had its start under President George W. Bush, but Obama carried the torch. The idea is that colleges divest from community-based programs not directly related to job creation or university degrees, and use a data measurement approach to

ensure two-year schools transfer and graduate students in greater numbers. “Community colleges” would quickly become “junior colleges,” accelerating a slow transition that began many years ago. But its critics say completion numbers are screwy: They discount students who are at affordable community colleges just to learn a single skill and students who switch schools, administrator Sanford Shugart of Valencia College in Florida wrote in an essay titled “Moving the Needle on College Completion Thoughtfully.” Funding decisions made from completion numbers affect millions of students nationwide — and CCSF has now become the biggest laboratory rat in this experiment in finding new ways to feed the modern economy. “I think there was a general consensus that the country is in a position that, coming out of the recession, we have diminished resources,” Paul Feist, spokesperson for the California Community College Chancellor’s Office, told us. “Completion is important to the nation — if you talk to economic forecasters, there’s a huge demand for educated workers. Completion is not a bad thing.” Like dominoes, the federal agenda and Obama’s controversial Secretary of

Education Arne Duncan tipped the Department of Education, followed by the ACCJC, and now City College — an activist school in an activist city and an institution that openly defied the new austerity regime.

Winning the battle In the ACCJC’s Summer 2006 newsletter, Brice Harris — then an accreditation commissioner, now chancellor of the state community college system — described the conflict that arose when colleges rallied against completion measurements established by the federal government. “In the current climate of increased accountability, our regional accrediting associations find that tight spot to be more like a vice,” Harris wrote. Many of the 14 demands the ACCJC made of City College trace back to the early days of Obama’s administration, when local trustees resisted slashing the curriculum during the Great Recession. “There’s a logic

to saying ‘We don’t want to put students on the street in the middle of a recession,’ ” said Karen Saginor, former City College academic senate president. “If you throw out the students, you can’t put them in the closet for two years and bring them back when you have the money.” And they have a lot of students — more than 85,000. Like all community colleges in California, the price of entry is cheap, at $46 a unit and all welcome to attend. But since 2008, the system was hammered with budget cuts of more than $809 million, or 12 percent of its budget. So programs were cut, including those for seniors, ex-inmates re-entering society, or young people enrolling to learn Photoshop or some other skill without committing to a four-year degree. “As the recession hit, the Legislature instructed the community college system [to] prioritize basic skills, career technical, and transfer,” Feist said. “That’s to a large extent what we did. That was the reshaping of the mission of that whole system.” It’s easy to cast the completion agenda as a shadowy villain in a grand dilemma, but as Feist or anyone on the federal level would note, people were already being pushed out of the system, to the tune of more than 500,000 students since the 2008-09 academic year due to the budget crisis. Course offerings have been slashed by 24 percent, according to the state chancellor’s office. But City College would only go so far. Then-Chancellor Don Q. Griffin raised the battle cry against austerity and the completion agenda at an October 2011 board meeting, his baritone voice sounding one of his fullest furies. “It was obvious to me when I heard Bush ... and then Obama talking about the value of community colleges ... they’re going to push out poor people, people of color, people who cannot afford to go anywhere else except the community college,” he said.

Countdown to crisis July 2006

2008

march 2009

July 2012

July 2013

July 2014

ACCJC reaffirms CCSF’s accreditation

Recession and first wave of budget cuts hit state community colleges, $809 million lost annually

Obama’s first State of the Union Address pushes for better graduation rates

ACCJC revisits CCSF, finds recommendations not met, places college on sanction

ACCJC revisits CCSF, finds recommendations not met, places college on “show cause” sanction with date set for accreditation loss

Date City College is slated to lose its accreditation, along with state funding

2006

2007 2006 Seven California community colleges are under sanction by ACCJC

12 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

february 2009

2008-2012

April 2013

December 2013

Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger’s budget cuts more than $300 million in categorical funding for community colleges

Then-City College Chancellor Don Q. Griffin makes cuts to administrators, services to preserve breadth of classes

California Federation of Teachers and CCSF American Federation of Teachers local file a nearly 300-page complaint on the ACCJC with the U.S. Department of Education

ACCJC to undergo review by the U.S. Department of Education

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But when it came to paying for that pushback, things got tricky. “No more of this bullshit, that we turn the other way and say it’s fine. We’re going to concentrate the money on the students,” Griffin said at a December 2011 board meeting. “You guys are talking about cutting classes, we don’t believe in that. Cut the other stuff first, cut it until it hurts, and then talk about cutting classes.” So he slashed his own salary and lost staff through attrition and other means. The college had more than 70 administrators before 2008, and it now has fewer than 40. “Since the recession in 2009, we’ve been seen as the rebels,” said Jeffrey Fang, a former student trustee on City College’s board. “When most of the colleges went and made cuts in light of the recession, we decided to find ways to keep everything open while doing what we could to eliminate spending.” But those successes in saving classes put City College on a collision course with its accreditor.

mally respond to all officially filed complaints about ACCJC. But the numbers speak volumes. As an ACCJC newsletter first described federal pressure back in 2006, seven community colleges in California were on probation or warning by the ACCJC. By 2012 that number leapt to 28. But the California Federation of Teachers is fighting back, and recently filed a 280-page complaint about the ACCJC with the

Quick facts What’s changed at City College since being placed on sanction in 2012? Percent wage cuts for faculty and administrators Faculty and staff not rehired for the next semester, including part-time teachers and counselors Campuses closed, Castro/ Valencia and Park Presidio

Losing the War Seven years ago, the ACCJC found six deficiencies that it asked City College to fix, finding it had too many campuses serving too many students, fiscal troubles, and hadn’t enforced measurement standards. Last year, it faulted City College for resisting those changes and tacked on eight additional demands, threatening to revoke its accreditation. Speaking on condition of anonymity, an official who worked closely with ACCJC as a member of one of the visiting accreditation teams told us there was pressure to make an example of City College. “The message they’re hearing from (ACCJC President) Barbara Beno is that Washington is demanding, ‘Why are you not being more strict with institutions with deficiencies that have lasted more than two years [and taking action] to revoke their accreditation?’” the source said. “What’s anomalous about California is we’re getting to where everyone will be in a few years.” The ACCJC’s next evaluation is this December, where it will be reviewed by the Department of Education. It wants to be ready, says Paul Fain, a reporter for Inside Higher Ed, a national trade publication. “Washington writ large ... is pushing very hard on accreditors to drive a harder line,” Fain told us. “There’s a criticism out there that accreditation is weak and toothless.” The U.S. Department of Education declined to comment on the issue, saying only that it will foreditorials

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Recommendations from the accrediting commission, essentially requirements the college has to meet to regain accreditation Colleges under sanction by the ACCJC as of 2012 Community colleges in California

Department of Education. The allegations were many: Business conflict of interest from a commission member, failure to adhere to its own policies and bylaws, and even the commission President Beno’s husband having served on City College’s visiting team, which the unions said is a clear conflict of interest. Some people think it’s a waste of time, that City College has already lost. “That process of fighting accreditation won’t succeed, it just forestalls the problem,” said Bill McGinnis, a trustee on Butte College’s board for over 20 years. He’s also served on many ACCJC visiting teams. But the unions are making some headway. The Department of Education wrote a letter to the ACCJC telling them to respond in

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full to the complaints by July 8, as this article goes to press. The accreditor will soon be the one evaluated.

What’s next? In the meantime, City College has exactly one year to reverse its fortunes: The loss of accreditation doesn’t actually kick in until July, 2014. A special trustee appointed by the state will be granted all the powers of the locally elected City College Board of Trustees to get with the federal program. Without voting power, the elected body is effectively castrated. No one knows what that will mean for the college board, not even Mayor Ed Lee, who issued a statement supporting the state takeover and criticizing local trustees for not cutting enough. “The ACCJC is fundamentally hostile to elected boards and they’ve made that clear,” City College Trustee Rafael Mandelman told us. “The Board of Trustees should and may look at all possible legal options around this.” Although officials say classes will proceed as normal for the next year, some aren’t waiting around to see if City College will survive. At its last board meeting, the CCSF Board of Trustees grappled with how to address dwindling enrollment. As news of its accreditation troubles spread, City College has been under-enrolled by thousands of students, exacerbating its problems. Since the state funds colleges based on numbers of students, City College’s funding is plummeting by the millions. A frightening statistic: When Compton College lost its accreditation in 2005 and was subsequently absorbed by a neighboring district, it lost half its student population, according to state records. Even the faculty is having a hard time hanging on, said Alisa Messer, the college’s faculty union president. “People are looking for jobs elsewhere already. Despite everyone’s dedication to see the college through, it has tried everyone and stretched them to the limit,” she told us. The college has two hopes — that the CFT wins its lawsuit and can reverse the ACCJC decision, or that the new special trustee can somehow turn the college around by next July. But either way, something will be lost. “City College is definitely changing,” Saginor said. “What it will change into, and if those changes will be permanent, that I don’t know.” 2 stage

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newS BARt By Steven t. JoneS steve@sfbg.com NEWS Last week’s four-day strike by Bay Area Rapid Transit workers dominated the news and made headlines around the country, marking the latest battleground in a national war between public employee unions and the austerity agenda pushed by conservatives and neoliberals. Of course, that wasn’t how the conflict was framed by BART, most journalists, or even the two BART unions involved, all of whom dutifully reported the details of each sides’ offers and counter-offers, the competing “safety� narratives (new security procedures demands by unions versus spending more on capital improvements than raises), and the strike’s impact on commuters and the local economy. But once this long-simmering labor standoff seized the attention of a public heavily reliant on BART, fueling the popular anger and resentment increasingly directed at public employee unions in recent years, familiar basic storylines emerged. At that point, the Bay Area could have been placed in Wisconsin, Ohio, Michigan, or Illinois — the most recent high-profile labor union

BARt employeeS picket At the coRneR of mARket And montgomeRy StReetS on mondAy, July 1.

Last train

SF EXAMINER PHOTO BY ALEX LEBER

#"35TUBOEPGGIBT OBUJPOBMJNQMJDBUJPOTJOBO BHFPGXFBMUIBOEBVTUFSJUZ battlegrounds, with their narratives of greedy public employees clinging to their fully funded pensions and higher than average salaries while the rest of us suffer through this stubbornly lingering hangover from the Great Recession. Around water coolers and online message boards, there were common refrains: How dare those unions demand the raises that the rest of us are being denied! Pensions? Who has fully funded pensions anymore? Why can’t they just be more realistic? When Bay Area residents were

finally forced to find other ways of getting around, within a transportation system that is already at the breaking point during peak hours thanks to years of austerity budgets and under-investment in basic infrastructure, those seething resentments exploded into outright anger. And those political dynamics could only get worse in a month. The BART strike could resume full strength on a non-holiday workweek if the two sides aren’t able to come to an agreement before the recently extended contract expires.

This is the Bay Area’s most visible and impactful labor standoff, and it could prove to be a pivotal one for the modern American labor movement.

BART AS BELLWETHER Chris Daly was a clarion voice for progressive values while serving on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors from 2000-2010. Now, as political director of Service Employee International Union Local 1021, one of the BART unions, he says this standoff is about more than just the issues being discussed

at the bargaining table. “The terms and conditions of workers in the public sector is a buoy for other workers,� Daly told us, explaining how everyone’s wages and benefits tend to follow the gains and setbacks negotiated by unions. “The right understands this, which is why the right has been mercilessly attacking public sector workers.� Ken Jacobs, chair of the UC Berkeley Labor Center, confirmed that union contracts affect the overall labor market. “When unions improve wages and benefits, it does have a ripple effect,� Jacobs said. He agreed that the outcome at BART could be a bellwether for the question, “As the economy comes back, how much will workers share in that prosperity?� Demonizing public sector workers as greedy or lazy also serves to undercut the entire labor movement, Daly said, considering that public employees make up a far higher percentage of union members than their private sector counterparts. And during election time, it is union money and ground troops that typically contest wealthy individuals and corporations’ efforts to maintain or expand power. “Labor is one of the main checks on unbridled corporate power, and public sector unions are the back-

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bone of labor,” Daly told us. So in that context, BART’s battle is about more than just the wages and benefits of train drivers and station agents, with their average base salary of $62,000, just barely above the area median income, and their demand for raises after accepting wage freezes in recent years. Daly sees this as part of a much broader political standoff, and he said there are indications that BART management also sees it that way, starting with the $399,000 the transit agency is paying its lead negotiator Thomas Hocke, a veteran of union-busting standoffs around the country. “He has a history of bargaining toward strikes, with the goal of breaking unions,” Daly said, noting that Hocke’s opening offer would have taken money from BART employees, with new pension and healthcare contributions outweighing raises. “It was a takeaway proposal when you add it up, while they have a $100 million surplus in their budget and the cost of living in the Bay Area is shooting up.” But BART spokesperson Rick Rice told us that Hocke is simply trying to get the best deal possible for this taxpayer-funded agency, and he denied there is any intention to

break the union or connection to some larger anti-worker agenda. “There is definitely a need to start funding the capital needs of the district,” Rice told us. “I don’t see that we’re pushing an austerity agenda as much as a realistic agenda.”

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Austerity And expAnsion But Daly said the very idea that austerity measures are “realistic” excuses the banks and other powerful players whose reckless pursuit of profits caused the financial meltdown of 2008. The underlying expectation is that workers should continue to pay for that debacle, rather than bouncing back with the rebounding economy. “They get in this austerity mindset, and we see it in every contract we’re negotiating,” Daly said, noting that capital needs and benefits have always needed funding, despite their elevation now as immediate imperatives. “You have good people with good intentions like [BART Board President] Tom Radulovich pushing this austerity mindset.” Radulovich, a longtime progressive activist, told us he agrees with some of how Daly is framing the standoff, but not all of it. He said that BART is being squeezed into its position by unique factors.

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Radulovich said that healthcare and pension costs really are rising faster then ever, creating a challenge in maintaining those benefit levels. And he said that Hocke isn’t simply carrying out some larger anti-union agenda. “He’s negotiating what the district wants him to negotiate,” he said. Radulovich said that while BART’s workers may deserve raises, most of BART’s revenues come from fares. “So it’s taking from workers to give to other workers,” Radulovich said. “It’s a little more complicated because it is a public agency and Chris is aware of that.” Yet Radulovich acknowledged that BART has opted to pursue an aggressive expansion policy that is diverting both capital and operating expenditures into new lines — such as the East Contra Costa, Oakland Airport, and Warm Springs extensions now underway — rather than setting some of that money aside for workers. “And for a lot of those, we were being cheered on by the [San Francisco] Labor Council, one of many ironies,” said Radulovich, who favors infill projects over new extensions. “These are some of the conversations I’ve had with labor leaders in ther last few weeks, how we think strategically about these things.”

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But if BART wanted to defeat the union, it may have miscalculated the level of worker discontent with austerity measures. “What they didn’t plan on is some high-level Bay Area political pressure,” Daly said, referring to the local uproar over the strike that led Gov. Jerry Brown to send in the state’s two top mediators, who made progress and created a one month cooling off period before the strike can resume.

retirement security One of the hardest issues to overcome in the court of public opinion may be the fully funded pensions of BART employees. “Times are changing, costs are escalating rapidly, and we’re asking for a modest contribution,” Rice said of BART’s demand that employees help fund their pensions. Daly acknowledges the resentments about the pension issue, even though it was essentially a trap set for public employee unions back in the 1980s, when BART and other public agencies were the ones offering to pay for employee pensions in lieu of raises. But rather than resenting public employees for having pensions, he said the public should be asking why most workers don’t have retirement security and how to fix that problem.

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“At what point do we organize and demand retirement security for all workers?” Daly said, noting that SEIU is now leading that fight on behalf of all workers, not just its members. “What we ought to be talking about is how we restore the social contract.” Jacobs confirmed that SEIU has indeed been pushing the retirement security issue at the state and federal levels. And it’s a crucial issue, he said, noting that just 45 percent of workers have pensions and that the average retirement savings is just $12,000. “The retirement problem we have is not the pension crisis, it is the lack of pensions crisis,” Jacobs said. That’s one reason that he said this standoff has implications that extend far beyond the Bay Area. “The fight goes beyond these particular workers,” Jacobs said. “It’s an important set of negotiations and an important strike in terms of looking at what happens in this country as the economy improves.” Daly agrees there’s a lot at stake, for more than just his members. “Losing on this means we’d be hard-pressed to win elsewhere, anytime,” Daly said. “It is important symbolically, and it is important to the strength and morale of the movement.” 2

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Can you believe the Upper Haight â&#x20AC;&#x201D; practically a food desert â&#x20AC;&#x201D; has a new option for vittles that looks downright promising? Freshly open on Haight Street is the rather darling Sparrow (1640 Haight, SF; www. sparrowbarandkitchen.com) Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got a heated beer garden in back, perfect for that foggy-ass neighborhood, and hello, 14 taps of beer. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find comfort classics, but better, like chicken leg stuffed with quinoa, and a brie-and-bacon grilled cheese with fig jam. The Sparrow peeps are also making ice cream and sorbet in-house for dessert, and the brunch lineup includes quite a few gluten-free choices. Welcome to the neighborhood, little bird. Watch Sparrowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website for hours, as itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just nesting in. The ever-growing taco empire Tacolicious (1548 Stockton, SF. www.tacolicious.com) has opened a new outpost in North Beach, complete with signature touches like vibrant tile, perfectly mixed margaritas, and tasty tacos. The space is bright, airy, and poised to become a popular hangout, especially since the restaurant is open straight through lunch and dinner, so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an easy spot to stop by midafternoon for an adult beverage and food + Drink

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a taco snack. Or keep it under consideration for the next time youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing hooky on a sunny afternoon. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never tell. Open daily 11:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;12am. Looking for a new place to get your buzz on? (Well, one that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t liquor induced.) Head to the new downtown spot Coffee Cultures (225 Bush, SF. www.coffee-cultures. com) for a sip and zip from North Carolina roaster Counter Culture coffee. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll also find breakfast pastries, a soft-serve machine, sandwiches and salads at lunchtime, and a cute, hip staff. Open Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri 6amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s another coffee kid in town, this time on the border between Bernal and the Mission. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tierra Mia (3188 Mission, SF. www.tierramiacoffee.com), and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the first northern location of the Southern California coffee chain. It features Latin American coffee drinks, so you can feel all arriba with a horchata latte or a Cubano con leche. Adelante.... Open daily 6:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm.

BALLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ON A BUDGET Valencia Streetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Range (842 Valencia, SF. www.rangesf.com) is celebrating eight years in business, and you, dear drinker and diner, stand to benefit from a couple deals. First, starting July 10th, Range will launch its new â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aperitif Menu,â&#x20AC;? offered during a new aperitif hour, beginning at 5pm and running until 6pm, every day. You can swing by for some lighter-style cocktails (shermusic

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ry and vermouth in the house!), plus some $7 bites, like trout rillette, chicken liver mousse, or little gem leaves with San Andreas cheese and lemon-caper vinaigrette. Yeah, sounds like a good kick-off to a summer evening. Bonus: order Rangeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lauded, bourbon-based signature Third Rail cocktail for $8 for the month of July. Cheers!

YOU GOTTA EAT THIS There is a definite art to the breakfast sandwich: the texture of the eggs, the bread (and how itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s toasted), the meaty and cheesy options, and yes, the price. While the McDonalds Egg McMuffin is a genius pop culture totem, everything inside that muffin is all wrong (donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make me enumerate why). But Nopa hangout Vinyl Coffee and Wine Bar (359 Divisadero, SF. www.vinylsf.com) makes a rather winning version, and a lot of it is due to the thick, honking, buttery English muffin they use, with a nice crunch of cornmeal. For $3.25, you get a muffin with egg and cheddar, and for just a buck more, you can add bacon or sausage â&#x20AC;&#x201D; both available as vegetarian faux meat â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or avocado. Back it up with your pick of a Blue Bottle Coffee item (Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a fan of the Gibraltar myself), and â&#x20AC;&#x153;goodâ&#x20AC;? will affix itself to your morning. 2 Marcia Gagliardi is the founder of the weekly tablehopper e-column; subscribe for more at tablehopper.com. Get her app: Tablehopperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Top Late-Night Eats. On Twitter: @tablehopper.

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July 10 - 16, 2013 / SFBG.com

17

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UNDEAD AND TWISTED. latest album, Except Sometimes was released earlier this year, and showcases her sultry vocals, along with her love for the classics and a desire to mesh those styles with more contemporary material — such as a jazz rendition of

WEDNESDAY 7/10 BOTANY’S BREATH

Even if you are a plant lover, the Conservatory of Flowers in Golden Gate Park can intimate you. Taking but a few steps from the Highland to the Lowland Tropics, places that on the outside are hundreds of miles apart, is decidedly weird. But choreographer Kim Epifano loves it. Her Epiphany Productions Sonic Dance Theater’s Botany’s Breath is both a tribute to the natural world and a wake-up call to be mindful of our position within in. Joining Epifano’s eight dancers are excellent collaborators Norman Rutherford and Peter Whitehead (music) Allen Willner (lighting design), and Ellen Bromberg and Ben Estabrook (video design). Space is tight so only 40 people at a time can take in the show.(Rita Felciano)

be her last local event, for now — she’s moving to Philadelphia. So it will indeed be your final opportunity (in the foreseeable future) to witness the homespun talent of one of SF’s favorite illustrators. (Savage) Through Sept. 15 Opening tonight, 6-10pm, free Nooworks 395 Valencia, SF www.nooworks.com

SUSPIRIA AND THE EXORCIST DOUBLE FEATURE

“Don’t You (Forget About Me),” from her film The Breakfast Club. (Sean McCourt)

If there’s anything horror movies of the 1970s taught us, it’s that evil lurks in unexpected places — a comfortable brick manse in Georgetown, or a ballet school in

Through Fri/12, 8pm (also 4pm, Sat/13), $50–$125 Starlite Room, Sir Francis Drake Hotel 450 Powell Street, SF

Through Sat/13, 7:30pm and 9pm, $25–$30

www.societycabaret.com

Conservatory of Flowers 100 John F. Kennedy Drive, Golden Gate Park, SF. conservatoryofflowers.org/special-events

THE MELODIC

The Melodic is like a flavorful snack that hits all the right spots. Pegged as experimental Afrofolk-pop, the London quartet’s delicious harmonies alone are enough to back this, but only one part of its allure — the group is inspired by sounds around the world. While the West African folk is brought by instruments like the Kora, and the Latin influence is evident in the acoustic guitar picking and charango, the songs are also chockfull of poppy melo-

BOTANY’S BREATH SEE WEDNESDAY/10

mighty versatile, dipping between South American and African influences with a pop edge — and how can that not translate into a great live performance? (Hillary Smith) With Song Preservation Society and Dyllan Hersey 8:30pm, $12 Rickshaw Stop 155 Fell, SF

FRIDAY 7/12 “NEW WORKS BY EMILY GLAUBINGER // SEAN NEWPORT” Wilson, and George Alexander, who all overlapped in the group from 1971 through ‘80. That power-pop lineup played a hastily arranged show in SF earlier this year, its first time together since ‘81, but now it’s given you more advance notice. The current crew is rounded out by drummer Victor Penalosa. Don’t miss it again. (Emily Savage)

This in-store exhibit takes the one-dimensional and make it pop in 3-D. It brings together noted

With Deniz Tek (Radio Birdman), Chuckleberries, DJ Sid Presley

(415) 861-2011 www.rickshawstop.com

9pm, $25

THE FLAMIN’ GROOVIES

dies and whimsical lyrics. Just as readily though, the group cranks out a song like “Ode to Victor Jara,” with such a heavy tone and earnest lyrics, you’d swear you’re hearing some kind of beautiful eulogy. The point is, the band is 18 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

Influential 1960s rockers the Flamin’ Groovies — who delivered wailing cult classics like “Slow Death,” “You Tore Me Down,” and “Shake Some Action” (you know this last one from its resurrection in the film Clueless) — have gone through some serious band changes over the past four decades, with more than 15 members rotating through the legendary group and some legendary rifts in the mix as well. Roy Loney has moved on to Roy Loney and the Phantom Movers. This current lineup is a circle back to Cyril Jordan, Chris EDITORIALS

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Chapel 777 Valencia, SF www.thechapelsf.com

THURSDAY 7/11 MOLLY RINGWALD

While Molly Ringwald might be best known for her acting career, having starred in several 1980s hit movies, she has recently returned to her first love, singing. She started performing with her father, a jazz pianist, when she was just a few years old, and recorded and released several songs before turning her attention to acting. Her FOOD + DRINK

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local graphic designer/jewelrymaker Emily Glaubinger’s colorful illustrations of bold patterns and textiles and Sean Newport’s carefully crafted sculptures, “turning her intricate illustrations into 3-D pieces of art.” The “New Works by Emily Glaubinger // Sean Newport” opening event at Mission apparel store Nooworks includes live musical performances by Wild Hum and Philip Manley Life Coach (Glaubinger created the eye-popping album cover for Life Coach’s newest record, Alphawaves). As Glaubinger mentions in the invite, this will MUSIC

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Germany, for example. Tonight, immerse yourself in a doublefeature that presents two of the decade’s spookiest standouts. First up is the 1973 film that launched Catholic nightmares galore (and probably just as many head-rotation jokes): William Friedkin’s The Exorcist, presented in director’s-cut form for maximum Captain Howdy thrills. It’s paired with Italian genre master Dario Argento’s 1977 Suspiria, which is still crazy after all these years — and is the perfect flick to get you pumped for soundtrack artist Goblin’s October tour stop in San Francisco. (Cheryl Eddy) The Exorcist, 7pm; Suspiria, 9:30pm, $8.50–$11 Castro Theatre 429 Castro, SF www.castrotheatre.com

“DAVID KING’S ODD ALCOVE” Iconography and graphic design have long been integral to the ethos of punk. For a certain sect, there’s no stronger symbol than the iconic, anarcho-punk Crass

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BOTANY’S BREATH PHOTO BY ANDY MOGG; NEW WORKS EMILY GLAUBINGER AND SEAN NEWPORT IMAGE COURTESY OF EMILY GLAUBINGER; CRASS IMAGE BY DAVID KING COPYRIGHT 2013; ACID PAULI PHOTO BY CAPERO.DE; LANGHORNE SLIM PHOTO BY TODD ROETHE; CREEPY KOFY PHOTO COURTESY KOFY TV.

logo (once explained by the designer David King as “a cross and a diagonal, negating serpent, formed into a circle.” This week, Needles and Pens will present “David King’s Odd Alcove,” a solo show and book release for The Secret Origins of the Crass Symbol, which will include Crass graphics, photographs, wood constructions, “hi-art, lo-art, and more.” King, who grew up in London, met Crass’ Penny Rimbaud and Gee Vaucher in art school, lived with

bevy of beautiful Cave Girls, beer, prizes, and more. (McCourt)

ACID PAULI SEE FRIDAY/12

9pm, $7.50–$10 Balboa Theater 3630 Balboa, SF cinemasf.com/balboa

MONDAY 7/15 LANGHORNE SLIM AND THE LAW Langhorne Slim and the Law is jumpy, chipper, and a whole lot of fun on stage — which is par for the course because it doesn’t need any of that. The group’s raw energy and commitment to its songs is seen in the stand-up bassist’s wriggly plucking, in the way Sean Scolnick approaches the mic like he’s communicating an urgent truth, and in the obvious connection they all share on stage. The group’s acoustic sound jumps

the band at Dial House, created illustrations for Crass and other acts, formed his own bands, and migrated to San Francisco during the early 1980s punk explosion. He’s remained here ever since, and now brings an assortment of personal treasures for this show. (Savage)

(415) 255-1534

rock’n’roll. The group’s songs work on low frequencies, never using volume as a crutch to get listeners pumped. Instead, it employs eloquent yet accessible lyrics, smooth vocals, and tight rhythms to draw a crowd. (Smith)

something else entirely. At this debut three+ hour set, I expect to see at least few cell phones on the dance floor, Shazam-ing to keep up. (Ryan Prendiville) With Eduardo Castillo (Crosstown Rebels/Voodoo),

www.needlesandpens.com

With Glacier and Beware of Safety

9pm-3:30am, $12 presale

9:30pm, $12

Public Works

Bottom of the Hill

161 Erie St., SF

1233 17th St., SF

(415) 932-0955

(415)626-4455

www.publicsf.com

Through Aug. 12 Opening tonight, 7-9pm, free Needles and Pens 3253 16th St., SF

WINFRED E. EYE

Rough around the edges but smooth when he wants to be, Winfred E. Eye frontperson Aaron Calvert crafts compelling tunes no matter where he takes them. From blues to folk to rock, Calvert’s haggard, sing-talk

style surprisingly doesn’t get old. “Moonlight touches on the snow, moonlight touches on my soul,” yelps Calvert in “Money in Bank,” a hybrid tune of country and EDITORIALS

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www.bottomofthehill.com

ACID PAULI

Punk bands, Bjork productions, hip-hop projects, an ambient album on Nicolas Jaar’s label, mixes for Crosstown Rebels: Martin Gretschmann has many musical roles and aliases. In DJ mode as Acid Pauli, the guy sends me Googling every time, re-energizing my excitement for new sounds. Half the time it’s something I’ve never heard like the wonky jazz romp of Der Dritte Raum’s “Swing Bop,” or tectonically teutonic deep house of Gunther Lause’s “Mountain.” (Where the school children astral pop on Jan Turkenburg’s “In My Spaceship” came from I. Just. Don’t. Know.) Even when it’s as familiar as Nancy Sinatra or Johnny Cash, Gretschmann reworkings are

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SATURDAY 7/13 CREEPY KOFY MOVIE TIME: THE GOLEM

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www.theindependentsf.com

TUESDAY 7/16 THE JAZZ COFFIN EMERGENCY ENSEMBLE If the free jazz sets on Wednesdays at Amnesia have taught us anything, it’s that hipsters can A) swing dance surprisingly well and B) appreciate music un-ironically when it comes without a price tag. The Jazz Coffin Emergency Ensemble promises standards from the 1950s and ‘60s, a period when jazz was really evolving its own sub-genres. The band describes its set as verging on funk and march/ dirge-heavy. This is the group’s second concert at El Rio and the price is certainly right. Hell, if that’s not enticing enough, for just $4 at 6:30pm before the show, Science, Neat, a monthly science happy hour that pairs short talks with live demos, will be on the patio with this month’s theme “Brains! Brains! Brains?” It’s the perfect opportunity to get your mind blown during a bustling happy hour at a colorful bar before enjoying some old favorites and a cheap buzz. (Ilan Moskowitz) With Science, Neat (6:30 p.m. on the patio, $4 donation) 8pm, free El Rio 3158 Mission, SF

as easily into foot-stomping folk as it does to soul and dirty rock. And Scolnick’s dynamic vocals thread it all together. One thing you can be sure of is there will never be a lack of energy or zeal at a Langhorne show. And with Easy Leaves on the bill, this show might just have double. (Smith) With Easy Leaves Independent 8pm, $20 628 Divisadero, SF

Keeping the tradition of the oldschool local late-night horror host TV show alive and well — or perhaps undead and twisted would be better terms — the ghouls, er, guys behind “Creepy KOFY Movie Time” are getting out of their cave/studio and hosting a special party at one of the oldest theaters in the city. Featuring a screening of the classic 1920 horror flick The Golem (with new music by Hob Goblin) co-hosts Balrok, Webberly, and Slob will be on hand for the festivities that will also include live music from their house band the Deadlies, a STAGE

(415) 771-1421

(415) 800-8782 www.elriosf.com

2

The Guardian listings deadline is two weeks prior to our Wednesday publication date. To submit an item for consideration, please include the title of the event, a brief description of the event, date and time, venue name, street address (listing cross streets only isn’t sufficient), city, telephone number readers can call for more information, telephone number for media, and admission costs. Send information to Listings, the Guardian, 225 Bush, 17th Flr., SF, CA 94105; or e-mail (paste press release into e-mail body — no attachments, please) to listings@sfbg.com. Digital photos may be submitted in jpeg format; the image must be at least 240 dpi and four inches by six inches in size. We regret we cannot accept listings over the phone.

CREEPY KOFY MOVIE TIME SEE SATURDAY/13 FILM

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JULY 10 - 16, 2013 / SFBG.COM

19

MUSIC

COOL GHOULS TAKE THE NATURAL APPROACH. PHOTO BY MICHAEL BORDELON

BY EMILY SAVAGE emilysavage@sfbg.com TOFU AND WHISKEY In these past three years, Phono Del Sol has built itself up into a tastemaker midsummer’s indie music fest — and it’s one to watch. It makes sense: the one-day fest is curated by on-thepulse local blog, the Bay Bridged. And beyond the interesting (and mostly local) band choices — the first year featured Aesop Rock and Mirah, last year the Fresh and Onlys and Mwahaha, and this year Thee Oh Sees, YACHT, Bleached, and K. Flay will headline — there’s something about the approach and atmosphere that calms the nerves. It’s in the Mission’s Potrero Del Sol park, a hilly, grassy area bordered by an active skate park. During the fest, skaters whizz by near the bands, and street food vendors offer salty snacks on the other side of the stage. The event tends to inhabit a particular San Francisco garage scene vibe of yesteryear, apart from current complications brewing in the nearby neighborhood between the old and new, the tech workers and SF lifers. One of the newest bands on this year’s bill fits this feeling as well, the young garage pop fourpiece Cool Ghouls. The psychinflected group is relaxed and gracious, perhaps not yet jaded by the outlying music community or industry. And they’ll be bringing a horn section to Phono Del Sol this year. (Sat/13, 11:30am-7pm, $20. Potrero Del Sol Park, 25th Street at Utah, SF. www.phonodelsol.com). Cool Ghouls, named after a phrase George Clinton used in a Parliament Funkadelic concert film, are a bit giggly during our conversation from lead guitarist Ryan Wong’s Duboce Park area apartment. They seem new to this whole recognition thing, and thusly, speak candidly, and nearly in circles. Singer Pat McDonald, bassist Pat Thomas, and Wong all grew up in the Bay Area, attending high school in Benicia together, and met up again in San Francisco after college. Alex Fleshman met the others when he went to San Francisco State University. They formed in early 2011 and began playing shows almost immediately — in early spring of that year, showing up at brick-and-mortar spots, house shows, even Serra Bowl before it closed, and at Noise Pop. That’s where they first crossed my path, as they began popping up 20 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

Summer ghouls at shows on a frequent basis. “Now, we’re being asked to play more local shows then we can play,” Thomas says. “Pat McDonald seems to know a lot of people somehow, maybe it’s his hair? Or he’s just like, really nice.” Their self-titled debut fulllength, recorded by Tim Cohen of Fresh and Onlys and Magic Trick, saw release this April on Empty Cellar Records. “We thought we could record a whole album by ourselves, so we recorded 90 percent of it on an eight-track recorder,” Wong says. “We showed Arvel [Hernandez], who runs Empty Cellar Records...he told us ‘the songs are really good but the recording is just shitty.’” He enlisted Cohen to record it, and said he’d release it on Empty Cellar. They were ecstatic with the revelation, and excited to work with the talented Cohen. They spent a few days in his Western Addition home, rerecording the full album while crammed in Cohen’s bedroom at the top of a towering Victorian near Alamo Square. Cohen’s since become a de facto advocate for the band, writing a glowing press release about Cool Ghouls and the album, in which he defiantly explains “First things first: Cool Ghouls are not a retro act... Truth be told, this being their first EDITORIALS

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official release, they may even be a bit naïve in their dogged pursuit of the true-blue, home-spun, rock and roll lifestyle.” Though he later concedes, “If one were to ascribe to them a ‘60sreverent description, as one often does in the case of San Francisco bands, one would most likely find an artistic kinship with some of the most inimitable, idiosyncratic, yet unmistakably influential bands of the retro-fitting oeuvre. The Troggs, The Monks, Sir Douglas Quintet come to mind immediately. (Save your Kinks and Rolling Stones references.) Like the aforementioned, the Ghouls are natural heirs to the folkloric lineage which precedes them, adding dashes of weirdness where needed.” The group laughs when I bring up the Cohen praise, “it’s so funny things people take away from press releases...but he did a really good job of writing that, I didn’t even know he understood us that well,” Thomas says. “He doesn’t give you that much in person, he’s a pretty stoic guy, so it’s been really cool to see that through all of that, he was digging us.” “We were all kind of intimidated, then that came out, and I didn’t have any idea he was even writing anything,” Wong adds. The Ghouls are democratic, and FOOD + DRINK

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all are multi-instrumentalists, with each group member writing songs and bringing the skeletons to the group to flesh out. And many of the tracks on the album do evoke that garage pop weirdness Cohen identified, and also a casual self-awareness. Thomas wrote joyful first single “Natural Life” quickly and brought it to the band. The perfectly corresponding video by his film student brother Rob Thomas features the band frolicking in the Marin Headlands and Sutro Baths. “That whole organic approach, natural approach, putting your pieces in place and then just winging it, is something that we generally do — it keeps it collaborative,” Thomas says. Another standout, is mid-tempo “Witches Game,” which singer McDonald wrote, starting with the fuzzy guitar riff that rides strong through the track. Woozy, surfy “Grace” was one of the first songs they ever played together, and usually closes out their live sets. And they agree that jangly psych-pop “Queen Sophie” was one of the more collaborative songs. There’ll be a proper video for that one out soon too. “The whole album was a group effort. I think of it as a specific piece of where we were at when we recorded it,” Wong says. The album artwork is worth notMUSIC

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ing as well, a collage-painting made by Thomas with a big glittery sun, swirly watercolor images of clouds, snowy mountaintops, red-yellow fire, and a colorful rooster. The images weren’t meant necessarily to reflect the songs on the album, but ended up having some meaning after the fact. “I was just trying to represent what I lean toward anyway, like if it’s a painting I make, it’ll probably evoke the music I make, just because I’m making both of them,” Thomas says. “But liked the rooster image because I was thinking about the way roosters strut, and this is our first album.” Wong pipes up, “I feel the way the album is with these songs, [it’s about] the morning, and the ideas of the natural life. It’s appropriate because it’s our first album, but maybe I’m looking too much into it?” Cool Ghouls will move on soon anyway — they’re currently prepping new songs and plan to record a second album this August.

DAVINCI Fillmore District-raised emcee DaVinci plays this free show alongside fellow burgeoning local rap duo Main Attrakionz, Young Gully, Shady Blaze, Ammbush, and Sayknowledge. DaVinci has been releasing tracks for a few years, in late 2012 dropping full-length The MOEna Lisa with an ode to SF in track “In My City” with the telling lyric, “Trying to push us out of the city/but we ain’t leaving,” in a hoarse whisper, but also referencing favorite spots like the waffle house at Fillmore and Eddy (Gussies). Wed/10, 9pm, free. Brick and Mortar Music Hall, 1710 Mission, SF; www.brickandmortarmusic.com.

JAPONIZE ELEPHANTS The elegant yet spooky old-worldcarnival act Japonize Elephants — noted for drawing sounds from eclectic styles like gypsy jazz, bluegrass, and klezmer — will celebrate the vinyl release party for newest album Mélodie fantastique, this week at Amnesia. Go, and witness all the instrumentation you can handle (fiddle, banjo, glockenspiel, vibraphone, accordion, percussion, surf guitar), along with four-part vocal harmonies. A group of waltzing ghosts, like the ones you find on the Haunted Mansion ride, wouldn’t seem out of place here. Thu/11, 9:30pm, $7–$10. Amnesia, 853 Valencia, SF. www.amnesiathebar. com. 2

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0!5,-C#!24.%9Â&#x201E;2%$(/4#(),)0%00%23Â&#x201E;Â?.).%).#(.!),3Â&#x201E;0(/%.)8 +!3+!$%Â&#x201E;6!-0)2%7%%+%.$Â&#x201E;02%449,)'(43Â&#x201E;9%!(9%!(9%!(3 $!.'%,/Â&#x201E;4(%.!4)/.!, Â&#x201E;*52!33)#Â&#x201E;7),,)%.%,3/.&!-),9 GRIZZLY BEARÂ&#x201E;$!29,(!,,*/(./!4%3Â&#x201E;9/5.'4(%')!.4 "!.$/&(/23%3Â&#x201E;! 42!+Â&#x201E;4(%(%!$!.$4(%(%!24Â&#x201E;9%!3!9%2 -!44+)-Â&#x201E;:%$$Â&#x201E;4(%4!,,%34-!./.%!24(Â&#x201E;Â?&/!,3Â&#x201E;$!7%3 42/-"/.%3(/249/2,%!.3!6%.5%Â&#x201E;RHYE Â&#x201E;9/54(,!'//.Â&#x201E;'!29#,!2+*2Â&#x201E;BAAUER *%33)%7!2%Â&#x201E;Â?$),,/.&2!.#)3Â&#x201E;+5246),%!.$4(%6)/,!4/23Â&#x201E;%-%,)3!.$b Â&#x201E;Â?GRIZ 4(%-/4(%2()03Â&#x201E;Â?352&%2",//$Â&#x201E;Â?#(2/-!4)#3Â&#x201E;4(%'2/7,%23Â&#x201E;Â?25$)-%.4!, 4(!/4(%'%4$/7.34!9$/7.Â&#x201E;Â?#!-0%26!."%%4(/6%.Â&#x201E;3-)4(7%34%2.3 "/-")./Â&#x201E;7!66%3Â&#x201E;Â?&)3("/.%Â&#x201E;-),/'2%%.%Â&#x201E;!4,!3'%.)53Â&#x201E;!.5(%! 47%.49/.%0),/43Â&#x201E;Â?4(%(%!69Â&#x201E;$!5'(4%2Â&#x201E;)6!..%6),,%3$5-034!0(5.+ 7),$"%,,%Â&#x201E;Â?+).'45&&Â&#x201E;4(%,/.%"%,,/7Â&#x201E;-3-2Â&#x201E;,)44,%'2%%.#!23 *!-%3-C#!24.%9Â&#x201E;4(%3/&47()4%3)84)%3Â&#x201E;$%!06!,,9Â&#x201E;4(%-%. -)$)-!4),$!Â&#x201E;CHERUBÂ&#x201E;+/0%#+9&!-),9"!.$Â&#x201E;Â?(/5.$-/54( &/96!.#%Â&#x201E;BHI BHIMANÂ&#x201E;,/#52!Â&#x201E;.!)!+%4%Â&#x201E;4(%%!39,%!6%3 34!.4/.7!22)/23Â&#x201E;4(%0,5-0$*3Â&#x201E;+2!&49+543Â&#x201E;$*0)%22%Â&#x201E;,!:92)#( '%.%&!22)3Â&#x201E;$*3!-30)%'%,.!3! Â&#x201E;!,,'//$&5.+!,,)!.#% $*3(/4.%:"!,+!."%!4"/8 Â&#x201E;-/4)/.0/4)/.Â&#x201E;$5"'!"2)%, 3,%)'(4/&(!.$3Â&#x201E;7()4%./):%Â&#x201E;'2)&&).#!-0%2Â&#x201E;,%8%, GO TO

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July 10 - 16, 2013 / SFBG.com

21

music WED JULY 10 9PM FREE

DJ TBA

THU JULY 11 8:30PM $8

SK KAKRABA LOBI WITH AARON M OLSON

James Ferraro looKs To The FuTure.

So fresh, so clean

Stephen Steinbrink, Filardo

FRI JULY 12 REZZIN 9PM FREE Count Dante SAT JULY 13 SONNY VINCENT 8:30PM $8 (of the Testors), Violent Change,

*TMBQUPQQSPEVDFE IJGJNVTJD UIFQVOLSPDLPGUIF*OUFSOFUBHF

Etts Feats (Austin), POW!

SUN JULY 14 ZACK BLIZZARD 6PM $6 (of Cannons and Clouds),

By Taylor Kaplan

Hunters, Akron Engine

MON JULY 15 EARLY 7PM, $10 LATER 10PM, FREE

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SLICK 46 (AUS), Rust PUNK ROCK SIDESHOW

TUE JULY 16 Subliminal SF presents 8:30PM $7 COMMISSURE

Set and Setting, Wander

WED JULY 17 KIRBY KRACKLE (Seattle), 8:30PM $8 H2Awesome, DJ Real THU JULY 18 GREX 8:30PM $7 Alto!, Efft, Street Priest FRI JULY 19 COOLZEY 9:30PM $8 Mr. Goodnight, Sunbeam Rd. SAT JULY 20 WILD HUNT 9:30PM $7 Ionophore (members of

vastum/amber asylum),

UPCOMING: Common Eider King Eider, Powerdove, NegativWobblyLand, Mitchell Brown (LA), Samvega, the Mondegreens, Cool Ghouls, Zebra Hunt, Blisses B, Swiftumz, Underground Railroad to Candyland, White Night (Burger), Naam (Brooklyn, Tee Pee), Mondo Drag, Porchlight, Josephine Foster, Neil Michael Hagerty & the Howling Hex (2 nights)

DAVE â&#x20AC;&#x153;The BestE VComedy E R Y T UClub E S D Ain Y The 2 FUSA!â&#x20AC;? O R 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;W I TCHAPPELLE H THIS AD EVERY SUNDAY! S F COMEDY S HOWCASE

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MUSIC In 1992, when Pavement released its seminally crusty, DIY masterstroke Slanted and Enchanted, tape hiss and low fidelity were inherent, unavoidable side-effects of recording on the cheap. As much as that fuzzy production sound complemented the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shambolic, punk sensibility, clean recording techniques were only attainable through studios, spendy gear, and other resources unavailable to most garage slackers in Stockton. Since then, home recording standards have improved dramatically. Professional-quality software like Ableton is easily obtainable via piracy, as is an infinite sea of musicas-source-material, waiting to be lifted, sampled, and recontextualized. in 2013, this increased accessibility has rendered lo-fi recording an aesthetic choice, and no longer an intrinsic property of DIY-ism. Yet, despite the advent of clean, sterile recording as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;default modeâ&#x20AC;? of DIY music in the age of the laptopas-recording-studio, a sizable chunk of modern, computer-based music is still permeated by the cultural signifiers and trappings of tape-based lo-fi, from the warped perversion of Ariel Pink, to the fuzzy obfuscation of Dirty Beaches, to the chillwave movementâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heavy-handed reliance on effects and filters. Ostensibly, this lo-fi aesthetic is kept intact partially in order to communicate the sort of subversionfrom-the-margins that we associate with punk-rock, and other dissenting art-forms, but over the past few years, a new approach has developed, which not only embraces the stylistic properties of clean recording, but uses that sterility in a fringe context, subverting the order of the music-world similarly to the lowest of lo-fi. James Ferraroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Far Side Virtual (2011) was a watershed moment in this marriage of anemic production qualities, and the left-field approach of the DIY movement. Whereas Ferraroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s previous albums, such as On Air (2010), presented a fairly standard, Ariel Pink-indebted take on hypnagogic pop, (refracting a broad palette of samples from both high-art and trash-culture through a reverberatious, dreamlike haze of outmoded recording food + Drink

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sensibilities), Far Side Virtual opted for a brighter, cleaner more limited set of source material, keeping the dryness of those samples intact. By co-opting stock commercial muzak, cheesy MIDI synths, and a jumble of ringtones, startup chimes, and Siri robot-speak, Ferraro was able to place these sounds into a new cultural framework, without significantly altering their sonic integrity, resulting in an approach now known as vaporwave. What might resemble generic, innocuous, (yet tastelessly compiled) stock-music, when presented without context, sounds like a scathing attack on the vapidity of techno-capitalism, and our docile complicity as consumers, given the knowledge of Ferraroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s outsider status, and the subversive reputation of the Hippos In Tanks label to which he is signed. The vaporwave trend has expanded since the release of Far Side Virtual, birthing #HDBoyz (a Mountain Dew chugging, Best Buy-patronizing boy-band whose cultural position is complicated by having performed at MoMA in NYC), and even Dis Magazine, a self-described â&#x20AC;&#x153;post-Internet lifestyleâ&#x20AC;? publication that embraces and/or lampoons fashion, commerce, and garish product placement. Vaporwave, however, is a mere component of the larger, comparatively apolitical movement towards clean, dry textures and production techniques in the DIY context. Laurel Haloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Quarantine (2012) staged dry, unadorned vocals against a dense, muddled wall of electronica, forcing two sound-worlds to compete for the same space. Ariel Pinkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mature Themes (2012) marked a Ween-like jump from the murkiness of his earlier work to an unsettlingly arid production aesthetic. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Look Back, Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Not Where Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Going, from Inga Copeland (half of hypnagogic pop duo Hype Williams) rejected the messy, fuzzy jumble of her previous output in favor of a streamlined, Madonna-esque pop approach. Halo, Pink, and Copeland, like Ferraro, are known for operating from the margins of culture and taste, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s precisely what renders their use of clean, dry sounds so provocative. Dean Blunt, the other half of Hype Williams, made an especially striking statement with this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music

stage

debut solo endeavor, The Redeemer, an LP that maintained the scattershot, indiscriminate sampling tactics of Hype Williamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; One Nation (2011) and Blunt and Copelandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Black is Beautiful (2012), while doing away with the grimy, resinous sonic impurities that permeated those records. Just as Black is Beautiful jumped impulsively between snippets of freejazz drumming, inept MIDI-flute noodling, underwater video-game music, and other disparate ideas, The Redeemer trades off between K-Ci & JoJo string samples, John Fahey-esque guitar impressionism, intimate voicemail messages, and theatrical piano hammering a la Tori Amos. However, the absence of sonic fuzz presents a novel tension between the albumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s haphazard composition, and its clarity of presentation, deeming Bluntâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intentions far more ambiguous this time around. Whereas Black is Beautifulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lo-fi approach placed its component samples squarely in the domain of weirdo art, fulfilling expectations of what DIY music â&#x20AC;&#x153;shouldâ&#x20AC;? sound like, The Redeemer forces its listeners to consider each snippet at face value. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Imperial Gold,â&#x20AC;? a twee, brightly produced folk tune towards the end of the album, would fit comfortably in a Portlandia episode, but what are we supposed to make of it, coming from Dean Blunt, the outsider? Does it present a moment of sincerity, a tongue-in-cheek jab against the art-world, or both? Much like Ferraro with Far Side Virtual, Blunt subverts the meaning of his musical gestures with simple shifts of context. Similarly to Pavementâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s initiation of the lo-fi movement, using the limited resources at their disposal, this emerging trend of cleanly-produced laptop music represents the confluence of modest means and radical ideas. If anyone in the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90s could start a three-chord garage band, surely anyone in 2013 with a laptop can compose original music from the scraps of their sample library. However, like punk, the lo-fi approach has lost much of its potency in the last 20 years, and simply cannot provoke the same bewilderment that it used to. By using sterile, dry sounds for subversive effect, provocateurs like Blunt and Ferraro have inflamed the artworld all over again. This is the punk rock of the Internet age. 2

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July 10 - 16, 2013 / SFBG.com

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By Marke B.

PEPPER 20-YEAR REUNION

SH*T SHOW

marke@sfbg.com

Nothing embodies that spirit of scrappy, funky-house, old school dance-on-the-tables SF like Pepper. With DJs Pal Joey, Smash, Toph One, Doc Fu, Steady-P, and Consuelo.

LA space-bass new school, posttrap funkmaster Taurus Scott of LA burns up the decks at this new monthly joint, which prides itself on downtown grittiness and fly style. (Traci P from Sisterz of the Underground puts it on, so you know the bonafides are in order.)

SUPER EGO Few things light up our nightlife scene like the whirling, clapping, shouting, laughing, dhol-drumdriven monthly bonanza that is Non Stop Bhangra. The recent influx of Indian arrivals, mostly due to techrelated jobs, has given Bay Area culture a nice, bright kick in the pakoras â&#x20AC;&#x201D; we were already home to a flourishing Indian community, too â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and the eight-year-old NSB monthly party is a welcome wagon everyone can hop on. DJ Jimmy Love, dancer Vicki Virk, the dholrythms dance crew, and live musicians and artists take the classic Punjab-via-UK sound of bhangra (a post-disco phenomenon that incorporates electronic innovation into traditional musical forms) and blow it up, showcasing the wonderful sonic effects and refractions of the recent Indian diaspora. Celtic bhangra? Underground bhangra hip-hop? Bhangra flashmobs? Bhangratronica? Balle balle, no problemo. Chak de phatte! This monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s installmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a special one, with an early screening (before 10pm) of Non Stop Bhangra documentary footage by filmmaker Odell Hussy. Three years in the making, the doc promises an intimate look inside one of SFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s night-time treasures. And after that: dancing, dancing, and more dancing. (Lessons at 9:30pm, yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;all.)

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BARDOT A GO GO Honestly one of may favorite annual all-ages parties. Celebrate Bastille Day with cool cats and kittens into French pop ditties, with a special emphasis on the swinginâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;60s of Serge Gainsbourg and the pre-hateful Miss Bardot herself. DJs Pink Frankenstein, Brother Grimm, and Cali Kid get you in le groove. Plus! Free â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;60s hairstyling by Peter Thomas Hair design from 9-11pm, oh mon dieu. Fri/12, 9pm, $10. Rickshaw Stop, 155 Fell, SF. www.bardotagogo.com

45 LIVE Basically, hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the deal: funky beat all-stars Prince Paul, Peanut Butter Wolf, Dam Funk, J Rocc, Shortkut, and Platurn play vinyl funk and soul 45s while we eat free BBQ and live the dream. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m kind of freaking out about it. Fri/12, 9pm, $20 advance. ighty, 119 Utah, SF. www.mighty119.com

FAG FRIDAYS GETS HONEY DIPPED

NON STOP BHANGRA Sat/13, 9pm-late, $10 before 10pm, $15 after. Public Works, 161 Erie, SF. www.publicsf.com

BLOCKHEAD

Fri/12, 10pm-late, $5. DNA Lounge, 375 11th St., SF. www.dnalounge.com

Thu/11, 10pm-3am, $10. Mighty, 119 Utah, SF. www.facebook.com/ritualsf

editorials

Fri/12, 9pm-late, $5. f8, 1172 Folsom, SF. www.feightsf.com

The gay â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;n joyful big-room house monthly gets a sticky splash of techno from Honey Soundsystem boys Jason Kendig and P-Play. Lick your fingers.

The Ritual bass crewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weekly Thursday parties, now at Mighty, are pretty damned great â&#x20AC;&#x201D; especially when theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re reconnecting with their lowdown influences. Like, say, seminal Ninja Tune ripper Blockhead, whose 2004 disc Music by Cavelight was a prophetic reanimation of triphop, pitch-shifted vocals and all.

24 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

photo by odell hussey

              

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soul in the dhol: raise your hands for non stop Bhangra

Bhanginâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Music nightlife

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HANUKKAH IN JULY Hostess Lil Miss Hot Mess hoists a giant MANorah for a summertime festival of lites at weekly artsy dragsplosion Some Thing. With DJ Josh Cheon and performances by Jil Filta Fish, Elijah Minelli, and more. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a mitzvah! Fri/12, 10pm-late, $8. The Stud, 399 Ninth St., SF. www.studsf.com

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Sat/13, 10pm, $5 for two. Showdown, 10 Sixth St., SF.

JACQUES RENAULT I am digging mysterious new party promotion entity Isis. Who else would start a press release for an appearance by DC disco re-edit/acid-jack prince Jacques Renault with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mighty mother, daughter of the Nile, we rejoice as you join us with the rays of the sun.â&#x20AC;? This party should be equally as supernatural. Sat/13, 9:30pm-3am, $10 advance. Public Works, 161 Erie, SF. www.publicsf.com

DISCO DADDY The Eagle: our beloved old school rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;n roll gay leather biker bar. Bus Station John: our beloved old school gay bathhouse disco and funk DJ. Put them both together on Sunday evening once a month and what do you get? Hot fudge! (And a real cute dance party.) Sun/14, 7pm-midnight, $5. SF Eagle, 398 12th St., SF. www.sf-eagle.com

SFAP: OK COMPUTER Fantastic drag collective The San Francisco Album Project is presenting â&#x20AC;&#x153;theatrical lipsynch reenactmentsâ&#x20AC;? of epic discs every month, this time taking on Thom Yorke and Co.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;OK Computer,â&#x20AC;? which basically made widescreen rock OK again in the late â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90s. With Trixxie Carr, Precious Moments, Raya Light, Nikki Sixx Mile, and many more. Sun/14, doors at 7pm, show at 8pm, $15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$20. The Chapel, 777 Valencia, SF. www.peacheschrist.com 2

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MUSIC LISTINgS WEDNESDAY 10 ROCK

Bottom of the Hill:'BMTF1SJFTU &WFSZPOF*T%JSUZ  .FSSJNBDL QN  Cafe Du Nord:/JHIUNBSF"JS )BQQZ)PMMPXT 5IF #SPBEIFET QN  The Chapel:5IF'MBNJOÂľ(SPPWJFT %FOJ[5FL 5IF $IVDLMFCFSSJFT %+4JE1SFTMFZ QN  Elbo Room:5IF5BNCP3BZT 5XJO4UFQT %+TFUCZ 1IOUN$MVC1PQHBOH QN GSFF Milk Bar:%PXO%JSUZ4IBLF 5IF&MFDUSJD.BHQJF  "DSPCBUJD%VEFT %JTBQQFBSJOH1FPQMF %+"M-PWFS  QN  Rickshaw Stop:5IF.FMPEJD 4POH1SFTFSWBUJPO 4PDJFUZ %ZMMBO)FSTFZ QN 

DANCE

Cat Club:²#POEBHF"(P(P ³QN   XXXCPOEBHFBHPHPDPN Edinburgh Castle:² ³QN  F8:'PMTPN4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²)PVTFQJUBMJUZ ³QN  XXXIPVTFQJUBMJ UZTGDPN The Knockout:²%JTPSEFS ³Disorder, Vol. 1WJOZM SFMFBTFQBSUZXJUI&MFWFO1POE %SBC.BKFTUZ %+ /JDLJF QN  XXXEJTPSEFSTGDPN Monarch:²4PVM1IVOLUJPO ³QN Q Bar:²#PPUZ$BMM ³QN  XXXCPPUZDBM MXFEOFTEBZTDPN

HIP-HOP

Brick & Mortar Music Hall:%B7JODJ .BJO "UUSBLJPO[ :PVOH(VMMZ 4IBEZ#MB[F "NNCVTI  4BZLOPXMFEHF QN GSFF

ACOUSTIC

Cafe Divine:$SBJH7FOUSFTDP.FSFEJUI"YFMSPE  QN GSFF Johnny Foleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s:5FSSZ4BWBTUBOP QN GSFF The Lost Church:$BQQ4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  .BSJP%J4BOESP #JMM'SJFE QN  Plough & Stars:-FJHI(SFHPSZ QN

JAZZ

Amnesia:(BVDIP &SJD(BSMBOEµT+B[[4FTTJPO %JOL %JOL%JOL QN GSFF XXXHBVDIPKB[[DPN Burritt Room:4UPDLUPO4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  5FSSZ%JTMFZµT3PDLJOH+B[[5SJP QN GSFF Club Deluxe:1BUSJDL8PMGG QN GSFF Le Colonial:5IF$PTNP"MMFZDBUT QN GSFF Savanna Jazz Club:²$BUµT$PSOFS ³QN  Top of the Mark:3JDBSEP4DBMFT 8FEOFTEBZT  QN 

INTERNATIONAL

Bissap Baobab:UI4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  5JNCB%BODF1BSUZ QN 

for club addresses, visit SFBg.COM/VENUE-gUIDE ²5VCFTUFBL$POOFDUJPO ³X%+#VT 4UBUJPO+PIO QN  The Cafe:.BSLFU 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²¡1BO%VMDF ³QN  XXXDMVCQBQJDPN Cat Club:²"MM´T5IVSTEBZT ³QN  The Cellar:4VUUFS 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²90 ³X%+T"TUSP3PTF QN  'BDFCPPL DPN1BSUZ90 DNA Lounge:#JU8FBQPO $PNQVUF)FS  $SBTIGBTUFS (OBSCPPUT %+5SBDFS 7+&MJPU-BTI  QN  Elbo Room:²"GSPMJDJPVT ³QN  BGSPMJ DJPVTPSH Madrone Art Bar:²/JHIU'FWFS ³QN BGUFS QN Mighty:²3JUVBM ³QN  'BDFCPPL DPN3JUVBM4' Q Bar:²5ISPXCBDL5IVSTEBZ ³QN GSFF Ruby Skye:²"XBLFOJOH ³QN  Temple:)PXBSE 4BO'SBODJTDP  #SJBO,FBSOFZ 3FWFSTF .JULB QN  BEWBODF CSZBOLFBSOFZTGFWFOUCSJUFDPN Underground SF:)BJHIU 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²#VCCMF ³QN GSFF

Wednesday 7/10 Leigh gregory + Patrick MaLey Thursday 7/11 Set Dancing, the Shannon cĂŠiLĂ­ banD Friday 7/12 teLL river + croSby tyLer saTurday 7/13 Seek the freek + DuSty green boneS banD sunday 7/14 SeiSiĂşn, cieran MarSDen & frienDS Monday 7/15 haPPy hour aLL Day, free PooL Tuesday 7/16 Sean oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;DonneLL anD Jack giLDer

116 cLeMent St. â&#x20AC;˘ 751-1122 â&#x20AC;˘ thePLoughanDStarS.coM

haPPy hour DaiLy 3-7PM

ACOUSTIC

Atlas Cafe:#FSNVEB(SBTT QN GSFF Cafe Du Nord:/FX"NFSJDBO'BSNFST 5JO$VQ 4FSFOBEF .BVSJDF5BOJ&M%FPSB QN   The Chapel:$IVDL.FBE)JT(SBTTZ,OPMM#PZT  )PSTFTIPF)JMM QN  Plough & Stars:5IF4IBOOPO$nJMr#BOE 4FDPOE 5IVSTEBZPGFWFSZNPOUI QN

tues july 16

JAZZ

Bottle Cap:1PXFMM 4BO'SBODJTDP  5IF/PSUI#FBDI4PVOE QN GSFF Club Deluxe:.JDIBFM1BSTPOT QN GSFF Harry Dentonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Starlight Room:1PXFMM 4BO 'SBODJTDP "O&WFOJOHXJUI.PMMZ 3JOHXBME QN  TPDJFUZDBCBSFUDPN Le Colonial:$PTNP 4BO'SBODJTDP  4UFWF-VDLZ5IF3IVNCB#VNT QN The Royal Cuckoo:.JTTJPO 4BO'SBODJTDP  $ISJT4JFCFSU QN GSFF Savanna Jazz Club:&EEZ3BNJSF[ QN  Top of the Mark:4UPNQZ+POFT QN  Yerba Buena gardens:'PVSUI4U.JTTJPO 4BO 'SBODJTDP -BUJO+B[[:PVUI&OTFNCMF PG4BO'SBODJTDP QN GSFF Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s San Francisco:)BMJF-PSFO QN  

INTERNATIONAL

Amnesia:+BQPOJ[F&MFQIBOUT QN Bissap Baobab:UI4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²1Bµ-BOUF ³QN  CONTINUES ON PAGE 26 >>

BLUES

Thursday July 11 Temple and sondra presenT Bryan Kearney (18+) Friday July 12 Temple presenTs recall Vol. 2 wiTh mario duBBz, Brian salazar and JaVyi Velasco

Biscuits and Blues:5IF)PVOE,JOHT QN  

FUNK

Vertigo:1PML 4BO'SBODJTDP ²'VMM 5JMU#PPHJF ³X,64'JO&YJMF%+T QN BN GSFF XXXTBWFLVTGPSH

SOUL

saTurday July 13 Temple and madmen presenT lazerTag

The Cellar:4VUUFS 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²$PMPS.F#BEE ³QN The Royal Cuckoo:.JTTJPO 4BO'SBODJTDP  'SFEEJF)VHIFT$ISJT#VSOT  QN GSFF

THURSDAY 11 ROCK

Bottom of the Hill:(SFBU"NFSJDBO$JUJFT .BUU+BGGF 5IF%JTUSBDUJPOT .-PDLXPPE1PSUFS QN   The Independent:4PSOF %JSUXJSF .FUBM.PUIFS  QN  The Lab:UI4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  5ISFF%BZ4UVCCMF +PIO5SVCFF5IF6HMZ+BOJUPST PG"NFSJDB .FSDIBOUTPGUIF/FX#J[BSSF QN   Thee Parkside:%BJLBJKV "MPIB4DSFXESJWFS 5IF "UPN"HF QN 

sunday July 14 Temple and epr presenT sunseT arcade

DANCE

Aunt Charlieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lounge:5VSL 4BO'SBODJTDP 

editorials

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July 10 - 16, 2013 / SFBG.com

25

MUSIC LISTINgS CONT>>

FRIDAY 12

Verdi Club:.BSJQPTB 4BO'SBODJTDP  5IF7FSEJ$MVC.JMPOHB QN 

ROCK

EXPERIMENTAL

The Luggage Store:.BSLFU 4BO'SBODJTDP  K.BB -PC +PSEBO(MFOO3PCFSU -PQF[ QN 

Bottom of the Hill:(MBDJFST #FXBSFPG4BGFUZ  8JOGSFE&&ZF QN  Hemlock Tavern:3F[[JO $PVOU%BOUF QN GSFF The Independent:3PHVF8BWF )FZ.BSTFJMMFT  QN  Milk Bar:%BOHFSNBLFS .BSZ+POFTÂľ-JHIUT )JCCJUZ %JCCJUZ QN  Thee Parkside:6SCBO8BTUF 0VUPG5VOF  (VBOUBOBNP%PHQJMF *MM$POUFOU QN 

SOUL

DANCE

BLUES

Biscuits and Blues:4IBOF%XJHIU QN 

Brick & Mortar Music Hall:,FOESB.PSSJT .ZSPO & %+1MBUVSO QN 

1015 Folsom:#FJSVU %+TFU .S-JUUMF+FBOT )BSE 'SFODI%+T #SB[B%+T QN BEWBODF Amnesia:²*OEJF4MBTI ³QN  BeatBox:UI4U 4BO'SBODJTDP 

²#FBSTJOUIF%BSL ³QN  The Cafe:.BSLFU 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²#PZ#BS ³X%+.BUU$POTPMB QN  Cat Club:²%BSL4IBEPXT ³QN  CFGPSF QN XXXGBDFCPPLDPNDMVCEBSLTIBEPXT DNA Lounge:²'BH'SJEBZT(FUT)POFZ%JQQFE ³ QN  Elbo Room:²-BTU/JUF"T*OEJF%BODF1BSUZ ³ QN  The EndUp:²'FWFS ³QN F8:'PMTPN4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²7JOUBHF ³QN GSFF Lookout:UI4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²):4- ³QN  Monarch:<B>QFOEJDTTIVGGMF %S3FL "OU"DJE  "CBOEPOFE'PPUXFBS .BY(BSEOFS QN   Project One:3IPEF*TMBOE 4BO'SBODJTDP  ².PEVMBS ³X4VQFS'MV 1FESP"SCVMV  .':34 QN  XXXNPEVMBSOJHIUT DPN

Public Works:&SJF 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²3FTPOBUF ³QN ²#FMPXUIF3BEBS ³ QN  Rebel:.BSLFU 4BO'SBODJTDP ²'JY :S)BJS ³QN  Rickshaw Stop:²#BSEPU"(P(P1SF#BTUJMMF%BZ %BODF1BSUZ ³QN 

HIP-HOP

Brick & Mortar Music Hall:/FX%FBMFST QN   1PTUIPQFPSHKVTUJOEPUZ John Colins:.JOOB 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²)FBSUCFBU ³QN  Mighty:²-JWF ³QN BEWBODF MJWF FWFOUCSJUFDPN

ACOUSTIC

Bazaar Cafe:²4JOH0VUPG%BSLOFTT ³QN  XXXTJOHPVUPGEBSLOFTTPSH

The Chapel:.FHBO,FFMZ+FTTJF#SJEHFT QN   Plough & Stars:5FMM3JWFS $SPTCZ5ZMFS QN

JAZZ

Cafe Royale:1PTU 4BO'SBODJTDP  3PCFSU,FOOFEZ5SJP QN Harry Dentonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Starlight Room:1PXFMM 4BO 'SBODJTDP "O&WFOJOHXJUI.PMMZ 3JOHXBME QN  TPDJFUZDBCBSFUDPN The Royal Cuckoo:.JTTJPO 4BO'SBODJTDP  +VMFT#SPVTTBSE QN GSFF Savanna Jazz Club:4BWBOOB+B[[5SJP QN 

INTERNATIONAL

Bissap Baobab:UI4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  ².BLPTTB8FTU ³QN  Cafe Cocomo:5BTUF'SJEBZT QN  XXX UBTUFGSJEBZTDPN

WEDnESDAY 7/10 AT 6Pm, no CoVER!

CREPESCULE

DJ 2LooSE & DR. DUmDUm

PoST PUnK/nEW WAVE/CinEmATiQUE FoLLoWinG AT 9Pm, FREE! DJS CLUTCH & SiKK LAFFTER PRESEnT:

SFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S onLY mUSiCAL CHAiR DAnCE PARTY! R&B STomPERS,inTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;L STinGERS, GiRL GRoUP BUmPS & WEiRDo HUmPS!

THURSDAY 7/11 AT 7Pm, FREE!

BoRn 2 LATE! W/ DJ CooL JERK

60S/70S PSYCH, SoUL, FUnK, FUZZ & FREAKoUTS FRom ARoUnD THE WoRLD! FoLLoWinG AT 10Pm, no CoVER!

FESTiVAL â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;68

RoCKSTEADY, EARLY REGGAE & SKA

SELECToRS: ADAm & DJ VAnESSA SPECiAL GUEST: THE SELECToR DJ KiRK FRiDAY 7/12 AT 7Pm, $15/$20 SWinG inTo SUmmER W/

JC HoPKinS BiGGiSH BAnD (nYC)

W/ SVETLAnA SHmULYiAn!!! & DJ ADAm LEE FoLLoWinG AT 10Pm, $5

LooSE JoinTS!

DJ Tom THUmP/DAmon BELL/CEnTiPEDE

FUnK/SoUL/HiP-HoP/LATin/AFRoBEAT SATURDAY 7/13 AT 7Pm, $5 To $50 SLiDinG SCALE

CARoL QUEEn BiRTHDAY BASH!

A BEnEFiT FoR THE CEnTER FoR SEX & CULTURE Simon SHEPPARD, LoRELEi LEE, & ninA HARTLEY! FoLLoWinG AT 10Pm, $5

EL SUPERRiTmo!

Something

W/ RoGER mĂĄS Y EL KooL KYLE

CUmBiA/DAnCEHALL/SALSA/HiP-HoP

Cool

SUnDAY 7/14 AT 7:30Pm, $8

SKYSTonE

JEFFREY LUCK LUCAS â&#x20AC;˘ SEA DRAmAS

Friday, July 12 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:45 pm FREE EVENTS

Celebrate the era of Richard Diebenkorn with an evening of jazz from the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;50s and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;60s by the Marcus Shelby Quintet. Plus, enjoy the lecture Art for the City: Civic Arts for Urban Change by Susan Wels and Kate Patterson, presented in partnership with the San Francisco Arts Commission.

Fees apply for galleries, special exhibitions, dining, and cocktails.

deyoungmuseum.org/fridays Images (clockwise from top left): Photograph by Adrian Arias; photograph by Peter Varshavsky; photographs by Justine Highsmith; photograph by Marissa Sonkin; Š FAMSF

monDAY 7/15 AT 7:30Pm, FREE!

SAD BASTARDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CLUB

mAURiCE TAni â&#x20AC;˘ AmY BLASHKE â&#x20AC;˘ mELiSSA PHiLLiPS W/ JAmES DEPRATo â&#x20AC;˘ CHRiS GUTHRiDGE â&#x20AC;˘ Tom HEYmAn FoLLoWinG AT 10Pm, FREE!

CHiCKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;n CooP JUKE

VinTAGE CoUnTRY W/DJ TEETS!

TUESDAY 7/16 AT 7Pm, $5

WRiTE CLUB!

WE PUnCH YoU W/ oUR WoRD FiSTS! FoLLoWinG AT 9:30Pm, FREE!

â&#x20AC;&#x153;LoST & FoUnDâ&#x20AC;?

DEEP & SWEET 60S SoUL DJS LUCKY, PRimo & FRiEnDS 3225 22nd ST. " miSSion SF CA 94110 415-647-2888 â&#x20AC;˘ www.makeoutroom.com 26 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

editorials

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MUSIC LISTINgS Little Baobab:UI4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²1BSJT%BLBS"GSJDBO.JY$PVQF%FDBMF ³ QN Mezzanine:4FV+PSHF QN 

QN4BU +VMZ QN  The Knockout:²/JHIUCFBU ³QN  Madrone Art Bar:²:P.PNNB.0.8FFLFOE &EJUJPO ³QN  GSFFCFGPSFQN 

BLUES

SATURDAY 13

Biscuits and Blues:+PIO-FF)PPLFS+S  QN  Boom Boom Room:#JMM1IJMMJQQF QN GSFF

EXPERIMENTAL

Center for New Music:5BZMPS4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  (JOP3PCBJS.BUUIFX(PPEIFBSU  QN 

SOUL

Edinburgh Castle:²4PVM$SVTI ³QN GSFF Feinsteinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at the Nikko:.BTPO4U 4BO 'SBODJTDP /JDPMF)FOSZ 'SJ +VMZ 

KITCHEN OPEN MON-SAT AT 6PM

7/10 £8)*4,&:8&%/&4%":¦4¤ 1#3"/%8)*4,&:4)05 "--/*()5-0/(

7/13

"-$0)0-"$"64513&4&/54

#655130#-&.4 4&$3&54&$3&5"3*&4 1.Â&#x2026;0/-:

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7/15

£.0+*50.0/%":4¤

.0+*504"--%":"/% "44&/%)"11:)0631. 50".0''%3"'58&--

7/16 £5&26*-"5&330356&4%":¦4¤ 4)050'5&26*-"8*5) "$"/0'5&$"5&

BENDERS BAR & GRILL 806 S. VAN NESS @ 19TH 415.824.1800 MON-THU 4PM-2AM FRI-SUN 2PM-2AM WWW.BENDERSBAR.COM

ROCK

Benderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s:47BO/FTT 4BO'SBODJTDP  #VUU1SPCMFNT 5IF4FDSFU4FDSFUBSJFT  QN  The Chapel:.BNNBUVT 3FTJEVBM&DIPFT 1FBDF  QN  Hemlock Tavern:4POOZ7JODFOU 7JPMFOU$IBOHF  &UUT'FBUT 108 QN  The Independent:3PHVF8BWF )FZ.BSTFJMMFT  QN  The Knockout:#JH#MBDL$MPVE %SVOL%BE $$3 )FBEDMFBOFS QN

Slimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s:1BMNT $SZQUT QN  Thee Parkside:.PN -JUUMF1JMHSJNT 4PDL$IJMESFO  '/6$MPOF QN 

DANCE

Amnesia:².FO8JMM.PWF:PV ³QN Cat Club:²$MVC(PTTJQ&DIP5IF#VOOZNFOWT 5IPNQTPO5XJOT ³QN  DNA Lounge:²#PPUJF4' ³QN  S.F. Eagle:UI4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²%BSL%BZT ³QN²4BEJTUJD4BUVSEBZT ³ QN GSFF Elbo Room:²5PSNFOUB5SPQJDBM ³QN  The EndUp:²&DMFDUSJDJUZ ³QN Madrone Art Bar:².VTJD7JEFP/JHIU ³QN  Mighty:²4BMUFE:FBS"OOJWFSTBSZ ³QN  BEWBODF Monarch:²(SFFO(PSJMMB-PVOHF ³QN  Public Works:&SJF 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²*TJT ³QN 

Rickshaw Stop:²$PDLCMPDL ³QN  XXX DPDLCMPDLTGDPN Slate Bar:UI4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²5IF,JTT(SPPWF4' ³QN GSFF The Stud:/JOUI4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²'SPMJD"$FMFCSBUJPOPG$PTUVNF%BODF ³ QN 

HIP-HOP

Double Dutch:²$BTI*7(PME ³QN GSFF

ACOUSTIC

Atlas Cafe:$SBJH7FOUSFTDP.FSFEJUI"YFMSPE  QN GSFF Bazaar Cafe:"MFY+JNFOF[ QN Bottom of the Hill:4IVHP5PLVNBSV 5BSB+BOF 0µ/FJM 4USBXCFSSZ4NPH QN  Brick & Mortar Music Hall:)BDLFOTBX#PZT 5IF #FBVUZ0QFSBUPST QN 

Plough & Stars:4FFLUIF'SFFL %VTUZ(SFFO#POFT #BOE QN The Riptide:4XFFU'FMPOZ QN GSFF

JAZZ

Cafe Royale:1PTU 4BO'SBODJTDP  5IF(MBTTFT QN Center for New Music:5BZMPS4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  4IFMUPO0DIT2VBSUFUXJUI.BSL %SFTTFS,KFMM/PSEFTPO QN  Harry Dentonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Starlight Room:1PXFMM 4BO 'SBODJTDP "O&WFOJOHXJUI.PMMZ 3JOHXBME QN  TPDJFUZDBCBSFUDPN The Royal Cuckoo:.JTTJPO 4BO'SBODJTDP  8JM#MBEFT+BDL5POF3JPSEBO  QN GSFF Savanna Jazz Club:4BWBOOB+B[[5SJP QN  (JOB)BSSJT5PSCJF1IJMMJQT QN  CONTINUES ON PAGE 28 >>

8FE

USJWJBXTBMQN UITUTXJOHUFUQN

wed 7/10 9pm FrEE

UIVS

IPUFJOTUFJOQN

CommUNE prESENTS

TwIN STEpS

ThE TAmbo rAyS DJ SETS by

phNTm CLUb & popgANg

GSJ

NBSTIBMMMBX

thu

AFro-TropI-ELECTrIC-SAmbA-FUNK

AFroLICIoUS

7/11 9:30pm $5 b4 wITh DJ/hoSTS 10:30 pLEASUrEmAKEr $8 AFTEr

TBU

OPSUICFBDI CSBTTCBOEQN

& SEñor oz

TVO

AND rESIDENT pErCUSSIoNISTS

UXBOHTVOEBZTQN UCBQN

fri DEbASEr prESENTS 7/12 10pm $10/$5 A 2000S INDIE DANCE pArTy b4 11pm wITh DJS

LAST NITE

NPO

UIFCBSSFOWJOFTQN

JAmIE JAmS AND EmDEE

UVF

sat

EBODFLBSBPLF XJUIEKQVSQMFQN

bErSA DISCoS prESENTS

TormENTA TropICAL

7/13 9pm FrEE pAUL DEVro (mAD DECENT) bEForE 9:30 JErEmy SoLE (KCrw) pm/$6 JAh wAVE (gUyANA) AFTEr wITh rESIDENTS

DJ oro 11 & DEEJAy ThEory

sun

GVMM!CBS!8!EBZT!¦!Ibqqz!Ipvs!N.G-!3.9qn PQFO!BU!3QN-!TBU!BU!OPPO LJUDIFO!PQFO!EBJMZ!¦!TVOEBZ!CSVODI!)22BN.4QN* :QN!¦!UIVSTEBZ-!KVMZ!22UI!¦!%8

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VSCBO!XBTUF

THURSDAY 7.11

PVU!PG!UVOF!¦!HVBOUBOBNP!EPHQJMF JMM!DPOUFOU! :QN!¦!TBUVSEBZ-!KVMZ!24UI!¦!%7

FRIDAY 7.12

NPN

MJUUMF!QJMHSJNT!¦!TPDL!DIJMESFO GOV!DMPOF! 5QN!¦!TVOEBZ-!KVMZ!25UI!¦!GSFF" PSJHJOBM!GBNPVT!UXBOH!TVOEBZT

SATURDAY 7.13

9QN!¦!TVOEBZ-!KVMZ!25UI!¦!%9

TUESDAY 7.16

DPVOUSZ!KFC!CPZOUPO!

OBNF

BSNFE!GPS!BQPDBMZQTF!¦!MBNFOU!DJUZTDBQF! HVUUFSTIBSL!¦!XBWF!XFMM!

xxx/uiffqbsltjef/dpn

2711!28ui!Tusffu!¦!526.363.2441 editorials

news

HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

MOn

6-10 P.M.

7/15 9pm $7

DANCE KARAOKE WITH

ELbo room prESENTS

mobILE DEAThCAmp pLUS hoLLywooD

JESUS

tue brAzILIAN wAX

7/16 9pm $7

THE HUSTLE

W/ BABY MUAH, SAKE ONE, SEAN G, JAMIE HUSTLE AND SARAH LEE (TRAP, RAP, HIP HOP)

FAT TUESDAyS prESENTS

bAmbA 5 (LIVE)

DJS CArIoCA & LUCIo K

KISSGROOVE SF

wed boUrgEoIS proDUCTIoNS prESENTS

ACCESS RHYTHM

CoLD ESKImo, DogCATChEr, ThE CrUX

7/17 9pm $8

WITH VINROC AND JULIO THEWHOOLIGAN (DEEP HOUSE, NU DISCO, FUTURE SOUL) (DANCE, FUNK, ELECTRONIC)

owL pAwS (Ep rELEASE)

UpComINg

ThU 7/18 AFroLICIoUS FrI 7/19 mArS ToDAy SAT 7/20 SAT NITE SoUL pArTy SUN 7/21 DUb mISSIoN: DJ SEp

)"11: )0634

!VQDPNJOH!TIPXT;

802:!.!!DBQUVSFE"!CZ!SPCPUT-!FMFQIBOU!SJGMF-!QJOT!PG!MJHIU 8031!.!MVJDJEBM-![FSP!CVMMTIJU-!OJIJMJTU!DVOU 8036!.!IPMZ!HSBJM-!TMPVHI!GFH-!TFSQFOU!DSPXO 8038!.!!UIF!EJDLJFT-!TIBSQ!PCKFDUT-!UIF!OFSW-!CPBUT" 8039!.!!JOUP!FUFSOJUZ-!BCOPSNBM!UIPVHIU!QBUUFSOT-!POUPHFOZ

DJ SEp J boogIE (DUbTroNIC SCIENCE)

music | cocktails | pool WEDNESDAY 7.10

DUb mISSIoN

7/14 9pm prESENTS ThE bEST IN DUb, rooTS FrEE rEggAE & DANCEhALL wITh b4 9:30pm $6 AFTEr AND

56&4%": 5)364"563%":

1.

ADVANCE TICKETS

slate-sf.com

www.browNpApErTICKETS.Com

2925 16th street :: san francisco, ca 94103 { ONE BLOCK FROM BART }

ELbo room IS LoCATED AT 647 VALENCIA NEAr 17Th

rsvp@slate-sf.com :: 415.558.8521

food + Drink

the selector

music

stage

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July 10 - 16, 2013 / SFBG.com

27

MUSIC LISTINGS EXPERIMENTAL

CONT>>

The Lab:UI4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²&YQFSJNFOUTJO-FWJUBUJPO"O&WFOJOHPG4PVOE BOE*NBHF ³ QN 

INTERNATIONAL

1015 Folsom:²1VSB ³QN  Bissap Baobab:UI4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  .JTJwO'MBNFODB QN Little Baobab:UI4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²1BSJT%BLBS"GSJDBO.JY$PVQF%FDBMF ³ QN Make-Out Room:²&M4VQFS3JUNP ³QN  Meridian Gallery:1PXFMM 4BO'SBODJTDP  )ZPTVOH+FPOH QN  Public Works:&SJF 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²/PO4UPQ#IBOHSB%PDVNFOUBSZ3FMFBTF1BSUZ ³ QN 

SOUL

Feinsteinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at the Nikko:.BTPO4U 4BO 'SBODJTDP /JDPMF)FOSZ 'SJ +VMZ  QN4BU +VMZ QN 

DNA Lounge:5IF4QBSLMZ%FWJM.FNPSJBM$FMFCSBUJPO  X-FF1SFTTPO5IF/BJMT QN GSFF Elbo Room:²%VC.JTTJPO ³QN  The Knockout:²4XFBUFS'VOL ³QN GSFF Lookout:UI4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²+PDL ³4VOEBZT QN  The Parlor:-FBWFOXPSUI 4BO'SBODJTDP  QN GSFF Q Bar:²(JHBOUF ³QN GSFF

SUNDAY 14

ACOUSTIC

ROCK

The Chapel:5IF4BO'SBODJTDP"MCVN1SPKFDU 3BEJPIFBE¾TOK Computer QN  Monarch:´-FDUSJD8BT)PVTF %VDLZPVTVDLFS  %SFBN5SFFT QN 

BLUES

Biscuits and Blues:3JDL&TUSJO5IF/JHIUDBUT  QN 

DANCE

Cafe Du Nord:-BVSFO.BOO5IF'BJSMZ0EE'PML  5IF&NJMZ"OOF#BOE .BSUZ0Âľ3FJMMZ QN   Club Deluxe:.VTJDBM.BZIFNXJUIUIF%JNFTUPSF %BOEZ QN GSFF Hemlock Tavern:;BDIBSZ#MJ[[BSE )VOUFST "LSPO &OHJOF QN 

Plough & Stars:4FJTJ|OXJUI$JFSBO.BSTEFO QN Tupelo:(SFFO4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²5XBOH4VOEBZ ³X+FXFMT+PIOOZ/BUJPO  QN GSFF

Bissap Baobab:UI4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²#SB[JM#FZPOE ³QN GSFF Brick & Mortar Music Hall:$IJDP.BOO &M,PPM,ZMF  QN 

JAZZ

BLUES

Amnesia:4MJN+FOLJOT QN  Club Deluxe:+BZ+PIOTPO QN GSFF Madrone Art Bar:²4VOEBZ4FTTJPOT ÂłQN GSFF Martuniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s:.BEBNF+P5SJP QN GSFF Revolution Cafe:OE4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  +B[[3FWPMVUJPO QN GSFFEPOBUJPO The Royal Cuckoo:.JTTJPO 4BO'SBODJTDP  -BWBZ4NJUI$ISJT4JFCFSU  QN GSFF Savanna Jazz Club:7PDBM+BNXJUI#FOO#BDPU  QN 

INTERNATIONAL

Biscuits and Blues:%BOJFM$BTUSP QN  Revolution Cafe:OE4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  )PXFMM%FWJOF QN GSFF

EXPERIMENTAL

The Lab:UI4U 4BO'SBODJTDP  ²(PEXBGGMF/PJTF1BODBLFT ³OPPO 

SOUL

Boom Boom Room:²%FFQ'SJFE4PVM ³QN  

MONDAY 15 ROCK

579 18TH STREET

(AT SAN PABLO)

OAKLAND, CA 94612 THENEWPARISH.COM

$ :6@@6<; @A @.; 3?.;06@0< 0. &! /?608.;1:<?A.?:B@600<:

Â&#x2019; Â&#x2019; Â&#x2019; Â&#x2019; Â&#x2019; Â&#x2019; Â&#x2019; Â&#x2019; g e t t i c k e t s at

yoshis.com Â&#x2019; Â&#x2019; Â&#x2019; Â&#x2019; Â&#x2019; Â&#x2019; Â&#x2019; Â&#x2019;

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oakland

Wed, Jul 10 World-beat fusion of raga with rock, jazz, funk & dance

Wed, Jul 10 Runner-up in Season 1 of The X-Factor USA

ASHwIN BATISH

Presents SITAR POwER! Thu, Jul 11 - Albums have reached #1 on Amazon Japanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jazz charts

HALIE LOREN Fri, Jul 12

Singer-Songwriter & R&B Diva: LA

CHANTĂ&#x2030; MOORE Sat, Jul 13- Malian blues guitar virtuoso touring new album Mon Pays

vIEUX FARKA TOURĂ&#x2030; Sun, Jul 14 - Iranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the wonders of world trance music.â&#x20AC;? LA Times

MAMAK KHADEM

.................................................

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EYE, EYE: COSTUMED UNIVERSITY OF CHICHESTER STUDENT DARREN PURNELL

MICHAEL PHILLIS AND SARA MOORE IN WUNDERWORLD

COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY OF CHICHESTER

PHOTO BY DAVID WILSON

Unfinished business UK and SF groups partner on performance-making

BY ROBERT AVILA arts@sfbg.com THEATER About two years ago, a small band of Brits came on an exploratory mission from the South of England to the Bay Area. They wanted to discover what, if anything, they had in common with their American counterparts in the theater world. The trip ended with a party in the Mission, where UK performance duo Action Hero performed A Western for their new friends way out West. And that might have been that. But a year later, in 2012, Action Hero (Gemma Paintin and James Stenhouse) was back, this time leading a workshop-residency at CounterPULSE. This collaboration with local artists (six people drawn mostly from the experimental dance and performance world) produced a one-night smorgasbord of performance, complete with a dining area, a menu, and a wait staff to bring you to your performance when it was ready. The evening was also a lively mixer, in which a friendly, jocular man named Ben Francombe — head of the pedagogically radical theater department at the small arts-focused University of Chichester in West Sussex — was an enthusiastic participant. As Francombe explained at the time, the school of performing arts at his university was eager to maintain contact with places like CounterPULSE as a partner in creative exchanges. “We share a commitment to the idea of ‘exchange’ in creative processes,” he wrote, in an email correspondence shortly before arriving in San Francisco, “and how artists develop methods of working through sharing ideas that are ‘foreign’ and different from their established practice. As an arts-based university, we are

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very interested in exploring ways in which our international connections stimulate our cultural ideas.” He added, “As a department we have a unique commitment to developing small-scale artists, and exploring radical ideas on the nature of theater and performance through facilitating interesting artists in interesting creative contexts.” That sounds good on paper, but what would it really mean in practice? The Chichester folks were the first to admit they didn’t really know but were seriously interested in finding out, as long as their counterparts here were game to work on it together. It turned out many were. The call for a joint programs of exchange geared to artist-centered new work found receptive ears among the experimental dance and performance makers gathered around CounterPULSE — whose working methods are already more or less akin to the devised approach facilitated at Chichester — but it also attracted people in the theater scene, where devised work (ensemble-driven theater built from the ground up) has its champions in companies like Mugwumpin and the work of artists like playwright-director Mark Jackson and actor Beth Wilmurt, co-creators of The Companion Piece at Z Space in 2011. Indeed, Z Space was soon onboard for more contact across the pond. Meanwhile, Jackson, Wilmurt, and CounterPULSE’s Julie Phelps all went over to Chichester in February of this year to see the university’s theater-performance MA program in action. This year, Chichester’s open-ended and open-minded dialogue with San Francisco’s theater and performance scene ramped up considerably with a just completed summer intensive at Z Space. And there’s more just ahead, including a festival of devised performance in October (at CounterPULSE) and, if all goes well, the inauguration sometime in 2014 of an international MFA program in theaterperformance making exclusively linked to San Francisco. “We decided to come here a couple of years ago,” says Louie Jenkins, a solo artist and Chichester faculty member who

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Stage listings are compiled by Guardian staff. Performance times may change; call venues to confirm. Reviewers are Robert Avila, Rita Felciano, and Nicole Gluckstern. Submit items for the listings at listings@sfbg.com.

THEATER OPENING

led the summer intensive in partnership with Mark Jackson. (Jackson has detailed the evolution of his involvement with, and his firsthand experience at, Chichester in an editorial promoting the intensive in Theatre Bay Area magazine.) “[We were] trying to understand what was happening here and whether what we did fit in with the ethos here. So we met with these different people. And the sense we had was that this was a fertile place.” The summer intensive involved 16 artists, including several Chichester masters students mixed in with the disparate group of local theater, dance, and performance practitioners. It also came with a public component, designed to further introduce this type of work to local audiences. This included a showing of MA student work and a shrewd little piece by Box Tracy Theatre Dance Company (Nixx Strapp-Freeman and Valerie Watkinson) at CounterPULSE. It also included last Saturday’s completely sold-out showing at ZBelow of work generated during the intensive — four pieces by four groupings of British and local artists. No director, no playwright, no set designers — the artists did everything, being responsible for the whole experience. The title of the evening was “Unfinished Business,” and yet it felt startlingly complete as an evening of performance. Still, the title is both apt and promising. At the same time, it was arguably one of the more exciting things to happen in a local theater for a long time. “We often talk about accidents,” says Jenkins, whose own history as an artist and resident of San Francisco in the 1990s inspired Chichester’s initial foray into the Bay Area. “Out of this process of trying to make work, an accident will happen, and that becomes what the piece is about. I know it’s a luxury to have time and space to be able to look at the processes, but in [the usual mode of theatrical production] there is very little flexibility for mistakes to happen, for accidents to happen. I think that is when the excitement comes into theater.” 2

Endgame Royce Gallery, 2901 Mariposa, SF; www. itetheater.org. $18-24. Previews Thu/11, 8pm. Opens Fri/12, 8pm. Runs Thu-Sat, 8pm. Through July 20. International Theater Ensemble performs Samuel Beckett’s Theatre of the Absurd classic. Keith Moon: The Real Me Eureka Theatre, 215 Jackson, SF; www.brownpapertickets.com. $40. Opens Wed/10, 8pm. Runs Thu-Sat, 8pm; Sun, 7pm. Through July 28. Mick Berry performs the world premiere of his solo play about the Who drummer. Wunderworld Creativity Theater, 221 Fourth St, SF; www.wunderworld.net. $10-15. Opens Sat/13, 11am and 2pm. Runs Sat-Sun, 2pm (also Sat, 11am; Sun, 5pm). Through Aug 11. Sara Moore and Michael Phillis wrote and star in this “worldpremiere human cartoon,” a pantomime about an elderly Alice going back down the rabbit hole.

BAY AREA

The Loudest Man on Earth Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305 Middlefield, Palo Alto; www.theatreworks. org. $19-73. Previews Wed/10-Fri/12, 8pm. Opens Sat/13, 8pm. Runs Tue-Wed, 7:30pm; Thu-Sat, 8pm (also Sat, 2pm); Sun, 2 and 7pm. Through Aug 4. TheatreWorks presents the world premiere of Catherine Rush’s unconventional romantic comedy starring acclaimed actor Adrian Blue, who is deaf. The Spanish Tragedy Forest Meadows Amphitheater, 890 Bella, Dominican University of California, San Rafael; www.marinshakespeare. org. $20-37.50. Opens Fri/12, 8pm. Presented in repertory Fri-Sun through Aug 11; visit website for performance schedule. Marin Shakespeare Company performs Thomas Kyd’s Elizabethan revenge tragedy. The Wiz Julia Morgan Theater, 2640 College, Berk; www.berkeleyplayhouse.org. $17-60. Previews Thu/11, 7pm; Sat/13, 2pm. Opens Sat/13, 7pm. Runs Wed-Thu and Sat, 7pm (also Sat, 2pm); Sun, noon and 5pm. Through Aug 25. Berkeley Playhouse travels to Oz with the Tony-winning musical.

ONGOING

Betrayal Phoenix Theatre, 414 Mason, Sixth Flr, SF; www.offbroadwaywest.org. $40. Thu-Sat, 8pm. Through July 20. Off Broadway West Theatre Company performs Harold Pinter’s out-of-sequence drama about an unfaithful married couple. Can You Dig It? Back Down East 14th — the 60s and Beyond Marsh San Francisco, 1062 Valencia, SF; www.themarsh.org. $15-50. Sat, 8:30pm; Sun, 7pm. Through Aug 25. Solo performer Don Reed returns with a prequel to his autobiographical coming-of-age hits, East 14th and The Kipling Hotel. Chance: A Musical Play About Love, Risk, and Getting it Right Alcove Theater, 415 Mason, Fifth Flr, SF; www.thealcovetheater.com. $40-60. Thu-Sat, 8pm (also Sat, 3pm); Sun, 5pm. Through July 28. New Musical Theater of San Francisco presents Richard Isen’s world

premiere work inspired by the writings of Oscar Wilde. Dark Play, or Stories for Boys Exit Theatre, 156 Eddy, SF; www.theexit.org. $5-20. Fri/12-Sat/13, 9pm. Do It Live! Productions offers a steadily engrossing production of this slippery play from Chicago playwright Carlos Murillo, wherein a lessthen-trusty teenage narrator, Nick (a clever, tightly wound, darkly charming Will Hand), addicted to “making shit up,” recounts his fateful internetbaiting of a fellow teen upon whom he had become fixated. As the unwitting object of Nick’s desire, sweet guy Adam (Adam Magil) gets pulled into an online love affair with Rachel (Amy Nowak), his first love, and — as fate and Nick would have it — Nick’s sister. But Rachel exists only online. And her equally fantastical evil stepdad (Nathan Tucker) soon intercedes, throwing Nick and Adam closer together. All of this disembodied desire floating around the ether leads to a physical climax even Freud might find a bit much, but the way there proves increasingly tense and interesting — if also a little frustrating itself at times in some strained plot points and, especially, its overwrought psychopathologizing of homoerotic desire. (Erik LaDue’s awkward set design also takes a little getting over.) But despite various flaws, the story intrigues, thanks to the solid performances from director Logan Ellis’s sure cast. Tucker and Kelly Rauch are dependable throughout in a varied range of sharp and often hilarious supporting roles. Nowak’s take on the vital (albeit imaginary) teen heroine is refreshingly straightforward. And Hand, while slightly slower to catch fire, ends up a persuasively complex figure at the center of it all. (Avila) Foodies! The Musical Shelton Theater, 533 Sutter, SF; www.foodiesthemusical.com. $30-34. Fri-Sat, 8pm. Open-ended. AWAT Productions presents Morris Bobrow’s musical comedy revue all about food. God of Carnage Shelton Theater, 533 Sutter, SF; www.sheltontheater.com. $26-38. Thu-Sat, 8pm. Through Sept 7. Shelton Theater peforms Yasmina Reza’s award-winning play about class and parenting. Hedwig and the Angry Inch Boxcar Theatre, 505 Natoma, SF; www.boxcartheatre.org. $27-43. ThuSat, 8pm. Open-ended. John Cameron Mitchell’s cult musical comes to life with director Nick A. Olivero’s ever-rotating cast. In A Daughter’s Eyes Brava Theater Center, 2781 24th St, SF; www.brava.org. $15. Thu/11Sat/13, 8pm; Sun/14, 3pm. Brava! For Women in the Arts and Black Artists Contemporary Cultural Experience presents the West Coast premiere of A. Zell Williams’ tale of two women: the daughter of a man on death row, and the daughter of the man he’s been convicted of killing. Sex and the City: LIVE! Rebel, 1760 Market, SF; trannyshack.com/sexandthecity. $25. Wed, 7 and 9pm. Open-ended. It seems a no-brainer. Not just the HBO series itself — that’s definitely missing some gray matter — but putting it onstage as a drag show. Mais naturellement! Why was Sex and the City not conceived of as a drag show in the first place? Making the sordid not exactly palatable but somehow, I don’t know, friendlier (and the canned a little cannier), Velvet Rage CONTINUES ON PAGE 30 >>

For information on the MFA program as it emerges and for details on the formal launch in October 2013: www.chi. ac.uk/theatremaking STAGE

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JULY 10 - 16, 2013 / SFBG.COM

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stage listings CONT>>

Productions mounts two verbatim episodes from the widely adored cable show, with Trannyshack’s Heklina in a smashing portrayal of SJP’s Carrie; D’Arcy Drollinger stealing much of the show as ever-randy Samantha (already more or less a gay man trapped in a woman’s body); Lady Bear as an endearingly out-to-lunch Miranda; and ever assured, quick-witted Trixxie Carr as pent-up Charlotte. There’s also a solid and enjoyable supporting cast courtesy of Cookie Dough, Jordan Wheeler, and Leigh Crow (as Mr. Big). That’s some heavyweight talent trodding the straining boards of bar Rebel’s tiny stage. The show’s still two-dimensional, even in 3D, but noticeably bigger than your 50” plasma flat panel. Update: new episodes began May 15. (Avila) So You Can Hear Me Marsh San Francisco, 1062 Valencia, SF; www.themarsh.org. $15-50. Thu-Fri, 8pm; Sat, 5pm. Through July 20. A 23-year-old with no experience, just high spirits and big ideals, gets a job in the South Bronx teaching special ed classes and quickly finds herself in over her head. Safiya Martinez, herself a bright young woman from the projects, delivers this inspired accounting of her time not long ago in perhaps the most neglected sector of the public school system — a 60-minute solo play that makes up for its relatively slim plot with a set of deft, powerful, lovingly crafted characterizations. These complex portraits, alternately hysterical and startling, offer their own moving ruminations on a violent but also vibrant stratum of American society, deeply fractured by pervasive poverty and injustice and yet full of restive young personalities too easily dismissed, ignored, or crudely caricatured elsewhere. An effervescent, big-hearted, and very talented performer, Martinez’s own bounding personality and contagious passion for her former students (as complicated as that relationship was), makes this deeply felt tribute all the more memorable. (Avila) Steve Seabrook: Better Than You Marsh San Francisco, 1062 Valencia, SF; www.themarsh. org. $15-50. Sat, 8:30pm. Extended through August 24. Self-awareness, self-actualization, selfaggrandizement — for these things we turn to the professionals: the self-empowerment coaches, the self-help authors and motivational speakers. What’s the good of having a “self” unless someone shows you how to use it? Writer-performer Kurt Bodden’s Steve Seabrook wants to sell you on a better you, but his “Better Than You” weekend seminar (and tie-in book series, assorted CDs, and other paraphernalia) belies a certain divided loyalty in its own self-flattering title. The bitter fruit of the personal growth industry may sound overly ripe for the picking, but Bodden’s deftly executed “seminar” and its behind-the-scenes reveals, directed by Mark Kenward, explore the terrain with panache, cool wit, and shrewd characterization. As both writer and performer, Bodden keeps his Steve Seabrook just this side of overly sensational or maudlin, a believable figure, finally, whose all-too-ordinary life ends up something of a modest model of its own. (Avila) Tinsel Tarts in a Hot Coma: The Next Cockettes Musical Hypnodrome, 575 10th St, SF; www. thrillpeddlers.com. $30-35. Thu-Sat, 8pm. Extended through July 27. Thrillpeddlers and director Russell Blackwood continue their Theatre of the Ridiculous series with this 1971 musical from San Francisco’s famed glitter-bearded acid queens, the Cockettes, revamped with a slew of new musical material by original member Scrumbly Koldewyn, and a freshly re-minted book co-written by Koldewyn and “Sweet Pam” Tent — both of whom join the large rotating cast of Thrillpeddler favorites alongside a third original Cockette, Rumi Missabu (playing diner waitress Brenda Breakfast like a deliciously unhinged scramble of Lucille Ball and Bette Davis). This is Thrillpeddlers’ third Cockettes revival, a winning streak that started with Pearls Over Shanghai. While not quite as frisky or imaginative as the production of Pearls, it easily charms with its fine songs, nifty routines, exquisite costumes, steady flashes of wit, less consistent flashes of flesh, and de rigueur irreverence. The plot may not be very easy to follow, but then, except perhaps for the bubbly accounting of the notorious New York flop of the same show 42 years ago by Tent (as poisoned-pen gossip columnist Vedda Viper), it hardly matters. (Avila) The World’s Funniest Bubble Show Marsh San Francisco, 1062 Valencia, SF; www.themarsh.org. $8-50. Sun, 11am. Through July 21. Louis “The Amazing Bubble Man” Pearl returns after a monthlong hiatus with his popular, kid-friendly bubble show.

Bay Area

Oil and Water This week: Rhythmix Cultural Works, 2513 Blanding, Alameda; www.sfmt.org. $15-25. Also Cedar Rose Park, 1300 Rose, Berk; www.sfmt.

30 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

stage theater org. Free. Sat/13-Sun/14, 2pm. At various NorCal venues through Sept. 2. The San Francisco Mime Troupe presents its 54th annual summer season; this year’s performance is comprised of two one-act musicals about corporations and the environment: Crude Intentions and Deal With the Devil. Sea of Reeds Ashby Stage, 1901 Ashby, Berk; www.shotgunplayers.org. $20-35. Wed-Thu, 7pm; Fri-Sat, 8pm; Sun, 5pm. Through Aug 18. Josh Kornbluth’s brand new comedy — it involves atheism, oboes, and the Book of Exodus — opens at Shotgun Players “before it goes on Torah.” Superior Donuts Pear Avenue Theatre, 1220 Pear, Mtn View; www.thepear.org. $10-30. Thu/11Sat/13, 8pm; Sun/14, 2pm. Pear Avenue Theatre performs Tracy Letts’ comedy about the redemptive power of friendship. This Is How It Goes Aurora Theatre, 2081 Addison, Berk; www.auroratheatre.org. $32-60. Tue and Sun, 7pm (also Sun, 2pm); Wed-Sat, 8pm. Extended through July 28. An awkward love triangle between former high school classmates gets the caustic Neil LaBute treatment in Aurora Theatre Company’s production of This is How it Goes. Not content to merely skewer the familiar battles between the sexes, LaBute further prods his captive audience with the big stick of race relations, and the often unacknowledged prejudices that lurk in the hearts of men. And women. There are no innocents in this play, though each character certainly has moments where they play upon audience sympathies, only to betray them a few inflammatory lines later. As the marriage between the successful yet self-conscious African American alpha male Cody (Aldo Billingslea) and his neurotically placating Caucasian wife Belinda (Carrie Paff) erodes, the mostly affable (and former fat kid) “Man” (Gabriel Marin) insinuates himself in the middle of their troubled relationship, obviously still carrying the torch for Belinda he did 15 years ago — as well as the same wary animosity an unpopular kid carries for the star of the track team, in this case, Cody. All three actors do a very good job of shape-shifting between their middle-class Jekyll and Hyde selves, assisted in part by Marin’s amiable asides, which don’t so much lull the audience as tease them with the idea that things are about to get better, when they can only get worse. (Gluckstern)

Performance /dance

BATS Improv Bayfront Theater, B350 Fort Mason, SF; www.improv.org. Fri, 8pm. Through July 26. $20. BATS Improv performs spontaneous shows based on current events. “Botany’s Breath” Conservatory of Flowers, 100 JFK Dr, Golden Gate Park, SF; www.conservatoryofflowers.org. Wed/10-Sat/13, 7:30-8:30pm and 9-10pm (short, free outdoor video/dance performances take place each night from 8:30-9pm). $30. Epiphany Productions Sonic Dance Theater performs a site-specific contemporary dance work. Caroline Lugo and Carolé Acuña’s Ballet Flamenco Peña Pachamama, 1630 Powell, SF; www. carolinalugo.com. Sat/13, July 21, and 27, 6:15pm. $15-19. Flamenco performance by the motherdaughter dance company, featuring live musicians. “Courage” CounterPULSE, 1310 Mission, SF; www.counterpulse.org. Fri/12-Sat/13, 8pm. $1015. Rasika Kumar presents a solo Bharatanatyam performance. “Mission Position Live” Cinecave, 1034 Valencia, SF; www.missionpositionlive.com. Thu, 8pm. Ongoing. $10. Stand-up comedy with rotating performers. “Randy Roberts: Live!” Alcove Theater, 414 Mason, Ste 502, SF; www.thealcovetheater.com. Tue, 9pm. Through July 23. $30. The famed female impersonator takes on Cher, Better Midler, and other stars. “The Rape of Lucretia” Everett Auditorium, 450 Church, SF; www.merola.org. Thu/11, 7:30pm; Sat/13, 2pm. $25-60. Merola Opera Program presents Britten’s chamber opera. Red Hots Burlesque El Rio, 3158 Mission, SF; www. redhotsburlesque.com. Wed, 7:30-9pm. Ongoing. $5-10. Come for the burlesque show, stay for OMG! Karaoke starting at 8pm (no cover for karaoke). “San Francisco Magic Parlor” Chancellor Hotel Union Square, 433 Powell, SF; www.sfmagicparlor. com. Thu-Sat, 8pm. Ongoing. $40. Magic vignettes with conjurer and storyteller Walt Anthony. “Union Square Live” Union Square, between Post, Geary, Powell, and Stockton, SF; www.unionsquarelive.org. Through Oct 9. Free. Music, dance, circus arts, film, and more; dates and times vary, so check website for the latest. “Yerba Buena Gardens Festival” Yerba Buena Gardens, Mission between 3rd and 4th Sts, SF; www.ybgfestival.org. Through Oct 15. Free. This week: AXIS Dance Company, inMotion Dance Workshop (Sun/14, 1-2pm). 2

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From left, SALTA scenes (and a written missive) photos by daniel jefferies; written image by mara poliak

Independence movement Oakland’s SALTA collective plans to be ‘always looking for a space’

By Robert Avila arts@sfbg.com THEATER/DANCE The crowd outside the Niebyl-Proctor Marxist Library in Oakland was hopping. Fidgeting, really — imperceptibly at first, but soon enough bodies were bouncing and flailing, until the scrum of dancers packed shoulder-to-front-to-back on the sidewalk morphed their collective way through the front door. June 22 marked one year’s worth of PPP, the monthly performance series instigated by Oakland-based dance collective SALTA. As much a scene as a performance platform, PPP has been building an ethic of serious, unbridled experimentation in a low-key setting where failure is as valid as success, and no one ever encounters a price tag, a door charge, or a gate keeper. In terms of curation, PPP is equally promiscuous and shrewd, emphasizing a cross-generational perspective. “We try to reach out to people who have paved pathways for us,” says one SALTA member. “And we’ve been a little brazen about cold-emailing, cold-calling people who are in town, like Jeremy Wade.” Meanwhile, PPP has been building a unique audience for contemporary dance-performance and inspiring dialogue about the ethics of artmaking in the Bay Area. As an attribute of its headlong dive into experimentation and openness, PPP never sits still but moves restlessly and freely from one donated space to another. With each space come new networks as well as many PPP diehards. As its members explain, the anniversary installment marked the beginning of a summer hiatus for PPP, so that the collective can better focus on advancing other projects — all geared to creating space, in the widest sense, for dance in Oakland. SALTA is very much the restive and searching reflection of its food + Drink

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monthly series. What began as necessity — a space for dance — has been embraced as ethic. Not that the two were entirely strangers to begin with. As suggested by the conversation below with the members of SALTA (currently seven young women who preferred to speak as members of the collective rather than use their individual names), the realities of dance today imply, more than ever, a confrontation with the values of the dominant culture. SFBG Which came first, PPP or SALTA, and what’s the relationship? SALTA It’s funny, we were just talking about this earlier — it’s so confusing! SALTA I guess we, as a collective, came first. SALTA And we named that SALTA. SALTA But the name SALTA didn’t come until after we had the name PPP. SALTA We all came together in the idea of making space for dance. We were talking a lot about having an actual space and, in the meantime, [we said] let’s do a performance series. So that came second, and then it eclipsed a lot of what we’d been doing. We’re actually going to take a break over the summer and focus on some other stuff. SALTA We want to have classes, [and start] a dance publication. We want to work on networking. We’ve had some out of town people, but just because the West Coast can be very isolating. SFBG How did it all start? SALTA We’re all based in Oakland, and we wanted to have a space for dance to happen here — there are not a lot of venues that are really open for experimental work. That was the big thing: we’re sick of going to San Francisco all the time, and we want to figure out what the community is in Oakland and see what we can build. Something that’s been really cool from the beginning is that music

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a lot of non-dancers come to PPP, a lot of Oakland people who hear about it from different arenas. SALTA As well as there not being institutions interested in the kind of work we were doing, we were also not interested in institutionalizing art, in the way that it’s done. Also, financially, making it a free event was really important to us as artists and the way we want to make art. Not having to play this whole [“who do you know”] game. It was modeled, or got a lot of guidance from Jmy [Leary] in LA, who started [dance organizers/activists] AUNTS in New York. That’s been a model that we’ve been in dialogue with. SALTA She’s a mentor of ours, and a benefactor actually, through the Yellow House fund. We originally wanted to create a space here in Oakland similar to Pieter Pasd in LA, but the realities of being who we are as artists and where we are in our lives, as transient people, we thought we’d keep the space moving. SFBG I like this ethic of moving around, of asking for a free space each time. It seems a good social ethic to encourage, and it really pushes back against the spirit of the times. SALTA I feel as we continue to exist and assert ourselves into spaces, it opens up more. We have to find a space, ask for a free space, because as dancers we don’t have the resources to be renting all the time. So where there’s this huge scene of First Friday or whatever — “art’s happening all the time in Oakland” — we’re not a part of that. It would be interesting at some point. Well, we WILL be a part of that. [Laughter.] But what does that mean? And how much more legit, in a certain sense, do we have to become? 2 For a longer version of this interview, visit www.sfbg.com/pixel_vision; for more information on SALTA, visit www.saltadance.info.

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Hey, baby

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BY AIRIAL CLARK culture@sfbg.com

LIT A new children’s book with a social justice, allinclusive approach to reproduction? To anyone who might question the need for such a thing, look no further than Toronto-based sexual health educator and writer Cory Silverberg’s enormously successful crowdfunding campaign to get it published: $65,000 in one month. Not too bad to kickstart a picture book, eh? Silverberg, along with illustrator Fiona Smyth, noticed that the existing resources for parents to explain to preschool-aged children where they came from are by default heterosexual and gender binarybased, thus excluding many families and children. These books also don’t provide much guidance on topics like adoption or alternative fertilization methods. Silverberg’s fundraising campaign gave LGBT parents an opportunity to prove demand for a factual, age-appropriate children’s book inclusive of all families regardless of how many people are involved, what the orientation, gender identity, or other make up of the family is, or how it all came to be that way. Parents in the Bay Area offered a lot of the support. Dr. Sonja Mackenzie, faculty at the Health Equity Institute and Center for Research and Education on Gender and Sexuality (CREGS) at San Francisco State University is a queer parent of two children, aged three and seven. Dr. Mackenzie started looking for resources about birth and reproduction when her daughter was two and she was pregnant with her second child. She and her partner sought out media providing ageappropriate but real information about reproduction that reflected their two-mom family structure. For years they found nothing. Which is why when she saw the What Makes A Baby campaign, she pre-ordered copies for their daughter’s first grade class and their son’s preschool class. Dr. Mackenzie said her favorite parts of the book are the questions that ask children to reflect on “who helped bring together the sperm and the egg that made you?” — because of the possibilities for varied family structures that question allows for. That, she says, “is beyond what we have ever seen represented in children’s books.” She also noted the tear-jerker at the close of the book that asks, “Who was waiting for you to be born?” alongside a depiceditorials

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tion of many and varied people surrounding a baby. Bay Area backer Vicki Hudson, parent to two kids aged four and one, also started looking for books when her wife was pregnant with their second child. What Makes A Baby “enables many different types of families to feel represented. Our story was there.” She also appreciated the physiological accuracy of the preschool material. Hudson believes that using accurate reproductive terms empowers children. Another family structure included in the story’s framework is that of a single parent household. Hilary Brooks of Berkeley is a single mother by choice, whose five-year-old daughter has a known sperm donor. Brooks was excited about the book because she was “ecstatic to see this entry for young children... it’s more accurate, includes everyone, and will not alienate many of the children it needs to reach.” Once she received her copy she was not disappointed, “I love that love is included in this book, and that it is reframed as love for every child from their family — instead of originating in hetero lovemaking, like it was in the sex-ed books I read growing up.” Which is a main premise of Silverberg’s work, to provide a sexual education resource that is straight-friendly, but is also for the parents who don’t have anything else right now. Are mainstream publishers beginning to recognize this demand? There’s still an overwhelming amount of stigma associated with any book related to alternative sexuality. Despite the actual facts of life, books like What Makes A Baby are still too risky for mainstream publishers, it seems. Or maybe it just takes a pitch in a language they understand. After the outpouring of immediate and public financial support for Silverberg’s book, he was approached by multiple publishing houses, and has signed a threebook deal with Seven Stories Press, beginning with What Makes A Baby. Silverberg’s next volume might well be What Makes a Book Contract. 2

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FILM

FROM LEFT: MICHAEL B. JORDAN, OCTAVIA SPENCER, AND RYAN COOGLER ON THE FRUITVALE STATION SET; JORDAN (SECOND FROM LEFT) IN THE PIVOTAL BART SCENE. LOWER PHOTO BY RON KOEBERER

Once upon a time in Oakland 3ZBO$PPHMFSUBMLT0TDBS(SBOUBOE´'SVJUWBMF4UBUJPOµ

BY CHERYL EDDY

there were people on both sides of the fence, since this was a complicated situation. Some people were glad the story was being told; others were like, “That story doesn’t deserve to be told.” There were also a lot of opinions between those two ends of the spectrum. But overwhelmingly, the community supported the film in many ways, especially when they found out the approach we were taking.

cheryl@sfbg.com FILM By now you’ve heard of Fruitvale Station, the debut feature from Oakland-born filmmaker Ryan Coogler. With a cast that includes Academy Award winner Octavia Spencer and rising star Michael B. Jordan (The Wire, Friday Night Lights), the film premiered at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival, winning both the Audience Award and the Grand Jury Prize en route to being scooped up for distribition by the Weinstein Company. A few months later, Coogler, a USC film school grad who just turned 27, won Best First Film at Cannes. Accolades are nice, especially when paired with a massive PR push from a studio known for bringing home little gold men. But particularly in the Bay Area, the true story behind Fruitvale Station eclipses even the most glowing pre-release hype. The film opens with real footage captured by cell phones the night 22year-old Oscar Grant was shot in the back by BART police, a tragedy that inspired multiple protests and grabbed national headlines. With its grim ending already revealed, Fruitvale Station backtracks to chart Oscar’s final hours, with a deeper flashback or two fleshing out the troubled past he was trying to overcome. Mostly, though, Fruitvale Station is very much a day in the life, with Oscar (Jordan, in a nuanced performance) dropping off his girlfriend at work, picking up supplies for a birthday party, texting friends about New Year’s Eve plans, and deciding not to follow through on a drug sale. Inevitably, much of what transpires is weighted with extra meaning — Oscar’s mother (Spencer) advising him to “just take the train” to San Francisco that night; Oscar’s tender interactions with his young daughter; the death of a friendly stray dog, hit by a car as BART thunders overhead. It’s a powerful, stripped-down portrait that belies Coogler’s rookie-filmmaker status.

I spoke with Coogler the day after Fruitvale Station’s emotional local premiere at Oakland’s Grand Lake Theater. San Francisco Bay Guardian How was the screening at the Grand Lake? Ryan Coogler It was intense! Pretty much everybody at the screening had a stake in the film and the story: being from the Bay Area, being there when [Grant’s death] happened, being a member of Oscar’s family, being an employee of BART or a law enforcement officer, being a member of my family, or being someone who opened up their home or business to our film. Everybody was there under one roof, you know? In many ways, we wanted our film to be something that brought people together — and that screening was a personification of that. SFBG The film doesn’t make Oscar out to be a saint; rather, it shows that he was a real human who’d made some serious mistakes. Were you careful to portray him that way? RC Absolutely. We set out to examine him through the lens of his relationships with the people who knew him best. I think that’s often what’s not looked at, in terms of tragedies that get politicized like this: people forget that this guy was a person who mattered to spe-

cific people — and he couldn’t make it home to those people. When you know somebody intimately, you know their good qualities and their faults. You know their flaws firsthand, and [their behavior] affects you firsthand. I think it would have been a mistake not to look at the things he was struggling with in his life. SFBG You were born in 1986, the same year as Oscar, and you���re both from the East Bay. Were there other things that drew you to his story? RC Those commonalities were a major factor. But young people like Oscar Grant’s lives are lost constantly over violence, and I was really interested in exploring why it happens, and why people shouldn’t be OK with it. Oscar was the kind of person who is often marginalized, both in the media and in fiction films. I thought that giving his story this type of personal perspective could be eye-opening for people that wouldn’t get to know a character like him in their own lives. So that’s what really drew me to it — to add a perspective that might promote some healing and some growth. SFBG What was the reaction when members of Oscar’s community found out you were making the film? RC The Bay Area is culturally diverse, but it’s also diverse as far as opinions go. Obviously,

BEING THERE – Friday July 19, 8

SFBG Did you ever consider making the BART cops full-fledged characters, or did you always plan to just focus on Oscar? RC I decided from the beginning that Oscar would be the focal point of the story. That was the type of film that I wanted to make, and that was the one perspective that I felt wasn’t really heard — because he’s not around to speak anymore. In terms of filmmaking, it was really a creative choice. You have these types of films that follow one character around, and we really wanted to follow Oscar and see how other characters bump off of him. In the scope of his day, the cops were only involved for a very small amount of time. SFBG BART itself is almost a character in the film. It’s something that non-locals might not pick up on, but Bay Area residents will be able to tell how carefully you chose your locations to include it in the background. RC When I was researching the film, I noticed a lot of things that were always there, but that I hadn’t thought about before. In San Francisco, BART is underground. You don’t see or hear it when you’re walking around. In the East Bay, however, it’s always above you. Oscar’s from the East Bay, and I’m from the East Bay, so that’s how I know BART. It’s something that you can always hear in the distance — and it’s something that rushes over you. 2 FRUITVALE STATION opens Fri/12 in Bay Area theaters.

pm (Doors open 7pm)

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the coven rises: sharon needles, Peaches christ, alaska thunderFuck, honey mahogany. Photo by Jose A GuzmAn Colon

We are the weirdos, mister 1FBDIFT$ISJTUSBJTFT´5IF$SBGUµXJUI4IBSPO/FFEMFTBOE"MBTLB5IVOEFSGVDL By Emily SavagE emilysavage@sfbg.com Film RuPaul’s Drag Race season four winner Sharon Needles and boyfriend/season five finalist Alaska Thunderfuck rarely do live shows together. But for Peaches Christ, and her stage-and-screen showing of witchtacular occult movie The Craft (1996), they made an exception. The Pittsburgh-based couple will star alongside one another in Christ’s Craft-based pre-movie play, as pure evil “Nancy” (originally played to perfection by wild-eyed, real life Wiccan actress Fairuza Balk) and Neve Campbell’s scarred and shy “Bonnie.” The rest of the gothy teen coven will be filled out by Christ as good witch “Sarah” and San Francisco’s first RuPaul’s Drag Race contestant Honey Mahogany as “Rochelle.” “It’s such a foursome vehicle,” Christ says in a phone call. “I said to Sharon, ‘how do you feel about working with your boyfriend?’ Obviously it makes more sense for them to split themselves up and do more gigs. And especially since Sharon was such a phenomenon and Alaska is now coming fresh off the show, and she was such a hit. But I said, ‘see if you’ll make an exception for me?’” Christ has been sending up cult classics in San Francisco since 1998, and says that it’s become increasingly clear that she needs to keep looking for newly cult titles. (This November look out for 9 to 5 with Pandora Boxx, and likely, a Clueless send-up.) “[The Craft] was brought to my attention by some of my fans these past few years, so I rewatched it and determined like, oh my god, why did I ever dismiss this? It’s witchy goth girls. It’s everything, it’s grunge, it’s goth, it’s witch.” And Thunderfuck and Needles were both enamored of the film from an early age. “It was like, one of those movies 34 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

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that everyone knew and saw when I was in high school and it made us feel like we were witches too, which we weren’t, we were just like, nerdy theater kids,” Thunderfuck nasally says from a Best Western hotel in Chicago. “But it made us feel really badass. And everyone was a weirdo in high school anyway.” “And I’m from the ‘90s so the witchcraft was always there,” Needles adds. The film has grown cult thanks to now-iconic scenes of the witches looking fierce at Catholic school, walking in a line down the hallways with sexy ‘90s music filling the montages. Favorites scenes by the performers include the ones of the witches down at the beach, intensely invoking “Manon” then passing out after an electric bolt hits Nancy, or the next morning, walking by beached whales and sharks, or giddily casting spells on another while driving through town, or vividly messing with teenqueen parties, and throwing sleazy jerks out of windows. During our conversation, Needles perfectly intones the Nancy line, “then why are you still bleeding?!” “I’ll tell you, this was one of the hardest and most challenging stage plays I’ve ever had to write, because the movie is so full of moments that people love, trying to cram them into a 50-minute stage show was almost impossible — I had to go back in and kind of kill babies here and there,” Christ says. “My memory of it was that it was a lot tamer, and a lot more PG-13 then it is. It’s actually rated R and it’s harsh, and in some ways really horrifying. The way the girls treat each other, even despite the violence or the snakes — I hate snakes — just the meanness of the witches.” That meanness should play out in some deviously amusing ways during Christ’s The Craft: Of Drag show before the film. The queens music

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play themselves emulating characters in the movie, with key scenes thrown in (someone will get thrown out of a window, and there will be a levitating “light as a feather, stiff as a board” moment) — but with a Drag Race twist. The reason the witches all turn on Christ’s “Sarah” this time, is because she’s never been on Drag Race. This inevitably leads to the question of why not? “I don’t think I’d survive,” Christ says. “I’ve said this to Sharon, I admire them so much for being able to go on that show but Peaches is a very established character that I’ve been doing for a long, long, long time, so it’s very hard for me in a lot of ways to be flexible. You know, I always wear that Bozo the Clown paint, and I just know I’d be ripped to shreds,” she says. Though she has been sending out signals to producers World of Wonder and RuPaul that she should come on as a guest judge for a hypothetical Scream Queen challenge. It was the show though that first introduced her to Needles — Elvira was the guest judge on the first episode of Needles’ season, and she fell in love with the queen (who spurts blood from her mouth during her runway walk). Elvira immediately told Christ, and that’s why she first reached out to Needles, last year. Along with heaps of praise for Elvira, and the show in general, Needles and Thunderfuck both tell me the drama in their seasons was all real. Says Needles, “When you take 13 adult males and dress them up like teenage girls, take away their cigarettes and booze, and force them in front of a camera for 16 hours a day for two months, you don’t need a producer or a storyboard, it writes itself.” 2 Peaches christ Productions Presents THE CRAFT Sat/13, 3pm and 8pm, $25 Castro Theatre 429 Castro, SF www.castrotheatre.com

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July 10 - 16, 2013 / SFBG.com

35

Film liSTinGS

man vS. naTure dOc Storm SurferS 3D OpenS Fri/12.

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OpeninG

Fruitvale Station 4FF²0ODF6QPOB5JNFJO 0BLMBOE³  California. Grown Ups 2 "EBN4BOEMFS ,FWJO+BNFT $ISJT 3PDL BOE%BWJE4QBEFSFVOJUFGPSBOPUIFSSPVOE PGEBEDPNFEZ 

How to Make Money Selling Drugs 8BOUUP TFFBEFFQMZUIPVHIUQSPWPLJOH XFMMNBEFEPDV NFOUBSZ XJUIDPNNFOUBSZCZThe WireµT%BWJE 4JNPO BNPOHPUIFST BCPVU"NFSJDBµT8BSPO %SVHT 4FFLPVUMBTUZFBSµTThe House I Live In  BOEHJWF.BUUIFX$PPLFµTNPSFTVQFSGJDJBMEJTUJM MBUJPOPGUIFTBNFTVCKFDU EPFT%BWJE4JNPOFWFS UVSOEPXOBUBMLJOHIFBESFRVFTU BQBTT5IBUµT OPUUPTBZHow to Make Money Selling Drugs JT BUPUBMGBJM CVUJUTTMJDLQSPEVDUJPOWBMVFTBOEHJN NJDLZQSFNJTF DPNQMFUFXJUIWJEFPHBNFTUZMF ²MFWFMT³USBDJOHUIFSJTFUISPVHIUIFESVHUSBEF  XFBSUIJOBGUFSBXIJMF)PXFWFS Drugs EPFTPGGFS BMJWFMZWJFXJOHFYQFSJFODF XJUIBOBSSBZPGDPMPS GVMDIBSBDUFST±GPSNFSEFBMFSTBOEMBXFOGPSDF NFOUPGGJDFST XJUITPNFDFMFCSJUJFTTQSJOLMFE JO±IPMEJOHGPSUIPO BOETPNFUJNFTCSBHHJOH BCPVU IPXESVHFNQJSFTBSFCVJMUBOEEJTNBOUMFE 4QFBLJOHPGDFMFCSJUJFT UIFGJMNµTCJHHFTUDPVQ JTBOFFSJFJOUFSWJFXXJUI&NJOFN JOXIJDIIF DBOEJEMZEJTDVTTFTUIFEFQUITPGIJTQSFTDSJQUJPO ESVHBEEJDUJPO*UµTBSBSFNPNFOUPGLJMMFSIPOFTUZ BNJEDrugsµTIPSUBUUFOUJPOTQBOGMBTI   Roxie. &EEZ

One Track Heart: The Story of Krishna Das #PSO+FGGSFZ,BHFM ²BWFSBHFOFVSPUJD-POH*TMBOE LJE ³UIFNBOOPXLOPXOBT(SBNNZOPNJOFF ,SJTIOB%BTVOEFSXFOUBTQJSJUVBMUSBOTGPSNBUJPO BGUFSUSZJOHBDJE ESPQQJOHPVUPGDPMMFHF NFFUJOH Be Here Now BVUIPS3BN%BTT BOECFDPN JOHBGPMMPXFSPG)JOEVHVSV/FFN,BSPMJ#BCB  BLB.BIBSBKKJ"SPDL´OµSPMMFSXIPEFDMJOFE UIFDIBODFUPKPJOUIFCBOEUIBUCFDBNF#MVF 0ZTUFS$VMU ,%µTUBMFOUTCFDBNFFOUXJOFEXJUI IJTSFMJHJPOZFBSTBGUFS.BIBSBKKJµTEFBUI±BO FNPUJPOBMMZEFWBTUBUJOHFWFOUUIBUMFEUPBCSJFG CVUSBHJOHDPLFIBCJU)FCFHBOQFSGPSNJOHLJS UBO PSDBMMBOESFTQPOTFDIBOUT BUZPHBTUVEJPT  BOE VOXJUUJOHMZPSOPU CFDBNFQBSUPGBTVEEFOMZ USFOEZNPWFNFOUUP²NBLFFOMJHIUFONFOUBDDFT TJCMF ³QFSUIF/FX:PSL5JNFT/PXIFµTSFDPSEFE NVMUJQMFBMCVNTXJUI3JDL3VCJOBOEUPVSTUIF DPVOUSZ QMBZJOHUPSBQUBVEJFODFTBUWFOVFTBT CJHBTUIF8BSGJFME8IFUIFSPSOPUZPVDBOTUPN BDI/FX"HFNVTJDPSQIJMPTPQIZ PSTIBSFUIF PQJOJPOUIBU,SJTIOB%BTPODFPWFSIFBSEBCPVU IJNTFMGUIBUIFµT²BO"NFSJDBOCVSHFSXJUI*OEJBO LFUDIVQ³ +FSFNZ'SJOEFMµTOne Track Heart

36 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

EDITORIALS

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LFFQTJUTSVOOJOHUJNFCSJFG KVTUPWFSBOIPVS BOE BWPJETEFJGZJOHJUTTVCKFDU±TPNFPOFXIPDMFBSMZ EJHTUIFTQPUMJHIU CVUXIPIBTBMTPFOPVHIEPOF TPVMTFBSDIJOHUPLFFQIJTFHPNPTUMZJODIFDL BOEBIJHIFSQPXFSJONJOE  Opera Plaza, Shattuck, Smith Rafael. &EEZ

Pacific Rim(VJMMFSNPEFM5PSPEJSFDUTBOEDP XSPUFUIJTTDJGJFQJDBCPVUHJBOUSPCPUT QJMPUFECZ TPMEJFST JODMVEJOH$IBSMJF)VOOBNBOE*ESJT&MCB  CBUUMJOHHJBOUNPOTUFSTUIBUTVEEFOMZFSVQUGSPN CFOFBUIUIFPDFBO  Balboa. Storm Surfers 3D8JUI%CFJOHTMBQQFE JOEJTDSJNJOBUFMZPOUPPNBOZJOUFSDIBOHFBCMF )PMMZXPPEGMJDLTUIFTFEBZT JUµTFBTZUPGPSHFUUIBU UIFSFBSFTPNFTVCKFDUTUIBUQSBDUJDBMMZCFHGPS UIFGPSNBU*ODSFEJCMZ JUTFFNTOPPOFUIPVHIU UPNBLFB%GJMNBCPVUTVSGJOH UIFTQPSUBOE TQFDUBDMFUPXIJDITUFSFPTDPQJDDJOFNBJTJEFBMMZ TVJUFE$ISJTUPQIFS/FMJVTBOE+VTUJO.D.JMMBOµT NPWJF BDUVBMMZUIFUIJSEStorm SurfersFOUSZTP GBS GPMMPXTCFTUGSJFOE"VTUSBMJBOTVSGJOHMFHFOET 3PTT$MBSLF+POFTBOE5PN$BSSPMMBT HVJEFECZ TVSGGPSFDBTUFS#FO.BUTPO UIFZSBDFPGGPOTIPSU OPUJDFUPWBSJPVTMPDBUJPOTXIFSFIVHFTUPSNGFE XBWFTDBOCFFYQFDUFE5IJTJTSJTLZCVTJOFTT BOE UIFSFµTIVNBOJOUFSFTUJOUIFUXPSJEFSTµEJGGFSFOU XBZTPGTUSVHHMJOHXJUIBHJOH UIFZµSFCPUIOFBSJOH  QPTTJCMZNPSUBMEBOHFS BOEGBNJMZSFTQPO TJCJMJUJFT5IFTFXBZIFBWJMZPO$BSSPMMOPUIJOH EPFTPO$MBSLF+POFT XIPJTZPVSCBTJD²GVDLJU  MFUµTHP³UISJMMKVOLJF5IFJSHFOJBMQFSTPOBMJUJFT IFMQTQBSLXIBUµTPUIFSXJTFBTPMJEJGVOSFNBSL BCMFTVSGJOHEPD±BMCFJUPOFUIBUEPFTJOEFFE MPPLHSFBUJO%  Smith Rafael, Vogue. )BSWFZ

MUSIC

STAGE

OnGOinG

A Band Called Death 5IFNPTUQPQVMBSGFFMHPPE EPDVNFOUBSZMBTUZFBSXBTSearching for Sugar Man .BMJL#FOEKFMMPVMµTGJMNBCPVU3PESJHVF[ ±BUBMFOUFETJOHFSTPOHXSJUFSXIPSFDPSEFEUXP NBKPSMBCFMBMCVNTJOUIFFBSMZTBOEUIFO EJTBQQFBSFEGSPNBOZQVCMJDWJFX6OCFLOPXOTU UPIJN UIFSFDPSETXFSFBCJHIJUJO4PVUI"GSJDB  XIFSFGBOTFWFOUVBMMZUSBDLFEIJNEPXOBOE JOGPSNFEIJNUIBUIFXBTBTUBSA Band Called Death JTBTJNJMBSTUPSZPGSFDPHOJUJPO±EFMBZFE TPMPOHUIBUUIFQSJODJQBMWJOEJDBUFEDIBSBDUFSXBT OPMPOHFSBMJWFUPFOKPZJU4POTPGB%FUSPJU#BQUJTU NJOJTUFS %BWJE %BOOJT BOE#PCCZ)BDLOFZXFSF FOBNPSFEXJUISPDLNVTJDGSPNUIFUJNFUIFZTBX UIF#FBUMFTQMBZThe Ed Sullivan ShowJO #ZUIFZXFSFDBMMJOHUIFNTFMWFT3PDL'JSF 'VOL&YQSFTT±CVUFYQPTVSFUPMJWFIBSESPDL BDUTMJLFUIF8IPBOE"MJDF$PPQFSDPOWJODFEUIFN UPEJUDIUIFGVOLQBSUDPNQMFUFMZ5IFJSGBUIFSµT USBHJDDBSBDDJEFOUEFBUIIJUBMMPGUIFNIBSE  CVUFTQFDJBMMZHVJUBSJTU%BWJE XIPIBEBTQJSJUVBM BXBLFOJOHPGTPSUTBOEJOTJTUFEUIFJSCBOECF OBNFEBGUFSXIBUIFOPXDPOTJEFSFE²UIFVMUJNBUF USJQ³%FBUI*UTFFNFEBDBSFFSLJMMJOHNPOJLFS JGFWFSUIFSFXBTPOFOPSEJEUIFUSJPµTMPVE GBTU  IFBWZTPVOENBLFTFOTFGPSBO"GSJDBO"NFSJDBO PVUGJUJOBDJUZXIFSF.PUPXOSVMFE'BTUGPSXBSE  BOE%FBUIXBTOµUKVTUGPSHPUUFOJUIBEOFWFS SFBMMZCFFOOPUJDFE*UTPOMZNBUFSJBMJTTVFXBTB TFMGEJTUSJCVUFETJOHMF#VUUISFFEFDBEFT MBUFSTPNFPGJUTQSFTTJOHTTUBSUFETVSGBDJOH POVOEFSHSPVOE%+µTUVSOUBCMFT SBSFSFDPSEDPM MFDUPSTµXJTIMJTUT BOEPOF#BZ BUBQPQ  8IBUDPVMECFBNPSFGBTDJOBUJOHFOJHNBUIBOBO VOLOPXO"GSJDBO"NFSJDBOHSPVQNBLJOHNVTJD UIBUXBTQSFDPDJPVTMZQSPUPQVOL "CJUPWFSMPOH  UIJTEPDVNFOUBSZOPOFUIFMFTTJOHSBUJBUFTXJUIJUT TVSQSJTJOHXFBMUIPGIPNFNPWJFGPPUBHF DPN NFOUBSZGSPNUIFWFSZHFOJBM)BDLOFZDMBO BOE UFTUJNPOZGSPNMBUUFSEBZGBOTMJLF)FOSZ3PMMJOT BOE2VFTUMPWF  Roxie. )BSWFZ

The Lone Ranger 5IFCJHHFTUTUSJLFBHBJOTU The Lone Ranger JTPOFZPVµMMSFBEBCPVUJO FWFSZSFWJFXJUµTKVTUBUFFOZCJUSBDJTU$BTUJOH +PIOOZ²NZHSFBUHSBOENPUIFSXBTNBZCFQBSU $IFSPLFF³%FQQBTBCVGGPPOJTI/BUJWF"NFSJDBO JTWFSZTVTQFDU FTQFDJBMMZXIFODBTUJOHPG%FQQJT UIFPOMZSFBTPOUIJTLone RangerFYJTUT$MFBSMZ  IFSFBMMZXBOUFEUPQMBZ5POUP BOE%FQQIBTB XBZPGNBLJOHIJTPWFSTJ[FEQFSGPSNBODFTUIF NPTUJNQPSUBOUUIJOHBCPVUXIBUFWFSGJMNIFµTJO 8FSFBVEJFODFTSFBMMZTDSFBNJOHPVUGPSThe Lone Ranger BSBUIFSMJUFSBMCJHTDSFFOUBLFPOBT 57TIPXXJUITPNFIFBWJMZ$(µEUSBJODIBTFT BEEFEJO $PVMEOPUNJMMJPO UIFGJMNµT SFQPSUFECVEHFU IBWFCFFOCFUUFSTQFOUEPJOH TPNFUIJOHBOZUIJOHFMTF "EEJOHJOTVMUUP JOKVSZ SBDJTNJTOµUFWFOThe Lone RangerµTPOMZ QSPCMFN5IFSFµTBMTPJUTCMPBUFEMFOHUIJUTTDPSF  XIJDIEBSFTUPJOUSPEVDFBO&OOJP.PSSJDPOF IPNBHFJOUPBGJMN4FSHJP-FPOFXPVMEOµUMJOF IJTgattoµTMJUUFSCPYXJUIJUTXBTUFPGTPNFHSFBU DIBSBDUFSBDUPST #BSSZ1FQQFS 8JMMJBN'JDIUOFS  JUTBTTVNQUJPOUIBUIBWJOHSBOEPNDIBSBDUFSTBTL UIF-POF3BOHFS²8IBUµTXJUIUIFNBTL ³PWFS BOEPWFSJTUIFGVOOJFTUKPLFFWFSBOEJUTGBJMVSF UPGPMMPXUISPVHIPOJUTGFXJOWFOUJWFFMFNFOUT ±UIBUIFSEPG.POUZ1ZUIPOJOTQJSFESBCCJUT  GPSFYBNQMF5IFRVFTUJPONVTUCFQPTFEJGUIF NPSBMPGThe Lone RangerJT²HSFFEJTCBE ³XIZ EJE&M%FQQPTJHOPOUPUIJTQJFDFPGDSBQJOUIF GJSTUQMBDF   Marina, Metreon, 1000 Van Ness, Sundance Kabuki. &EEZ

ARTS + CULTURE

FILM

CLASSIFIEDS

Film liSTiNGS

Doc André GreGory: Before And After dinner ScreeNS aT Yerba bueNa ceNTer For The arTS. photo courtesy of cinema guild

20 Feet From Stardom 4JOHJOHUIFQSBJTFTPG UIPTFPUIFSXJTFOFHMFDUFECBDLVQWPDBMJTUTXIP QVUUIFTPVMJOUPUIBU8BMMPG4PVOE CSPVHIU IFGUUP²:PVOH"NFSJDBOT ³BOEMFOUSFBMGVSZUP ²(JNNF4IFMUFS ³20 Feet From StardomJT EPJOHUIFSPDL´OµSPMMUSVFCFMJFWFSµ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µUEFOZUIFQBTTJPOJOUIFWPJDFTIFµTDIPTFO UPGPMMPX±BOEUIFSJHIUFPVTCFMJFGUIF/FWJMMF DMFBSMZIBTJOIJTTVCKFDUT FTQFDJBMMZXIFO MJLF )JMM UIFZBSFSFBEZUPQJDLUIFNTFMWFTVQBOEDBSSZ POBGUFSCFJOHUPMEUIFZµSFOPU²UIF7PJDF³   Metreon, Smith Rafael. $IVO

The Way, Way Back %VODBO -JBN+BNFT  JT BOEJGZPVSFNFNCFSCFJOHUIBUBHFZPV SFNFNCFSUIFBXLXBSEOFTT UIFBNCJWBMFODF  BOEUIFDPOGVTJPOUIBUXFOUBMPOHXJUIJU%VODBOµT NPUIFS 5POJ$PMMFUUF UBLFTIJNBMPOHGPSBO ²JNQPSUBOUTVNNFS³XJUIIFSKFSLZCPZGSJFOE  5SFOU 4UFWF$BSFMM ±BOEEFTQJUFCFJOHUIFMFBTU JNQPSUBOUHVZBUUIFTVNNFSDPUUBHF %VODBOµT POMZNBSHJOBMMZTZNQBUIFUJD.PTUFWFSZBDUPS TVSSPVOEJOHIJNQMBZTBHBJOTUUZQF 3PC$PSEESZ JTBOVOGVOOZ XIJQQFEIVTCBOE"MMJTPO+BOOFZ JTBESVOL EFTQFSBUFEJWPSDFF BOETJODFUIFDBTU JTBDBUUMFDBMMGPSBOZPOFXJUIJOEJFDSFE ZPVµMM XPOEFSXIZUIFZµSFHSPVQFEGPSTVDIBEVMMNPWJF 8SJUFSEJSFDUPST/BU'BYPOBOE+JN3BTIQSFWJPVTMZ XSPUFUIF0TDBSXJOOJOHTDSFFOQMBZGPSµTThe Descendants CVUThe Way, Way BackEPFTOµU NBUDIUIBUGJMNµTDBMJCFSPGJOUFMMJHFOU ESZXJU$BTU NFNCFSTUBLFUVSOTSFTVTDJUBUJOHUIFNPWJF CVU POMZ4BN3PDLXFMMTBWFTUIFEBZ BUMFBTUEVSJOH UIFTDFOFTIFµTJO1MBZJOHBOPUIFSMPWBCMFMPTFS  3PDLXFMMµT0XFOESPQQFEPVUPGMJGFBOEJOUPBQBU UFSOPGIPVTFQBJOUJOHBOEXBUFSQBSLNBOBHFNFOU JOUIFGBTIJPOPGBDPOTDJFOUJPVTPCKFDUPS0XFO JTBOUJUIFUJDBMUP5SFOUµTDSBQQZFYBNQMFPGNBO IPPE BOESBJTFTIJTXBUFSXJOHUPMFU%VODBOJO 5IFTIPSUTUJOU%VODBOIBTXPSLJOHBU8BUFS8J[[ JTBCMPTTPNJOHUIBUMFBETUPBNJOPSSPNBODF XJUI "OOB4PQIJB3PCC BOEBNBKPSDPOGSPOUBUJPOXJUI 5SFOU TPNFPGXIJDIJTBGGFDUJOH CVUOPOFPGXIJDI XJMMIFMQZPVSFNFNCFSUIFNPWJFBGUFSDSFEJUTSPMM  California, Metreon, Sundance Kabuki. 7J[DBSSPOEP 2

EDITORIALS

NEWS

rep clock

4DIFEVMFTBSFGPS8FE5VFFYDFQUXIFSF OPUFE%JSFDUPSBOEZFBSBSFHJWFOXIFOBWBJMBCMF %PVCMFBOEUSJQMFGFBUVSFTNBSLFEXJUIB…"MMUJNFT QNVOMFTTPUIFSXJTFTQFDJGJFE ARTISTS’ TELEVISION ACCESS 7BMFODJB 4' XXXBUBTJUFPSH²0QFO4DSFFOJOH ³5IV  'PSQBSUJDJQBUJPOJOGP DPOUBDUQSPHSBNNJOH!BUBTJUF PSH²3F*OWFOUJOHUIF3FFM ³BSUJTUNBEFXPSLTGSPN &MFNFOUTPG*NBHF.BLJOH 'SJ ²:PVS4LJOJTUIF 'PVSUI8BMM ³WJEFPBOEQFSGPSNBODFXPSL 4BU  CASTRO $BTUSP 4'   XXX DBTUSPUIFBUSFDPN …The Night of the Hunter -BVHIUPO  5IV  BOECape Fear 4DPSTFTF  5IV …The Exorcist 'SJFELJO  'SJ  BOESuspiria "SHFOUP   'SJ The Craft 'MFNJOH   4BU  8JUIB²XJUDIUBDVMBS³QFSGPSNBODF TUBSSJOH1FBDIFT$ISJTU 4IBSPO/FFEMFT "MBTLB 5IVOEFSGVDL BOE)POFZ.BIPHBOZ5IJTFWFOU  NPSFEFUBJMTBUXXXQFBDIFTDISJTUDPN ²3BZ)BSSZIBVTFO5SJCVUF³The 7th Voyage of Sinbad +VSBO  4VO   BOEJason and the Argonauts $IBGGFZ  4VO    Diana Vreeland: The Eye Has to Travel *NNPSEJOP7SFFMBOE  5VF  BOERenoir #PVSEPT  5VF  CHRISTOPHER B. SMITH RAFAEL FILM CENTER 'PVSUI4U 4BO3BGBFM   XXX DBGJMNPSHAugustine 8JOPDPVS   DBMMGPSEBUFTBOEUJNFTFrances Ha #BVNCBDI  DBMMGPSEBUFTBOEUJNFTRebels With a Cause ,FMMZ  DBMMGPSEBUFTBOE UJNFT20 Feet From Stardom /FWJMMF  DBMM GPSEBUFTBOEUJNFTOne Track Heart: The Story of Krishna Das 'SJOEFM  +VMZ DBMM GPSUJNFTStorm Surfers 3D .D.JMMBOBOE/FMJVT   +VMZ DBMMGPSUJNFT CLAY 'JMMNPSF 4'XXXMBOENBSLUIFBUSFT DPN².JEOJHIU.PWJFT³The Room 8JTFBV   'SJ NJEOJHIU)PTUFECZ4BN4IBSLFZ “FILM NIGHT IN THE PARK” 5IJTXFFL$SFFL 1BSL 4JS'SBODJT%SBLF 4BO"OTFMNPXXX GJMNOJHIUPSH'SFF EPOBUJPOTBQQSFDJBUFE  Footloose 'SJ 6OJPO4RVBSF (FBSZBU1PXFMM 4' Vicky Cristina Barcelona "MMFO  4BU  518 VALENCIA 4'XXXMBCPSGFTUOFU%POBUJPOT BDDFQUFE*OUFSOBUJPOBM8PSLJOH$MBTT'JMNBOE7JEFP 'FTUJWBM…Shift Change %XBSLJOBOE:PVOH   BOEOne Shot, One Kill 'VKJNPUP  8FE  "MTP*-86-PDBM)BMM 4FDPOE4U 4'…The Contis: The Struggle Continues $MBUPU  BOE

FOOD + DRINK

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MUSIC

On the Art of Water -V[JBOE#FMMJOP  'SJ  JACK LONDON SQUARE .BSLFUMBXO )BSSJTPOBU 8BUFS 0BLMXXXKBDLMPOEPOTRVBSFDPN'SFF Hitchcock (FSWBTJ  5IV TVOEPXO PACIFIC FILM ARCHIVE #BODSPGU #FSL    CBNQGBCFSLFMFZFEV²"$BMM UP"DUJPO5IF'JMNTPG3BPVM8BMTI³Regeneration  'SJ The Yellow Ticket  'SJ  The Big Trail  4VO ²'SPNUIF"SDIJWF 5SFBTVSFTPG&BTUFSO&VSPQFBOBOE4PWJFU$JOFNB³ Pastorale *PTTFMJBOJ  8FE Five Evenings .JLIBMLPW  4BU ²%BSL/JHIUT4JNFOPO BOE$JOFNB³La tête d’un homme %VWJWJFS   5IV Stray Dog ,VSPTBXB  4BU  ²$BTUMFTJOUIF4LZ.BTUFSGVM"OJNFGSPN4UVEJP (IJCMJ³Porco Rosso .JZB[BLJ  4VO  ROXIE BOEUI4U 4'    XXXSPYJFDPNA Band Called Death $PWJOPBOE)PXMFUU  8FE5IV   Maniac ,IBMGPVO  8FE5IV   4BO'SBODJTDP'SP[FO'JMN'FTUJWBM JOEJFGJMNT  'SJ4BU.PSFEFUBJMTBUXXXGSP[FOGJMNGFTUJWBM DPNHow to Make Money Selling Drugs $PPLF   +VMZ   BMTP4BU4VO    VOGUE 4BDSBNFOUP 4'XXXXPSETPOEBODF PSH²8PSETPO%BODF³Maria Tallchief in Conversation with Evelyn Cisneros  .PO  YERBA BUENA CENTER FOR THE ARTS  .JTTJPO 4'XXXZCDBPSHAndré Gregory: Before and After Dinner ,MFJOF  5IVBOE 4BU QN4VO  2

STAGE

ARTS + CULTURE

FirST ruN veNueS 5IFGPMMPXJOHJTDPOUBDUJOGPSNBUJPOGPS#BZ"SFB GJSTUSVOUIFBUFST Balboa UI"WF#BMCPB  XXXCBMCPBNPWJFTDPN Bridge(FBSZ#MBLF Century Plaza /PPSPGG&M$BNJOP 4PVUI4'   Century 20 +VOJQFSP4FSSB+PIO%BMZ %BMZ$JUZ   Clay 'JMMNPSF$MBZ Embarcadero &NCBSDBEFSP$FOUFS QSPNFOBEF MFWFM5IFBUFSDMPTFEGPSSFOPWBUJPOT VOUJM/PWFNCFS Empire8FTU1PSUBM7JDFOUF Four Star $MFNFOUSE"WF Marina $IFTUOVUXXXMOUTGDPNNBSJOB@ UIFBUSF Metreon'PVSUI4U.JTTJPO  '"/%"/(0 New People Cinema 1PTUXXXOFXQFPQMF XPSMEDPN 1000 Van Ness7BO/FTT   Opera Plaza7BO/FTT(PMEFO(BUF Presidio$IFTUOVU SF Center .JTTJPOCFUXFFO'PVSUIBOE'JGUI4UT 

FILM

CLASSIFIEDS

StonestownUI"WF8JOTUPO Sundance Kabuki Cinema 1PTU'JMMNPSF  Vogue4BDSBNFOUP1SFTJEJP

BAY AREA Albany 4PMBOP "MCBOZ   AMC Bay Street 164IFMMNPVOE &NFSZWJMMF   California,JUUSFEHF4IBUUVDL #FSL   Cerrito 4BO1BCMP &M$FSSJUP   Emery Bay$ISJTUJF &NFSZWJMMF   Grand Lake(SBOE 0BLM   Jack London Stadium8BTIJOHUPO +BDL -POEPO4RVBSF 0BLM   Magick Lantern 1BSL1MBDF 1PJOU3JDINPOE   New Parkway UI4U 0BLM   Piedmont 1JFENPOUTU4U 0BLM   Rialto Cinemas Elmwood$PMMFHF"WFBU "TICZ #FSL   Shattuck Cinemas4IBUUVDL #FSL   UA Berkeley4IBUUVDL #FSL  2

JULY 10 - 16, 2013 / SFBG.COM

37

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