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Leave the occupiers alone EDITORIAL With all of the police raids and arguments over messages and demands and tactics, it’s easy to forget that the Occupy Wall Street movement has a clear political point — and it’s right. The movement is about the devastating and unsustainable direction of the American economy, about the fact that a tiny elite controls much of the nation’s wealth, that virtually all of the income growth over the past 20 years has gone to the very top, about the collapse of the middle class and the rise of economic inequality that would have been unthinkable a generation ago. Those are the central issues facing the United States, the state of California and the cities of San Francisco and Oakland today — and instead of trying to crack down on the protests, city officials ought to be endorsing the occupy movement and talking about cracking down on the financial institutions and the wealthy. A few things worth noting: 1. The protesters are almost entirely nonviolent. Although there have been a few isolated incidents in Oakland and SF, the overwhelming majority of the thousands of picks

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people at Justin Herman Plaza and Frank Ogawa Plaza are actively promoting and insisting on nonviolence. This is not a crowd that is a threat to anyone. 2. There’s a precedent for longterm political protest camps in San Francisco. The AIDS Vigil remained at U.N. Plaza — with tents, tarps, and cooking gear — for ten years, from 1985 to 1995. 3. The city of San Francisco’s citations — reported without question in the daily newspapers — about health and sanitation problems are way overblown. The OccupySF protesters are making extraordinary efforts to keep the place clean. When the city failed to live up to its promise to provide portable toilets, the protesters ordered (and paid for) their own. As state Sen. Leland Yee (not known as a crazy radical) noted after a visit Oct. 26: “While hundreds gathered, there was not one incident of violence. If the interim mayor thinks there are health issues, I certainly didn’t see them.” We visited Oct 31, and the place was clean and peaceful. 4. The cat-and-mouse game CONTINUES ON PAGE  >>

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Vote for three but not Ed Lee By Aaron Peskin OPINION Halloween 2011. Next week San Francisco will choose a new mayor. Is this a masquerade? Who is behind Mayor Ed Lee’s mask? I’ll call it exactly how I see it: I am disappointed in Ed Lee. I’ve known him since before I was first elected to the Board of Supervisors in 2000. I wanted to be hopeful, but I actually can’t say that I’m surprised. Ed Lee has always been a goalong-to-get-along bureaucrat who has moved up the feeding chain by doing the bidding of former Mayor Willie Brown and Willie’s loyal lieutenant Rose Pak. I had a fantasy that maybe Ed would rise to the occasion, become his own person, and emerge as an independent leader free of those that orchestrated his appointment to “interim” mayor. But in the first year since his appointment (in one of the most masterful political plays since Abe Ruef got Eugene Schmitz installed as mayor in 1902), Ed has consistently sided with the powers and their “City Family” that “made” him. Even I was astounded when Ed moved legislation to displace CONTINUES ON PAGE  >>

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One cool October day in 1985, when I was a young reporter at the Guardian, a friend who was visiting from New York, where she was working with Gay Men’s Health Crisis, called me with an urgent message: City employees were out with water hoses, trying to force a couple of HIV-positive men from camping in front of a federal office building at U.N. Plaza. I ran down there; she had photos. I talked to the men, who were tired and wet, but determined not to leave — and within a few days after my story ran (“AIDS vigil under attack,” 11/6/85), they were joined by dozens more. And as the months passed, the AIDS vigil grew and grew. It raised awareness of the federal government’s criminal lack of attention to the epidemic. It became a tent city, a small community in the middle of San Francisco with donated food and supplies. The city figured out that the encampment was no danger to anyone and was making an important political statement. And it remained there — with tents and tarps — for ten years. I was at the OccupySF camp Oct. 3rd to do a live KPFA broadcast with Mitch Jeserich, and the place was clean, peaceful and well-organized. A couple of cops walked through while we were on the air; they were smiling and chatting with the protesters, who were negotiating with the Department of Public Works about vacating the grassy areas to allow watering. The only real health and safety problem was the lack of portable toilets — the seven on site weren’t enough for the number of people there. So if the city wants to keep things sanitary, Mayor Ed Lee ought to send in some more. Oh, and the medical tent needs supplies, particularly ice packs and sterile gauze. A woman from Occupy Vancouver was down visiting and showing solidarity; she said that protesters all over the continent were looking to San Francisco and Oakland for inspiration. This is a good thing. The protests may not have an agenda, but they have a message, and it’s getting to big and too loud to ignore. I hope it doesn’t take ten years for politicians at the local, state and federal level to respond — but as long as nobody’s addressing economic inequality, OccupySF is and ought to be here to stay. 2 november 2 - 8, 2011 / SFBG.com




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with the San Francisco police is the equivalent of psychological warfare; protesters have to be on edge at all times for fear of a crackdown that may or may not come. 5. Mayor Jean Quan made a bad mistake sending in the cops to roust Occupy Oakland. Nothing good at all can come of any further police eviction action. Frankly, we don’t see why the protesters — who are well-behaved, represent no threat to anyone, and are doing a huge civic and national service by bringing attention to an issue that the powers that be in Washington, Sacramento and (sadly) San Francisco have largely ignored — can’t stay where they are. If there are health issues, let the Department of Public Health work with the occupiers. If there’s a problem with a portable kitchen, let the Fire Department show the protesters how to run it safely and legally (there are portable cooking devices at every street fair, in dozens of food trucks and in probably 100 other places around town). The people at OccupySF and Occupy Oakland have done an amazing job of building a safe, respectful and inclusive community. They are the political heroes of 2011. If there’s anyplace in America where the movement ought to be allowed to grow and thrive, it’s here in the Bay Area. 2 vote for three but not ed lee CONT>>

hundreds of hotel workers at San Francisco’s Fairmont Hotel. And I was actually shocked when he did the bidding of the right-wing Restaurant Association and vetoed common-sense legislation to stop the exploitation of local restaurant workers. His list of disappointments grew. He orchestrated the demolition of more than 1,500 units of rent controlled housing at Park Merced. Then he had the audacity to laud Pacific Gas and Electric Co. as a “great local corporation” on the anniversary of the lethal San Bruno pipeline explosion. Several pols have been credited with the statement that “money is the mother’s milk of politics.” Well, Willie and Rose and their friends at the Chamber of Commerce got milk! Willie Brown is fundraising for three different committees to get Lee elected, Rose Pak started two different fundraising committees of  SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

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her own, and right-wing Republican billionaires like Ron Conway and right wing corporations like Pacific Gas and Electric are lining up to throw money into the coffers. Why? Because Ed is their guy. The proof is right in front of us. All of Willie’s trademark slights of hand are resurfacing in Ed Lee’s friends’ bag of tricks: money laundering, pay to play politics, allegations of voter fraud. These are all hallmarks of Brown and his cronies, all executed under the visage of the supposedly humble Ed Lee. And voters shouldn’t fall for it. Because if we do, we’ll go back to the days before Gavin Newsom when backroom deals, self-dealing, cronyism and out-and-out corruption were the rule of the day. It is no coincidence that in a year gripped by the divide between the 99 and 1 percent, the latter is working feverishly to elect Lee. If you don’t believe me, look it up on the Ethics Commission website (sfgov.org/ethics). PG&E alone has contributed at least $50,000 to one such “independent” committee. I know this is the first race for mayor with ranked choice voting—and it is confusing. That’s a concern. But frankly, at this point all I care about is that voters understand not to mark Ed Lee anywhere on their ballot. The good news? The outcome of the Mayor’s race is far from a foregone conclusion. San Franciscans are seeing through the millions of corporate dollars being spent on behalf of Lee. You have a choice—three, in fact. And you should use them strategically, because you can make a difference by voting not just with your heart, but also with your mind. That means making sure you do your research and vote for three candidates who represent your values—and have a chance to win. The Guardian has endorsed three candidates—Avalos, Herrera, and Yee—who have demonstrated enough of a commitment to progressive values and an aversion to the powers of the once-dormant machine that, like a vampire, is attempting to rise from the crypt. These three candidates also happen to have the best shot to beat Lee. Your votes for all three—in any order—are your best guarantee not to elect Ed Lee. Vote for three and don’t vote for Lee! 2 Aaron Peskin chairs the San Francisco Democratic County Central Committee.

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WTF, Chronicle? — assemblymember Tom Ammiano

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Politics Up-to-the-minute coverage of the last week of elections Occupy Oakland’s general strike happens Wednesday – who is taking the day off?

Noise Reviews and photos of Halloween weekend’s costumed concerts  Localized Appreesh on this week’s Architecture in Helsinki opener at the Fillmore: Sandwitches  James H. Miller profiles indie favorite Wild Flag, the new group with musicians from Helium, the Minders, and Sleater-Kinney

pixel Vision  Scott Pasfield’s photographic survey of the homo landscape, Gay in America, comes to Magnet  A sneak peek at the Dia de los Muertos altars at SOMArts Cultural Center  Cheryl Eddy interviews Sam Brower, author of Prophet’s Prey: My SevenYear Investigation into Warren Jeffs and the Fundamentalist Church of Latter-Day Saints

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Herrera takes some flak, but pushes right back, while property interests reveal their support for Prop. E by guardian news staff news@sfbg.com

Victory’s mudslinging Hit pieces are common in San Francisco politics. So, sadly, are negative mailers funded by outside independent expenditure committees that can raise unlimited money. But it’s highly unusual for an organization devoted to electing queer candidates to fund an attack on a candidate who is endorsed by both leading LGBT organizations and is, by all accounts, an ally of the community. That’s what happened last week when the Washingtonbased Victory Fund — the leading national organization for LGBT political candidates — sent out a bizarre mailer blasting City Attorney Dennis Herrera for taking money from law firms that do business with the city. The Victory Fund has endorsed former Sup. Bevan Dufty, who is the most prominent LGBT candidate in the mayor’s race. That’s to be expected; it’s what the Victory Fund does. But why, in a race with 16 candidates, would the fund go after Herrera, who has spent much of the past seven years fighting in court for marriage equality? Why try to knock down a candidate who has the support of both the Harvey Milk Club and the Alice B. Toklas Club? It’s baffled — and infuriated — longtime queer activist Cleve Jones, who is a Herrera supporter. “I have long respected the Victory Fund,” Jones told us. “But I’ve never seen them do what they did here. And it’s going to undermine the fund’s credibility.” Jones dashed off an angry letter to the fund’s president, Chuck Wolfe, saying he was “appalled that this scurrilous attack, in the waning days of a mayoral campaign, would go out to the San Francisco electorate under the name of the Victory Fund. “You really screwed up, Chuck, and I am not alone in my anger.” editorials

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We couldn’t get Wolfe on the phone, but the fund’s vice president for communications, Denis Dison, told us that the mailer “is all about fighting for our endorsed candidates.” So how does it help Dufty, in a ranked-choice election, to attack Herrera? (In fact, given the dynamics of this election, the person it helps most is probably Mayor Ed Lee). Dison couldn’t explain. Nor would he say who at the fund decided to do the attack mailer. But there are a couple of interesting connections that might help explain what’s going on. For starters, Joyce Newstat, a political consultant who is working for the Dufty campaign, is active in the Victory Fund, sits on the board of the fund’s Leadership Institute, and, according to a March 24 article in the Bay Area Reporter, was among those active in helping Dufty win the Victory Fund endorsement. But again: Supporting Dufty is one thing. Attacking Herrera is another. Who would want to do that? Well, if there’s one single constituency in the city that would like to sink Herrera, it’s Pacific Gas and Electric Co. And guess what? PG&E Governmental Affairs Manager Brandon Hernandez chairs the Victory Fund’s Leadership Institute. PG&E’s corporate logo appears on the front page of the fund’s website, and the company gave the Victory Fund more than $50,000 in 2010, according to the fund’s annual report. Dison insisted that neither Hernadez nor anyone else from PG&E was involved in making the decision to hit Herrera and said the money went to the Leadership Institute, which trains LGBT candidates, not directly to the campaign fund. Maybe so –- but the folks at the private utility, who are among the top three corporate donors to the Victory Fund, have to be happy. (Tim Redmond)

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LGBT community leaders express support for Dennis Herrera | guardian photo by steven t. jones Herrera hit backfires Herrera was also the target of another attack on his LGBT credentials last week, this one by the San Francisco Chronicle, which ran a front page story on Oct. 26 in which anonymous sources said he raised doubts in private City Hall meetings about San Francisco’s decision to issue same-sex marriage licenses in 2004. It was entitled, “Fight turns ugly to win gay votes in mayor’s race.” Despite trying to couch the hit in passive language, writing that “ a surprise issue has emerged” based on accusations “leveled by several members of former Mayor Gavin Newsom’s administration,” it was clear that it was the Chron that made it an issue, for which the newspaper was denounced by leaders of the LGBT community from across the political spectrum at a rally the next day. music listings

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“Those who are saying this now anonymously are as cowardly as Dennis and Gavin were courageous back then,” said Deputy City Attorney Theresa Stewart, the lead attorney who defended San Francisco’s decision in 2004 to unilaterally issue marriage licenses to same-sax couples, in defiance of state and federal law, which eventually led to the legalizing of such unions. “We can’t have our community turn on us for petty political gain.” “WTF, Chronicle?” was how Assemblymember Tom Ammiano began his speech, going on to lay blame for the attack on surrogates for Mayor Ed Lee. Ammiano also called out the mayor for campaign finance violations by his supporters, for undermining the Healthy San Francisco program that was created by Ammiano’s legislation, and for repeatedly ordering police raids on the OccupySF encampment.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;How about some fucking leadership?!â&#x20AC;? Ammiano said. Cleve Jones, an early gay rights leader who marched with Harvey Milk, also denounced Lee and his supporters for cronyism, vote tampering, money laundering, and the â&#x20AC;&#x153;fake grassrootsâ&#x20AC;? efforts of the various wellfunded independent expenditure campaigns, which he said have fooled the Chronicle. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To the Chronicle and that reporter â&#x20AC;&#x201D; really? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; this is what you do two weeks before the election? You should be ashamed of yourself,â&#x20AC;? Jones said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;How stupid do you think we are?â&#x20AC;? Yet Chronicle City Editor Audrey Cooper defended the article. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clearly, I disagree [with the criticisms],â&#x20AC;? she told the Guardian. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I personally vetted every one of the sources and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m confident everything we printed is true.â&#x20AC;? She also tried to cast the article as something other than a political attack, saying it was about an issue of interest to the LGBT community, but no LGBT leaders have stepped up to defend the paper. Beyond criticizing the obvious political motivations behind the attack, speakers at the rally called the article bad journalism and said it was simply untrue to suggest that Herrera didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t strongly support the effort to legalize same-sex marriage from the beginning. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I can tell you that Dennis never once shrank from this fight. I was there, I know,â&#x20AC;? Stewart said, calling Herrera â&#x20AC;&#x153;a straight ally whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s devoted his heart and soul to this community.â&#x20AC;? Sen. Mark Leno, who introduced the first bill legalizing same-sex marriage to clear the Legislature, emphasized that he isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t endorsing any candidates for mayor and that he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to comment on the details of the articleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s allegations. But he noted that even within the LGBT community, there were differences of opinion over the right timing and tactics for pushing the issue, and that Herrera has been a leader of the fight for marriage equality since the beginning. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am here to speak in defense of the character and integrity of our city attorney, Dennis Herrera,â&#x20AC;? Leno said, later adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I do not appreciate when the battle for our civil rights is used as a political football in the waning days of an election.â&#x20AC;? editorials

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Molly McKay, one of the original plaintiffs in the civil lawsuit that followed San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actions, teared up as she described the ups and downs that the case took, working closely with Herrera throughout. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But this is one of the strangest twists I can imagine,â&#x20AC;? she said of the attack by the Chronicle and its anonymous sources. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ridiculous and despicable.â&#x20AC;? Representatives for both the progressive Harvey Milk LGBT Democratic Club and fiscally conservative Alice B. Toklas LGBT Democratic Club also took to the microphone together, both saying they often disagree on issues, but they were each denouncing the attack and have both endorsed Herrera, largely because of his strong advocacy for the LGBT community. Sup. Scott Wiener called Herrera, â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the greatest straight allies weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve every had as a community.â&#x20AC;? When Herrera finally took the microphone, he thanked mayoral opponents Joanne Rees and Jeff Adachi for showing up at the event to help denounce the attack and said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is bigger than the mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s race. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bigger than me.â&#x20AC;? He criticized those who would trivialize this issue for petty political gain and said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was my pleasure and honor to have been a part of this battle from the beginning â&#x20AC;&#x201D; from the beginning â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be there in the end.â&#x20AC;? (Steven T. Jones)

BuyinG reFOrm October yielded tremendous financial contributions from real estate investors and interest groups for Yes on E, feeding fears that the measure will be used to target rent control and development standards in San Francisco. Sup. Scott Wiener has been the biggest proponent for Prop E since May 2011. He argues that the Board of Supervisors should be able to change or repeal voter-approved ballot measures years after they become law, saying that voters are hampered with too many issues on the ballot. Leaving the complex issues to city officials rather than the voters, makes the most sense of this â&#x20AC;&#x153;common sense measureâ&#x20AC;?, Wiener calls it. But how democratic is a board that can change laws from a time before some of the picks

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supervisors were even out of high school? Calvin Welch, a longtime progressive and housing activist, has his own theory: Wiener is targeting certain landlord and tenant issues that date back to 1978, when San Francisco voters first started adopting rent control and tenants protection measures. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That is what the agenda is all about â&#x20AC;&#x201D; roughly 30 measures that deal with rent control and growth control,â&#x20AC;? he said. Critics say that retroactive policy changes will leave progressive reforms vulnerable to a board heavily influenced by big-money interests. Among the most vulnerable reforms may be tenant protections such as limitations on rent increases, relocation assistance for no-fault tenant removal, and owner move-in eviction limits, to name a few. Although Wiener denies Prop E is an attack on tenants, who make up about two thirds of San Franciscans, the late financial support for the measure is coming from the same downtown villains that tenant and progressive groups fight just about every election cycle. High-roller donations are coming straight from the housing sector, which would directly profit from such repeals and amendments. Contributions to Yes on E include $15,000 from Committee on Jobs Government Reform Fund, $10,000 from Building Owners and Managers Association of SF PAC, another $10,000 from high-tech billionaire Ron Conway, and $2,500 from Shorenstein Realty Services LP. Then â&#x20AC;&#x201D; on Oct. 28, after the deadline for final pre-election campaign reporting â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the San Francisco Association of Realtors made a late contribution of another $18,772, given through the front group Coalition for Sensible Government. Prop. E is organized so that the first three years, an initiative cannot be subject to review. However after four years, a two-thirds majority vote by the board could make changes, and after seven years, a simple major could do so. That means if voters say Yes to Prop E, a slew of tenant measures approved in the 1990s could come under immediate attack. (Christine Deakers) 2

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Wednesday, nov. 2 OCCupy OaklanD General strike *OSFTQPOTFUPMBTUXFFL¾TQPMJDFDSBDLEPXO 0DDVQZ 0BLMBOEDBMMFEGPSBHFOFSBMTUSJLFPO/PW VSH JOHXPSLFSTBOETUVEFOUTUPTIVUUIFDJUZEPXO BOEKPJOUIFNPWFNFOU$POWFOFXJUIOFJHICPST  DPNNVOJUZNFNCFSTBOEBGGJOJUZHSPVQTUPUBLF QBSUBUBNPNFOUXIFO²UIFXIPMFXPSMEJTXBUDIJOH 0BLMBOE³#BOLTBOEDPSQPSBUJPOTUIBUEPO¾UDMPTF XJMMCFNBSDIFEPO5IF4USJLF$PPSEJOBUJOH$PVODJM XJMMCFHJONFFUJOHFWFSZ8FEOFTEBZBUQNJO0TDBS (SBOU1MB[BCFGPSFUIFEBJMZ(FOFSBM"TTFNCMZBU QN"MMQBSUJDJQBOUTBSFXFMDPNF "MM%BZ GSFF 0TDBS(SBOU1MB[B UI#SPBEXBZ 0BLMBOE XXXPDDVQZPBLMBOEPSH

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If the election were held three weeks from now, Lee would lose

Anyone but Lee The incumbent is falling fast in the polls, and it’s actually possible for Avalos to win By Tim Redmond tredmond@sfbg.com Two weeks ago, the race for mayor of San Francisco seemed in the bag. Mayor Ed Lee was so far ahead in most polls that everyone else looked like an also-ran. A Bay Citizen simulation of rankedchoice voting showed Lee getting enough seconds and thirds to emerge easily as the winner. His approval rating with voters was above 70 percent. The money was pouring in to his campaign and to the coffers of independent expenditure committees promoting him. But that was before the voterfraud scandals, OccupySF, Sup. John Avalos appearing on national TV, a controversial veto, Sup. David Chiu getting the endorsement of the San Francisco Chronicle, and an attack on City Attorney Dennis Herrera backfiring. “It’s changing,” Corey Cook, a political scientist at the University of San Francisco, told us. “I don’t know whether it’s tightening up, but it’s certainly changing.” 10 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

One campaign consultant, who asked not to be named, was more blunt: “The Lee campaign is one bad news story away from free-fall.” That’s not to say Lee is going to lose, or even that he’s anything but the clear front-runner. But over the past week, as Lee has taken a series of hits, supporters of the other candidates — particularly Herrera and Avalos — are starting to wonder: Could somebody else really win? The answer, of course, is yes — anything can happen in the week before an election. But defeating Mayor Lee will take a confluence of events and strategies that starts with a big progressive turnout — and with voters who don’t like the idea of an incumbent with ties to a corrupt old political machine carefully allocating their three ranked choices.

No surprise So far, there’s been no crushing “October surprise” — no single event or revelation that can change the course of the election. And the editorials

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impact of anything that happens in the next few days will be blunted by the fact that 27,000 absentee ballots have already arrived at the Department of Elections. By all accounts, Lee’s campaign and the somewhat sketchy independent expenditure groups that are working in parallel, if not in concert, have done an impressive job of identifying and turning out absentee voters. Local consultants from most of the campaigns agree that at least 20 percent of the final turnout will be Chinese voters — and Lee will get at least 75 and as much of 90 percent of that vote. But as Cook notes, there are still “huge undecideds” for this late in a race. And while Lee was polling above 30 percent a few weeks ago, by most accounts his numbers have been dropping steadily. One recent poll shows him falling 10 points in the past two weeks, leaving him closer to 20 percent than 30 percent. “If the election were held three weeks from now, he’d lose,” said one consultant who asked not to be identified by name. What’s happened? A confluence of factors have put the incumbent in a bad light. The voter-fraud allegations have made headlines and the district attorney is discussing a criminal investigation. Although Lee and his campaign weren’t directly involved — the possibly illegal efforts to steer voters to Lee were run by one of the IEs — the last thing a politician wants to see in the waning days before an election are the words “voter fraud” and “criminal investigation.” And the allegation — that Lee supporters in Chinatown filled out ballots for absentee voters then collected them for later delivery — play right into Lee’s weakness. While voters generally have good impressions of his work at City Hall, the fact that he’s connected to sleazy operators and tied to the old discredited Brown machine continues to haunt him. And this sort of activity simply reenforces that perception. The Leland Yee campaign has taken direct advantage of that perception, releasing a parody of the hagiographic Lee biography written by political consultant Enrique Pearce. “The Real Ed Lee story,” which repeatedly talks of his connections to unethical power brokers, hit the streets this past weekend. Lee also sided with the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce

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over a coalition of labor and consumer groups with his veto of legislation by Sup. David Campos that would have prevented employers from draining $50 million per year from health savings accounts set up to comply with city law. Many restaurants even tack a 3-5 percent surcharge onto customers’ bills, making it essentially consumer fraud. “It’s important for us to take a stance on the issue and say that what the mayor did was wrong,” Campos told us. “It’s a defining issue for us in City Hall.” Then there’s OccupySF. Nobody knows for sure, but it’s likely that a majority of San Franciscans are at least somewhat sympathetic to the group’s message. And Lee has so far avoided the public relations disaster of Oakland’s crackdown. But the left is unhappy with Lee’s constant threats to clear out the encampment, and the right is unhappy that he hasn’t sent in the cops already — and even the San Francisco Chronicle has denounced his lack of decisiveness. Lee put the police on high alert and had them moving around in buses, ready to move in — than at the last minute changed his mind. “What this shows,” said former Supervisor Aaron Peskin, “is that we don’t have a mayor with a firm hand on the tiller.” Most observers expected that the Chronicle would join the San Francisco Examiner and endorse Lee. But the paper came down on the side of Supervisor David Chiu. Chiu is still running well behind in the polls, and not that many voters follow the Chron’s advice, but the endorsement was a huge boost to his campaign. “Ed Lee’s had a bad couple of weeks, and some of the others have had a good couple of weeks,” Cooks said.

ranked choice Ranked-choice voting puts an interesting twist into all of this. Several consultants and election experts I talked to this week said that Lee would be far more vulnerable in a traditional election. “He would lose a runoff against almost any of the top challengers,” one person said. But every poll that’s tested the ranked-choice scenario — even recent polls that show Lee faltering — still put him on top after the votes are all tallied and allocated. That’s in part because supporters of candidates who are lower in the music listings

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for more news content visit sfbg.com/politics pack — Chiu, for example — tend to put Lee as a second or third choice. The Bay Citizen/USF poll showed that when Chiu was eliminated, most of his votes wound up going to Lee. “Ranked-choice voting clearly favors incumbents,” Cook told me. And, people walking precincts say, there are still some Herrera and even Avalos voters who put Lee second or third. And the only way Avalos — or anyone other than Lee — can win the election is if progressive and independent voters stick to a clear “anyone but Lee” voting strategy. Avalos is doing well in recent polls; in fact, one shows him ahead of Herrera in first-place votes. Herrera does better when seconds and thirds are counted. Michela Alioto-Pier gets a fair number of first-place votes, which isn’t surprising since she’s one of only three women in the race, the only woman with citywide name recognition — and the only real credible conservative. Yee and Chiu are both in the running, and Yee has come out strong attacking Lee and is running hard for progressive votes. He showed up at OccupySF the night a police raid was threatened and has been the leading critic of the alleged voter fraud. Cook says a scenario where somebody beats Lee is still “an inside straight” — but it’s not at all impossible. If Lee gets 30 percent of the first-place votes, most observers (including his opponents) agree that he’s going to cruise to victory. But if his first-place total is closer to 20 percent, and one or more of the other candidates are within five points, it’s going to be a lot closer. Here’s the bottom line: If you don’t want to see a repeat of the late 1990s, when Willie Brown was mayor and City Hall was for sale to the highest bidder, vote for anyone but Lee — and use your three votes strategically. If you like John Avalos, put him first — but give your second-place vote to Herrera, who seems positioned right now to be the next strongest challenger. If you like Herrera, give your second to Avalos. If you like Leland Yee or David Chiu, make sure that Avalos and Herrera are also on your slate. Fill out all three votes. And get your friends and family to the polls. Because turnout is projected to be low, which helps Lee — and the race may well be decided on the basis of who shows up November 8th. 2

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11


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thousands marched in downtown oakland oct. 25.

for more news content visit sfbg.com/politics

guardian photo by rebecca bowe

Flattened fences and strengthened bridges Bay Area occupiers resist police, lend mutual support, and attract international attention By Rebecca Bowe and Steven T. Jones rebeccab@sfbg.com steve@sfbg.com With their high-profile standoffs between protesters and police last week, Occupy Oakland and OccupySF have attracted international attention and support, helping to galvanize the six-week-old Occupy Wall Street movement. At press time, Occupy Oakland organizers working in league with local unions were gearing up for a citywide general strike intended to shut down the Port of Oakland and encourage work stoppages and school walkouts on Nov. 2. The occupation at Frank Ogawa Plaza, which had been dismantled by police only days earlier, had begun to reseed, with some 40 tents and a kitchen and first aid area reassembling. Planning meetings for the general strike were being held daily. Nearly 2,000 Occupy Oakland participants voted at an Oct. 26 general assembly to call for the shutdown, following an Oct. 25 clash with law enforcement that left Iraq war veteran Scott Olsen with brain injuries after his skull was fractured by a projectile fired from a line of riot police. Olsen, 24, who completed two tours of duty before becoming a member of Iraq Veterans Against the War, had progressed beyond critical condition and was expected to eventually recover, yet he continued to have difficulty speaking. At a flagpole near 14th and Broadway, near where Olsen was struck, a shrine was created with his visage illuminated with candlelight and surrounded by flowers and notes wishing his speedy recovery. Video of an injured Olsen being carried by fellow activists through what looked and sounded like a war 12 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

zone went viral, putting pressure of Oakland Mayor Jean Quan to retreat from her stance against the encampment. But in San Francisco, Mayor Ed Lee stuck to his position that the OccupySF encampment must come down, threatening another police raid if necessary. “Any official who would send in the riot police to deal with this camp does not deserve to be mayor of San Francisco,” said Brad Newsham, one of a stream of activists sounding off at an Oct. 31 hearing of the Board of Supervisors’ City Operations and Neighborhood Services Committee convened by Sup. John Avalos to consider a resolution the mayoral candidate had created allowing OccupySF to keep its infrastructure in place. OccupySF was jolted to a new level of activity Oct. 26 when supporters flooded into the camp in anticipation of a pending police raid. As hundreds practiced forming human blockades to defend the space and news of police whereabouts traveled like wildfire along social network sites, five members of the Board of Supervisors and Sen. Leland Yee appeared in the plaza and voiced their support for the Occupy movement. “We should allow OccupySF to do what they’re doing,” Sup. David Campos, who was among those to turn out at the plaza and address protesters around 2 a.m., said at the Oct. 31 hearing. “It’s good for San Francisco.” Campos singled out Lee and Quan for the violent raids, disputing the idea that “somehow it’s okay for us to spend the limited resources we have on these kinds of police actions...I hope we don’t have Mayors Quan and Lee wasting resources that could be better spent elsewhere.” editorials

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Amid the ranks of Bay Area occupiers, it was clear that a week marked by fierce government resistance to their organizing had only strengthened their resolve and ignited greater passion for advancing the Bay Area’s role in a nationwide movement that, on the cusp of its seventh week, continued gaining momentum. Chinatown residents rallying with the Chinese Progressive Association gathered in Portsmouth Square Oct. 30 and marched to the OccupySF encampment in solidarity with the “We are the 99 Percent” movement. On Oct. 29, some 1,000 activists gathered at Ocean Beach to spell out “Tax the 1%” in a human formation. “For every one of us you repress, 50 join the movement,” said camper Steven Boffo, according to an Occupy Oakland press statement. “Oppressive attacks like the exorbitantly expensive one last night give social movements their wings.”

Police brutality Olsen was not the only protester to be injured by the Oakland Police Department (OPD) and other regional law enforcement agencies recruited for backup on Oct. 25. The conflict began with a 4:30 a.m. police raid of the Occupy Oakland encampment, and ended with a street conflict akin to a war zone just outside the plaza, in which toxic teargas clouded the streets and thunderous booms from flash grenades sent protesters fleeing. The National Lawyers Guild San Francisco Bay Area Chapter (NLGSF) condemned police actions as excessive and unjustified. “The police violated just about every provision of their own crowd control policy last night,” said Bobbie Stein, a NLGSF attorney.

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“Tear gas canisters and flash bang grenades were thrown directly at protesters. ... Demonstrators were shot with rubber bullets and shotfilled ‘bean bags.’ All of this is prohibited under the policy that we helped write and under which all OPD officers and commanders are required to be trained.” There were reports of hand injuries, welts and bruises that appeared to be from rubber bullets, and a head injury stemming from the encampment raid in which officers made 115 arrests, according to a briefing delivered by NLGSF when protesters reconvened in the aftermath. When the raid occurred, activists erected barricades using wooden pallets, Dumpsters, and an old couch, yet the occupation was crushed in a show of force carried out by hundreds of officers. “The first thing they did was teargas,” explained a protester who gave her name as Maria Jackson. “The teargas created a blackout zone.” Injuries resulting from the early morning raid paled in comparison with wounds inflicted that night, when Occupy Oakland activists sought to return en masse to Frank Ogawa Plaza, which they had dubbed Oscar Grant Plaza in memory of a 22-year-old police shooting victim. More than 1,000 marched from the Oakland Public Library around 5 p.m. and continued progressing through the streets for hours, though several standoffs with police sent protesters scattering in mayhem before they reconvened to head back to the plaza, chanting forcefully. Harun Arsalai, a 29-year-old Muslim organizer originally from Afghanistan, told the Guardian he was taken to the hospital after losing consciousness when several police officers pummeled him on the music listings

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pavement during a heated standoff at the intersection of Eighth and Washington streets, not long after the march began. A YouTube video shot from a window above the scene shows several officers piling on top of him. After being released from Highland Hospital to Santa Rita Jail several hours later, Arsalai said several officers stationed inside the jail brought him into an empty cell where they beat him, forced his hand into a toilet, and restrained his neck so that he could not turn to see their faces. Arsalai — a student, bartender, social worker and organizer who was at Occupy Oakland nearly every day since the encampment started — said he has no way of knowing whether he was specifically targeted. Yet his visibility was high during the march because he was in the front line, helping to carry a banner with writing in English and Arabic. He partially covered his face with a bandana inscribed with an Arabic prayer. When we was initially arrested, Arsalai said he tried to make police aware that he was having difficulty breathing, but then everything went white. “I didn’t realize teargas was going off right behind me, because I was passed out, unconscious,” he said later. Upon arriving to jail, Arsalai said he was first placed in a holding cell for a short time which was doused in urine and lacked a toilet. He complained, saying he wanted to speak to a lawyer, but then he said he was taken to a different cell, put in a pain compliance hold, and beaten by several officers. Arsalai weighs about 130 pounds. “They were standing on my face and telling me not to dare move to look at them before they closed the door and locked it,” he said. “I’m still basically in shock. I’m banged up everywhere. It made me feel less than human.” Sgt. J.D. Nelson, a spokesperson for the Alameda County Sheriff Department, told us: “His allegations are false...We have surveillance areas of all the areas of the jail. We’ve been reviewing all those tapes.” He added, “We’re looking into it, but it’s not an internal investigation at this point. Nobody seemed to remember this guy, so it’s odd.”

Threat of a raid Across the bay, meanwhile, protesters at the OccupySF encampment continued to live on the psychological edge, not knowing when the hammer would come down. Avalos’ resolution to allow OccupySF infrastructure to remain in place — which was co-sponsored by Sups. Eric Mar, Campos, and Jane

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oppressive attacks ... give sOcial mOvements their wings.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; steven BOffO, Occupy Oakland

Kim â&#x20AC;&#x201D; was approved by the committee and sent to the full board for consideration on Nov. 1, after Guardian press time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is something I am wholeheartedly supporting because it is an expression of great frustration and concern about the economic system,â&#x20AC;? Avalos said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to speak with a greater voice about changing our economic system so it works for the many and not just the few.â&#x20AC;? But Avalos noted his frustration that Lee and the police had raided the camp twice and were threatening to do so again, something the mayoral candidate has sought to mediate since Oct. 5. The city should learn from Oakland that using police force to stop the movement only makes it stronger, Avalos said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we were to try to stop it from happening, it would just encourage more people to take part in it,â&#x20AC;? he said, noting that more midnight raids are dangerous for both police and protesters. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have to figure out as a city how weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to facilitate, encourage, and accommodate this movement.â&#x20AC;? With a second police raid fresh in memory and the threat of a third looming, protester Philip Oje, 26, said the numbers in the camp had swelled. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a microcosm of society and we have to work through all kinds of issues, which weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been doing as a group,â&#x20AC;? he said. Oje spoke with the Guardian on Oct. 25, hours after the raid on Occupy Oakland. The SFPD had just circulated memos warning OccupySF inhabitants: â&#x20AC;&#x153;You are subject to arrest.â&#x20AC;? But rather than backing down, OccupySF rented four porta-potties â&#x20AC;&#x201D; what many called â&#x20AC;&#x153;occu-pottiesâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; that arrived that afternoon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last night, because of what was happening in Oakland, I thought it would happen here as well,â&#x20AC;? Oje said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Personally, I feel like police action is imminent.â&#x20AC;? Oje said his personal strategy

was to place his body between police and the medical tent to try to salvage that critical resource. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about peace and nonviolence and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard when we have people of lots of different backgrounds,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So we have to practice rational responses. We need to know what to do when the tear gas comes and the rubber bullets start flying.â&#x20AC;? As the evening of Oct. 26 wore on, however, the camp experienced no teargas, projectiles, or physical force â&#x20AC;&#x201D; only an outpouring of support from local labor leaders, activists, and elected officials. By 4:30 am, some 500 were still gathered when OccupySF organizer Ryan Andreola announced, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just got a report from an official police statement that the raid has been called off because there were not enough police for the number of people here.â&#x20AC;? The crowd erupted in applause. The following day, a different story emerged from City Hall. Mayor Lee and Police Chief Greg Suhr offered shifting explanations for the massing of SFPD troops in riot gear, which protesters tracked by sending motorists to keep tabs on them and by communicating via Twitter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There were that many police amassed last Wednesday, there will be that many police amassed next Wednesday,â&#x20AC;? Suhr said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wednesday is a standard training day for the Police Department.â&#x20AC;? But when reporters expressed skepticism â&#x20AC;&#x201D; many were aware of last-minute changes in police staffing schedules and notices issued to neighboring businesses warning of police activity â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Suhr said police were preparing to either assist in Oakland, where occupiers had planned to reconverge at the plaza for a general assembly, or deal with trouble from OccupySF. Lee also raised the concern that violent agitators might come to San Francisco. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They had to get ready for what they saw in downtown

Oakland. They had to get ready for hundreds of people coming to San Francisco, either walking over the bridge or coming through the BART system. So they were trying to get ready for that particular activity because we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what was going to happen.â&#x20AC;? BART stations nearby the Oakland and San Francisco encampments were shuttered for some time that evening, presumably to prevent Oakland supporters from joining the ranks of the OccupySF protesters facing a possible police raid. BART did not respond to inquiries as to who made the decision to close those stations or why. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always asked the chief to be ready [to enter the camp],â&#x20AC;? Lee said at the Oct. 27 press conference. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been insistent that we have to be ready to enforce our laws so heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been under that instruction for quite some time. But the tactical decisions are the chiefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s responsibilities.â&#x20AC;? Yet later in the press conference, after Lee had left the room, Suhr made it clear that the final decision lies with the mayor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make no mistake about it, Mayor Lee is in charge of this situation,â&#x20AC;? Suhr said. After a series of vague responses to reportersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; questions, Lee stood by his earlier statements that protesters would not be allowed to camp. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fine line between occupying public space within your First Amendment rights and sleeping overnight and causing health conditions that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been very concerned about,â&#x20AC;? Lee said. Asked whether tents would still be allowed if the camp was clean and otherwise compliant, he said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still saying no tents.â&#x20AC;?

World Watches, and responds The Oakland crackdown stirred an international response. Talk show host Keith Olbermann condemned the excessive show of police force in a special broadcast and called for Mayor Quan to

either resign or fire Police Chief Howard Jordan, whose interim term began just weeks ago following the departure of Chief Anthony Batts. Quan, for her part, was thrust into the center of a public relations nightmare upon her return from a trip to Washington, D.C., where she was when the raid was occurring. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am deeply saddened about the outcome on Tuesday,â&#x20AC;? she wrote in a statement released Oct. 27. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was not what anyone hoped for, ultimately it was my responsibility, and I apologize for what happened. Today I visited Scott Olsen and his parents because I was concerned about his recovery,â&#x20AC;? she wrote. Quan added that she had called for an investigation into police use of force, and stated, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I will continue to order a minimal police presence.â&#x20AC;? But Quan noted in her message that camping was still prohibited overnight, a fundamental conflict that seemed to be leading the city back to square one with regards to the occupiers. Occupy Wall Street (OWS), the encampment based in Manhattanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Zucotti Park, voted to send $20,000 to Occupy Oakland in the wake of the police crackdown. Between 500 and 1,000 people also marched through the streets of New York City Oct. 26 in a show of solidarity with the Oakland occupiers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was a really big march, especially considering how quickly it came together,â&#x20AC;? said Joseph Carter, a member of IVAW based in New York. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was a good sized veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; contingent. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of outrage and a lot of sadness here in New York related to what happened to Scott.â&#x20AC;? Donations to IVAW for Olsenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s medical and legal needs were pouring in, Carter added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had about 700 donations, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re coming from across the country,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clearly this has touched a nerve here in America.â&#x20AC;?

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In Cairo on Oct. 28, thousands rallying against Egyptâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interim military government marched from Tahrir Square to the U.S. Embassy in a show of support for Occupy Oakland. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re following everything minute to minute,â&#x20AC;? said Gan Golan, an OWS activist. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This entire movement is interconnected through the use of social networking technology.â&#x20AC;?

Before the strike At an Oct. 31 press conference at Telegraph and Broadway streets, an intersection which held historic significance in the 1946 Oakland general strike, Occupy Oakland organizers shared their plans for their Nov. 2 day of action, which they officially titled, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Liberate Oakland, Shut Down the One Percent.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; The strike was being called to demonstrate solidarity with the global Occupy movement, to call for an end to police attacks, to defend Oakland schools and libraries, and to resist an economic system that promotes inequality and environmental destruction, activists said. The idea of holding a general strike had won support from the Oakland Education Association (also known as the Oakland teachersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; union), the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU), and Oaklandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest union, Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 1021. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Oakland General Strike will demonstrate the wide reaching implications of the Occupy Wall Street movement,â&#x20AC;? according to a statement on the Occupy Oakland website. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The entire world is fed up with the huge disparity of wealth caused by the present system. Now is the time that the people are doing something about it. The Oakland General Strike is a warning shot to the one percent â&#x20AC;&#x201D; their wealth only exists because the 99 percent creates it for them.â&#x20AC;? 2 Yael Chanoff contributed to this report.

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Guy Fawkes masks are a common siGht at occupy protests.

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over police reform and the agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision to cut cell phone service to scuttle a protest, with many wearing the Fawkes mask. Videos in several languages have proliferated on You Tube, featuring a speaker in a Guy Fawkes mask and electronic voice accusing Facebook of giving corporations and government agencies access to peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal information (Facebook did not respond to a request for comment). The videos urge people to close their Facebook accounts by Nov. 5 or risk having the hackers expose their information, urging allies to help â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kill Facebook, for the sake of your own privacy.â&#x20AC;?

Go down in hiStory

rememBer, rememBer, the 5th of novemBer )PXBUIDFOUVSZ#SJUJTISFCFMCFDBNFUIFTZNCPM PGSFTJTUBODFUP"NFSJDBOFNQJSF By Steven t. JoneS TUFWF!TGCHDPN Guy Fawkesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; masks â&#x20AC;&#x201D; popularized by the film and graphic novel V for Vendetta â&#x20AC;&#x201D; have been the most common face of American resistance to empire, used by the hacktivists of Anonymous and by the Occupy Wall Street protesters in cities across the country. Bay Area costume stores report the masks getting snapped up as soon as they hit the shelves. Guy Fawkes Day on Nov. 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; commemorating the day in 1605 when Fawkes was caught with a cache of explosives under the House of Lords â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is also the deadline set for a pair of unrelated actions directed at powerful corporations: national banks and Facebook. Bank Transfer Day calls for people to transfer their money from the huge banking institutions that helped crash the economy and into

local credit unions or locally owned banks. It was created as a Facebook event by Central Coast resident Kristen Christian and it went viral, with almost 67,000 people pledging the take part. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Together we can ensure that these banking institutions will ALWAYS remember the 5th of November!! If the 99% removes our funds from the major banking institutions to nonprofit credit unions on or by this date, we will send a clear message to the 1% that conscious consumers wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t support companies with unethical business practices,â&#x20AC;? reads the invite. Meanwhile, Facebook is the target of threats by a splinter group from Anonymous, the leaderless online collective whose hackers have crashed corporate websites in defense of Wikileaks, confronted the Church of Scientology, and organized protesters against BART

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Prepare for a day that will go down in history, Nov. 5, 2011. We are Anonymous. We are legion. We do not forgive. We do not forget. Expect us,â&#x20AC;? the video closes, using the standard Anonymous tagline. While many supporters of Anonymous have criticized the Facebook campaign and cast doubts on its chances of success, the system administrator for the AnonyOps.com website told us it is the nature of this movement that small groups can start campaigns of their choosing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One thing I do want to state about Anonymous is the fact that it is not a group. As stated above; it is an idea, an idea in which anyone can sail under freely. Think of it as a banner, a banner anyone can use to spread awareness of an issue or topic,â&#x20AC;? the administrator said. As for Bank Transfer Day â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which has significant support in both the Anonymous and Occupy communities, although it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t identify with either â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the AnonyOps administrator wrote, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t speak for Anonymous as a whole about the expected response from banks, but I personally believe that this movement is mostly to send a message. A message that says, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re fed up of your lies, and we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t trust you anymore.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?

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So how exactly did Guy Fawkes Day â&#x20AC;&#x201D; with its sing-song mantra learned by British schoolchildren: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Remember, remember, the fifth of November, the gunpowder treason and plot/ I know of no reason why the gunpowder treason should ever be forgotâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; come to play such an iconic role in the current political moment? Much of it was the power and timing of the 2005 movie, a dystopian tale of fascism taking root in England, with the state using fear and aggressive police tactics to quiet dissent and control the population. While the filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hero, V, adopts the Fawkes mask and story, it is his ideology that probably resonates with the modern movement rather than the historical Fawkes, a Catholic partisan who targeted a Protestant king. In particular, when V speaks to the people through a television broadcast, his issues and critique on power resonate with young people raised in the post-9/11 world who then watch the financial collapse and see how crony capitalism protects the powerful at the expense of the powerless. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The truth is that there is something terribly wrong with this country, isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t there? If you look about, you witness cruelty, injustice and despotism. But what do you do about it? What can you do? You are but a single individual. How can you possible make any difference? Individuals have no power in this modern world. That is what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve

been taught because that is what they need you to believe. But it is not true,â&#x20AC;? V says. Indeed, the young people of Occupy, Anonymous, and various other nascent political movements are feeling empowered by their successes and the support theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re receiving. In his speech, V calls for everyone to show up in Guy Fawkes masks on Nov. 5 to watch him blow up the House of Lords. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have come to offer you a deal,â&#x20AC;? V says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you accept, I will give you a different world. A world without curfews, without soldiers and surveillance systems. A world that is not run by other men but that is run by you. I am offering you a second chance.â&#x20AC;? The notion that an idea can ripple through the populace with little organizational support seems to be borne out by Bank Transfer Day, which was announced shortly after Bank of America said it would charge monthly fees on debit cards. Since then, credit unions report a steady uptick in business. Robin McKenzie from the nonprofit Redwood Credit Union in San Francisco said more than 500 people have opened accounts with the community institution since the announcement, specifically by customers who reported being unhappy with the fees, ethics, and government bailouts of the big banks. Carol Highton of Patelco Credit Union told us sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seen a 65 percent increase in checking, 80 percent increase in credit cards, and 33 percent increase in membership since Bank Transfer Day was announced. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our stance on it is: why wait? If theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re interested in moving their money they should do it now,â&#x20AC;? McKenzie said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been seeing a lot of demand from people for honesty and trust, and a lot on the local level... Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not looking to profit from them, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking to serve them.â&#x20AC;? 2 Nena Farrell and Paige Rickes contributed to this report.

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He also wrote, â&#x20AC;&#x153;November 5th was chosen because it is a rather big day for Anonymous. A lot of Anonymousâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ideas are based around the ideology of Guy Fawkes, and the movie â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;V for Vendetta.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; November 5th marks the day that Guy Fawkes failed to assassinate King James I of England, and this is also the same day in which the people stand up to their Government in the movie, so it marks a special day.â&#x20AC;?

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NOVEMBER 2 - 8, 2011 / SFBG.com

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drink’s effect would vary among individuals. “It doesn’t work for everyone, that is true for every medication out there,” he said. But generally, “45 minutes before.” It was further clarified that he meant pre-sexual escapade. Our Guardian tester, who took the “for her” variety of Amoré, found its power varied, a.k.a., got turned-on, then slightly nauseous, then turned-on. Tastes like a particularly gnarly 5-Hour Energy Drink, fades fast. A mixed bag. On a small “caution” panel, the label of Amoré prohibits the contents being taken with alcohol, other supplements, and heavy machinery.

HERBWISE The ever- unfolding swath of life’s problems that can be solved by cannabis has been extended the length of an aphrodisiac shot made from cannabis, cane syrup, glycerin, citric acid, and other supplements. Product name: Amoré. Don’t worry, it’s locally made. Amoré is the brainchild of a one Ed Silva, a gregarious medical industry product developer (think defibrillators and glucose monitors) who started up his San Jose dispensary Sensi Herbal Care in November 2010. It sells topical cannabis treatments, lemonade, chocolates, and buds, but Silva says its “flagship product” is its insomnia-fighting cannabis shot called Indi. “That product has literally helped thousands of people with their insomnia problems,” he told the Guardian in a phone interview. The dispensary also stocks an energy formula, of course Amoré, and has a pain reliever in the works. Recent legislation posed at the city level in San Jose, where regulations that would limit the city’s number of dispensaries (now hovering around 900) to 10 businesses. Paid campaigners and volunteers say they turned in AMORÉ: A LOCALLY-PRODUCED 48,598 petition signatures CAN NABIS APHRODISIAC. last week to halt the process. They only needed 29,653 to initiate a referendum on the new When asked about one of the guidelines. The United Food and label’s more esoteric ingredients, Commercial Workers union Local the fo-ti root (also listed are dod5 donated $5,000 towards supportder seed extract, kudzu root, and ing the referendum to stop them. tribulus fruit), Silva semi-helpfully The city’s new policies, an explains “It’s also called sho-wu. employee who answered the phone It means ‘black-haired Mr. Hee.’ at Sansi said, could have shut down It means that in Chinese, it’s a the dispensary — and community Chinese herb. That’s a name from access to the Viagra of the cannabis someone in an old village in China. world — down. Later, Silva sounded You can research that on Google, triumphant when he informed there’s a story behind that.” the Guardian reporter on the laws’ So of course we do, and sure impending curtailing. enough, it tends to be used to Without a medical background restore graying hair. So that’s fo-ti. — besides developing defibrillaBut why is it in this cannabis aphrotors — Silva was a bit vague about disiac shot, whose silver hard plastic his methods of creating cannabis bottle clearly states “for her”? formulas, but was confident in Says Silva: “It’s also known as the way customers responded that a happy herb. It has the effect of they were doing their job. He’d making you happy, which is always submitted the product to lab quala good thing. There’s a few people ity assurance testing and informal who I’d like to give that regularly, focus groups. like every hour.” Which left us still The optimal way to use unconvinced regarding Amoré, but Amoré? Silva cautioned that the still a big fan of Silva. 2 music listings

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local liBaTions: Barrique (lefT) ToPPed our faVoriTe new wine Bar lisT of lasT year. This year, soMa’s BluxoMe sTreeT winery crushes our graPes.

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wine Tales By Virginia Miller virginia@sfbg.com aPPeTiTe The wine scene never rests, particularly during harvest time. Besides traveling to Bordeaux for harvest a couple weeks ago (where I picked grapes with the harvesters one day in Sauternes), and continued weekends in Napa and Sonoma, I’ve been savoring the city’s latest wine bars, wine books, and a rare panel for Robert Mondavi staff of key Napa winemakers discussing Napa’s premier soil.

new ciTy siPs Alongside the best wine bar openings of 2010 — like Barrique (www. barriquesf.com) and Fat Angel (www.fatangelsf.com) — there are the new Barrel Room (www.barrelroomsf.com) in the old Hidden Vine space, and the new Hidden Vine (www.thehiddenvine.com), near the Transamerica Building. But for city-produced vino, I’d head to brand new Bluxome Street Winery (www.bluxomewinery. com). Reclaiming a SoMa winemaking heritage they say was thriving pre-1906 Great Quake, the Bluxome crew grows their own grapes within 100 miles of SF, producing a handful of whites and reds, from Sauvignon Blanc to Pinot. Tasting through flights of each, I found all balanced and interesting, particularly a Chardonnay, which reigns in typically over-oaked California qualities for a pleasantly acidic, well-rounded white. In the tasting room, sit in front of giant windows overlooking production of the wine you’re tasting.

grand cru aT To Kalon This summer I spent an unforgettable weekend with Robert Mondavi staff at Mondavi’s To Kalon vineyards, where vines were first planted in 1868. Mondavi’s master editorials

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of wine, Mark de Vere, deems this land, “the preeminent Grand Cru [exceptional growth] site of Napa since the 19th century.” At the cost of more than $40,000 per acre, it’s outrageously expensive land. But to the winemakers who each claim a plot of it, they say it produces some of California’s (and the world’s) finest wine, reflective of the unique terroir of Napa. A panel of six To Kalon winemakers (including Mondavi’s Genevieve Janssens, a Frenchwoman named 2010 winemaker of the year by Wine Enthusiast) mesmerized me, discussing how Napa is reaching maturing in the quality of vines, land, and winemaker technique. Tor Kenward, of TOR wines, said working with To Kalon vines is “intellectually challenging.... Despite price, it’s fascinating to work with.” Sampling five To Kalon Cabernet Sauvignons side-by-side, each reflects similar characteristics pointing to the properties inherent in the land. Each also reflects winemaker style (these winemakers likewise produce wines from other Napa regions). Standouts were Carter Cellars 2008 Cab ($125 a bottle), with dusty earth and spice giving it profound character, balanced by bright floral notes. At a mere 185300 cases a year, it’s truly a limited wine. The other was TOR’s 2008 Cab ($150, with 400-500 cases a year). A clean, mineral nose exudes light perfume, while it tastes of dark berries with gentle spice, vanilla, and a creamy finish. As one would expect, these are pricey bottles, hovering between $125-150 due to immense land costs. Provenance Vineyards was the exception at $75 a bottle for its 2007 Cab, exhibiting notes of white pepper, vanilla, and berries. picks

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Provenance winemaker Tom Rinaldi may get flak for not increasing the price of his To Kalon wine to more closely match fellow winemakers, but he keeps costs low for reasons akin to benefiting from rent control: he secured an early contract and plot with an essentially fixed price. I admire that although he could be making double, he has chosen not to put this on his customers... yet. (His current rates will be re-examined soon.) Tor Kenward commented on Napa’s maturing winemaking, playfully expressing California’s place in the wine world: “I’ve gone mano y mano with Bordeaux through the decades. It’s amazing how California goes head to head.”

drinKing in Pages My recent flights overseas required some serious reading, and finishing Natalie Maclean’s new Unquenchable: A Tipsy Quest for the World’s Best Bargain Wines (www. nataliemaclean.com) helped a 10hour flight pass quickly. Each section hits a different part of the world in search of high quality, value wines. From South Africa to Sicily, wine terms and history are subtly slipped into stories about individual winemakers and pairing recipes. A cheery book cover belies Ms. Maclean’s skill with imagery (she’s won the M.F.K. Fisher Distinguished Writing Award and four James Beard Foundation Journalism Awards). For example, in her particularly engaging chapter on German riesling, she compares riesling as the “quivering ... opera diva Sarah Brightman singing pop tunes... [with a] range [that] stretches far beyond what I hear,” to popular chardonnays as: “breathy pop stars who have to whisper the high notes.” 2 Subscribe to Virgina’s twice monthly newsletter, The Perfect Spot (www. theperfectspotsf.com)

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DrivE, SHE SAiD By L.E. LEonE le.chicken.farmer@gmail.com CHEAP EATS Hedgehog was going to baseball games before she met me â&#x20AC;&#x201D; mostly minor league ones, but anyway she was in it for the hot dogs. And beer. And people-watching. Now that she understands whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actually going on down there on the field, well, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a whole new ball game. Naturally, she wants to play. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m all for that, so I got us a big bag of spits, and once she learned to spit them like a pro, I went to K-Mart: two gloves, one baseball, and a big old brand new wooden bat. Wood because Hedgehog is of course a sound person, and the crack of the bat is more important to her than longevity and distance, or even the ethics involved with the slaughter of innocent trees. Through the course of only a few catch sessions, my boo evolved into a world class glove user and ball thrower. Now, having mastered the â&#x20AC;&#x153;wax on/wax offâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;paint the fenceâ&#x20AC;? of baseball, it was time for her to learn the Crane kick. So it was that we happened to be out and about in search of batting cages, me and her and Earl Butter. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the back seat, humming a happy little ditty and just generally playing with the power windows. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m driving Hedgehogâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s car, because I kind of know where Redwood City might be, and Hedgehog is firmly fastened into the passenger seat, trying to look casual while pressing the life out of the dashboard â&#x20AC;&#x201D; her usual position when sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not driving. Or at least when I am. Our sense of equilibrium was toppled, however, when the conversation turned to oysters â&#x20AC;&#x201D; an inevitable subject since, not only were they food, and not only were they one of our collective favorite foods, but Hedgehog had just had a batch of bad â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;uns in her hangtown fry. Not bad as in â&#x20AC;&#x153;get the bucketâ&#x20AC;?; bad as in not fried, like I told Just For You to do a long time ago. Because every time I get breaded and fried oysters in my hangtown fry, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my new favorite dish ever, and every time I get just out-of-the-jar and into-the-eggs oysters, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crap. So: Just For You. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been trying to sell Hedgehog on San Francisco for almost a year, and now that I have her here, you feed her an overpriced and undergood hangtown fry. If she runs screaming back to New Orleans, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on you. music listings

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Anyway, the post-mortem being concluded on Hedgehogâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unfried fried oysters, someone who might have been me mentioned something about raw oysters. And then someone else who might have been me mentioned how when oysters are eaten raw, they might maybe be still alive. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Define â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;alive,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Hedgehog gasped, even wide-eyeder than she already was on account of my driving skills, which are considerable. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry, babe. They arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t alive the way we are,â&#x20AC;? I said, changing lanes for the third time in three seconds and zooming through what I like to call a â&#x20AC;&#x153;pinkâ&#x20AC;? light. (I may not enjoy living on the edge, but I sure do enjoy driving on it.) â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Not alive the way we areâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;?â&#x20AC;? Earl Butter said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just remember that when the aliens spear you with a cocktail fork and swallow you whole with a spritz of lemon.â&#x20AC;? He had a point there. But speaking of eating things raw: sushi! Sushi is a good thing, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure we all agree, but it turns out there are levels of good. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean fine, good, and great; I mean there is sushi that just tastes how it tastes, and then there is Morally Superior sushi. Welcome to Tataki South. We werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t there, when we were there, just because it was rumored to be yummy (which it was). We wanted to try us some â&#x20AC;&#x153;ethically caught fishâ&#x20AC;? to see if it was like aluminum bats. Well, the fish that is ethical to kill and eat is pretty tasty, but the short story that accompanies every slice justifying its death made dinner seem more like an outing to a museum than a meal. It also turns out that, just as in the Real World, clearing your palateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conscious has a higher price tag. Tataki is a tiny place that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe in reservations for parties of less-than-six, so the wait was kinda long. But once we were inside, shoving ethically murdered fish down our gullets, it was so damn cozy and friendly, nothing else mattered. 2 TaTaki SouTh Sun.-Thu. 5-9:30 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 5-10 p.m. 1740 Church, S.F. (415) 282-1889 AE/D/MC/V Beer & sake

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NOVEMBER 2 - 8, 2011 / SFBG.com

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How would Debussy sound with a killer rhythm section?

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Friday 11/4

mastodon see thurs/3

American Indian Film Festival Hollywood loves to depict indigenous people as creatures who exist only in the past, battling cowboys or stepping forth to offer solemn life lessons to the likes of Kevin Costner. The American Indian Film Festival, now in its 36th year, offers ample cinematic evidence to the contrary, with a jam-packed week of programming. Ok, there’s a Western — supernatural frontier tale Yellow Rock — but there are also documentaries (Wild Horses and Renegades, about the Bureau of Land Management’s controversial stance on wild horses), a thriller set in deepest Alaska (On the Ice, which won “Best Debut Film” at the Berlin International Film Festival), and opening night family drama Every Emotion Costs, a Canadian film making its US premiere. (Eddy)

Thursday 11/3 Fruit Bats

Wednesday 11/2 “The Unstable Object” The PFA hosts the West Coast premiere of The Unstable Object, a mysterious, precisely observed work by Daniel Eisenberg. Nearly wordless (but densely aural), the film surveys three work sites: a glassy Volkswagen plant in Germany which doubles as a tourist destination; a Chicago clock producer staffed by the blind; and the alchemical Zildjian Cymbal factory in Istanbul. Occasionally surreal and completely engrossing, the film poetically analyzes differing degrees of labor and manual reproduction. Tomorrow night Eisenberg visits Yerba Buena Center for the Arts to present his film Persistence (1997) and to continue a conversation with Jeffrey Skoller, a UC Berkeley scholar who has edited a new critical anthology on Eisenberg’s work. (Max Goldberg) 7:30 p.m., $11 Pacific Film Archive Theater 2575 Bancroft, Berk. (510) 642-1412 www.bampfa.berkeley.edu www.sfcinematheque.org

20 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

Starting out life as a lo-fi project of Eric D. Johnson (who has stints behind him as a member of the Shins, among other bands) in the mid 1990s, the Fruit Bats came together as an working live band around the turn of the millennium, and has had somewhat of an open/revolving door of a lineup since — but its releases continue to get better and better. The group’s music is full of joyously simple , yet infectiously catchy folk-esque tunes, mixed with a touch of country-fried Southern rock and brightly sung sweet melodies — Johnson keeps the successful formula going on the group’s most recent release, Tripper (Sub Pop), which dropped earlier this year. (Sean McCourt) With Parsons Red Heads 9 p.m., $15 Great American Music Hall 859 O’Farrell, SF (415) 885-0750 www.gamh.com

Thursday 11/3 Unknown Mortal Orchestra Unknown Mortal Orchestra’s eponymous debut has to be one of my favorite albums of 2011. The brainchild of Portland, Ore., via New Zealand rocker Ruban Nielson, Unknown Mortal Orchestra is like listening to a crate of dusty, warped ‘60s psych and Motown editorials

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records after ingesting a couple mind-altering substances. It may have originated in Portland, but I can’t imagine a place more suited to this fuzzy drugged out basementpop than San Francisco. Come get weird. (Frances Capell)

8 p.m., $30  Warfield  982 Market, SF  (415) 345-0900  www.thewarfieldtheatre.com

With Gauntlet Hair and Popscene DJs  9 p.m., $12–$14  Rickshaw Stop  155 Fell, SF  (415) 861-2011  www.rickshawstop.com

San Francisco Transgender Film Festival

Thursday 11/3 Mastodon Mastodon didn’t please everyone with Crack the Skye, its astral-projecting 2009 concept album, but the band isn’t really in the pleasing business. Ever since mid-aughts underground success propelled the Atlanta quartet into the major label limelight, Mastodon has stuck to its wildly inventive, idiosyncratic guns. Pivoting away from Crack’s epic song structures and complicated arrangements, The Hunter, released this fall, is an infectious smorgasbord of taut, focused songwriting, heavy on vocal hooks provided by the band’s three singers (guitarist Brent Hinds, bassist Troy Sanders, and drummer Brann Dailor). Lyrical topics range from meth-addled lumberjacks to lonely octopi, but the star of the show is Mastodon’s boundless, yet disciplined creativity. No note, no matter how unexpected or bizarre, feels out of place. (Ben Richardson) With the Dillinger Escape Plan   and Red Fang

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Nov. 4-12, free–$20 Embarcadero Cinema One Embarcadero Center, Promenade Level, SF Palace of Fine Arts 3301 Lyon, SF

Thursday 11/3

(415) 554-0525 www.americanindianfilminstitute.com

One of the greatest things about San Francisco is that there’s a film festival for everyone: green activists, dog lovers, anti-corporate crusaders, horror fiends, outdoor enthusiasts, kung fu fans, and dozens more. Basically, if you can’t find a festival that excites you, you probably don’t actually like movies. This week alone there’s “Not Necessarily Noir” at the Roxie, the San Francisco Film Society’s “Cinema By the Bay,” the American Indian Film Festival (see Fri/4), and the San Francisco Transgender Film Festival. Step out tonight to check out a performance honoring the Transgender fest’s 10th anniversary, with artistic director Shawna Virago among those taking the stage. The films kick in this weekend, showcasing two shorts programs from across the globe; all have a transgender element in common, but topics range from boxing, boobs, and bunnies to the search for true love. (Cheryl Eddy) Through Sat/5 8 p.m., $12–$15 CounterPulse 1310 Mission, SF www.sftff.org

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Friday 11/4 “Cat Lady” Performance artist, writer, and serious prankster Kristina Wong has a way with stereotypes (cf. her mail-order-bride site, bigbadchinesemama.com), but her work defies categories by virtue of the brilliant wit, creative reach, and restless iconoclasm informing such acclaimed pieces as Wong Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (about the high incidence of suicide among Asian American women) and Going Green the Wong Way (which made its Bay Area debut in July). The SF-born, LA-based Wong normally flies solo, but in her anticipated return to San Francisco this weekend, she unveils her first full-length ensemble piece, a work bringing together “animal psychics, aggressive pick-up artists

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Mastodon photo by Cindy Frey; “cat lady” photo by mark francis; das racist photo by Simon Wald-Lasowski; San Francisco Transgender Film Festival still from “the Girl Bunnies. BIG TREE” Directed by Francoise Doherty.

and musty cat ladies” in a hilarious and unsettling exploration of connection at the social and sexual margins. (Robert Avila)

san francisco transgender film festival see thurs/3

Fri/4-Sat/5, 8 p.m., Sun/6, 7 p.m.; $17–$20 ODC Theater 3153 17th St., SF (415) 863-9834 www.odctheater.org

Friday 11/4 Wild Flag Wild Flag’s self-titled debut, released in September on Merge, is a breath of fresh air from the former members of Sleater-Kinney (Carrie Brownstein, Janet Weiss), Helium (Mary Timony), and the Minders (Rebecca Cole). As tested rockers from Portland, Ore. and Washington D.C. who’ve been playing in bands and listening to them for years (Brownstein also had a blog at NPR Music), Wild Flag’s tough pop rock feels decidedly different from other new bands out today — in other words, not esoteric indie rock awash in reverb. Wild Flag is vivacious, accessible, and catchy. It delivers a multifarious punch of classic hard rock, punk, and post-hardcore that’s downright fun to listen to. And if there’s ever been a great live band, it’s Wild Flag; these women grew up on stage.(James H. Miller) With Drew Grow & the Pastors’ Wives Through Sat/5   9 p.m., $19

With Boots Riley (sitting in with Das Racist), Danny Brown, and Despot

Great American Music Hall

Ruby Skye 420 Mason, SF www.rubyskye.com

Saturday 11/5

(415) 885-0750 www.gamh.com

SF Symphony Dia de los Muertos

Friday 11/4 Das Racist Das Racist is a tough act to define. It’s weed rap; it’s social commentary. It’s catchy and fun; it’s edgy and subversive. Or, as Himanshu Suri (a.k.a. Heems) and Victor Vazquez (a.k.a. Kool AD) put it, they’re not joking — just joking — they are joking. Since the pair first broke into the hip-hop scene with silly cyberhit “Combination Pizza Hut and Taco Bell,” Das Racist has released news

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There is musically much more to Day of the Dead than the ominous-humorous beating of drums, the rustle of voluminous skirts through ofrenda-dotted parks, and the clackity-clack of dancing skeletons bumping knees. There is singing at the symphony! Mexican tenor David Lomelí will join the players in a festive, family-oriented afternoon of favorites like “Besame Mucho,” “Granada,” and works by Mexican composers. Starting at 1 p. m., the colorful Ensambles Ballet Folklórico de San Francisco and musical group Vinikai will lead a procession into Davies Symphony Hall, where musically themed altars will be on display. Plus, complimentary pan de muerto from Bay Baking Co and Mexican hot chocolate will be served, eliciting a few shouts of “Yum!” (Marke B.) picks

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1 p.m. procession, 2 p.m. performance, $15–$68 Davies Symphony Hall 201 Van Ness, SF. (415) 552-8338 www.sfsymphony.org

Saturday 11/5 DaM-Funk and Master Blazter

8 p.m., $25

(415) 693-0777

859 O’Farrell, SF

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two hugely successful mixtapes and an album, Relax (Greedhead). Suri and Vazquez may be joking, but with remarkably astute lyrics and a crazy amount of talent, Das Racist is taking over the rap game in a very serious way. (Capell)

The last few times DaM-Funk was in town for shows — a DJ set at Som Bar; an incredible but barely remembered 45 party at Public Works to cap off Noise Pop — it wasn’t the full deal. Now the ambassador of boogie will cap off his fall tour with live accompaniment from Master Blazter, strapping on the shoulder synth to accomplish his main goal: throwing a party where everyone gets down. And there’s a good chance DaM-Funk has picked up some new old school tricks producing former Slave frontman Steve Arrington’s new album which comes out this month, Love, Peace, and Funky Beats. (Ryan Prendiville) With Matthew David, Devon Who, and Sweater Funk DJs  9 p.m., $20  Mezzanine  444 Jessie, SF  (415) 625-8880  www.mezzaninesf.com

Sunday 11/6 “Beyond This Place” with live soundtrack It makes sense that Sufjan Stevens would compose the

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soundtrack for Kaleo La Belle’s documentary Beyond This Place. The two have been friends since childhood and the documentary is personal. After 30 years of estrangement, La Belle and his stubborn hippie father, Cloud Rock, embark on a 500-mile bike excursion where La Belle hopes he’ll learn whether there’s an inextricable bond between himself and Cloud Rock — a man without guilt, regret, or compassion. At the Castro Theater, Beyond This Place screens with a live soundtrack performance by Sufjan Stevens and Castanets’ Ray Raposa; a Q&A with La Belle follows. (Miller) 7:30 p.m., $25

Zinner were so fashionable and seductive that I couldn’t quite relate to the coolness of it all. I preferred Brian Chase, who looked like a 1980s tech guy by comparison. Besides, the classically trained drummer played phenomenally. All three members have been working on projects outside the Yeah Yeah Yeahs lately. O wrote a “psycho opera,” Zinner has been doing photography, and Chase? He’s been pounding at the drums with the North Sky Cello Ensemble, a collection of classical musicians whose players have supported the likes of Beyonce and Elton John. How would, say, Debussy sound with a killer rhythm section? (Miller)

Castro Theater

8 p.m., free

429 Castro, SF

Brick and Mortar Music Hall

(415) 621-6120

1710 Mission, SF

www.castrotheater.com

(415) 800-8782 www.brickandmortarmusic.com 2

Tuesday 11/8 North Sky Cello Ensemble When the Yeah Yeah Yeahs burst onto the indie rock scene in 2003, singer Karen O and guitarist Nick film listings

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The Guardian listings deadline is two weeks prior to our Wednesday publication date. To submit an item for consideration, please include the title of the event, a brief description of the event, date and time, venue name, street address (listing cross streets only isn’t sufficient), city, telephone number readers can call for more information, telephone number for media, and admission costs. Send information to Listings, the Guardian Building, 135 Mississippi St., SF, CA 94107; fax to (415) 487-2506; or e‑mail (paste press release into e‑mail body — no text attachments, please) to listings@sfbg. com. Digital photos may be submitted in jpeg format; the image must be at least 240 dpi and four inches by six inches in size. We regret we cannot accept listings over the phone.

november 2 - 8, 2011 / SFBG.com

21


arts + culture: film

FraMe MIssInG

By Max GoldBerG arts@sfbg.com get tickets at

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student discounts of 50% off are back! Check yoshis.com/discounts for available shows!

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Free Music in the Lounge! Wed-Sat 6:30pm-11pm New! Weekly Jazz Jam! Wed 9:30p-12am

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Wed, Nov 2 B-3 Organ Master’s Yoshi’s Debut!

chester thoMpson quartet Thurs-Sat Nov 3-5

JAZZ MAFIA presents: emperor norton suite 35-piece jazz/hip-hop symphony combines jazz/hip-hop/electronica

Sun, Nov 6 A Benefit for Golestan Kids

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Mon, Nov 7

hot 8 Brass BanD ............................................... Tues, Nov 8 “Walking in Memphis”

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Wed, Nov 9

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with San Francisco Giants’ own tim Flannery & the Lunatic Fringe and more!

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Thurs, Nov 10

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& Her red Hot skillet lickers “crazy in Love with patsy cline”

feat. a 7-piece band + pedal steel legend Bobby Black

DavID Murray cuBan enseMBLe NOV 11-13 Plays Nat king cole en español

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Mon, Nov 7 Live Recording

WaLLy schnaLLe seXtet ............................................... Tues, Nov 8 Virtuosic guitar trio

neW West GuItar Group ............................................... Wed, Nov 9 UK Funk & Soul

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22 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

FIlM Of all Elliot Lavine’s noir programs for the Roxie, “Not Necessarily Noir” is both the toughest sell and the most creative from a curatorial perspective. There are two programs in this abbreviated “Not Necessarily Noir” run that should have built-in audiences — a slam dunk Joan Crawford double bill of Johnny Guitar (1954) and Female on the Beach (1955), and a full course of Ed Wood — but the terrifically nervous movies at the start of the series do the most to stake out its intuitive terrain. As a thorough revision of Robert Siodmak’s classic adaptation of the Hemingway story, Don Siegel’s The Killers (1964) is a fine place to begin. Siegel’s remake was initially contracted for television, but that fell through when the director littered the film with mean specks of violence; a sniper sequence seemed in especially poor taste after the Kennedy assassination. If they only knew: in the movie version it’s Ronald Reagan pulling the trigger. The wild casting combinations are dynamite in Siegel’s hands: the future president and John Cassavetes brawl and killer pair Lee Marvin and Clu Gulager pursue the story of a big heist. Marvin’s hired gun wants to know what made former racecar driver Johnny North (Cassavetes) die without a fight. Gulager’s goofy psychopath needs the suggestion of a million bucks to get interested. Ducking Siodmak’s smooth noir style, Siegel gives us hard daylight, cheap motels, and actors sweating through their makeup. The director approaches fatalism matter-of-factly, leaving the expressionistic language of seduction and madness without much purchase. With characteristic perversity, Siegel has Johnny accuse femme fatale Sheila Farr (Angie Dickinson, a Kennedy friend) of betrayal when his head is wrapped up following an auto accident. It should be an emotional peak and we can’t even see his eyes. Against the odds of its title, the unjustly obscure Brainstorm (1965) charts a well-plotted crackup. With its glinting surfaces, jazz score, and debauched party scenes, the William Conrad film can evoke a pulp La Dolce Vita (1960) or La Notte (1961). Jim (Jeffrey Hunter) is a chiseled intellectual manning room-sized computers. In a dreamlike prologue, he discovers a beautiful woman (Anne Francis) wrapped in mink in the backseat of her car. She’s unconscious, and her car is parked in the editorials

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dancInG In the dark (FroM top): Brainstorm (1965), the Killers (1964), and Play misty For me (1971).

5IFVOPSUIPEPYWJTJPOTPG²/PU/FDFTTBSJMZ/PJS³

Brainstorm never ventures into the underworld, but Conrad’s squeezed widescreen framing gives the sense of being underwater. Along with the hard horizontals of modernist offices and passing references to the Nuremberg Trials, the film’s self-conscious tripling of female threat (the traditional femme fatale, a woman psychologist, a hired hand who accuses Jim of lewd phone calls) insinuates deep pathological reserves of noir anxiety. Brainstorm’s disintegration isn’t quite up to Shock Corridor (1963) and The Manchurian Candidate (1962), but they’re all stirring the same pot. If Clint Eastwood’s avenging cop in Siegel’s Dirty Harry (1971) was a neo-noir lodestar, his directorial debut of that same year pushed in a different direction. In Play Misty for Me, an extreme amplification of the femme fatale into a castrating bitch (many fatal attractions followed) obscures his character’s masculine code. As Dave, Eastwood appears every bit the New Hollywood playboy driving along the Pacific Coast Highway to his nighttime disc jockey gig. After the show he has a drink with his barkeep friend (Siegel, naturally) and soon looks to pick up a swell-looking babe down the bar (Jessica Walter). Back at her place Evelyn admits she’s the one always calling in with a request for “Misty,” and things only get stickier from there. Dave grasps at Evelyn’s movieromance psychosis with the same hard stare reserved for bad dudes in the spaghetti westerns and crime movies, but here this front signals disbelief, frustration, and ineffectuality. Instead of trapping his onscreen persona in the frame, as in the classical noir, Eastwood pictures himself enjoying a false mastery of space. Dave strolls with a good girl in sylvan nature (shades of 1947’s Out of the Past), but the unnervingly distant framings anticipate the knockout moment when Evelyn’s hand strikes menacingly into the foreground of one of these shots. Play Misty for Me isn’t necessarily noir, but Eastwood’s cunning extension of the “deadly is the female” trope doesn’t play nice with the audience’s identification — and that’s maybe the coolest killer of all. 2 “Not Necessarily Noir ii” Nov. 4-8, $5–$9.75

path of a train. After the rescue, Jim finds out she belongs to Jim’s boss Cort Benson (Dana Andrews in a fine menacing turn). A little later Cort finds out the two youngsters

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have been playing around and uses his power to cast Jim as a lunatic. Jim begins to play along when he realizes it could make for a persuasive alibi for murder. music listings

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Roxie Theater 3117 16th St., SF (415) 863-1087 www.roxie.com

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CoMBat fatiGue Battlefield 3 %*$& &MFDUSPOJD"SUT

9CPY 14 1$ GaMeR It’s disappointing that a Battlefield 3 review has to begin with a discussion of Call of Duty, but we can’t ignore the elephant in the room. For months, the Battlefield team has been shooting barbs at Call of Duty, warning the makers of the bestselling video game in the world that they intended to steal the Brown-War-Shooter crown. The previous Battlefield release was a multiplayer surprise success, performing just below Call of Duty for the better part of a year, and Swedish developer DICE intended to go all the way this time. Well, the time has come to evaluate the threat. And while the multiplayer delivers on the promise, the rest of the package makes those earlier boasts seem a little premature. A significant number of Battlefield fans never touch the single-player campaign, bypassing it to dive right into the online experience, and this time they aren’t missing much. In search of authenticity, the campaign takes a deliberate approach to combat, but it feels old hat. Most action takes place in corridors — not Battlefield’s strong suit — where soldiers pour into an area and you have to clear them out. Yawn. You start thinking, maybe Call of Duty was right to juice up their ostentatious campaigns in the name of fun. In the campaign’s second half, DICE comes around on editorials

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Call of Duty’s strengths as well, feebly aping that series’ better bits: a nuclear threat, car chases and shootouts in the streets of Paris and the NY subway. It’s not just disappointing that the levels are unmemorable and derivative, it’s a shame there’s no real exploration of the teambased combat that makes the series unique. And yet: it’s revealing that for the reviewed Xbox version, Battlefield 3’s campaign comes on the second of two discs; the campaign itself is negligible. Battlefield’s roots are multiplayer, where their Conquest and Rush modes prove that war is not just about killing, it is about cooperation. Whether you’re driving friends around in a jet, helicopter, or tank, fixing vehicles or attacking capture points, Battlefield is more than a shooter, it’s a full war experience. Undeniably, having 64 combatants on the field in multiplayer makes PC the go-to version if you can afford the rig. Despite how much went wrong with the story missions, if you approach Battlefield 3 with the right expectations, it comes out largely unscathed. DICE’s multiplayer offers up massive vistas and the opportunity to feel like an essential cog in the war machine. Will it take this year’s Brown-War-Shooter crown? The online community will suss that out for themselves, but until DICE can deliver a complete package, I suspect Battlefield will have to learn to share. (Peter Galvin) 2 picks

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loriC Sih, matt rogErS, and amitai hEllEr throUgh thE looking glaSS | Photo by Chris stevens

mood SEttErS 8BUFS#PSEFSTESBXPVUUIFJOIFSJUDSFFQPGWJOUBHFGJMN By Emily SavagE emilysavage@sfbg.com

                                

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mUSiC Water Borders, a gloomy beat-driven San Francisco band with a new release (Harbored Mantras) on Tri Angle Records, spent the past few weekends practicing the art of creating atmosphere for obscure vintage films. The band was picked for the first San Francisco installment of Celluloid Salon, a multimedia series that also takes place in cities such as New York, Chicago, and Austin, Texas. At the event â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nov. 15 at Public Works â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the trio will live score four silent shorts from the 1920s and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;30s. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re good at soundscapes,â&#x20AC;? explains the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s singer Amitai Heller, sitting amongst pedals, synths, stacked TVs, and laptops in the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tenderloin practice space. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of what we do best, is create moods.â&#x20AC;? Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right. The textured tracks on Harbored Mantras creep from black velvet-swaddled eerie (â&#x20AC;&#x153;What Wiwantâ&#x20AC;?) to veiled ethereal (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Waldenpond.comâ&#x20AC;?). Moody synths and drum machine beats are layered with cinematic samples that recall snake rattles, dragging chains, even bird chirps. The album â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which is the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first full-length release after putting out a CD-R, a cassette, and a few records on labels such as Disaro â&#x20AC;&#x201D; also takes hints from post-punk and experimental industrial, most notably, Coil. Hellerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doomed, swallowed vocals are the most startling.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s definitely a lot of studio tricks with the vocals,â&#x20AC;? says Hellerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s partner-in-sound, Loric Sih. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our music is generally dense and cavernous, the vocals have to be mixed in a specific way to sound right sitting on top of that. There was a lot of experimenting, a lot of trial and error, a lot of long nights in here.â&#x20AC;? Here meaning the practice space, where a nearby metal actâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s muffled guitar bleeds through the walls. While this project arose in 2009, the two met 10 years back at UC Santa Cruz when Heller was the â&#x20AC;&#x153;flamboyantly dressedâ&#x20AC;? singer of Gross Gang. After Gross Gang ended, Heller started New Thrill Parade and asked Sih to join. With Water Borders, Heller says they had a plan: â&#x20AC;&#x153;everything in reverse from how we did things in the previous band.â&#x20AC;? In the other band, they â&#x20AC;&#x153;self-promoted aggressively, toured insane, and lost tons of money.â&#x20AC;? Says Heller, â&#x20AC;&#x153;With this, [Loric and I] decided that we wanted to get everything in order first, have concise direction...and not show people the evolution as it unfolded. So itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s record it, perfect it, show it.â&#x20AC;? While that was the theory, the reality was a bit more complicated. They had to work at bringing the synth-and-machine music to the stage in an engrossing way. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taken us about this long to understand how to make electronic sound good live. I think the [record release] show we just played at Amnesia was probably the first time that nothing went wrong.â&#x20AC;? music listings

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Part of that newfound live strength comes from the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newest member, Matt Rogers, a longtime friend and recent Seattle transplant. At shows, the multiinstrumentalist plays guitar, keyboard, and an electrical kalimba, among other pieces. The addition of Rogers, who joined in August, meant Heller could focus mainly on vocals. And those are important to him. While theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re murky, under a thick goth-y haze, the lyrics on Harbored Mantras touch on themes of dissatisfaction, systemic and institutional change, and colonialism. They come from Hellerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sociopolitical awareness; raised on a kibbutz in Israel, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s now a volunteer counselor at the Tenants Union and frequents the Occupy SF grounds. While likely not so in line with his personal politics, he once composed music for a documentary on the Seastedding Institute (which, he says, is basically an organization of rich libertarians who want to colonize the ocean by creating autonomous cities). The event at Public Works will be the first scoring for Water Borders as a band though. Sih and Heller seem stoked at the prospect. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would be happy if this band was able to score films professionally,â&#x20AC;? enthuses Sih. The tones of the short films vary wildly, one even has a slapstick element â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which seems worlds away from the Water Borders vibe. Says Heller, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s challenging in a good way.â&#x20AC;? 2 Water Borders Nov. 15, 7 p.m., free with RSVP Public Works 161 Erie, SF (415) 932-0955 www.publicsf.com www.myopenbar.com/celluloidsalon

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arts + cuLture: Music

the san FRanCIsCo Band exeRCIses Its deMons thRoUgh gUttURal Folk Photo by Daniel berman

ResURReCtIon 5IFFYRVJTJUFQBJOBOESFCJSUIPGGSFBLGPMLFST-JUUMF5FFUI By Jen Vezosa arts@sfbg.com MUsIC In a once-pink house, atop a hill where San Francisco and Daly City collide, freak folk four-piece Little Teeth practices its trash thrash in a small living room decked with tawdry holiday tchotchkes year round, as if suspended in a never-ending Christmas. When I arrive, pajama-clad vocalist/multi-instrumentalist Sofia Bell is baking Christmas tree-shaped vegan cookies. As she enters the bedroom, she serves percussionist Sean Real and the band’s newest addition, Brian Rodriguez, her freshly baked confections. Her wife, vocalist/multi-instrumentalist Dannie Murrie, is in their bed, watching 16 and Pregnant. When Bell ensures everyone is eating, she gets in the bed and cozies up next to Murrie. The room’s energy shifts when the interview commences. Weeks prior — to accompany Daly City/Andalusia, an EP of demos — Little Teeth posted a tell-all bio on Bandcamp, scrupulously detailing the dissolution of the band’s original lineup (Ammo Eisu, Andy Tisdall, Murrie — Murrie remains the only original member). On New Year’s Eve 2008, after she was introduced to Little Teeth’s music by her boyfriend, Bell saw Tisdall perform solo. His music — simple folky melodies above 26 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

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clamorous creaky piano, banjos, and cellos — made for enchanting chamber folk. “It was like a religious experience. Everyone blacked out of the room. Doves were flying. [There were] huge choruses of kneeling skeletons,” she says, catching her breath. “It was a very dramatic experience for me.” She also met Murrie that evening. “I saw her come up the stairs. And I will never not remember that ‘cause it really [was] like that love at first sight thing,” she says. To Bell, the music Tisdall and Murrie were making both together as Little Teeth and separately as solo artists was what she had been waiting for her whole life. “I just felt like nothing had ever played the sound of a person — what it felt like to be on the inside in your nervous system running and the voices in your head arguing with you,” she says. “I just felt so completely naked in front of their music.” So enamored with Tisdall’s music, Bell began cheating on her boyfriend with him. A room opened up in the Pink House — where Murrie resided — when the band was at SXSW. Bell moved in. And upon his return, Tisdall shared a room with Bell. During what Bell and Murrie call “the golden era,” Bell was experimenting as Stanzamaphone, her solo project, while Murrie was producing Little Teeth’s music listings

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debut album, Child Bearing Man (Absolutely Kosher). In it, Murrie’s snarling, metallic gruff rises above the banging of pots and pans and wailing of mandolin, accordion, banjo, and cello. When Murrie began working on Stanzamaphone with Bell, they fell in love. “It was the Chernobyl of the house,” Murrie says, referring to the day she and Bell decided to disclose their feelings for each other with their housemates. “It went the worst way it could have possibly gone. It went the way of hospitals and 5150s” — involuntary 72-hour hold in a psychiatric hospital. All the while, Bell had developed a gastrointestinal disorder. After her hospitalization, she began to write down what had happened over the past six months. The pared down version of that story was posted to Bandcamp, as the band worked on repairing itself. With sagacious hindsight, in the house frozen in Christmas time, Murrie says, “Our sentence is to face the ghost and do it justice and do it service. And live with it everyday. And live it through our songs.” 2 LittLe teeth With Faun Fables Fri/4, 9p.m., $10–$13 New Parish 579 18th St., Oak. www.thenewparish.com

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oaklandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JhamEEl analyzES EmotionS throUgh Song, CovErS t-pain.

BEaUtifUl pop

music. Go watch it now. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not wearing any fancy face paint, but heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got style. 2

5IFNBOZTJEFTPGVQBOEDPNJOHWJSUVPTP+IBNFFM By Emily SavagE emilysavage@sfbg.com mUSiC I half-expect Jhameel to be sporting face paint whiskers swiped across his cheeks as I walk up to meet him at Cafe Strada near the UC Berkeley campus. Lyrically, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inspired by Ben Gibbard, musically by Sufjan Stevens, but aesthetically, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early Bowie. After listening to Jhameelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest full-length â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Human Condition, which came out in early 2011 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; on repeat, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve grown accustomed to seeing his face painted with black streaks like on the cover, or in rainbow stripes like in the frenetic video for the poppy â&#x20AC;&#x153;How Many Lovers.â&#x20AC;? The rational side of my brain, however, assures me heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll show up in street clothes. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not like the multi-instrumentalist singer-songwriter wears face paint in real life, or even in all of his output. In reality, his style is gradually morphing. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fluid, like the danceable baroquepop music itself, which Jhameel (his legal name, meaning â&#x20AC;&#x153;beautifulâ&#x20AC;?) composes and creates almost entirely solo. He played every instrument on the album: guitar, piano, bass, drums, violin, cello, trumpet, keyboard. While itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not his biggest strength (that would be violin), he says heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most in line with the cello. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I relate to its personality,â&#x20AC;? he explains, fresh-faced when we spot each other at the cafe wearing similar black pea coats, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got a strong foundation. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rooted in the ground. I get a good vibe out it.â&#x20AC;? The son of a master violinist (who appeared in the original Fame) Jhameel spent his childhood surrounded by instruments. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been writing [music] since before I can remember, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been like a language for me.â&#x20AC;? It can be included in the long list of languages he knows, including Spanish, bits of Korean and Chinese, Latin, some Russian, and near fluency in Arabic. He majored in Arabic at Berkeley and graduated in two years, paying for schooling through ROTC (Reserve Officersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Training Corps). But editorials

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something happened during that time, a â&#x20AC;&#x153;clichĂŠ self-identity crisesâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a seismic shift of values, mentality. He wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t shed too much light on the life change, but he says he had to let go of ROTC. He joined a co-op; the contrasts enlivened his lyrics. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I only have one life to do this. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to have a positive effect on the world.â&#x20AC;? In January, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll release a new album. The concept derives sounds from different eras of music. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a disco cut set in a modern context, a 1980s pop song, a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bob Dylan-esqueâ&#x20AC;? composition. He calls the upcoming album more primal and animalistic then the highly poetic The Human Condition, which is an analysis of emotion. The 2012 release will be more in line with the dance EP he released this summer. He does already have some experience mining pop culture. Early in this musical journey he covered T-Painâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buy You a Drinkâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; on violin â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and posted it to Youtube. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the perfect slice of modern

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HaIRy EyEBaLL Today marks the first citywide general strike in our country since 1946. Spearheaded by Occupy Oakland in the wake of the Oakland Police’s grossly excessive use of force against protestors last week, the strike is further proof that the only definitive thing one can say about the Occupy movement is that it is growing at a remarkable pace. Whether this growth will result in greater political traction, rather than merely prompt further sympathy or ridicule from politicians and the media alike, remains to be seen. Then again, one metric of political traction for the Occupy movement is simply endurance, measured by present bodies. As Lili Loofbourow recently wrote in an on-the-ground report on Occupy Oakland for website The Awl, “technology tilts the political machine so that only that which is public matters.” And despite the Occupy movement’s necessary imperfections, there is no more direct and immediate way of being public than showing up and speaking out. What gets broadcast and what gets heard beyond the encampments is another matter. Even with the tools of social media at the Occupiers’ disposal, can the movement’s horizontal, leaderless structure effectively amplifying the voices of “the 99%” without resulting in an echo chamber?

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And if that is what’s being perceived, both on the ground and in the national conversation, is that necessarily a sign of the movement’s failure or merely a testament to its vibrancy? A variation on these questions of mediums and messages is at the heart of Geof Oppenheimer’s intellectually bracing and formally daring show at Ratio 3, Inside Us All There Is A Part That Would Like to Burn Down Our Own House, which although not explicitly about current events, uncannily resonates with them. The work in Inside Us formally traces the fluctuating state of the body politic by zeroing in on moments of stress in which civic faith breaks down or flares up, whether due to admissions of failure on the part if its appointed leaders or from internal combustion. The latter isn’t just a figure of speech. The ballistic-grade Plexiglass cubes on plinths that snake down the center of Ratio 3’s main room, collectively titled Modern Ensembles, each contain the multicolored residue of an explosion set off within. Oppenheimer worked with a pyro-technician (a former employee of the Disney Corporation, no less) to create custom-made charges of various explosive chemicals that were then detonated inside the cubes, resulting in gorgeous, nebula-like washes of color that completely cover each cube’s interior face.

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That the beauty of the Modern Ensembles comes from such violent origins is less interesting to me (that’s an old story in Art History, particularly in regards to action painting, a tradition which these sculptures extend as much as they do classic Minimalism’ proverbial cube), than how they embody a tension between explosive force and containment. The Oakland occupiers also hit a wall — a phalanx of police armed with riot gear and tear gas. It’s hard not to think of that moment, that so many experienced remotely via Facebook posts and Flickr feeds, when viewing these chemically colored cubes that, although transparent, you can’t actually see through. Communication breakdown is also taken up in Social Failure and Black Signs, a suite of five pigment prints that surround the enigmatic vitrines like a gaggle of lost protestors. Each black and white image consists of a similarly-positioned arm holding aloft a sign printed with phrases concerning governance or economics but clearly removed, media res, from their original context. “Tolerated, as unfortunate excess,” reads one. Another states, “everything, but it is not enough.” These stranded phrases are, in fact, excerpts from interviews with political figures such as Margaret Thatcher, Ronald Reagan, Fidel Castro and Robert McNamara, in which they discuss moments when their ideologies resulted in music listings

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policy failure, something which Oppenheimer’s photographs formally restage by transforming these confessional moments into incomplete sound bytes. The opposite tack is used to achieve similarly disorienting results in Anthems, a four minute high definition video, which superimposes footage of a military marching band playing four different national anthems while in formation. The resulting wall of sound renders the pieces indistinguishable from each other, while, visually, the rapidly overlaid footage scrambles the patterned order of military spectacle. Politically, a lot can happen when polyphony gives way to cacophony (or in the case of Social Failure and Black Signs when signal becomes noise). But the result can also just be chaos. As an ongoing experiment in the messy business of building a participatory democracy with its share of successful and failed words and deeds, the Occupy movement is a living, everexpanding testament to this. And despite being presented under a title full of Freudian dramatics, so are the pieces in Inside Us. 2 GEOF OPPENHEIMER: INSIDE US ALL THERE IS A PART THAT WOULD LIKE TO BURN DOWN OUR OWN HOUSE Through December 10 Ratio 3 1447 Stevenson, SF. (415) 821-3371 www.ratio3.org

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aRtS + cultuRe: theateR

GoinG stAG: steijn witH His spiRit AnimAl.

fridaY nights 04

nov.

at the de Young

HomemAde sHAmAn %VUDIQFSGPSNBODFNBLFS3PCFSU4UFJKOEFCVUTJOUIF#BZ"SFB By RoBeRt AvilA arts@sfbg.com tHeAteR A rare event for rare times: Robert Steijn comes to San Francisco. The visit â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which included a workshop Oct. 31-Nov. 2, and comes courtesy of THEOFFCENTER, Zero Performance, and Jorge Rodolfo De Hoyos â&#x20AC;&#x201D; marks the first Bay Area show by this somewhat unexpected but internationally acclaimed figure in contemporary dance-performance. A onetime dance critic who made a mid-career leap into performance, Steijn is at 53 defiantly not young, nor especially sleek despite a close working relationship with his spirit animal, a deer. But a graceful, probing, witty, and intriguing artist he certainly is. Known to collaborate widely â&#x20AC;&#x201D; most consistently with compatriot Frans Poelstra, with whom he forms United Sorry â&#x20AC;&#x201D; heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also the creator of a handful of idiosyncratic solo works, one of which he performs Thursday night at the new Joe Goode Performance Annex in the Mission. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am reborn a smoker/Allowing myself to get high in the clouds of imaginationâ&#x20AC;? is billed as â&#x20AC;&#x153;a performance in the form of a lecture/demonstration,â&#x20AC;? but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a misleadingly dry description for a euphoric foray into the â&#x20AC;&#x153;invisibleâ&#x20AC;? places Steijn â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who counts among his influences Jack Smith, Korean shaman-performer Hi-Ah Park, and ayahuasca rituals â&#x20AC;&#x201D; has long pursued with a playful earnestness. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every time I do it, it changes a little bit,â&#x20AC;? Steijn says of the piece. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In a way, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my introduction about what I can do onstage, but editorials

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itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a kind of showcase of how we use imagination. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really about belief systems.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a piece where he channels a deer to communicate with the dead. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I dance a lot with a deer, and also it comes into my mind sometimes.â&#x20AC;? Of the titleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reference to a reborn smoker, Steijn explains, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was working on shamanistic power animals, and I manifested the deer, and the deer was smoking a cigar.â&#x20AC;? Steijn, who divides much of his time between Vienna and Amsterdam, spoke by phone last week from New York City, where he was at work on a new collaboration with choreographer Maria Hassabi (with whom he made a splash last year in an eye-locking duet at New Yorkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Danspace). Genial, thoughtful, self-effacing, and prone to shy laughter, Steijn remembers that as a lonely child he fantasized a guardian angel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And it really worked,â&#x20AC;? he chuckles. It led him to consider â&#x20AC;&#x153;how you can comfort yourself with imagination; how imagination can open up a certain structure for reality.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I found I was interested in how the mind works,â&#x20AC;? he continues, â&#x20AC;&#x153;how we can put our self in a certain mind state, or in a way of thinking, or in a way of perceiving reality, and how that could be very truthful for theater, to show what happens when you are in this state of mind. Because I feel sometimes weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re too rational â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or not even rational, but we think too much in the patterns we are used to thinking in. William Forsythe [showed how] we can change the center of movement in the body; it can be in every body part almost, and you can [put picks

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it] also outside the body sometimes. I like to think in that way about the mind: how can you perceive or analyze reality from another center than you are used to? I felt that in shamanism it was very playful to go there, to still a little bit your logical mind. What I found is that when I imagine [myself] into a state, I look at the world with much more compassion and love. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a strategy to relate differently to the audience and to movement in the body, to a different imagination.â&#x20AC;? Steijn had been in New York only a few days, but said heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d already visited Occupy Wall Street several times. Waxing enthusiastic about what he found there, he spoke of the dialogue and imagination opened up in this re-appropriated public square, and it seemed to recall much of his own work with â&#x20AC;&#x153;intensifyingâ&#x20AC;? a space, setting it free of the usual constraints to imagination and experience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You know when Joseph Boeys said everybody has to be an artist? I think it would be nice if everyone has to be a poet,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Perhaps thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not so much difference between the two. But I like to think you meet with a situation and then you have to create how you want to deal with it, how you want to change it. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not to adapt yourself to a situation but really to make it your own. I think this empowerment is important.â&#x20AC;? 2 RobeRt Steijn Thurs/3, 8 p.m., $10-$20 Joe Goode Performance Annex 401 Alabama, SF

Quartet San Francisco

From 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:45pm with free programs and live music. Enjoy cocktails and a dinner menu in the cafĂŠ.

> VIEW the special exhibition Masters of Venice:

Renaissance Painters of Passion and Power from the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna.

> cElEbratE the San Francisco Symphonyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

100th Anniversary with musical performances by the Quartet San Francisco and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss the Salute to the Symphony installation in Wilsey Court.

> VIsIt the November Artist-in-Residence, muralist John Wehrle and participate in the creation of his community mural. In the Kimball Education Gallery from 6â&#x20AC;&#x201D;8:30pm.

> WatchWKHĂ&#x20AC;OPEmpire of the Eye: The Magic

of Illusion. In the Koret Auditorium at 7pm; seating is on DĂ&#x20AC;UVWFRPHĂ&#x20AC;UVWVHUYHGEDVLV

> crEatE your own Venetian masterpiece. Friday Nights at the de Young is part of FAMSFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cultural Encounters initiative generously funded by The James Irvine Foundation, The Wallace Foundation, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the Columbia Foundation, and the Winifred Johnson Clive Foundation.

Golden Gate Park 50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive deyoungmuseum.org 415.750.3600

www.brownpapertickets.com

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NOVEMBER 2 - 8, 2011 / SFBG.com

29


arts + culture: dance change from culture to culture. “One of the things that fascinates me about these festivals is how differently these musicians, who come from all over the world, carry themselves. It was one of the most profound experiences with my first body music festival because we are, basically, all just clapping and stepping. It’s definitely a cultural thing. You put a French group next to a Brazilian one and you can immediately see the difference.” One of the first groups Terry identified with as kindred spirits was Çudamani, an astounding troupe of male dancer-musicians from Bali. They perform kecak, a rhythmic, chanting-and-swaying “monkey dance” that originated in trance rituals. Six of its dancers bring new choreography as part of this year’s International Body Music Festival line-up, which features a total of eleven companies. Others include the theatrical Cambuyón, from the Canary Islands, which integrates tap and hip-hop into other percussive forms, and Kantu Korpu, which draws on flamenco and tap to

clap-happy: Kantu KoRpu means “song oF the BoDy” in Vlach, a Dialect spoKen in noRtheRn gReece.

Rhythm nations 5IF*OUFSOBUJPOBM#PEZ.VTJD'FTUJWBMGFFMTUIFCFBU GSPN0BLMBOE (SFFDF UIF$BOBSZ*TMBOET BOECFZPOE By Rita Felciano arts@sfbg.com Dance Watched over by two pink carousel horses, a rainbow. and a big lotus flower, they sway, stomp, and slide even as they chant, clap, and body slap in increasingly complex rhythms. They are SlamDance, Keith Terry’s sextet of musiciandancers, and they are rehearsing their upcoming performance at the fourth International Body Music Festival, held this year at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Last year, the (free) festival took place in São Paulo, Brazil; next October it will happen (also free) in Istanbul, Turkey. “Free performances [are] something we could never do in this country,” Terry ruefully observes. Still, the plan is to have a local festival (2011 tickets start at $25) every other year. Terry, who organized the first festival in 2008, started out as a percussionist. He was the first drummer for the Jazz Tap Ensemble, and he is a founding member of Berkeley’s Gamelan Sekar Jaya. So the beat has been in his body for a very long time — yet early in his career he changed from “a seated musician to a moving musician,” as he calls himself. Using one’s body as a musical instrument, he says, 30 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

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sometimes is called “body percussion” or “body drumming.” Terry prefers the term “body music” because it includes melodic and harmonic aspects as well as its rhythmic components. SlamDance performers, for instance, use their voices to percussive effect as well as in simple part-singing. Using your body to make music is pretty basic. We all do it, perhaps starting as toddlers with patty-cake, progressing into clapping games at recess, and ending up as oldsters who play the spoons. Much of these practices go back to folkways rooted in ritualistic endeavors. But there are also innovations: the gumboot dance, for instance, was developed by South African miners early in the 20th century, while African American fraternities popularized a particular form of step-dancing. Body music is both a communal practice with a sense of freedom even as it demands great discipline and precision. “That’s what makes it fun,” Terry explains. Often it integrates improvisation and fixed passages, not unlike what happens in both hip-hop and jazz. Noticeable from a dance perspective is the SlamDancers’ slight sway in the torso. “It helps with the breathing,” Terry notes, though he was surprised to see how practices music listings

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the teRm “BoDy music” incluDes meloDic, haRmonic, anD Rhythmic components. translate regional Greek music into motion. Both of these groups are making their US debut. KeKeÇa’s five performers interpret Turkish songs within Near Eastern movement traditions. Fernando Barba from Brazil draws from samba and maracatu; Danny “Slapjazz” Barber is a hambone virtuoso; the Las Vegas-based group Molodi pulls in theater and just about everything with a beat. A gentler soul is Quebec’s Éric Beaudry, who will also team up with a trio of Oakland step dancers. 2 InternatIonal Body MusIc FestIval Fri/4-Sat/5, 8 p.m.; Sun/6, 2 p.m., $25–$50 Yerba Buena Center for the Arts 701 Mission, SF www.internationalbodymusicfestival.com

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artS + culture: FIlm

GunSlInGer: SrI lanka’S Flying Fish depICtS a Country In deSpaIr. (-034)@ 2(3,63(),33,

@ 65,50./;653

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deep South SE*µTGFTUJWBMHPFTUP#PMMZXPPE±BOECFZPOE By Cheryl eddy cheryl@sfbg.com FIlM It’s a sunny day in Los Angeles, and Omi Vaidya is puttering around, looking for a neighbor who’ll loan him a lawnmower. Vaidya is an actor of the “working” (as opposed to “unemployed” or “superstar”) variety, with bit parts on shows like Arrested Development and The Office dotting his resume. Finding work as an Indian American actor can be frustrating — “a lot of it is typecasting,” he notes. Computer nerds and such. But thousands of miles away in Mumbai, Vaidya’s star is about to explode. Accompanied by a film crew comprised of pals from UC Santa Cruz, he makes the trek to India to attend the premiere of 3 Idiots — a massive movie even by Bollywood standards — in which he has a small but showy part. Big in Bollywood tracks Vaidya’s journey from unknown to chased-downthe-street famous, a process that begins happening literally halfway through the film’s very first screening. (This being Bollywood, the movie is so long there’s an intermission.) Vaidya doesn’t speak much Hindi, but neither does the buffoonish character he plays; the film’s breakout joke, on the scale of “Show me the money” or “I drink your milkshake,” hinges on his confusing the word for “miracle” with the word for editorials

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“rape.” (Indian audiences find this hilarious, and Vaidya is so endearing it’s almost easy to let that ickiness go.) Working in a totally unfamiliar environment, directors Bill Bowles and Kenny Mehan, both of whom are slated to appear in person at Big in Bollywood’s screening at the 3rd I International South Asian Film Festival, are forced to go gonzo at times. Amazingly, fake press passes identifying them as “Hollywood Kitchen” correspondents are all it takes to get their camera onto 3 Idiots’ red carpet, and later, backstage at a glitzy awards show, where new sensation Vaidya is both co-host and nominee. As Vaidya enjoys his success, Bowles and Mehan capture an insider’s view of how different the Bollywood and Hollywood industries are. Massive fame, however, evokes the same reaction in any language: “It feels like a zombie movie!” Vaidya exclaims, breathless after dodging an enthusiastic hoard of fans. Despite the adulation, he remains humble — thanks in part to his supportive mother, once an aspiring actress herself, and understanding wife, a PhD student who’s due back for class in SoCal just as Omi-mania starts to overtake India. Having his buddies film his every move probably also helped keep his ego in check, though he doesn’t seem prone to diva-ish behavpicks

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ior anyway: soon after he goes home to L.A., Vaidya — whose imdb.com profile suggests he’s not hurting for gigs — is back tending to his lawn, apparently unruffled about his return to anonymity. While the 3rd I festival isn’t, alas, screening 3 Idiots, you can get your Bollywood fix with Delhi Belly, which looks to be in the same song-and-danceinfused screwball vein (with a poop-joke title). In a tidy illustration of how insular the industry is, Imran Khan, nephew of 3 Idiots star Aamir Khan (producer of Delhi Belly), plays the lead. Other fest selections worth noting include Sanjeewa Pushpakumara’s grim (if overly long and rambling) Flying Fish, one of several films from Sri Lanka in this year’s program; its multiple stories are united not by overlapping characters but by a sense of despair in a country ravaged by war. In a program of short films about gender and sexuality, The Boxing Ladies, a doc about a trio of rebellious Kolkata sisters who shock their Muslim family with their shared passion for pugilism, is a standout. 2 3rd I San FrancISco InternatIonal South aSIan FIlm FeStIval Nov. 9-13, $12 Roxie Theater 3117 16th St., SF Castro Theater 429 Castro, SF thirdi.org/festival

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NOVEMBER 2 - 8, 2011 / SFBG.com

31


oakland music complex

aRtS + cUltURE: niGhtlifE

Heads will roFl: Ben tundra (leFt) proudly releases witcH House acts like aiMon on His tundra duBs laBel Braza! two-year anniversary

Monthly Music Rehearsal Studios

5ISJMMJOHHMPCBMIJQIPQ%+/V.BSL XJMMESPQBOFYDMVTJWFMZ#SB[JMJBOTFUBU UIJTMPWFMZNPOUIMZ3JPMJDJPVTUIFNF QBSUZ1MVTPOFPGNZGBWPSJUFT %+ 4PVMTBMBBN SFUVSOTGSPN4BP1BVMPUP KPJOIJN4IPVMECFBOJHIUPGGFBUIFS QPQQJOÂľUVOFT

1255 21St St. Oakland, Ca (510) 406-9697 OaklandMusicComplex.com

Fri/4, 10 p.m.-late, $5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$10. SOM, 2925 16th St., SF. www.som-bar.com

oaklandmusiccomplex@gmail.com

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1600 17th Street 252-1330

32 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

desd = dsys By Marke B. marke@sfbg.com SUPER EGO â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m on my way to play Dungeons and Dragons with a group I just joined,â&#x20AC;? Ben Tundra, owner of the Bay Areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only official witch house label, Tundra Dubs (tundradubs.tumblr.com), told me over the phone. Could the beginning of our conversation be any more hotly nerd-perfect? Oh, wait. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actually a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;fasterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; version of D&D called Pathfinder. Dungeons and Dragons is usually about who knows all the rules more, but this is easier to play. [The Pathfinder website claims â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;players need only the single 576-page Pathfinder RPG Core Rulebook to play.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;] I usually play a ranger or rogue character â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m particularly drawn to dwarves. The Lord of the Rings is my obsession, and in my head Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m always Gimli. If I could be anyone in real life, it would be Gimli.â&#x20AC;? And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when my geek pants exploded. Sorry ladies, Benâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s married; he and his wife moved to Oakland from Iowa last year to pursue their creative dreams. (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Believe it or not, Iowa isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t much of a musical hub,â&#x20AC;? he obliterates my cornfield-rave fantasies.) The fast-growing, year-old Tundra Dubs was originally set to be a dubstep label â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but the Bayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bit flooded with those, and besides, this wicked new dubby-gory witch house sound was casting its spell. Whatever side of the Great Witch House Debate of 2k10 you fell on â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is it really a genre? Does it embody the over-nichefication of current music scenes? Who are all these hot goth kids with postironic â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90s rap-rave gear and fancy computers? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one thingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for cereditorials

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tain: witch house, a.k.a. drag, a.k.a. rape gaze, a.k.a. based goth sure ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going away. (Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been into it. The typical witch house musical template is sometimes only OK, but the visually sardonic, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why so seriousâ&#x20AC;? inversion of Internet culture by way of melted memes, splattered celebrities, crunked swagger, emotion-scrambling videos, and unGoogleable text trickery, accompanied by hectic chipmunking and slo-mo surroundsound fascinates me. Goths were once assumed to be lily-white Luddites and then, later, mindless mall rats â&#x20AC;&#x201D; here is a Goth 3.0 culture that embraces technology and hip-hop, often questioning consumerism while slicing open the underbelly of the trashy Web wonderland. Hot Topic, RIP.) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel that witch house is perhaps the first true Internet genre â&#x20AC;&#x201D; thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s such a sense of community thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s come up from exchanging music and connecting online,â&#x20AC;? Tundra told me. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I kept finding this great music though blogs and links and I was attracted to the overall aesthetic. It was almost nomadic. And there was so much variety, all under this dark umbrella. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve released things that sound like Berlin-style techno, old school industrial, more ambient textures...â&#x20AC;? Despite all the attention it attracted online and in the music press, witch house has so far only been explicitly represented on the SF nightlife scene by excellent monthly party 120 Minutes at Elbo Room (happening this Friday: www.facebook.com/120minutes), a scattered handful of concerts, and a recently ended series of Tundra Dubs showcases at Truck. (Ben tells me thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s another one in the works.) Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s too bad, because recent Tundra

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Dubs releases by intriguing acts like Funerals, AIMON, and Zombelle would sound really great really loud in a club. But at least thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s some local representation, and hometown spooky-tuners like oOOoO and Water Borders are gaining international recognition. (Shouts out here to my fave up-and-coming dark horse, powwow.) And, borderless as witch house may be aesthetic-wise, Tundra Dubs is filtering it through a distinctly Bay Area mindset. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Regardless of outward appearances, this is such a positive scene â&#x20AC;&#x201D; these kids are making this music out of a strange compulsion, familiar to everyone who makes art. They have to do it. And theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re finding others like them online. So itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actually kind of a happy community, unselfconscious with surprisingly little attitude.â&#x20AC;? So, as the owner of a label that puts out music engendered by Internet shares, how does Tundra Dubs conjure up any income? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well,â&#x20AC;? Tundra laughs with resignation, â&#x20AC;&#x153;this is the thing everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trying to figure out. Live shows are always key; the challenge is how to make a live electronic show look like more than some guy checking his email on stage for an hour. I think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve kept it interesting. And weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gone the exclusive artifact route â&#x20AC;&#x201D; releasing cassettes and limited edition singles. In the future, though, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just sticking to digital and vinyl. People want digital for their headphones and vinyl at home. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a very young label dealing with a very young scene. So at least we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t start with this huge business model thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suddenly eroding. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in a position to try whatever works.â&#x20AC;? Maybe a little witchcraft? Xanopticon, earn, Mirror to Mirror, and Ben tundra Sat/5, 9 p.m.-4 a.m., $6. SUB/Mission, 2183 Mission, SF. www.sf-submission.com

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paco osuna 0OFPGUIF4QBOJTIQPTUFSCPZTGPS UIFEFFQBOEHSPPWZ UPUBMMZOPO JDLZLJOEPG*CJ[BUFDIOP UIF.OVT BOE.JOETIBLFMBCFMSFQCFBUTVQ #FBUCPY Fri/4, 10 p.m.-4 a.m. $10 advance. BeatBox, 314 11th St., SF. www. beatboxsf.com

Gay in aMerica 'PSUIFQBTUGFXZFBST 4DPUU1BTGJFME IBTCFFOUSBWFMJOHUIFDPVOUSZ QIP UPHSBQIJOHHBZNFOÂąNBOZJOQMBDFT MJLF0LMBIPNB ,FOUVDLZ BOE"MBTLB ÂąBOEMFUUJOHUIFNUFMMUIFJSTUPSJFT GPSIJT(BZJO"NFSJDBCPPL)FÂľMM CFTIPXJOHBQIPUPTMJEFTIPXBUUIF $BTUSPÂľT.BHOFUIFBMUIDFOUFS XIPTF PQFOJOHTBMXBZTESBXBMBWFOEFSXIPÂľT XIP GPMMPXFECZESJOLTBOESFDFQ UJPOBU6OEFS0OF3PPG XXXVOEFS POFSPPGPSH  Sat/5, 7p.m., free. Magnet, 4122 18th St., SF. www.magnetsf.org

Haçeteria 4'µTNPOUIMZUSJCVUFUPUIFMFHFOEBSZ T FBSMZ´T)BDJFOEBDMVCJO .BODIFTUFS±BDJEIPVTF 'BDUPSZ SFDPSET .BEDIFTUFSCBHHZBOEBMM ±DFMFCSBUFTJUTPOFZFBSBOOJWFSTBSZ XJUIBQFSGPSNBODFGSPNMPDBMFMFD USPOJDFYDJUFNFOU$-"84 Sun/5, 9 p.m.-late, $3 (free before 11 p.m.). Deco Lounge, 510 Larkin, SF. www.decosf.com

eaGle in eXile 5IFDMBTTJDHBZMFBUIFSCJLFSCBSXPO¾U MFUBQVOZFWJDUJPODVUJUTGPBN*UT BXFTPNFMZDIBSJUBCMFSPDL´OSPMM 4VOEBZCFFSCVTUJTOPXNPOUIMZPO&M 3JP¾TQBUJP UIJTUJNFBSPVOEXJUIQFS GPSNFSTUIF1BUTZDIPSETBOE$BSMFUUB 4VF,BZ QMVTQMFOUZPGDJHBSTNPLF  Sun/6 3 p.m.-8 p.m., free ($10 for beer bust). El Rio, 3158 Mission, SF. www. elriosf.com

on the cheap

2

film listings

classifieds


music listings

for more music content visit sfbg.com/noise Kate Voegele, Parachute, Kevin Hammond 4MJNµTQN  Zeds Dead, Big Chocolate, DJ AUDIO13FHFODZ #BMMSPPNQN 

jazz/new music

zodiac death Valley plays cafe du nord sat/5 and sun/6 .VTJDMJTUJOHTBSFDPNQJMFECZ&NJMZ4BWBHF4JODF DMVCMJGFJTVOQSFEJDUBCMF JUµTBHPPEJEFBUPDBMM BIFBEPSDIFDLUIFWFOVFµTXFCTJUFUPDPOGJSNCPPL JOHTBOEIPVST1SJDFTBSFMJTUFEXIFOQSPWJEFEUPVT 4VCNJUJUFNTGPSUIFMJTUJOHTBUMJTUJOHT!TGCHDPN 'PSGVSUIFSJOGPSNBUJPOPOIPXUPTVCNJUJUFNTGPS UIFMJTUJOHT TFF1JDLT

wednesday 2 rock /blues/hip-hop

Bell X1, Favourite Sons 3JDLTIBX4UPQQN  Gaelic Storm (SFBU"NFSJDBO.VTJD)BMMQN   Girl in a Coma "NPFCB.VTJDQN GSFF Magic Christian, Bitter Honeys, Tomorrow Men , DJ Neil Martinson &MCP3PPNQN  Mayday Parade, We Are The In Crowd, You Me at Six, There For Tomorrow, Make 3FHFODZ #BMMSPPNQN  Method Man, Curren$y, Big KRIT, Smoke DZA, Pricks, Corner Boy P, Paypa 8BSGJFMEQN  Yael Naim, David Donatien#JNCPµTQN  Priory, Vir, Matinees#PUUPNPGUIF)JMMQN  Rabbles .BTPO4PDJBM)PVTF 4' XXXNBTPOTPDJBMIPVTFDPNQN Terry Savastano +PIOOZ'PMFZµT 0µ'BSSFMM 4' XXXKPIOOZGPMFZTDPNQN GSFF Sirhan Sirhan, Hazzardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cure, Prizehog )FNMPDL5BWFSOQN  Uh Huh Her, Jarrod Gorbel 4MJNµTQN 

jazz/new music

Chester Thompson Quartet :PTIJµTQN  Chris Amberger Trio :PTIJµT-PVOHFQN Cosmo AlleyCats-F$PMPOJBM $PTNP1MBDF 4' XXXMFDPMPOJBMTGDPNQN Dink Dink Dink, Gaucho, Michael Abraham "NOFTJBQN GSFF Jazz organ party 3PZBM$VDLPP .JTTJPO 4' XXXSPZBMDVDLPPDPNQN GSFF Ricardo Scales 5PQPGUIF.BSL $BMJGPSOJB 4' XXXUPQPGUIFNBSLDPNQN 

dance clubs

Booty Call 2#BS $BTUSP 4'XXXCPPUZDBM MXFEOFTEBZTDPNQN+VBOJUB.PPSFIPTUTUIJT EBODFQBSUZ GFBUVSJOH%+3PCPU)VTUMF Mary Go Round -PPLPVU UI4U 4'XXX MPPLPVUTGDPNQN %SBHXJUI4VQQPTJUPSJ 4QFMMJOH .FSDFEF[.VOSP BOE(JOHFS4OBQ Megatallica 'JEEMFSµT(SFFO $PMVNCVT 4' XXXNFHBUBMMJDBDPNQN GSFF)FBWZNFUBMIBOHPVU No Room For Squares4PN UI4U 4'  QN GSFF%+"GSPEJUF4IBLF TQJOTKB[[GPSIBQQZIPVS Vespa Beat #MJTT#BS UI4U 4'XXX CMJTTCBSTGDPNQN GSFF.4,GNTQJOTSBSF HSPPWFT FMFDUSPTXJOH BOECPPHJF

thursday 3 rock /blues/hip-hop

Architecture in Helsinki, DOM, Sandwitches 'JMMNPSFQN  Complications, RxNightly 5IFF1BSLTJEFQN  Cut Loose Band +PIOOZ'PMFZµT 0µ'BSSFMM 4' XXXKPIOOZGPMFZTDPNQN GSFF Fishtank Ensemble, Kelly McFarling #SBWB 5IFBUFS UI4U 4'XXXCSBWBPSHQN  . Fruit Bats, Parson Red Heads (SFBU"NFSJDBO .VTJD)BMMQN  In Defense, Migraine, Love Below, Vulvalard 4VC.JTTJPOQN  Mastodon, Dillinger Escape Plan, Red Fang 8BSGJFMEQN  Naked Fiction, Jordan Baron .BTPO4PDJBM )PVTF 4'XXXNBTPOTPDJBMIPVTFDPNQN Northern Key, Ash Reiter #SJDLBOE.PSUBS.VTJD )BMMQN  Sharon Robinson, Conspiracy of Beards $BGF%V /PSEQN  Street Pyramids, Yeah Great Fine, We Arsons )FNMPDL5BWFSOQN  Typhoon, Wild Ones, Youth #PUUPNPGUIF)JMM QN  Unknown Mortal Orchestra, Gauntlet Hair 3JDLTIBX4UPQQN 

editorials

news

food + Drink

Blues Organ Party 3PZBM$VDLPP .JTTJPO  4'XXXSPZBMDVDLPPDPNQN GSFF Rachelle Ferrell 3SB[[3PPN .BTPO 4' XXXUIFSSB[[SPPNDPNQN  Jazz Mafia Presents: Emporer Norton Suite :PTIJµTBOEQN  Naje :PTIJµT-PVOHFQN Stompy Jones 5PQPGUIF.BSL $BMJGPSOJB 4' XXXUPQPGUIFNBSLDPNQN 

folk / world/country

Creole Choir of Cuba)FSCTU5IFBUSF 7BO /FTT 4'XXXTGXNQBDPSHQN  Twang! Honky Tonk 'JEEMFSµT(SFFO  $PMVNCVT 4'XXXUXBOHIPOLZUPOLDPNQN -JWFDPVOUSZNVTJD EBODJOH BOEHJWFBXBZT

dance clubs

Afrolicious &MCP3PPNQN 8JUI 1MFBTVSFNBLFSBOE4FOPS0[TQJO"GSPCFBU  5SPQJDgMJB FMFDUSP TBNCB BOEGVOL Guilty Pleasures (FTUBMU UI4U 4'   QN GSFF%+5PQI;JMMB 3PC.FUBM  %+4UFG BOE%JTDP%TQJOQVOL NFUBM FMFDUSPGVOL  BOET Thursday Special Tralala 3FWPMVUJPO$BGn  OE4U 4'  QN GSFF %PXOUFNQP IJQIPQ BOEGSFFTUZMFCFBUTCZ%S .VTDPBOE6OCSPLFO$JSDMF.$T Thursdays at the Cat Club $BU$MVCQN  GSFF CFGPSFQN 5XPEBODFGMPPSTCVNQJOµXJUI UIFCFTUPGTNBJOTUSFBNBOEVOEFSHSPVOEXJUI %BOHFSPVT%BO -PX-JGF BOEHVFTUT Tropicana .BESPOF"SU#BSQN GSFF4BMTB DVNCJB  SFHHBFUPO BOENPSFXJUI%+T%PO#VTUBNBOUF  "QPDPMZQUP 4S4BFO 4BOUFSP BOE.S&

friday 4 rock /blues/hip-hop

Acacia, Tell River, Clay Hawkins 1MPVHIBOEUIF 4UBST $MFNFOU 4'XXXUIFQMPVHIBOETUBST DPNQN  Body and Soul +PIOOZ'PMFZµT 0µ'BSSFMM 4' XXXKPIOOZGPMFZTDPNQN GSFF Collie Buddz 'JMMNPSFQN  Deertick, Guards, Kamp Camille *OEFQFOEFOU QN  Four Year Strong, Gallows, Title Fight, Swellers, Sharks 3FHFODZ#BMMSPPNQN  Gavilan, Cloaking Device, Blame #SBJOXBTI$BGF  'PMTPN 4'XXXCSBJOXBTIDPNQN GSFF Knights of the New Crusade, Hondettes, Ogres, Khans )FNMPDL5BWFSOQN  Lydia Loveless )PUFM 6UBIQN  Matthew Edwards and the Unfortunates, Paul Griffiths"NOFTJBQN  Minus the Bear, Velvet Teen 4MJNµTQN  Troy Neihardt, Greg Zema, Jason Marion +PIOOZ 'PMFZµT 0µ'BSSFMM 4'XXXEVFMJOHQJBOPTBU GPMFZTDPNQN Peter Wolf Crier, Birds & Batteries, Curious Mystery $BGF%V/PSEQN  Shonen Knife, Shannon & the Clams, Pleasure Kills #PUUPNPGUIF)JMMQN  Sore Thumbs, Re-Volts, Street Justice, Paper Bags 5IFF1BSLTJEFQN  Still Corners, Silver Swans, Ganglians 3JDLTIBX 4UPQQN  Super Diamond, Petty Theft #JNCPµTQN  Wild Flag, Drew Grow & the Pastorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Wives (SFBU"NFSJDBO.VTJD)BMMQN 

jazz/new music

Black Market Jazz Orchestra 5PQPGUIF.BSL  $BMJGPSOJB 4'XXXUPQPGUIFNBSLDPNQN  Rachelle Ferrell 3SB[[3PPN .BTPO 4' XXXUIFSSB[[SPPNDPNBOEQN  Jazz Mafia Presents: Emporer Norton Suite :PTIJµTBOEQN  Anita Lofton, Sean Hughes .BTPO4PDJBM )PVTF 4'XXXNBTPOTPDJBMIPVTFDPNQN Tyrese :PTIJµT-PVOHFQN  Ways & Means Committee:PTIJµTQN

folk / world/country

Jessica Fichot 3FE1PQQZ"SU)PVTFQN 

dance clubs

Afro Bao -JUUMF#BPCBC UI4U 4'   QN "GSPBOEXPSMENVTJDXJUI SPUBUJOH%+TJODMVEJOH4UFQXJTF 4UFWF $MBVEF  4BOUFSP BOE&MFNCF Old School Dance Party &M3JPQN%+TTQJOOJOH GSFFTUZMF OFXXBWF IJQIPQ BOEPMETDIPPMKBNT 120 Minutes &MCP3PPNQN 8JUDIIPVTF XJUIQFSGPSNBODFCZ$SFFQBOE4MFB[FNPSF BOE SFTJEFOU%+T8IJUDIBOE(V..Z#FB3 Strangelove: Dia de los Muertos $BU$MVC QN (PUIBOEJOEVTUSJBMXJUI%+T5PNBT %JBCMP +PF3BEJP 'BDU BOE1SJODF$IBSNJOH

picks

arts + culture

50 KicK Ass Beers on DrAught

Vintage 0STPO 'PVSUI4U 4'   QN GSFF%+5PQI0OFBOEHVFTUTQJOKB[[Z CFBUTGPSDPDLUBMJBOT

saturday 5

over 100 different bottles, specializing in Belgians

rock /blues/hip-hop

A Beer Drinkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s PArADise!

Amber Asylum, Velnias, Fell Voices, Ash Border, Lycus &MCP3PPNQN  Back Pages +PIOOZ'PMFZµT 0µ'BSSFMM 4' XXXKPIOOZGPMFZTDPNQN GSFF Belligerator, Catacomb Creeps, Asada Messiah, Over the Falls 5IFF1BSLTJEFQN  Bray 3PDLJU3PPN $MFNFOU 4'XXXSPDLJU SPPNDPNQN  City and Colour, Hacienda 'JMMNPSFQN  Cormorant, La Fin du Monde, Hell Ship &M3JP QN  Dos Gringos Chicanos 5IFF1BSLTJEFQN GSFF Hot Rod Circuit, No Motiv, I The Mighty #PUUPN PGUIF)JMMQN  Icarus Line, Zodiac Death Valley, Tambo Rays $BGF%V/PSEQN  Little Red, OONA, Bleeding Knees Club 3JDLTIBX 4UPQQN  Liquorball, Carlton Melton, Harderships )FNMPDL 5BWFSOQN  Jason Marion, Troy Neihardt, Greg Zema,+PIOOZ 'PMFZµT 0µ'BSSFMM 4'XXXEVFMJOHQJBOPTBU GPMFZTDPNQN Mike Doughty and His Band Fantastic, Moon Hooch*OEFQFOEFOUQN  Minus the Bear, Lonely Forrest 4MJNµTQN  Petrojvic Blasting Company "NOFTJBQN  Rayband #SJDLBOE.PSUBS.VTJD)BMMQN   Rockabilly with the Roundups, Bay Area Swing All-Stars .BTPO4PDJBM)PVTF 4' XXXNBTPOTPDJBMIPVTFDPNQN Thrice, La Dispute, Moving Mountains, Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brother 3FHFODZ#BMMSPPNQN  Wild Flag, Drew Grow & the Pastorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Wives (SFBU"NFSJDBO.VTJD)BMMQN 

since 1987

for future event info looK @ toronADo.com

hAPPY hour every Day until 6:00 pm hours: Daily 11:30 am to 2:00 am

jazz/new music

 )"*()545!'*--.03&

Rachelle Ferrell 3SB[[3PPN .BTPO 4' XXXUIFSSB[[SPPNDPNBOEQN  Jazz Mafia Presents: Emporer Norton Suite :PTIJµTBOEQN 

XXXUPSPOBEPDPN

folk / world/country

Latif Bolat 4U$ZQSJBOµT&QJTDPQBM$IVSDI  5VSL 4'XXXMJWFBUDZQSJBOTCMPHTQPUDPNQN   Max Lax and the Nearly Beloved 3JQUJEF  5BSBWBM 4'XXXSJQUJEFTGDPNBOEQN GSFF Saturday Night Salsa 3BNQ 'SBODPJT 4' XXXGBDFCPPLDPNUIFSBNQTGQN  Skillet Licorice$BGF*OUFSOBUJPOBM )BJHIU 4' XXXDBGFJOUFSOBUJPOBMVTQN GSFF

dance clubs

Afro Bao -JUUMF#BPCBC UI4U 4'   QN "GSPBOEXPSMENVTJDXJUI SPUBUJOH%+TJODMVEJOH4UFQXJTF 4UFWF $MBVEF  4BOUFSP BOE&MFNCF Cockfight 6OEFSHSPVOE4' )BJHIU 4'   QN 3PXEZEBODFOJHIUGPSHBZCPZT Haceteria %FDP-PVOHF -BSLJO 4'XXX EFDPTGDPNQN GSFF-JWFTFUCZ$-"84 "OESFTJEFOU%+T5SJTUFT5SPQJRVFT +BTPO1 4NBD Sanafrica #PMMZIPPE$BGnQN 8FTU "GSJDBOBOE-BUJOGVTJPOQBSUZXJUI+PTF-VJT %+ /BEP BOE%+.JHOBOF Saturday Night Soul Party &MCP3PPNQN  %+T-VDLZ 1BVM1BVM BOE1IFOHSFO0TXBME TQJOOJOH´TTPVMT

sunday 6 rock /blues/hip-hop

City and Colour, Hacienda 'JMMNPSFQN  Deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s List, OnCue #SJDLBOE.PSUBS.VTJD)BMM QN  Indian &MCP3PPNQN Kiwi Time, In One Wind, Reggie Gin ,JNPµT QN  Mike Doughty and His Band Fantastic, Moon Hooch *OEFQFOEFOUQN  Eliza Rickman "NOFTJBQN Rock the Bottom, Vanish Breed, War Child, Poor Sons ,OPDLPVUQN GSFF7JEFPQSFNJFSFGPS UXPTLBUFWJEFPT Said the Whale, We Are The City )FNMPDL 5BWFSOQN  Terry Savanstano +PIOOZ'PMFZµT 0µ'BSSFMM  4'XXXKPIOOZGPMFZTDPNQN GSFF Zodiac Death Valley, Icarus Line, Tambo Rays $BGF%V/PSEQN 

jazz/new music

Jazz Organ Party with Lavay Smith and Chris Siebert 3PZBM$VDLPP .JTTJPO 4'XXX SPZBMDVDLPPDPNQN GSFF CONTINUES ON PAGE 34 >>

music listings

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on the cheap

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NOVEMBER 2 - 8, 2011 / SFBG.com

33


Music listings SuN/6 CONT>>

Rachelle Ferrell 3SB[[3PPN .BTPO 4' XXXUIFSSB[[SPPNDPNQN  Kally Price Old Blues and Jazz Band, Emperor Nortonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jazz Band "NOFTJBQN  Suzanna Smith, John R. Burr, Brandon Essex #MJTT#BS UI4U 4'XXXCMJTTCBSDPN QN  Faith Wintrhop 3SB[[3PPN .BTPO 4'XXX UIFSSB[[SPPNDPNQN 

folk / world/country

Monika Jalili :PTIJµTQN  Sunday Night Salsa 3BNQ 'SBODPJT 4'XXX GBDFCPPLDPNUIFSBNQTGQN  Twang Sundays5IFF1BSLTJEFQN GSFF8JUI 3FBM4JQQJOµ8IJTLFZT #PUUPN%XFMMFSTQN GSFF

dance clubs

Batcave $MVC UI4U 4'QN %FBUI

SPDL HPUI BOEQPTUQVOLXJUI4UFFQMFSPU 9$ISJT5  /FDSPNPTBOED@EFBUI Dub Mission &MCP3PPNQN %VC SPPUT BOE DMBTTJDEBODFIBMMXJUI%+4FQ +#PPHJF BOEHVFTU %+5IFPSZ Jock -PPLPVU UI4U 4'XXXMPPLPVUTG DPNQN 3BJTFNPOFZGPS-(#5TQPSUTUFBNT XIJMFFOKPZJOH%+TBOEESJOLTQFDJBMT La Pachanga#MVF.BDBX .JTTJPO 4'XXX UIFCMVFNBDBXTGDPNQN 4BMTBEBODFQBSUZ XJUIMJWF"GSP$VCBOTBMTBCBOET

Monday 7 rock /blues/hip-hop

Aziatix 4MJNµTQN  Bible Thumper )FNMPDL5BWFSOQN  Big Tree, Lawlands, City Tribe 3JDLTIBX4UPQ QN  Damir +PIOOZ'PMFZµT 0µ'BSSFMM 4'XXX KPIOOZGPMFZTDPNQN GSFF Illmaculate with G Force and DJ Fatboy&MCP

3PPNQN "MTPXJUI'PSUJMJWF 4BVSVT (PMEJOJ #BHXFMM BOE.JLFZ7FHB[ Jackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mannequin, Scars on 45, Lady Danville 3FHFODZ#BMMSPPNQN  Tony Lucca 3FE%FWJM-PVOHFQN  Warbringer, Lazarus A.D., Landmine Marathon, Diamond Plate, Necrosin5IFF1BSLTJEFQN  

jazz/new Music

Bossa Nova 5VOOFM5PQ #VTI 4'   QN GSFF-JWFBDPVTUJD#PTTB/PWB Hot 8 Brass Band :PTIJµTQN 

folk / world/country

Belle Monroe and Her Brewglass Boys "NOFTJB QN

dance clubs

Death Guild %/"-PVOHFQN (PUIJD  JOEVTUSJBM BOETZOUIQPQXJUI+PF3BEJP %FDBZ BOE .FMUJOH(JSM

M.O.M. .BESPOF"SU#BSQN GSFF%+T5JNPUFP (JHBOUF (PSEP$BCF[B BOE$ISJT1IMFLQMBZJOHBMM .PUPXOFWFSZ.POEBZ Sausage Party 3PTBNVOEF4BVTBHF(SJMM  .JTTJPO 4'  QN GSFF%+ %BOEZ%JYPOTQJOTWJOUBHFSPDL 3# HMPCBMCFBUT  GVOL BOEEJTDPBUUIJTIBQQZIPVSTBVTBHFTIBDLHJH

tuesday 8

North Sky Cello Ensemble #SJDLBOE.PSUBS.VTJD )BMMQN GSFF Pierce the Veil, Miss May I, Woe is Me, Letlive, Amity Affliction 3FHFODZ#BMMSPPNQN  Matthew Stewart, Mental 99, Quartet Rouge $BGF%V/PSEQN  Stan Erhart Band +PIOOZ'PMFZµT 0µ'BSSFMM 4' XXXKPIOOZGPMFZTDPNQN GSFF VV Brown, Cambo & the Life 3JDLTIBX4UPQ QN 

rock /blues/hip-hop

folk / world/country

Bangles 'JMMNPSFQN  Jefferson Bergey.BTPO4PDJBM)PVTF 4' XXXNBTPOTPDJBMIPVTFDPNQN Boots Electric, Light FM, Baron Von Luxxury #PUUPNPGUIF)JMMQN  Marc Cohn :PTIJµTQN  Hull, Dimesland )FNMPDL5BWFSOQN  Lights, Rubik Great "NFSJDBO.VTJD)BMMQN   Megan Keely, Goodnight Texas, Lia Rose "NOFTJBQN 

Buster Blue, Drop Apollo #PPN#PPN3PPN  'JMMNPSF 4'XXXCPPNCPPNCMVFTDPNQN  GSFF

dance clubs

Bombshell Betty & Her Burlesqueteers &MCP 3PPNQN -JWFNVTJDGSPN'SPNBHJRVF Eclectic Company 4LZMBSL QN GSFF%+T5POFT BOE+BZCFFTQJOPMETDIPPMIJQIPQ CBTT EVC HMJUDI  BOEFMFDUSP2

wED ELbo room & SmILE prESENT 11/2 9pm $8

THU

11/3

9:30pm $5

FRI

11/4

10pm

$10 ADV. $12 Door

mAGIC ChrISTIAN fEAT. CyrIL JorDAN of ThE fLAmIN GrooVIES, ThE bITTEr hoNEyS, ThE Tomorrow mEN

pLuS

AND DJ NEIL mArTINSoN Afro-TropI-ELECTrIC-SAmbA-fuNK

AfroLICIouS wITh DJS/hoSTS:

pLEASurEmAKEr, SENor oZ ELbo room prESENTS

120 mINuTES SpECIAL LIVE pErformANCE CrEEp AND GuEST DJ

SLEAZEmorE rESIDENT DJS

whITCh & GummybEAr LASErS by fuTurE wEApoNS

LZYCdk#' +eb"&%eb

76C<76C<»++ +%¼hAVi^cHdja ;VgbIVXdWn9V7Zii^cV

SAT 11/5

EArLy Show 4pm $8 LATE Show 10pm $10

LuCIfErS hAmmEr prESENTS

AmbEr ASyLum,

VELNIAS, fELL VoICES, ASh borEr, LyCuS SpINNING 60â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SouL 45S

SATurDAy NIGhT SouL pArTy wITh DJS LuCKy, pAuL pAuL, phENGrEN oSwALD

($5 DISCouNT IN SEmI-formAL ATTIrE)

=Veen=djg :kZgnLZY;g^*",eb

9g^c`heZX^Vah

(9gV[i *LZaa +L^cZ Eajh7gj\VaGjb 9g^c`HeZX^Vah

&&&B^ccV<VaaZgn &&&B^ccVHigZZi5'cYHi &&&B^ccV<VaaZgn#Xdb )&*#.,)#&,&.Â&#x2122;DkZg'&dcan#

34 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

editorials

news

food + Drink

picks

arts + culture

SUN 11/6 9pm $6

Dub mISSIoN prESENTS

ThE bEST IN Dub, DubSTEp, rooTS & DANCEhALL wITh

DJ SEp, J. booGIE

(DubTroNIC SCIENCE/om) AND GuEST DJ ThEory (fEVEr/bAy ArEA burNErS)

prESENTS MON IrApbETTEr.Com ThE SKrILL wALToN Tour fEAT.

11/7 9pm $7 wITh CALVIN

ILLmACuLATE &

VALENTINE

DJ fATboy, ThE SAuruS

wITh ChASE moorE, GoLDINI bAGwELL AND mIKEy VEGAZ

TUE

LIVE muSIC & TAwDry burLESquE

9pm $10

bombShELL bETTy & hEr burLESquETEErS

11/9

ToKyo rAID,

11/8

pLuS LIVE muSIC from fromAGIquE wED ChAD STAb prESENTS 9pm $6

bAD bIbLES, ASTrAL

upComING: Thu 11/10 AfroLICIouS frI 11/11 rIChIE CuNNING/ pEp LoVE SAT 11/12 TormENTA TropICAL VS boDEGA SuN 11/13 Dub mISSIoN: DJ SEp ADVANCE TICKETS

www.browNpApErTICKETS.Com ELbo room IS LoCATED AT 647 VALENCIA NEAr 17Th

music listings

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on the cheap

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In Defense, MIgraIne,Love

11/5 8pm

Front Room

$12

9pm

Back Room

11/6 8pm $15

                           

synchro Mg presents: faLL fashIon show

11/4 8pm

&              

BoLochos & yuca punx presents: ska/reggae w/ raskahueLe (La), coDIgo 510, aLLergIc to peopLe earn (La),xanoptIcon, MIrror to MIrror (La), BranDon nIckeLL, wIth Dj Ben tunDra hate war proDuctIons & Insane presents: the voMIt chaos tour w/ IMpIety, gravehILL, BLack fuckIng cancer, heLLhunter, kILLgasM

Wed 11/2 7:30pm $8

penny ArCAde

trappeD unDer Ice,huDreDth,Backtrack, BetrayeL, take offense

   %$   # "$! %             

HArBoUrS â&#x20AC;¢ SiLenT piCTUreS â&#x20AC;¢ mATTHeW edWArdS â&#x20AC;¢ Hey LiTTLe Bird THU 11/3 6pm no CoVer!

SiCK SoUndS!

rAW 60S SoUL, FreAKBeAT, gArAge, BUBBLegUm dJ mediUm rAre & miKey TASHJiAn

TM

9pm Free!

dJ FoodCoUrT And HiS pALS roCK/pop/SoUL/CrAp Fri 11/4 6:00-9:30pm Free!

Max Montez presents: 11/18 8pm

      

            

10/3 BeLow, vuLvaLarD 8pm $8

ur o y e k a o t m y n as ca e e s a W e t d i r s o b e W w a s a t i d t. e n n e m atio r g u e t ia In pment doc d e lM elo

nerd niTe SF: nerd Speed dATing! nerdS need LoVe Too!

eVery FridAy 10pm $5

LooSe JoinTS!

W/ dJS Tom THUmp, dAmon BeLL & CenTipede rAre grooVe/FUnK/SoUL/Hip-Hop & more!

SAT 11/5 7:30pm $8

STeVe dAUBenSpeCK â&#x20AC;¢ THe VermS

KITCHEN OPEN MON-SAT

11/2

eVery SATUrdAy nigHT! 10pm $5

8)*4,&:8&%/&4%":

1#34)05"--/*()5-0/( 8*5)5)&

7"/*--"(03*--"5)& $"/"%*&/#",*/

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Upcoming: Little Queenie, Sex Church, Live Evil, Slough Feg, Christian Mistress, Myles Boisen, Hides, Outdoorsmen, Los Headaches, Golden Void, Spyrals, Michael Beach, Smokestacks, The Atlas Moth, Mark Sultan, King Lollipop

36 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

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club list AMNESIA 853 Valencia (415) 970-0012 ARGUS LOUNGE 3187 Mission (415) 824-1447 ASIASF 201 Ninth St (415) 255-2742 ATLAS CAFE 3049 20th St (415) 648-1047 ATMOSPHERE 3 447 Broadway (415) 788-4623 BAMBUDDHA LOUNGE 601 Eddy (415) 885-5088 BAOBAB 3388 19th St (415) 643-3558 BEAUTY BAR 2299 Mission (415) 285-0323 BIMBOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 365 CLUB 1025 Columbus (415) 474-0365 BISCUITS AND BLUES 401 Mason (415) 292-2583 BOLLYHOOD CAFĂŠ 3372 19th St (415) 970-0362 BOOM BOOM ROOM 1601 Fillmore (415) 673-8000 BOTTOM OF THE HILL 1233 17th St (415) 621-4455 BRICK AND MORTAR MUSIC HALL 1710 Mission www.brickandmortarmusic.com BROADWAY STUDIOS 435 Broadway (415) 291-0333 BRUNOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 2389 Mission (415) 643-5200 CAFE COCOMO 650 Indiana (415) 824-6910 CAFĂŠ DU NORD 2170 Market (415) 861-5016 CASANOVA LOUNGE 527 Valencia (415) 863-9328 CAT CLUB 1190 Folsom (415) 431-3332 CLUB DELUXE 1509 Haight (415) 552-6949 CLUB 525 525 Howard (415) 339-8686 CLUB SIX 60 Sixth St (415) 863-1221 DALVA 3121 16th St (415) 252-7740 DELIRIUM 3139 16th St (415) 552-5525 DNA LOUNGE 375 11th St (415) 626-1409 DOLORES PARK CAFE 501 Dolores (414) 621-2936 DOUBLE DUTCH 3192 16th St (415) 503-1670

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EDINBURGH CASTLE PUB 950 Geary (415) 885-4074 ELBO ROOM 647 Valencia (415) 552-7788. ELEMENT LOUNGE 1028 Geary (415) 571-1362 ENDUP 401 Sixth St (415) 357-0827 FILLMORE 1805 Geary (415) 346-6000 540 CLUB 540 Clement (415) 752-7276 FLUID ULTRA LOUNGE 662 Mission (415) 615-6888 GLAS KAT 520 Fourth St (415) 495-6626 GRANT AND GREEN 1371 Grant (415) 693-9565 GREAT AMERICAN MUSIC HALL 859 Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrell (415) 885-0750 HEMLOCK TAVERN 1131 Polk (415) 923-0923 HIFI 2125 Lombard (415) 345-TONE HOTEL UTAH SALOON 500 Fourth St (415) 546-6300 ICON ULTRA LOUNGE 1192 Folsom (415) 626-4800 INDEPENDENT 628 Divisadero (415) 771-1421 INFUSION LOUNGE 124 Ellis (415) 421-8700 IRELANDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 32 3920 Geary (415) 386-6173 JOHNNY FOLEYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 243 Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrell (415) 954-0777 KIMOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 1351 Polk (415) 885-4535 KNOCKOUT 3223 Mission (415) 550-6994 LASZLO 2526 Mission (415) 401-0810 LEXINGTON CLUB 3464 19th St (415) 863-2052 MADRONE ART BAR 500 Divisadero (415) 241-0202 MAKE-OUT ROOM 3225 22nd St (415) 647-2888 MEZZANINE 444 Jessie (415) 625-8880 MIGHTY 119 Utah (415) 626-7001 MILK 1840 Haight (415) 387-6455 MISSION ROCK CAFĂŠ 817 Terry Francois (415) 626-5355 MOJITO 1337 Grant (415) 398-1120 NICKIEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 466 Haight (415) 255-0300

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111 MINNA GALLERY 111 Minna (415) 974-1719 PARADISE LOUNGE 1501 Folsom (415) 252-5018 PARKSIDE 1600 17th St (415) 252-1330 PIER 23 Pier 23 (415) 362-5125 PLOUGH AND STARS 116 Clement (415) 751-1122 POLENG LOUNGE 1751 Fulton (415) 441-1710 PUBLIC WORKS 161 Erie www.publicsf.com PURPLE ONION 140 Columbus (415) 217-8400 RASSELAS JAZZ 1534 Fillmore (415) 346-8696 RED DEVIL LOUNGE 1695 Polk (415) 921-1695 RED POPPY ART HOUSE 2698 Folsom (415) 826-2402 REGENCY BALLROOM 1300 Van Ness (415) 673-5716 RETOX LOUNGE 628 20th St (415) 626-7386 RICKSHAW STOP 155 Fell (415) 861-2011 EL RINCON 2700 16th St (415) 437-9240 EL RIO 3158 Mission (415) 282-3325 RIPTIDE BAR 3639 Taraval (415) 240-8360 ROCKIT ROOM 406 Clement (415) 387-6343 RRAZZ ROOM 222 Mason (415) 394-1189 RUBY SKYE 420 Mason (415) 693-0777 SAVANNA JAZZ 2937 Mission (415) 285-3369 SHANGHAI 1930 133 Steuart (415) 896-5600 SHINE DANCE LOUNGE 1337 Mission (415) 255-1337 SKYLARK 3089 16th St (415) 621-9294 SLIDE 430 Mason (415) 421-1916 SLIMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 333 11th St (415) 255-0333 SOM. 2925 16th St (415) 558-8521 SPACE 550 550 Barneveld (415) 550-8286 STUD 399 Ninth St (415) 252-7883 SUB-MISSION 2183 Mission (415) 255-7227

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SUPPERCLUB 657 Harrison (415) 348-0900 TEMPLE 540 Howard (415) 978-9942 1015 FOLSOM 1015 Folsom (415) 431-1200 330 RITCH 330 Ritch (415) 541-9574 TOP OF THE MARK Mark Hopkins Intercontinental Hotel 1 Nob Hill (415) 616-6916 TUNNEL TOP 601 Bush (415) 986-8900 UNDERGROUND SF 424 Haight (415) 864-7386 VESSEL 85 Campton (415) 433-8585 WARFIELD 982 Market (415) 345-0900 YOSHIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SAN FRANCISCO 1330 Fillmore (415) 655-5600

BAY AREA ANNAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ ISLAND 2120 Allston Way, Berk (510) 841-JAZZ ASHKENAZ 1317 San Pablo, Berk (510) 525-5054 BECKETTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 2271 Shattuck, Berk (510) 647-1790 FOX THEATER 1807 Telegraph, Oakl 1-800-745-3000 FREIGHT AND SALVAGE COFFEE HOUSE 1111 Addison, Berk (510) 548-1761 JUPITER 2181 Shattuck, Berk (510) THE-ROCK 924 GILMAN STREET PROJECT 924 Gilman, Berk (510) 525-9926 LA PEĂąA CULTURAL CENTER 3104 Shattuck, Berk (510) 849-2568 SHATTUCK DOWN LOW 2284 Shattuck, Berk (510) 548-1159 STARRY PLOUGH 3101 Shattuck, Berk (510) 841-2082 STORK CLUB 2330 Telegraph, Oakl (510) 444-6174 21 GRAND 416 25th St, Oakl (510) 444-7263 UPTOWN 1928 Telegraph, Oakl (510) 451-8100 YOSHIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 510 Embarcadero West Jack London Square, Oakl (510) 238-9200 2

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on the cheap will either shatter your blissful ignorance or confirm your worst suspicions about the corporate Disney machine. (Note: review from the show’s recent run at La Val’s Subterranean in Berkeley.) (Gluckstern)

Ongoing

Thomas Wilde, Teressa Byrne, and Brian Yates Sharber in 42nd Street Moon’s Oh, Kay! photo by davidallenstudio.com

Stage listings are compiled by Guardian staff. Performance times may change; call venues to confirm. Reviewers are Robert Avila, Rita Felciano, and Nicole Gluckstern. Submit items for the listings at listings@sfbg.com. Additional listings can be found at www.sfbg.com.

THEATER oPENING

Annapurna Magic Theatre, Bldg D, Fort Mason Center, Marina at Laguna, SF; (415) 441-8822, www.magictheatre.org. $20-60. Previews Wed/2-Sat/5, 8pm; Sun/6, 2:30pm; Tues/8, 7pm. Opens Nov 9, 8pm. Through Dec 4, showtimes vary. Magic Theatre performs Sharr White’s world premiere drama about love’s longevity. More Human Than Human Dark Room Theater, 2263 Mission, SF; (415) 401-7987, www.brownpapertickets.com. $25. Opens Fri/4, 8pm. Runs Thurs-Sat, 8pm. Through Nov 17. B. Duke’s dystopian drama is inspired by Philip K. Dick. Oh, Kay! Eureka Theatre, 215 Jackson, SF; (415) 255-8207, www.42ndstmoon.org. $2050. Previews Wed/2, 7pm; Thurs/3-Fri/4, 8pm. Opens Sat/5, 6pm. Runs Wed, 7pm; Thurs-Fri, 8pm; Sat, 6pm; Sun, 3pm. Through Nov 20. 42nd Street Moon performs George and Ira Gershwin’s Prohibition-set comedy. The Temperamentals New Conservatory Theatre Center, 25 Van Ness, SF; (415) 861-8972, www. nctcsf.org. $25-45. Previews Fri/4-Sat/5 and Nov 9-11, 8pm; Sun/6, 2pm. Opens Nov 12, 8pm. Runs Wed-Sat, 8pm; Sun, 2pm. Through Dec 18. New Conservatory Theatre Center performs Jon Marans’ drama about gay rights during the McCarthy era. Two Dead Clowns Box Car Theatre Studios, 125A Hyde, SF; www.brownpapertickets.com. $20. Previews Thurs/3, 8pm (free preview). Opens Fri/4, 7pm. Runs Fri-Sat, 7pm. Through Nov 26. Ronnie Larsen’s new play explores the lives of Divine and John Wayne Gacy. The Waiting Period MainStage, Marsh San Francisco, 1062 Valencia, SF; (415) 282-3055, www.themarsh.org. $15-35. Opens Fri/4, 8pm. Runs Fri, 8pm; Sat, 5pm. Through Nov 26. Brian Copeland (Not a Genuine Black Man) presents a workshop production of his new solo show. Working for the Mouse Exit Theatre, 156 Eddy, SF; www.brownpapertickets.com. $22. Opens Thurs/3, 8pm. Runs Thurs-Sat, 8pm (no performances Nov 24-16). Through Dec 17. It might not come as a surprise to hear that even “the happiest place on earth” has a dark side, but hearing Trevor Allen describe it during this reprise of 2002’s Working for the Mouse will put a smile on your face as big as Mickey’s. With a burst of youthful energy, Allen bounds onto the tiny stage of Impact Theatre to confess his one-time aspiration to never grow up — a desire which made auditioning for the role of Peter Pan at Disneyland a sensible career move. But in order to break into the big time of “charactering,” one must pay some heavy, plush-covered dues. Smoothly paced and astutely crafted, Mouse

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Almost Nothing, Day of Absence Lorraine Hansberry Theatre, 450 Post, SF; (415) 4748800, www.lhtsf.org. $43-53. Wed-Sat, 8pm (also Sat, 2pm); Sun, 2pm. Through Nov 20. The Lorraine Hansberry Theatre christens its grand new home near Union Square with two well-acted one-act plays under sharp direction by artistic director Steven Anthony Jones. Almost Nothing by Brazilian playwright Marcos Barbosa marks the North American premiere of an intriguing and shrewdly crafted Pinteresque drama, wherein a middle-class couple (Rhonnie Washington and Kathryn Tkel) returns home from an unexpected encounter at a stop light that leaves them jittery and distracted. As an eerie wind blows outside (in David Molina’s atmospheric sound design), their conversation circles around the event as if fearing to name it outright. When a poor woman (Wilma Bonet) arrives claiming to have seen everything, the couple abandons rationalization for a practical emergency and a moral morass dictated by poverty and class advantage — negotiated on their behalf by a black market professional (Rudy Guerrero). Next comes a spirited revival of Douglas Turner Ward’s Civil Rights–era Day of Absence (1965), a broad satire of Southern race relations that posits a day when all the “Neegras” mysteriously disappear, leaving white society helpless and desperate. The cast (in white face) excel at the high-energy comedy, and in staging the text director Jones makes a convincing parallel with today’s anti-immigrant laws and rhetoric. But if the play remains topical in one way, its too-blunt agitprop mode makes the message plain immediately and interest accordingly pales rapidly. (Avila) Desdemona: A Play About a Handkerchief Boxcar Theatre Playhouse, 505 Natoma, SF; www.boxcartheatre.org. $15-35. Wed/2Sat/5, 8pm. Written in 1979 by a 28-year-old Paula Vogel, Desdemona retells a familiar Shakespearean tragedy, Othello, through the eyes of its more marginalized characters, much as Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead did with Hamlet in 1966. In Vogel’s play, it is the women of Othello — Desdemona the wife, Emilia her attendant (demoted down to washer-woman in Vogel’s piece), and Bianca, Cassio’s lover, and the bawdy town pump — who are the focus, and are the play’s only onstage characters. Though the relationship between the two women often veers into uncomfortable condescension from both sides, their repartee generally feels natural and uncontrived. (Gluckstern) Honey Brown Eyes SF Playhouse, 533 Sutter, SF; (415) 677-9596, www.sfplayhouse.org. $2050. Wed/2-Thurs/3, 7pm; Fri/4-Sat/5, 8pm (also Sat/5, 3pm). Bosnia in 1992 is divided in a horrifying civil war, some characteristics of which play out in parallel circumstances for two members of a single rock band in SF Playhouse’s west coast premiere of Stefanie Zadravec’s new play. In the first act, set in Visegrad, a young Bosnian Muslim woman (Jennifer Stuckert) is held at gunpoint in her kitchen by a jumpy soldier (Nic Grelli) engaged in a mission of murder and dispossession known as ethnic cleansing. The second act moves to Sarajevo and the apartment of an elderly woman (Wanda McCaddon) who gives shelter and a rare meal to an army fugitive (Chad Deverman). He in turn keeps the bereaved if indomitable woman company. Director Susi Damilano and cast are clearly committed to Zadravec’s ambitious if hobbled play, but the action can be too contrived and unrealistic (especially in act one) to be credible while the tone — zigzagging between the horror of atrocity and the offbeat gestures of romantic comedy — comes over as confused indecision rather than a deliberate concoction. (Avila) How to Love Garage, 975 Howard, SF; www. pustheatre.com. $15. Fri-Sat, 8pm; Sun, 2pm. Through Nov 20. Performers Under Stress Theatre presents Megan Cohen’s Plato-inspired world premiere. The Kipling Hotel: True Misadventures of the Electric Pink ‘80s Marsh San Francisco, 1062 Valencia, SF; (415) 282-3055, www. themarsh.org. $15-50. Sat, 8:30pm; Sun, 7pm. Through Nov 13. Acclaimed solo performer Don Reed (East 14th) premieres his new show, based on his post-Oakland years living in Los Angeles. ”Master Harold” ... and the Boys Phoenix Theater, 414 Mason, Ste 601, SF; 1-800838-3006, www.offbroadwaywest.org. $18-

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40. Thurs-Sat, 8pm. Through Nov 19. Based loosely on personal history, Athol Fugard’s drama explores institutionalized racism in South Africa’s apartheid era ensconced in the seemingly innocuous world of a Port Elizabeth tea room. The play opens during a rainy afternoon with no customers, leaving the Black African help, Willie (Anthony Rollins-Mullens) and Sam (LaMont Ridgell), with little to do but rehearse ballroom dance steps for a big competition coming up in a couple of weeks. When Hally (Adam Simpson), the owner’s son, arrives from school, the atmosphere remains convivial at first then increasingly strained, as events happening outside the tea room conspire to tear apart their fragile camaraderie. The greatest burdens of the play are carried by Sam, who fills a range of roles for the increasingly pessimistic and emotionally-stunted Hally — teacher, student, surrogate father, confidante, and servant — all the while completely aware that their mutual love is almost certainly doomed to not survive past Hally’s adolescence, and possibly not past the afternoon. Ridgell rises greatly to the challenges of his character, ably flanked by Rollins-Mullens, and Simpson; he embodies the depth of Sam’s humanity, from his wisdom of experience, to his admiration for beauty, to his capacity to bear and finally to forgive Hally’s need to lash out at him. It is a moving and memorable rendering. (Gluckstern) Not Getting Any Younger Marsh San Francisco, Studio Theater, 1062 Valencia, SF; (415) 8265750, www.themarsh.org. $15-50. Thurs-Fri, 8pm; Sat, 8:30pm; Sun, 3pm. Extended through Dec 17. Marga Gomez is back at the Marsh, a couple of too-brief decades after inaugurating the theater’s new stage with her first solo show — an apt setting, in other words, for the writer-performer’s latest monologue, a reflection on the inevitable process of aging for a Latina lesbian comedian and artist who still hangs at Starbucks and can’t be trusted with the details of her own Wikipedia entry. If the thought of someone as perennially irreverent, insouciant, and appealingly immature as Gomez makes you depressed, the show is, strangely enough, the best antidote. (Avila) The Odyssey Aboard Alma, Hyde Street Pier, San Francisco Maritime National Historic Park, SF; www.weplayers.org. $160. Fri/4-Sun/6, Nov 11-12, and 18, 12:30pm. Heralding their hugely ambitious Spring 2012 production of The Odyssey, which will take place all over Angel Island, the WE Players are tackling the work on a slightly smaller scale by staging it on the historic scow schooner Alma, which is part of the Maritime National Historical Park fleet docked at the end of Hyde Street Pier. Using both boat and Bay as setting, the essential chapters of the ten-year voyage — encounters with the Cyclops, Circe, the Underworld, the Sirens, Aeolus, the Laestrygonians, and Calypso — are enacted through an intriguing mash-up of narration, choreography, sea chanteys, salty dog stories (like shaggy dog stories, but more water-logged), breathtaking views, and a few death-defying stunts the likes of which you won’t see on many conventional stages. High points include the casual swapping of roles (every actor gets to play Odysseus, however briefly), Ross Travis’ masked and flatulent Prometheus and sure-footed Hermes, Ava Roy’s hot pants-clad Circe, Charlie Gurke’s steady musical direction and multi-instrumental abilities, and the sail itself, an experiential bonus. Landlubbers beware, so much time facing the back of the boat where much of the action takes place can result in mild quease, even on a calm day. Take advantage of the downtime between scenes to walk around and face forward now and again. You’ll want to anyway. (Gluckstern) Pellas and Melisande Cutting Ball Theater, Exit on Taylor, 277 Taylor, SF; 1-800-8383006, www.cuttingball.com. $10-50. Thurs, 7:30; Fri-Sat, 8pm (also Sat, 2pm); Sun, 5pm. Through Nov 27. Cutting Ball Theater performs Rob Melrose’s new translation of Maurice Maeterlinck’s avant-garde classic. Race American Conservatory Theater, 415 Geary, SF; (415) 749-2228, www.act-sf.org. $10-85. Opens Wed/26, 8pm. Tues-Sat, 8pm (also Wed and Sat, 2pm); Sun, 2pm (also Sun/6, 7pm). Through Nov 13. ACT performs David Mamet’s wicked courtroom comedy. “Shocktoberfest 12: Fear Over Frisco” Hypnodrome Theatre, 575 10th St, SF; (415) 377-4202, www.thrillpeddlers.com. $25-35. Thurs-Sat, 8pm. Through Nov 19. In its annual season-scented horror bid, Thrillpeddlers joins forces with SF’s Czar of Noir, writer-director Eddie Muller, for a sharply penned triplet of plays that resurrect lurid San Francisco lore as flesh-andblood action. (Avila) 2

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on the cheap

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Commemorate Dia de los Muertos by bringing your cadaver by SOMArts Cultural Center’s altar exhibit. Here, this year’s tribute to the victims of Hurricane Katrina. PHOTO COURTESY SOMARTS

On the Cheap listings are compiled by Lucy Schiller. Submit items for the listings at listings@sfbg.com. For further information on how to submit items for the listings, see Picks.

wednesday 2 Ecology, Ethics, and World Renewal lecture Northbrae Community Church, 941 Alameda, Berk. (510) 526-3805. 7:30 p.m., $5 suggested donation. Stephen Most, documentarian and dreamer, discusses the links between Aldo Leopold’s philosophies and those of the Klamath River tribes. Alan Kaufman reading Booksmith, 1644 Haight, SF. www.booksmith.com. 7:30 p.m., free. San Franciscan Alan Kaufman, author of “Matches” and “Jew Boy,” has led a life as steeped in alcohol as that of a tequila worm. Somehow, he made it out of the bottle and has managed to write a harrowing account of the battle. Ask a Scientist Science Trivia Atlas Café, 3049 20th St., SF. www.atlascafe.net. 7 p.m., free. Finally, a trivia night where no one has to name all the members of the Bangles. Join revelers for more cerebral concerns (and munch on an Atlas yam sandwich). Day of the Dead procession 22nd St. and Bryant, SF. www.dayofthedeadsf.org. 7 p.m., free. With marigolds, stilts, drum-pounders, candles, and altars, SF’s annual Dia de los Muertos procession mixes reverence with neighborhood block party. Join thousands under cover of darkness for a thoughtful remembrance of friends, family, pets, and strangers. Day of the Dead Festival of Altars Garfield Park, 26th St. and Harrison, SF. www.dayofthedeadsf. org. 6-11 p.m., free. Upwards of 80 altars commemorating the lives of loved ones light up Garfield Park. Break out your sugar skulls, candles, photos, and meaningful mementos, this is the time to celebrate the folks you love and miss. Casa Bonampak Day of the Dead Fiesta Casa Bonampak, 1051 Valencia, SF. www.casabonampak.com. 7-10 p.m., free. Duck into the papel picado-bedecked nook for a break from the DOTD parade to dance, eat, drink, and browse.

Thursday 3 San Francisco Transgender Film Festival opening celebration CounterPULSE, 1310 Mission, SF. Also Fri/4, Sat/5. www.counterpulse.org. 8 p.m., $12 sliding scale. Honoring its tenth anniversary as a massive exhibition of short, trans-themed films, this year’s festival opens with a veritable extravaganza featuring some of the more creative names around: Fairy Butch and Kentucky Fried Woman, for starters.

Friday 4 Pico Sanchez Tribute and Dia de los Muertos celebration Mission Arts Center, 745 Treat, SF. (415) 695-5014. 5-8 p.m, free. Kick off the opening of the new Mission Arts Center with a fitting Dia de los Muertos remembrance of formative Mission muralist Pico Sanchez. Dance Palace Day of the Dead celebration Dance Palace Community Center, 5th St. and B St., Point Reyes. www.dancepalace.org. 6-8 p. m., free. Head north for a smaller-scale Dia de los Muertos, attended by Point Reyesians (Reyesites?)

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whose aim for the evening is constructing a communal altar celebrating the lives of their loved ones.

Saturday 5 Robin Hood and Occupy Wall Street lecture Green Arcade, 1680 Market, SF. www.thegreenarcade.com. 7 p.m., free. Paul Buhle, radical historian and illustrator extraordinaire, recently published a graphic exploration of the original populist hero: Robin Hood. Here he talks about the link between Occupy and men in tights. Bay Area Star Party Thornton Hall, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway, SF. www.astrosociety.org. 8-10 p.m., free. Hubble, Hubble — SFSU opens its stellar planetarium and telescope to the public as part of a bay-wide celestial celebration and viewing. Because we’re all stars in our own right, right? Cowgirl Tricks Performance Potrero Branch Library, 1616 20th St., SF. www.sfpl.org. 4 p.m., free. San Franciscan Karen Quest holds a rather vague prize from the Wild West Arts International Convention for “Most Unusual Trick” — quite a trophy to carry in this city, anyway. Quest whipcracks, yeehaws, and ropes in style among library bookshelves. Rad Dad book release and reading Rock Paper Scissors Collective, 2278 Telegraph, Oakl. www. rpscollective.org. 7-9 p.m., free. The hip dads biking through SF with faux-hawked toddlers named things like “Orbison” are sweet alright, but there are also plenty of radical folks for whom politics and parenting go hand-in-hand. Zinesters and Rad Dad scenesters Tomas Moniz and Jeremy Adam Smith speak on activist parenting. Hypothesis: An Art and Science Fair The Lab, 2948 16th St., SF. www.thelab.org. 7:30-11 p.m., free. For a certain high school subculture, science fairs were make-it-or-break-it happenings. Would your sputtering baking-soda-and-vinegar volcano land you that NYU scholarship? Now of legal drinking age, local artists vie for the blue ribbon at the Lab’s true-to-form exhibition, which was closed to any entries lacking the classic tripartite foam board. Trail Ridge service day UCSF Mount Sutro Open Space Reserve, SF. www.ridgetrail.org. 8:30 a. m.-12:30 p.m., free. Register online. When completed, the ongoing trail work sponsored by the Bay Area Ridge Trail Council, Sutro Stewards, and REI will culminate in 550 miles of hikeable, bikeable horse-ridable glory. Make your mark this weekend restoring the Twin Peaks Connector Trail. Illuminations: Dia de los Muertos 2011 closing reception, SOMArts, 934 Brannan, SF. www. somarts.org. 6-9 p.m., $10 sliding scale. Last chance to catch the upwards of 30 altars and installations covering death, from the gravely massive — Fukushima — to the highly personal. Pablo Picasso and beloved Casa Sanchez owner, Martha Sanchez, are among those honored.

Sunday 6 Come Out and Play Festival ending games The Go Game, 400 Treat, SF. www.comeoutandplaysf. org. Noon-6 p.m., free. Today marks the end of this week-long, maddeningly mysterious and impossibly brilliant festival challenging San Franciscans to step away from the laptop and onto the streets for games titled things like “Charge of the Rubber Ball Brigade”. Don’t forget to Daylight Savings-ify your reminder notification. 2

november 2 - 8, 2011 / SFBG.com

37


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38 SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN

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1

“Splendid” Roger Ebert / ChiCago Sun-TimES

“Brilliant!”

Bonnie Laufer / TRiBuTE EnTERTainmEnT

“Riveting!” Ed Douglas / ComingSoon.nET

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Entertainment.” marshall Fine / huFFingTonPoST.Com

A ROLAND EMMERICH FILM

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS IN ASSOCIATION WITH RELATIVITY MEDIA A CENTROPOLIS ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTION “ANONYMOUS” RHYS IFANS VANESSA REDGRAVE JOELY RICMUSIC HARDSON DAVID THEWLIS XAVIER SAMUEL EXECUTIVE SEBASTIAN ARMESTO RAFE SPALL EDWARD HOGG JAMI E CAMPBELL BOWER AND DEREK JACOBI BY THOMAS WANDER AND HARALD KLOSER PRODUCERS VOLKER ENGEL MARC WEIGERT JOHN ORLOFF WRITTEN PRODUCED DIRECTED BY JOHN ORLOFF BY ROLAND EMMERICH LARRY FRANCO ROBERT LEGER BY ROLAND EMMERICH CINEMARK CENTURY SAN FRANCISCO CENTRE 9 845 Market St. Ste. 500 San Francisco 800/FANDANGO 991# SUNDANCE KABUKI CINEMAS 1881 Post St. San Francisco 415/346-3243 AMC VAN NESS 14 1000 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 888/AMC-4FUN

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