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SEWICKLEY SPEAKING T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

S E W I C K L E Y

In this issue, meet Academy alumni who are contributing to Pittsburgh’s rebirth and hear their perspective on the exciting potential that lies ahead for the City of Bridges.

A C A D E M Y

SUMMER 2010


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CONTENTS 2

WINTER & SPRING SPORTS WRAP-UP

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D. SCULLEY ’93: BACK HOME AT GOOGLE PITTSBURGH

EDITOR

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PITTSBURGH PERSPECTIVES

Haley Wilson

CONTRIBUTORS

Lawrence Connolly

Greta Daniels

Sharon Hurt Davidson

Jennifer FitzPatrick

Larry Hall

Winthrop Palmer

Mandi Semple

Susan Sour

Haley Wilson

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PHOTOGRAPHERS

Carrie Kennedy ’86

Mandi Semple

James R. Wardrop ’57

Haley Wilson

DESIGN

Richard A. Hooper

Third Planet Communications

www.333planet.com

ON A WING & A PRAYER

A MESSAGE FROM THE HEAD OF SCHOOL | LETTERS

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WINTER & SPRING SPORTS WRAP-UP

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NEW TRUSTEES

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PITTSBURGH PERSPECTIVES

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ALL THINGS PITTSBURGH

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SEWICKLEY SERIES 2010-2011

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D. SCULLEY ’93: BACK HOME AT GOOGLE PITTSBURGH

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FAREWELLS

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REUNION 2010 PREVIEW

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SEWICKLEY ACADEMY IN THE NEWS

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ON A WING & A PRAYER

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ALUMNI GATHERINGS | WELCOMING A NEW ALUMNI COUNCIL PRESIDENT

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START HERE, GO ANYWHERE

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CLASS NOTES

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IN MEMORIAM

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FIND US ON FACEBOOK & TWITTER Follow Sewickley Academy on Twitter and join the Academy alumni group on Facebook to stay informed and connected!

Sewickley Academy does not discriminate on the basis of race, gender, religion, national or ethnic origin, or sexual orientation in the administration of its educational policies, financial aid program, athletic program, or any other policy or program.

C Printed on 100% recycled paper that is processed chlorine-free.


S E W I C KLEY

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A M E S S AGE FROM T H E H E A D OF SCHOOL

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LETTERS “Fun to see photos of ‘our era’ faculty retirees in the Summer 2009 issue: Alden Sector, Jim Cavalier, Al Dugan, Mary Nichols. Also, I listen to Anna Singer on Pittsburgh’s PBS, who is a former classmate of our daughter, Julia ’76. We loved Sewickley and the Academy!”

Dear Readers of Sewickley Speaking, As I write, the pace at the Academy has slowed appreciably for the summer. Graduation was celebrated on Sunday, June 13, for the first time under a tent on Wardrop Field. Preparations for graduation involved not just the erecting of the tent but the fabrication of a ramp to the field and a stage. Now that these have been dismantled and stored until next year, one can see the dramatic impact that the lack of sun had on the grass (echoes of a Lower School science experiment). What is remarkable is how quickly, just three days later, the grass is regaining its former color, with chlorophyll absorbing light waves and causing the lime green to grow darker each day.

Tad Murphy, wife of the late John C. Murphy (Former Head of Lower School) Rector, PA

“I was disappointed to read about the visit by Jennifer Iserloh ’90, the ‘Skinny Chef.’ Do we really want to teach our kids that ‘skinny’ is the goal rather than ‘healthy’? I’m sure her suggestions are about health, or claim to be, but language says a lot. The article about Megan Osterhout ’02 and her sustainable Vermont farm struck me as espousing a much more beautiful and healthful attitude about food.”

The resilience of the natural world is remarkable, and this gives us hope for the Gulf, but we must also be mindful that man’s activities can have a significant deleterious impact on the natural world, on the landscape of a city, and on the quality of our lives, and we must seek to mitigate that impact. What is heartening is that, today, we are ever more mindful of those potential effects, and we seek to balance human needs against the demands of “mother nature.”

Sam Musher ‘96 Somerville, MA Editor’s Note: Although her title may suggest that Jennifer’s approach is geared toward being “skinny,” her mission is to promote health by preparing nutritious, home-cooked meals. Learn more at www.skinnychef.com.

In this issue of Sewickley Speaking, we treat you to the exciting work of a number of our alumni, who are working in a range of fields that reflect the resurgence of Pittsburgh as a center for innovation in green building, in technology, and in the careful management of natural resources. In the aftermath of the devastating earthquake in Haiti, Pittsburgh also became the center of attention for humanitarian work, in which our alumni were also involved.

“As I read Sewickley Speaking I came upon the sad announcement of the passing of Dominick Spinelli … When I came to SA in 1979 as a ninth grade student, I participated in the summer work-study program and Dominick supervised me as a member of the grounds crew. He was kind to me and encouraged me by knowing my name, treating me as a “man,” and welcoming me to eat lunch with him. I felt at home with men like him and he gave me confidence as I began my new academic life at SA. … My father once told me that no matter where I worked, to always remember to get to know the support staff in an organization, for they are the ones who really give depth to the organization. I have made it my habit to do so, and my father was correct. I know his advice to be true, because my best teacher at SA was Dominick Spinelli.”

The pride Pittsburghers justifiably feel in our city is reflected not only in the way we root for our sports teams, but also in the way we have persevered through the decades and thereby transformed and reinvented the city. We stand as a model for the way old industrial centers can re-imagine themselves and create a brighter future for themselves and succeeding generations. It is exciting to see Sewickley Academy alumni playing such important roles in this process. I trust you will enjoy reading their stories.

Parker “P.J.” Freshwater ’82 Groton, NY

Sincerely,

Love it? Hate it? Read it? We would love to hear what you think about this issue of Sewickley Speaking. We may edit your letters for length and clarity, but please write! Haley Wilson Sewickley Speaking 315 Academy Avenue Sewickley, PA 15143 hwilson@sewickley.org

Kolia O’Connor

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WINTER & SPRING SPORTS WRAP-UP BOYS’ BASKETBALL The boys’ varsity basketball team did not lose a single game to a team in the state of Pennsylvania on its way to a school record of 27-2. SA defeated Lincoln Park 49-48 in the WPIAL Championship game on Tom Droney’s (’10) three pointer in front of more than 5,000 fans at the Palumbo Center. Carrington Motley ’12 and Danny Timpona ’12 were critical players throughout the season. Peter Schramm ’10 led the team in rebounding and inside points; David Bonomo ’10 was another key rebounder whose defense was critical to the team’s success; JT Ahearn ’10 was a spark off the bench in the state playoffs; and Tyler Palmer ’10 set a single season school record for his five three pointers that made him the leading scorer in the state championship victory over Reading Central Catholic. Tom Droney was named the State Player of the Year by the Associated Press.

The boys’ basketball team celebrates its PIAA Championship.

BOWLING The varsity bowling roster continues to grow with a total of 26 boys and girls competing. To encourage more competition, the WPIBL changed its playing format this year. With just two full games per player, as well as two Baker games in which a team’s whole five-player lineup takes its turn to bowl a standard game, the Academy fared much better this year, and won a good number of Baker games. Conor McKenna ’10 led the boys in scoring with a 139 average while Aurley Morris ’11 led the girls in scoring with a 114 average. BASEBALL The varsity baseball team featured the largest roster in many years, led by Brian Ferri ’10 and Jack Howes ’10, and the future looks bright as the Panthers competed well throughout a tough schedule. Will Hogan ’11 and Jack Straka ’11 led the team in hitting. An early season section victory over perennial section power Avonworth was one of the highlights. The Panthers hit the ball well throughout the season, and the pitching should continue to improve as all but one pitcher were underclassmen.

In a game against Cornell, Jordan Milo ’13 deals the pitch while Will Hogan ’11 waits for the hit.

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GIRLS’ BASKETBALL The varsity girls’ basketball team once again made it to the playoffs with an overall record of 9-8, finishing third in the section with a 5-3 record. Reed Mango ’11 was selected first team AllSection as she led the team in rebounding and was a consistent inside scorer. Sharp shooters Rachel Prigal ’12 and Jackie Orr ’12 led a strong group of long distance shooters, and the team set a new school record with nine three pointers against Monaca. Point guard Nudge Vacarelli ’12 served as the floor leader who led the team in assists.

Alex Gideon ‘11 strides toward the goal in the game against South Park. The Panthers won the game 10-3.

ICE HOCKEY The varsity ice hockey team made incredible improvements from last year, winning seven additional games to finish the season with a 11-11-1 record and a second place finish in the section to earn a playoff berth. No one will soon forget the dramatic overtime goal by Mike Tully ’10 on an assist from Reed Houston ’12 to garner the first victory over Quaker Valley. Jimmy Compliment ’10 was outstanding in goal all season. Ed Lally ’11 and Danny Sponseller ’11 were outstanding scorers for the Panthers. Trey Carbeau ’10 was awarded the Badger Bob Sportsmanship Award by the PIHL.

Jackie Orr ’12 takes it through the lane and to the hoop.

BOYS’ LACROSSE The varsity boys’ lacrosse team capped a banner season by defeating Franklin Regional 9-7 in the WPIAL Championship game. In just the second season of WPIAL play, the Panthers compiled an 18-5 record and advanced to the PIAA quarterfinals. One of the most thrilling games of the year was the 8-7 victory over Mt. Lebanon in the WPIAL semifinals. Connor Behun ’10, Trey Carbeau ’10, Stephen Gill ’10, Aaron Lenchner ’10, and Brendan Yakulis ’10 were instrumental in the team’s success. Max Pawk ’10 was outstanding in goal, and he, along with teammates Jack Roberts ’11 and Ed Lally ’11, were selected by the WPIAL coaches to the All-American lacrosse team. Lally established a new scoring record with 81 goals. David Bonomo ’10 was named to the Academic All-American team.

The boys’ lacrosse team poses with its first WPIAL trophy.

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W I NTER & SPRING SPORTS WRAP-UP [ C O N T I N U E D ]

Casey Ross ’10 goes for the score against Oakland Catholic.

This spring, the boys’ tennis team won its seventh consecutive WPIAL Championship.

GIRLS’ LACROSSE

BOYS’ TENNIS

The varsity girls’ lacrosse team captured its sixth section championship in the past seven years with an overall record of 14-6 and 8-2 in the section. The Panthers defeated Latrobe in the first round of the WPIAL playoffs 18-6 before falling in the WPIAL semifinals. Emma Jordan ’10, Lyssa Bantleon ’10, Meredith Kendall ’10, Eleanore Marsh ’10, and Jul Tehovnik ’10 were key players throughout the season. Olivia Ahearn ’11 was named by the WPIAL coaches to the All-American lacrosse team, and Kathleen Yakulis ’10 was named honorable mention All-American. Also, Casey Ross ’10 was selected to the Academic All-American team.

The varsity boys’ tennis team captured an eighth straight section championship and a seventh consecutive WPIAL Championship by defeating Hampton 5-0 in the finals. Jordan Chang ’10 won the section singles championship, playing at No. 1 singles. Colin Kaye ’13 won more than 80 percent of his matches playing at No. 2 singles. The doubles team of David Lasorda ’10 and Grayson Geller ’12 captured the WPIAL Doubles Championship when they defeated the SA team of Kareem Termanini ’10 and Chris Weir ’10 in a three-set final. The Panthers advanced to Hershey and fell in the state quarterfinals. TRACK & FIELD

SOFTBALL

The varsity track and field team set a number of school records as eight individuals qualified for the WPIAL championships. Qualifying individually were Peter Schramm ’10 with a school record discus throw of 131 feet; Emily Mistick ’11 in the 300m hurdles; JT Ahearn ’10 in the 1600m; Caitlin Bungo ’12 in the 1600m; and the boys’ 4x800m relay team of Ian Carroll ’11, Charlie Sutherland ’12, Liam Condon ’12, and Nehemiah Norris ’13. The varsity boys’ team went 3-4 in dual meets, the best record thus far in the team’s short history. The varsity girls’ team posted its first winning record, going 4-3 in dual meets. JT Ahearn once again qualified for the PIAA championships as did Caitlin Bungo who set an Academy record for the highest finish at states.

The varsity softball team, in its second year of WPIAL competition, earned its first section victory over Cornell. Pitchers Annie Duer ’11 and Maddie Greathouse ’12 performed well in a section that was senior-dominated. Catcher Aja Happel ’11 batted over .400 in the season. Rachel Kaye ’10 was the only senior on the team, and her leadership guided the young Panthers to a promising future. SWIMMING & DIVING The varsity boys’ swimming and diving team captured the first section championship in school history to finish with a 10-1 record. John Quinn ’10 qualified for the WPIAL individual championships. The varsity girls’ swimming and diving team finished second in the section with a 7-4 record. Larissa Holley ’10 and Aja Happel ’11 qualified for the WPIAL individual championships. The team of Rhett Happel ’13, Ian Bickett ’12, John Quinn, and Quaker Valley’s Kyle Richert qualified for WPIALS in the medley 100 and 200 relays.

COACHES RECOGNIZED This spring, Coach Win Palmer was selected by the AP as Pennsylvania “A” Basketball Coach of the Year. He was also recognized for his 500th win as a basketball coach, an achievement reached by only 3 percent of high school coaches across the nation. Coach Cheryl Lassen was also honored this spring as WPIAL Division I Coach of the Year for her work with the section champion girls’ lacrosse team.

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NEW TRUSTEES Margie Shields Gilfillan ’59 After a one-year hiatus, Margie returns for her second term as a Sewickley Academy trustee. She is an alumna of the Academy, with an undergraduate degree from Penn State and a Master of Business Administration from the University of Pittsburgh. Upon graduating from Pitt, she worked for Deloitte & Touche where she became a CPA and a senior manager in audit. She subsequently worked as chief financial officer for Point Park University where she is currently employed as a professor of accounting. This fall she starts a new position as chair of the business management department in Point Park’s School of Business. Margie is involved in various local organizations and is currently the treasurer for FAME and the Sewickley Valley Historical Society. She and her husband, Howard, live in the Sewickley area and have two grown children, Kyle and Erin ’95.

Gretchen S. Hansen At Wheaton College, Gretchen received a Bachelor of Arts in speech/communications and interned her senior year at the White House News Summary Office under the Reagan Administration. She later worked as assistant director of development of special giving at Cornell University and then as a development assistant for the Pittsburgh Leadership Foundation. She is currently president of the Hansen Foundation and also CEO/owner of Per-Fit Personal Fitness, a fitness studio in Sewickley. As an active member of the community, Gretchen has volunteered with the Child Health Association of Sewickley, Girl Scouts, and her local church. She and her late husband, W. Gregg Hansen ’77, have devoted many years to the long-term mission of Sewickley Academy, and their legacy continues through their four daughters, Katherine ’07, Julia ’09, Laura ’12, and Sarah ’18.

Eric C. Johnson Father of current Academy students Kenny ’11 and Drew ’15, Eric currently serves as chairman and chief financial officer of The Hillman Company. He received his undergraduate degree from Duke University and a Master of Business Administration from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management. In the past, he has served as a trustee or director for the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, the Pittsburgh Public Theater, and Orchard Hill Church.

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PITTSBURGH PERSPECTIVES

Over the past year, the nation has been abuzz with news of Pittsburgh’s renaissance – one that is transforming the steel town into a diverse and burgeoning metropolis worthy to be named the “Most Livable City” by Forbes magazine. Through this evolution, Pittsburgh has become a model of economic diversification on both a national and global scale. Meet three Academy alumni who individually contribute to the city’s rebirth and hear their perspective on the exciting potential that lies ahead for the City of Bridges.

K E VO N C O P ELAND ‘71

For Kevon Copeland ’71, senior business development specialist at the Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh (URA), the renaissance of Pittsburgh takes place in front of his eyes each day. After spending 18 years in banking, Kevon joined the URA in 1998, and since then has had a hand in the economic diversification of post-industrial Pittsburgh. “When I first started working with the URA under Mayor Tom Murphy, there was an expressed vision for the development of the city. We were just beginning to come out of the economic downturn of the 80s and the city was severely lacking self-confidence.” The initiatives

set before Kevon and the URA at that time were to develop downtown housing as well as office space for the companies emerging from the local universities. Just a year before Kevon came on board, the URA, along with developers, had completed its first brownfield project, Washington’s Landing – a 42-acre island located on the western bank of the Allegheny River. Once the site of Herr’s Island, a large meatpacking center along the Pennsylvania Railroad, the abandoned land was transformed into a mixed-use development hosting upscale housing and businesses as well as a marina.

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The success of the Washington’s Landing project led to what Kevon calls the city’s most transformative project – South Side Works, the former site of an LTV Steel Finishing Mill – and one in which he had a hand in shaping. “One of the first things we [the URA] did was renovate the Hot Metal Bridge from a railroad bridge used to transport molten steel into a bridge for vehicles, bicycles, and pedestrians.” Today, the bridge’s name stands as perhaps the only remaining clue of the area’s former usage.

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For Kevon, the most exciting developments for Pittsburgh are those companies coming out of the universities, particularly in biotechnology and robotics. “The universities are driving the regional economy in very exciting ways. These biotech companies, specifically in tissue regeneration, are cutting edge and have the potential to change peoples’ lives and how they live their lives for generations to come.” He cites another client with great potential - Bossa Nova Robotics, a start-up specializing in robotic toys. “As a spinoff from Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Institute, this company is particularly exciting because in Pittsburgh’s corporate-to-corporate history, there has not been as much growth in consumer products. These toys, however, are being well-received in the market worldwide.”

After the environmental clearance was obtained for the site in 1998, Kevon played a formative role in the tax increment financing for developers and businesses for the dense development, which is now the bustling home to many retailers, restaurants, offices, a 38,000-square-foot sports complex, and the campus of one of 28 Pittsburgh-headquartered corporations, American Eagle Outfitters. “American Eagle’s move was very strategic and symbolic because it was the attraction of the publicly-traded company’s headquarters from the suburbs into the heart of the city. The company has a significant number of young employees, which helps fuel the residential, commercial, and entertainment industries offered in the South Side Works and throughout the South Side.”

Kevon referenced his Academy experience when remarking on the influence that the city’s many universities have on today’s changing landscape. “The Academy allowed me to think creatively, and exchange ideas in a free, open, and nonthreatening environment. The ability to engage in those ways is essential in all situations whether you are in business development, scientific innovation, or artistic creation, and especially when you are a young person still in school.”

“Pittsburgh has regained its self-confidence. Pittsburghers are choosing to stay here, many who have left are returning home, and all are bragging on their city just as they do for their Steelers and Penguins.”

Slowly, with the URA’s help, the empty riverbanks once occupied by the industrial sites of years past are becoming shining showcases of the city’s new identity. “Pittsburgh has gained a national and worldwide reputation for brownfield redevelopment, not simply because we have a lot of them, but because we have done it quite successfully by integrating new developments with existing neighborhoods,” says Kevon.

There’s no doubt that the city of Pittsburgh, in hand with the URA, has come a long way since the “Smoky City” perched on the banks of the three rivers. There is still work to be done, but one thing is for certain, “Pittsburgh has regained its selfconfidence. Pittsburghers are choosing to stay here, many who have left are returning home, and all are bragging on their city just as they do for their Steelers and Penguins.”

But the URA isn’t always looking to wipe away the old and erect the new. Often times it is an important advocate for restoring alreadyexisting facilities, many of which are historical. In his business development role, Kevon works to get financing for business owners as they improve the façade of their building or develop the structure for a new purpose. In fact, the URA has recently celebrated the granting of its 1,200th façade improvement grant, which provides 40 percent of the funds needed to put a new face on existing businesses in Pittsburgh. Another restoration project Kevon has been directly involved with is the historic restoration of two residences on Millionaires’ Row in Shadyside, which will open in September 2010 as a boutique inn called Mansions on Fifth Avenue. “This project has been a challenge as we met many roadblocks in preserving the mansions in a prime area [Fifth Avenue]. Now that construction has begun, it is promising that the beautiful mansions will remain an important piece of Pittsburgh history instead of being razed for condominiums.”

With the URA’s help, this mansion on Millionaires’ Row in Shadyside will open in September as a boutique inn.

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P I T TSBURGH PERSPECTIVES [CONTIN U E D ]

K AT I E K L A BER ’84 As the executive director of the Marcellus Shale Coalition, Katie Klaber ’84 is working with local landowners, regional governments, and natural gas companies to safely and conscientiously tap the potential of Pittsburgh’s natural resources. In doing so, Katie believes that Western Pennsylvania – specifically Pittsburgh – is poised to shape the future of the United States’ energy profile. The Marcellus Shale Coalition was founded in 2008 when the natural gas companies in Western Pennsylvania recognized the full potential of the Marcellus Shale formation and the necessity for unified organization in its development. The coalition, which aims to responsibly harvest the natural gas from the Marcellus Shale geological formation through improved regulation and environmental protection, is made up of gas companies, environmental engineering firms, resource management institutions, and other companies involved in the regular operations of the Marcellus Shale development. Some of the coalition’s most important work revolves around engaging and educating the communities directly affected by the shale development.

to a career that has the potential to change the lives of hundreds of thousands of Pennsylvanians in the immediate future and millions of Americans in the long term. Western Pennsylvania is already a leader in coal, nuclear, solar, and wind development, all of which can place Pennsylvania at the forefront of U.S. energy production and policy. According to Katie, however, the potential benefits from the Marcellus Shale natural gas deposits are the most exciting opportunities for the region and the nation. The 95,000 square miles of the Marcellus Shale formation could be the second largest gas development in the world once it’s fully developed, second only to Texas. The amount of potential energy that could be provided to American consumers equals 87 billion barrels of oil, while the U.S. currently consumes 7 billion barrels of oil per year. A June 2009 study done by the Gas Technology Institute concluded that the increased use of natural gas will reduce primary energy consumption, consumer energy costs, and national CO2 emissions. In addition to the impact that natural gas development can have on a national scale, the Marcellus Shale deposit has the potential to create more than 211,000 new jobs in Pennsylvania (without government subsidy) and generate nearly $1.8 billion in state and local tax revenues for the Commonwealth in 2010.

To her new leadership role, Katie brings extensive experience in environmental development and community engagement as well as a keen appreciation of Pittsburgh’s recent transformations. Before joining the Coalition, she spent seven years with the Allegheny Conference (AC) where she worked with leaders in the Pittsburgh civic community to improve the region from a fundamental standpoint and spread the word about those successes. As her work with the AC shifted focus to Western Pennsylvania’s energy strategy, Katie took note of the exciting regional developments in different types of energy solutions and was impressed with the future prospect of natural gas as a daily energy source. She attributes her fascination with the scientific breakthroughs to her indepth exposure to math and science at Sewickley Academy and particularly to her time with AP Calculus instructor, Mr. Symons. That interest in innovation and discovery led her

“People who have lived in this region their whole lives have never seen this kind of growth and economic opportunity.”

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By 2014, Pennsylvania will be a net exporter of natural gas. “People who have lived in this region their whole lives have never seen this kind of growth and economic opportunity,” comments Katie.

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there is no denying the immediate and future economic impacts that this industry will have on the Pittsburgh area. The Coalition is now focusing on educating the public about natural gas development: the risks and the potential for landowners, community members, and Pittsburgh. Katie remarked, “I think, unfortunately, the industry was not ahead of the education, so there is a lot of misinformation out there. For example, there has never been in this country, according to the EPA, state agencies, DEP, or the Ground Water Protection Council, ground-water contamination from hydraulic-fracturing of any shale. It has been going on for 60 years in this country with no cases of groundwater contamination, but you would never know that given the rhetoric.”

While the Marcellus Shale stretches across four surrounding states, Pittsburgh has quickly become the headquarters for shale development operations. Why? The city is centrally located and companies have access to an international airport, but perhaps most importantly, Pittsburgh already has a “traditional cultural infrastructure.” “It is not a tough sell to get families to relocate to Pittsburgh from around the country. About 10 folks that I work with closely have settled on their house in the last couple of months. They were living in New York, Harrisburg, Texas, or Oklahoma. People are moving to Pittsburgh for the Marcellus Shale,” says Katie. She also noted the recent boomerang effect of Pennsylvania natives who had left the area to pursue their careers in the petroleum capitals of the country. These highly educated professionals are returning to the area in droves. They are already in on the secret of Pittsburgh and hands are shooting up in corporate board rooms when companies are asking for transfer volunteers.

Despite the challenges that face the natural gas industry in Pittsburgh, Katie is optimistic about its prospects for increased and sustainable development in the region. “Pittsburgh is a city with a history of doing ‘real business,’” she remarked. “We are used to making things and making them well. We are not a community that likes disposable goods. Commitments are made and kept in Pittsburgh and we are thrilled to be developing this industry here where business relationships will last for generations.”

While there has been substantial controversy regarding the potential environmental risks associated with natural gas development,

M AG G I E KO P F ’91 During a week-long visit to Pittsburgh from her home in New York City, Maggie Kopf ’91, owner of Square One Interior Design, made the decision to return to the place where it all started. “It just clicked for me,” she says. “I wanted to move back to Pittsburgh.” This was a big step for the adventurous young professional who, since her graduation from Vanderbilt University, had traveled first to Los Angeles to pursue acting, then to Telluride, Colorado, to purchase and renovate a historical house, before eventually settling in New York City in 2003. Landing in the Big Apple with no clear direction, Maggie found a job in healthcare through a temp agency and reflected on what she wanted to do with her life. Having already tried her hand in design during the successful renovation of a miner’s shack in Telluride, she decided to pursue a degree in interior design and enrolled in the two-year program at Parsons School of Design.

in the city. “Being that it was such a small firm, I was given a lot of responsibility from the start. I was often amazed to be working on million dollar jobs.” There, she excelled at her true

Upon graduation from Parsons in 2005, Maggie took on two internships and then began working at J.D. Bell, a small interior design firm

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P I T TSBURGH PERSPECTIVES [CONTIN U E D ] passion. In fact, one of the projects on which she collaborated was featured in an eight-page spread in Architectural Digest.

with the new and matches the loft’s architecture perfectly. In fact, the now modern building was, at the turn of the century, the home of Westinghouse Air Brake Company.

But something was missing for Maggie. Working long hours and yearning for a balance in her professional and personal life, she took a week off to return to Pittsburgh for a visit – a visit that ultimately changed her direction. “Truth be told, New York was a grind. I gained a lot from being there, but eventually, I just recognized that Pittsburgh offered the ability to have a nice personal life while still pursuing a career, and that was important to me.” Once the decision was made, she began to research the architecture scene in Pittsburgh, and what she found made her even more enthusiastic about the move back. “What excited me most was the revitalization of Pittsburgh’s old architecture and the boom in green buildings. Although I do mostly residential work, there is some trickle down that comes from the green architecture in the commercial realm.” And so, she packed her bags and returned to the Steel City in 2007, just as her entrepreneurial dream was beginning to emerge.

Each work day looks different for Maggie – some days she travels around the city in pursuit of the perfect material, furniture, or lighting for a space. Other days she stays home to draw her vision for a project and get quotes from various venders. In her off hours, she reintroduces herself to the city of Pittsburgh by attending cultural events or various affairs for design professionals. As an entrepreneur, Maggie has found the “new” Pittsburgh to be a great place to start a business – a far cry from the city 10 years ago that Time magazine called “insular and somewhat skeptical of entrepreneurs.” She attributes her budding client base to the city’s networking potential. “The networking is a thousand times better here than it was in New York City. In a short time, I’ve built a meaningful network. Even the most successful people in the city are accessible and are good for their word. They truly want to help entrepreneurs like me who are working to build a reputation.”

“I’m proud that Pittsburgh was able to create a new identity and become a modern city … There is real opportunity here.”

“When I got here, I knew that I wanted to start my own business and that it would take some time to get it off the ground,” she says. So, she spent the next year laying the groundwork for Square One Interior Design, LLC, which launched in May 2009. Today, Maggie runs her business out of her loft apartment – one with industrial exposed brick walls and pine-beamed ceilings – which is not-so-ironically reminiscent of what one would find in Tribeca or SoHo. Her eclectic style charmingly marries the old

Along with the connections she has established in the “big city with the small-town feel,” Maggie says that her Academy education has been an essential component in starting her own business. “As a ‘lifer,’ the Academy instilled in me the ability to interact and relate to many different people. In interior design, I’m required to wear many different hats, not only as a creative director, but also as a problem solver. That type of dynamic, well-rounded experience is exactly what I had at the Academy,” says Maggie. But the Pittsburgh she remembers from her Academy days is not the same Pittsburgh she calls home now. “I’m proud that Pittsburgh was able to create a new identity and become a modern city with good ideas, good fashion, and good design. There is real opportunity here.”

One of Maggie’s recent projects – the master bedroom in the home of Pam and Walter Gregg – was designed around the Alice Soulie print.

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ALL THINGS PITTSBURGH

ALUMNI’S FAVORITE PITTSBURGH HOTSPOTS

“That’s easy, Wings Suds & Spuds in Moon Township, by the old airport. Best wings on the planet (seriously).”

“North Park on a summer morning.” Nikki Becich ’09

Nick Batyko ’00

“I love the bike trails. Also, I like getting crepes at Pamela’s in the strip on Sunday mornings.”

“The Allegheny River! You can always find me in the middle of it in a kayak!”

David Street ’93

Rasheda Vereen ’06

RANKINGS

DID YOU KNOW?

• For it’s plethora of jobs, low crime rate, and “myriad of entertainment options,” Pittsburgh was rated the “Most Livable City” by Forbes magazine for the third year in a row.

• The Steel City welcomed the world for the G-20 Summit in September 2009, hosting world leaders and more than 2,000 journalists for the two-day meeting.

Pittsburgh was the North American host of World Environment Day 2010 on June 5, 2010. The city sponsored various events, including an attempt to break the world record for the “largest flotilla of kayaks and canoes.”

The David L. Lawrence Convention Center in downtown Pittsburgh is the nation’s first certified green convention center and was, at the time of its construction, the largest certified green building in the world.

Pittsburgh now hosts the fifth most educated young workforce in the U.S., a distinction that groups the city with Boston, San Francisco, and Washington, D.C., according to a recent report in the Pittsburgh Economic Quarterly published by the University of Pittsburgh’s University Center for Social and Urban Research.

• Pittsburgh ranked No. 2 on Huffington Post’s Best Cities for College Graduates. • Charity Navigator’s 2010 Metro Market Study of the philanthropic charities in metropolitan markets named Pittsburgh as the nation’s most charity-conscious city.

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2010-2011 See the back cover for a tear-out save the date card!

Film Series: Women & Asian Cultures Silk Screen Saturday, January 8 / 2 PM Thursday, January 20 / 7 PM Sunday, January 30 / 2 PM Gregg Theater

Deconstructing Broadway Seth Rudetsky Thursday, October 28 7 PM / Rea Auditorium

As host of Sirius/XM Radio’s daily Broadway show, pianist for more than a dozen Broadway shows including Les Miz and The Producers, and artistic producer/ music director for the first five annual Actors Fund Fall Concerts, Seth Rudetsky is nothing short of a Broadway luminary. Seth’s one-man show – Deconstructing Broadway – is a hilarious performance where he plays clips from his private Broadway video and audio collection and deconstructs “what’s vocally amazing” versus “what’s vocal travesty.”

Silk Screen is a Pittsburgh non-profit organization that celebrates Asian arts and culture through films, music, and dance. Since 2006, Silk Screen has been showcasing films, filmmakers, and actors with origins in Asia through its annual Silk Screen Asian American Film Festival. The Academy partners with Silk Screen to present three films that focus on women in Asian cultures. Each film will be followed by a moderated discussion.

Wednesday, December 1 7 PM / Rea Auditorium

You don’t want to miss this annual Sewickley Series tradition! Academy strings teacher Jhonnatan Mata and his talented string quartet will celebrate the holiday season with the community with a lively concert of holiday music from around the globe.

Wednesday, April 20 7 PM / Gregg Theater

For the past five years, Academy alumnus Jim Caruso ’76 has been hosting Cast Party, a wildly popular weekly cabaret night out that brings showbiz superstars to the legendary Birdland in New York City. Caruso’s Cast Party has gone on the road to Orlando, Chicago, and Los Angeles … and now it’s coming to Pittsburgh! Jim, along with musical director Billy Stitch, will host a hilarious impromptu variety show where local Pittsburgh superstars will showcase their Broadway, musical, and comedic talents. Supported in part by the Albert & Bertha Sector Speaker Series Fund.

Supported in part by the Geller Family Educational Speakers Fund.

Holiday Music from Around the World The Mata String Quartet

Jim Caruso’s Cast Party

Rediscovering Pittsburgh: A Panel Discussion on History & Current Trends Thursday, February 10 7 PM / Rea Auditorium

What does 21st century Pittsburgh look like? During a panel discussion, various Pittsburgh leaders and experts, many of whom are alumni, will share their knowledge and insight on our renaissance city. Topics will include Pittsburgh history, regional demographics, the green movement, job growth and markets, technology, trends, and the future.

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ALL SEWICKLEY SERIES PROGRAMS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

For more information and to register, please visit www.sewickley.org/sewickleyseries.


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D. SCULLEY ’93: BACK HOME AT GOOGLE PITTSBURGH By: Senior School English teacher Lawrence C. Connolly Google Pittsburgh. D. explained that his return to Pittsburgh began in 2006, while he was in Silicone Valley, California, serving as a data-mining intern at Yahoo! “My mom sent me a newspaper clipping about Google opening a Pittsburgh office,” he said. Although D. hadn’t lived in the area since he was 18, he applied for and received an internship at the company in 2007. “It turned out to be great,” he said, so great that when he went back to school to finish his doctorate, Google Pittsburgh remained on his job-search radar.

Start here, go anywhere. If anyone embodies that phrase, it is D. Sculley ’93. Since graduating from the Academy, D. has taught computer science in Abu Dhabi, math in Venezuela, and history and English in Switzerland. He has helped the Perseus Digital Library develop algorithms for reading support and assisted Yahoo! and Google in optimizing online advertising. He holds three advanced degrees, one from Harvard, two from Tufts. Today, D. works at Google Pittsburgh, on the campus of Carnegie Mellon University, focusing on online advertising and user experience. The facility is a test site for Google’s high-speed broadband network, and its presence in this region was one of the reasons cited when Forbes Magazine named Pittsburgh the most livable city in the U.S. earlier this year.

Now in his second year as a full-time member of the Google team, D. explains that his official position is that of “a software engineer, like everyone else at the office.” There is no hierarchy at Google. In that respect, the company’s staffing resembles the landscape of the Internet. “It’s pretty flat,” D. explains as he leads me through a maze of workspaces where people seem to be spending more time consulting with one another than working alone at their computers.

People who know D., however, might cite his return as another thing that makes Pittsburgh special. Photography teacher James Wardrop ’57 remembers D. as a student “who liked to find new challenges and conquer them.” Sitting in his office in the Oliver Building, Wardrop recalls how D. once “built his own 4x5 camera and used it to produce Ansel Adams style negatives, which he then printed with Ansel Adams style skill.” To support the statement, Wardrop produces a few black-and-white prints that he still keeps on hand in the photography lab, spreading them out on his desk. “Such detail,” he says, pointing to one of D.’s prints. “Such range!”

“This is a place where figuring out what needs to be done is as important as getting it done,” D. says, and he credits his education at the Academy as a key source for such a skill. Computer science teacher Don Slater and AP physics teacher John Ball were two educators that D. cites as having had a strong influence on him at the Academy. Likewise, he says he learned a great deal from “the excellent English department” and took as many English classes as possible. “When I started doing research on machine learning, I found that being able to write was an incredible advantage.” In fields as complex as data mining and information retrieval, “it’s important to be able to describe what you do in a manner that people will understand.”

Former classmates recall D. as one of the founders (along with fellow members of the Class of 1993 Jonathan Glance, Jason Fincke, Jason Long, Brad Pasanek, and Greg Walters) of the Nerd Society of America (NSA), a comedy troupe that performed skits during morning announcements.

It is the Google facility itself, however, that suggests the biggest reason why D. is a perfect match for the company. Following him through the 20,000-square-foot office, I am continually surprised at the array of eccentric artifacts and paraphernalia that hang from walls, lean against cubicles, and sometimes even stand in the hallways. Around one corner I find a life-size cutout of Humphrey Bogart, around another stands a mannequin in a hula skirt, farther on lies a brightly colored playroom filled with toys, games, and comfy chairs. “Google provides daycare?” I ask. D. smiles. “No,” he says. “That’s for us.”

Joan Cucinotta, Senior School English teacher and senior class coordinator, recalls how D. and the NSA took over a graduation ceremony, interrupting a speech by the senior class president (who just happened to be NSA central-committee member Jason Fincke). As one of D.’s English teachers, I recall a gifted writer who, as part of an independent senior project, contacted the science fiction and fantasy writer John Alfred Taylor to request permission to edit and publish a critical edition of Taylor’s story that had originally appeared in Rod Serling’s Twilight Zone Magazine a few years earlier. The resulting book, John Alfred Taylor’s Hell is Murky, contained the authoritative text of Taylor’s story along with D.’s commentary, annotations, and a photographic portrait of the author. The book is still available through Amazon.

Clearly, the young man who distinguished himself at the Academy by playfully thinking outside of the box has found a home worthy of his talents and sensibilities. D. currently lives in Point Breeze with his wife Jessica and 1-year-old daughter Sofia. After over a decade of living and working in locations as far-flung as Abu Dhabi and Silicone Valley, D. and his family are now within an easy drive of his parents, who still reside in Sewickley. “Pittsburgh is a fantastic place to raise a family,” he says.

Clearly, D. is the kind of individual whose talents could easily have gone anywhere and stayed. Instead, D. has decided to bring his talents back to the region.

Start here, go anywhere. For D. Sculley, “anywhere” is right here.

In June, D. graciously invited me to join him at the Google offices to talk about his decision to return to Western Pennsylvania and his work at

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FAREWELLS BOB ELDRIDGE Bob Eldridge began his career at Sewickley Academy in 1985 and has contributed so much to the school both in and out of the classroom. As a U.S. history teacher, Bob has an uncanny ability to make history come alive for his students and has been incredibly successful in getting them to understand the vital connection between the Red Sox and national affairs. Bob has long known what it means to be part of a team, to be committed to the highest standards, and to work with colleagues in pursuit of a common goal, an approach he has shared with his fellow faculty at the Academy. His commitment to excellence drove Bob when he designed and taught the first AP U.S. history course. He helped set the standard for the work of students in history, consistently preparing them to think critically about the past and also to connect the past to the present in ways that illuminate the challenges we face as a nation today. Facing challenges is something that Bob has not shied away from, and as a leader on the faculty, Bob was instrumental in the founding of 3AC, working hard to create structures to support African-American students and send a powerful message about what kind of community we want to be. Lydia Roberts Valentine ‘93 comments, “With the formation of 3AC, Bob stepped into the middle of the tightly woven web that held us together. He made us stretch and grow, pushed us to challenge and to connect until we were as linked to the community and to him as we were to each other. … I asked him once why he’d done so much for us when I know it wasn’t easy. … He said he did it because it was the right thing to do. He did it because we needed it.”

As a U.S. history teacher, Bob Eldridge has an uncanny ability to make history come alive.

advisor for several years, facilitating prom fundraisers such as the haunted house and the fruit sale. At Bob’s retirement party, Senior School teacher Bill Barnes summarized, “This is a bittersweet event. It is bitter that you are leaving after all these years. It is sweet that you are leaving in good health and with the fullness of life ahead of you. Please know that you take with you the deep affection of your colleagues and students whose lives you have enriched.”

In his 25 years of service, Bob also coached baseball and basketball for many years, creating a reputation for excellence and a legacy of friendships with his players that endures to this day. He was junior class

FAMILIAR FACE IN A NEW PLACE: TOM SMART Although retiring from his Middle School classroom, Mr. Smart will transition this fall to a newly created role in the Academy’s Department of Support Services. He will provide full-time math support for Grades 4-9. This will enable him to consult with teachers during the day and provide remediation and enrichment math services for students individually or in small groups. Head of Middle School Susan Sour says, “Tom Smart has been an incredibly dedicated teacher. Unceasingly kind and caring, he is a great colleague to all Middle School teachers. He is excellent at communicating with parents about their children’s progress in math, and he always goes above and beyond in offering extra help to students who need it. These are personal qualities and skills that he will bring to this much-needed position of math support specialist. Our students are bound to benefit from his work with them this year.”

Tom Smart has taught Middle School math for the past 33 years. For the last 16 years, his focus has been specifically on Grade 7. Mr. Smart is highly regarded by students and parents for his calm presence, continuing patience, and organized style of presentation that support and encourage students to approach the study of mathematics in a step-by-step, logical manner. He has also served as a tutor for many students outside the classroom, providing both remedial and enrichment work as needed on a case-by-case basis. Additionally, Mr. Smart has served as the chair of the Middle School math department, the Grade 7 team leader, a Grade 7 advisor, the ERB test coordinator, and the coordinator of the Williamsburg trip each fall.

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RUSS WEBER He was especially helpful to new teachers at the Academy. Fellow Middle School teacher Lori Sherry shares, “Russ never made me feel stupid or like I was a failure, but would give wonderful advice on how to deal with an unruly boy or how to approach Mr. Heagy with my problems dealing with unruly boys.” Former colleague Ginny Haiges adds, “When I worked with Russ on the seventh grade English/history program, I deeply admired his organizational skills and his innate ability to appeal to his students, not to mention his command of the subject.” Russ was the consummate “professional” teacher. He never wore jeans on a jeans day and was never caught without his jacket and tie. When asked about his always-formal attire, he said that his mentor teacher Chuck Glarrow, during his first years at the Academy, said, “You set the tone for the class. Never take off your jacket. It sets you apart from your students and helps to garner their respect.” And that is exactly how his students and colleagues felt about him – they respected him. For Russ’s grace, dignity, professionalism, and hard work, his colleagues awarded him the Elizabeth Bishop Martin Award at the end of the 2009-2010 school year. This annual award honors a teacher at the Academy who has made a significant contribution to advancing the mission of the school. Accepting the award on Russ’s behalf, Head of Middle School Susan Sour stated, “Mr. Weber’s passion for American history, his deep concern for his students’ well-being, his devotion to the school through the years, his personal integrity, and his high standards are the legacy he leaves with more than three decades of students.”

Basketball coaches Ridge Diven and Russ Weber (right) in 1984.

In his 30 years at Sewickley Academy, Russ Weber has played many roles. In 1976, he started as a Lower School teacher. Then 12 years later, he transitioned into the Middle School as a history teacher and seventh grade coordinator. Throughout his career, he coached basketball and baseball for the Middle and Senior Schools for a total of 17 years. Russ’s colleagues give nothing but glowing reviews of him, describing him as the “go to” guy and “the voice of reason when things got crazy.”

Tom Smart and Brendan King ‘04 work together on a math assignment.

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REUNION 2010 PREVIEW SCHEDULE OF EVENTS (Subject to Change)

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1 All Reunion Celebration! Allegheny Country Club 6:30 PM

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2 Alumni brunch with former and current faculty Families welcome! Sewickley Academy 10:30-12:00 PM Campus Tours 12:00 PM Games Day Events Show your support for the Panthers!

REGISTRATION You can register for Reunion Weekend 2010 and check for updates by visiting www.sewickley.org/reunion. All RSVP’s must be received by September 24, 2010. Invitations, including a list of finalized activities, are forthcoming.

HOTEL RESERVATIONS A block of rooms has been reserved at the Courtyard Marriott in Coraopolis for Reunion Weekend. Mention “Sewickley Academy Reunion” before September 3 to receive a special rate of $69 per night (Friday and Saturday only).

CLASS PARTIES - SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2 Formal invitation from host to follow. Additional class parties (for years ending in 0 and 5) are in planning. 1960 Party at Sewickley Valley Historical Society (Old Sewickley Post Office) 1970, 1975, 1980 Party at Jim and Linda Edson’s Home 1985 Party at Natalie Renda Mueller’s Home

Girls’ Soccer vs. Montour Nichols Field 12:00 PM Field Hockey vs. Mt. Lebanon Wardrop Field 2:00 PM Boys’ Soccer vs. Quaker Valley Nichols Field 3:00 PM

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’55: Friends from the Class of 1955. ’60: Students from the Class of 1960 take time out of Mr. Heagy’s sixth grade class to pose for a picture. ’70: The Class of 1970 in eleventh grade.

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’75

’75: The Class of 1975’s eighth grade graduation. ’80: Students from the Class of 1980 pull their senior prank with the panther statue. ’85: The Class of 1985 in nursery school. ’90: Members of the Class of 1990 complete a craft with teacher Mary Nichols. ’95: Class of 1995 performs “Turnaround Tonight.” ’00: The Class of 2000 on an adventure at McKeever.

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‘05: The Class of 2005’s graduation.

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SEWICKLEY ACADEMY IN THE NEWS

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ON A WING & A PRAYER By: Tom Doyle ’81 On January 19, just a week after the devastating earthquake in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Dr. Tom Doyle ’81, alongside Pennsylvania Governor Ed Rendell and Congressman Jason Altmire, was part of the team that successfully airlifted 54 Haitian orphans to Pittsburgh for adoption. The rescue captured international attention. The following is Tom’s account of the rescue. At a secret meeting at China Palace in Wexford after the earthquake in Haiti, five critical elements were cobbled together into an unforgettable adventure that brought 54 endangered orphans from Port-au-Prince to Pittsburgh in January 2010.

We asked our Creole translator, Smana Pamphile, what the most important phrases would be. She replied simply: “‘Pa peur.’ It means don’t be afraid.” After circling Haiti for hours, Gov. Ed Rendell and U.S. Rep. Jason Altmire finally applied enough political clout to allow us to land. I heard that Bill and Hillary Clinton were pulling for us, too, and even the White House. Something finally worked, and we descended into the dark Caribbean night.

Dozens of private citizens and several prominent public officials eventually were required to put the pieces in place. We needed a privately funded plane, medical and rescue personnel, supplies, landing clearance into Haiti, and legal release of the orphans.

On the way down I could see a few lights and vehicles, but what struck me was the eerie glow of hundreds of small bonfires in the hills surrounding Port-au-Prince. The plane had to pull up suddenly, aborting the first landing attempt. After an unnerving tight loop and a brake-slamming landing, we parked between a gigantic military transport and a U.S. Navy Osprey.

Everyone brought a different piece of the puzzle to the table, and the next thing I knew I was headed to the airport with Dr. Jeb Blaugrund, a local ENT surgeon, and Dr. Michael Barton, a colleague at the Heritage Valley Sewickley Emergency Department. The mission had two goals: the rescue of the orphans and, what was arguably more crucial in terms of saving lives, the delivery of half a million dollars worth of medical supplies and Dr. Chip Lambert, a veteran disaster management physician, to help establish a hospital in Leogane, the hardest-hit area in Haiti.

On the tarmac, the jet and propeller noise was deafening. Knowing our time slot was limited, Jeb led us in forming a human bucket brigade to unload the supplies. Content that at least one crucial aspect of our mission had succeeded, we milled anxiously around the plane, drinking bottled water and snapping photos of the military planes, the damaged terminal, and the hundreds of refugees awaiting evacuation.

While loading the plane, there was some conflict between the two priorities. Our window of opportunity was There wasn’t enough room closing fast. All the children still On their flight back to the States, Dr. Tom Doyle ’81 holds Sam, a for both teams’ supplies, but hadn’t been cleared for release. 1-year-old Haitian orphan. the quick-thinking flight crew We heard that Ali and Jamie Mcfound the answer by removMutrie, the heroic young women ing two massive spare landing wheels from the cargo bay. who took care of the orphans, had been kicked out of the U.S. Embassy and were moments from driving back to the orphanage, ending In the air everyone maintained cheerful optimism in the face all hope of the kids leaving on our plane. of anxiety and uncertainty. While refueling in Miami, we heard that the U.S. consulate in Port-au-Prince had blocked the mission. Were we even going to be able to land in Haiti? Still not knowing, we took off over the ocean.

With less than half an hour left, I was asked to be part of a small team to drive to the embassy to help convince Ali and Jamie to allow the ones with clearance, about 47 of 54 children, to leave. Gov. Rendell thought that maybe if a doctor told them that delays could risk the lives of some of the children, it might convince them.

The medical team had no idea what to expect. How sick were the children? What would they need? How would we communicate with them?

I told my colleague Mike Barton what I was going to do, and he promised he wouldn’t leave Haiti without me. Jamie and Ali’s par-

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ents pulled me aside and asked me to check up on how well their daughters’ health was holding up under the circumstances. I assured them I’d look them over in addition to the kids.

“I’m not a politician, I’m just a regular guy you can trust.” I just told them that any child they put on that plane would live, and they couldn’t be sure of that if they stayed.

I hopped into a car with Dr. Alan Russell and Leslie McCombs, two of the principal organizers of the mission, and Pennsylvania first lady Midge Rendell. Our driver, Air Force Lt. Col. Randon Draper, pointed out the flattened U.N. compound and the devastated buildings en route to the embassy.

Something got through to them, because the next thing I know we were all headed back to the airport in a convoy – the bus, the van and a couple of cars. I heard Ali would fly home with us and Jamie would stay with the kids left behind. En route to the airport, the National Security Council gave the final word, “Clear them all.”

We found the children in a bus and a van, parked on the street After an 11-hour flight, the Haitian orphans arrive safely in Pittsburgh. outside the embassy compound. By the time we got to the airThe bus was like a rowdy classport, our plane had taken off room; the kids were singing and I expected to be the only songs and bouncing all around. The sicker children and several doctor on a later flight with 54 kids. But when we arrived, every sleeping babies were in the van. I asked the orphanage director, single volunteer had stayed behind. They weren’t leaving withMargaret, who the sickest child was, and she showed me the inout the children either. fant in her lap. “He’s been vomiting and has diarrhea. He won’t Singing and dancing broke out as we waited to get on a military drink anything,” she said. cargo plane. Luckily, my wife had convinced me that lollipops One touch to the forehead and I realized he had a fever. I also realized that I had very little with me that could help. My stethoscope was useless due to the street noise, and the only medicine I’d brought from the airport was a single dissolvable tablet of Zofran, an anti-nausea medication. Not knowing if the children were coming or staying, I gave Margaret the tablet and told her to use it if he kept vomiting. At that point, I also realized that I had left my passport and wallet on the plane. If I got stranded in Haiti, I’d have some explaining to do.

and toys were likely to be more useful than medical supplies, so I broke out the Dum-Dums and was swarmed. Dr. Madeline Simasek took the sickest baby and began intensive one-on-one care while the rest of the health care workers checked the other children. The last crisis hit as the doors were closing and we were about to take off. The head count was only 53, one short! Little 2-yearold Emma had fallen asleep inside the embassy and was somehow overlooked in the chaos. Jamie refused to leave without her and hopped off the plane to find her.

Jamie and Ali were exhausted but appeared healthy. I can’t begin to imagine the ordeal they had been through and the stress they were under. Jamie was understandably hysterical; Ali was calmer but clearly deferring to her older sister to make the final decision about the children.

For the next 11 hours or so we were all surrogate parents and babysitters. With a smattering of high-school French I was able to engage in rudimentary conversation with 10-year-old Lora, who drew me a picture from a coloring book which I will treasure forever. She wrote, “Tom Doyle, MD. I love you, Lora.”

Jamie was screaming that they had been lied to (true), and that in her heart she knew the right thing to do was to take all of the kids or none of them. They were her family and she wasn’t leaving a single one behind. “In a week, America will forget all about us and the ones left here will be stuck forever!” she cried. As Mrs. Rendell and Ms. McCombs went inside to negotiate with the embassy staff, Alan, Col. Draper, and I did our best to talk Ali and Jamie into coming to the airport. Col. Draper offered to adopt a baby on the spot, and I could tell he meant it. Alan told them,

Ten-year-old Lora’s drawing for Dr. Tom Doyle.

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open-air clinic serving hundreds of patients daily. My experiences ranged from nerve-wracking (surgically draining a throat abscess which would have been fatal if left untreated) to quirky (showing a man how to get a rock out of his baby daughter’s nose by blowing into her mouth).

the military is used to crushed pretzels, crayons, and Juicy Juice spread through its cargo holds. Everyone nurtured a baby. Mrs. Rendell was particularly maternally adept, but we all pitched in with bottles and diaper changes, feeding and games. By the time we landed in Pittsburgh we were all in love.

The devastation was, and remains, profound. While the efforts of relief personnel are yielding great results, the problem is overwhelming and ongoing. The main message I would like to convey is that this issue is not going away. Haiti will need years of humanitarian support just to get back to where it was before the earthquake. My hope is that we will not forsake them merely because the suffering is no longer headline news.

The last I saw Lora and Sam they were being whisked away on a bus toward Children’s Hospital, their lives changed forever. Mine, too. Update: In late February I returned to Haiti for an eight-day medical relief mission in Leogane. Medical personnel from all over the country came together to staff a mobile hospital and an

SEWICKLEY ACADEMY SUPPORTS HAITI All members of the Sewickley Academy community – students, faculty and staff, parents, alumni, and families – pulled together in many different ways to support the earthquake relief efforts in Haiti. In just a month after the earthquake, the Academy community raised and donated $5,238 to help rebuild Haiti and bring relief to the country’s people. •

An all school jeans day raised $2,241, which was donated to World Vision International – an organization that the Academy partners with as part of its service learning program.

• The Senior and Middle Schools raised an additional $220 in donations for World Vision.

Mackenzie Pryor ’14 and Sydney Joseph ’14 prepare for Hotcakes for Haiti, a community pancake dinner that raised $2,020 to support earthquake relief efforts.

• The Lower School hosted a hot chocolate and cookie sale that raised $757, which was donated to Doctors Without Borders and Save the Children. • Hotcakes for Haiti – a community pancake dinner hosted at the Academy in late February – raised $2,020 for World Vision. Our community’s quick and compassionate response during such an intense time of devastation demonstrates our school’s commitment to helping those in need and supporting people and places beyond our own borders.

In the morning drop-off line, Teddy McClain ’17 and Cole Stine ’17 promote the hot chocolate and cookie sale.

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ALUMNI GATHERINGS

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1. This April, alumni gathered at the home of Althea (Standish) Kaemmer ’77 to catch up with fellow classmates and hear the latest Sewickley Academy news. Left to right: Candy (Kappel) Bolte ’77, George “Josh” Gould, Jr. ’77, Carolyn Gould, Mark Buckley ’77, Peggy Buckley, Anne Standish, Peter Standish ’79, Althea (Standish) Kaemmer ’77, Peter Doyle ’78, and David Kaemmer.

3. On April 29, alumni in the D.C. area gathered for an informal networking reception hosted by Bob James ’85. The event included a brief presentation by Garrett Graff, editor-at-large of Washingtonian magazine. Left to right: Onil Mistry, Head of School Kolia O’Connor, Jason deChambeau ’88, Shilpa (Shah) Mistry ’00, Natasha Lopez, Bob James ’85, Garrett Graff, and Martha Prine ’75.

2. Jennifer Markus ’89, Kirsten ’89 and Edward Stripay, and Academy parents Deanna and Mark Clouse enjoy the 23rd Annual Auction, Jazz in the Park.

4. As the newest Academy alumni, Dan Petricca ’10, Ellie Lehman ’10, and Rayven Davè ’10 enjoy lunch at the Alumni Council luncheon on June 11.

WE L C O M I N G A N E W A L U M N I COUNCIL PRESIDENT After two years of dedicated service, the Alumni Council bids farewell to outgoing President Suzanne Genter Friday ’76 and recognizes her tireless efforts as the leader of the entire Sewickley Academy alumni community. Throughout her term, Suzanne worked to increase alumni involvement in Sewickley Academy activities and motivate her fellow alumni to reconnect with the school in different ways. Her continual support of the Academy and its students has been greatly appreciated and she has paved the way for her successor, Amy Muse Lang ’80. Amy graduated in 1980 as an Academy lifer. Her brothers, Chip ’83 and Jay ’85, are also Academy alums. After graduating, Amy went on to receive her Bachelor of Arts in sociology from the University of Vermont in 1984. She is currently a signing agent/notary for titling companies in the area. Upon her return to Sewickley in 1998, Amy got right back into the SA groove and has been involved with the Academy and the community in many different capacities. In addition to serving on the board of the Home & School Association, Amy has also volunteered for the Fund for Sewickley Academy, and is a member of the Sewickley Civic Garden Council and the Garden Club of Allegheny County. Her sons, Griffin ’12 and Lucas ’17, are both current students at the Academy. Amy is looking forward to “effectively engaging Academy alumni, so they ultimately feel connected to one another and to the school.” The Alumni Council will reconvene in September with Amy at the helm and, under her supervision, will continue to work to support Academy alumni and find new ways for alumni to reconnect with the school.

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S TA RT HERE, G O A N YWHERE The Class of 2010 will attend 54 different colleges and universities, from California and Canada to London and Texas. Nearly 70% are venturing out of state or country. Ninety-six percent of seniors were admitted to a college they ranked as a top choice, and the class was offered more than $4.5 million in college merit scholarship money.

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The Class of 2010 will attend the following institutions: Adrian College Alfred University Allegheny College (2) Boston University (3) Brown University (2) Bucknell University (2) Carnegie Mellon University (3) Case Western Reserve University Colgate University (3) Columbia University (2) Davidson College Dickinson College Drexel University Duke University Duquesne University (2) Elon University Georgetown University (2) Goucher College Harvard University (2) Heidelberg College Kalamazoo College King’s College London (United Kingdom) Lafayette College Lake Forest College Loyola University, Maryland Maryland Institute College of Art McGill University (Canada) Miami University, Ohio Ohio Wesleyan University (2) Pacific Lutheran University

Pennsylvania State University, Erie: The Behrend College Pennsylvania State University, University Park (3) Pepperdine University Roanoke College Roger Williams University Skidmore College (2) Southern Methodist University The Catholic University of America The George Washington University Tufts University University of Colorado at Boulder University of Notre Dame (2) University of Pennsylvania (2) University of Pittsburgh (2) University of Pittsburgh, Honors College (2) University of Richmond (3) University of Rochester University of South Carolina Vanderbilt University Villanova University (2) Wake Forest University Washington and Lee University (2) Washington University in St. Louis Wittenberg University

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3 1: Alumni parents celebrate with their children at the Class of 2010’s graduation. Left to right: Jennifer Clement Morin ’86 and Lauren Clement ’10, Katherine Walker Bantleon ’78 and Lyssa Bantleon ’10, Mollie Fitzgerald ’81 and Abby Larsen ’10, Jeffrey Lenchner ’77 and Aaron Lenchner ’10, Malcolm Nimick ’81 and Mac Nimick ’10, Sean Behun ’78 and Connor Behun ’10. 2: The Class of 2010’s Kathleen Yakulis, Brendan Yakulis, Chris Weir, and Julie Uptegraff line up in the procession before the ceremony begins. 3: At the Graduation Tea, seniors Alexa Harper, Renèe Motley, Aimee Fadden, and Ekaterina Grebenyuk gather for a photo.


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The Class of 2010.

Joseph Ahearn Colgate University Michael Arriaga University of Pennsylvania Ian Bangor Carnegie Mellon University Elizabeth Bantleon The George Washington University Connor Behun Roanoke College David Bonomo Brown University Justine Cady Maryland Institute College of Art Robert Carbeau Allegheny College Jordan Chang Wake Forest University Sung Keun Chey Brown University Lauren Clement King’s College London Clay Colonna Boston University James Compliment Ohio Wesleyan University Christina Cribari University of Richmond Rayven Davé Loyola University, Maryland Evan Davis Georgetown University Nicole Dianzumba Ohio Wesleyan University Salil Doshi Georgetown University Thomas Droney Davidson College Aimee Fadden Lake Forest College Brian Ferri Carnegie Mellon University

Stephen Gill University of Pittsburgh Christina Giusti Washington University in St. Louis Maria Gonzalez Skidmore College Aliza Gordon Tufts University Ekaterina Grebenyuk McGill University Marielle Hampe University of Notre Dame Christina Hapanowicz Duquesne University Alexa Harper Duquesne University Larissa Holley Pacific Lutheran University Katelyn Hough Heidelberg College Ross Houston Lafayette College John Howes Colgate University Zoha Imam Case Western Reserve University Emma Jordan University of Richmond Rachel Kaye Villanova University Meredith Kendall Villanova University Byunghyo Koh University of Rochester Krista Kohler Columbia University Susan Larsen Duke University David Lasorda Pepperdine University Eleanor Lehman Goucher College

Aaron Lenchner Boston University Adara Maroon Vanderbilt University Eleanore Marsh Southern Methodist University Conor McKenna Pennsylvania State University, Erie (Behrend) Katelin Meakem Harvard University Elizabeth Miller Miami University, Oxford Renée Motley Harvard University Arsen Nikiforouk Drexel University Malcolm Nimick University of Richmond John Nocita Kalamazoo College Walter Nogay University of Notre Dame Jeffrey Oliver Smith Elon University Jonathan Palmer Wittenberg University Maxwell Pawk Dickinson College Calder Pegden Roger Williams University Daniel Petricca Skidmore College Elizabeth Price Alfred University Owen Proctor Allegheny College Jonathan Quinn University of Pittsburgh Karl Rosario University of Pennsylvania

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Casey Ross Columbia University Madison Sabo University of Colorado at Boulder Alexandra Sanzo Pennsylvania State University, University Park Peter Schramm The Catholic University of America Anita Shah Boston University Zabriawn Smith Washington and Lee University Madalyn Sproull University of Pittsburgh, Honors College Julia Tehovnik Adrian College Kareem Termanini University of Pittsburgh, Honors College Michael Tully Pennsylvania State University, University Park Julie Uptegraff Bucknell University Christopher Weir Colgate University Brendan Yakulis Bucknell University Kathleen Yakulis Washington and Lee University Kristin Zernich University of South Carolina Mark Zindren Pennsylvania State University, University Park Chloe Zomnir Carnegie Mellon University


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CLASS NOTES 1934 Marian Edwards Mukerji ’34 is presently awaiting the arrival of her 12th greatgrandchild.

1936 Marjorie Jump ’36 writes that she is “still enjoying life at 91 years old!”

1954 Stephanie Culbertson Kerns ’54 married John H. Woolard on November 28, 2009. The couple lives on the Outer Banks in “an old Nags Header just over the sand dunes.” Stephanie writes, “It is so wonderful to wake up and see the waves from our bedroom and watch the moon come up from our porch overlooking the ocean. It is truly a Carolina moon.”

1959 Lewis “Lew” Favorite ’59 writes, “My lady, Teri, and I are now in Arizona in a small town just south of Sedona. I work at the Hilton Sedona Resort and Spa as a massage therapist. Teri and I also have a private business,

1975 Favorite Starr Massage Therapy and Bodywork, in Cottonwood. This is my retirement vocation and I love the work. I just wish I had found it many years ago. Most of what we do is combination work using several styles of massage and combining it with energy work. I also have a private practice at my home in Cottonwood. Saw the class picture from the 50th reunion and was delighted to see so many faces I could still recognize. Good to see all of you again.”

1969 Niland Mortimer ’69 is enjoying living and working in the Bay Area, teaching at Stanford and the University of San Francisco, and serving as a partner and chief marketing officer for a Berkeley-based social media marketing firm. His youngest son Adam is a sophomore at Bowdoin College; middle son Sam graduated from NYU last year and will be going to New England Law School in the fall; and oldest son David is completing his doctorate at Columbia and is teaching math and science at the Bank Street School in Manhattan.

Newlyweds Stephanie Culbertson Kerns ’54 and John Woolard with their family at the November 2009 ceremony.

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John MacDonald ’75 recently published a novel for middle-school-aged readers titled Pachunga. It is a fantasy set in Africa and is available on Amazon.com, BarnesandNoble. com, and a host of other booksellers. “The initial reviews have been very positive, which is encouraging!” John also defended his doctoral dissertation in June 2010. In addition to his teaching responsibilities and oversight of the Stanway Institute at Trinity School for Ministry, he has been named chair of the pastoral studies department. His daughter, Parry ‘06, just graduated from Wheaton College and will be starting a doctorate in Entomology at University of California, Riverside, in the fall.

1976 Molly Amsler ’76 recently reopened The Two Sisters Art Gallery in Sewickley and put on a show, Bridges to the Neighborhood Community Collaboration, with two fellow Sewickley Academy alumni, Anna Singer ’76 and Andrew Nimick ’78. Molly, owner of House of Two Sisters, values and supports community collaboration. She asked Anna, world

Lew Favorite ’59 and his wife, Teri Starr, at the Grand Canyon.


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IN YOUR WILDEST DREAMS

renowned opera singer and WQED music programmer and mid-day host, to curate a one man show featuring the art of Ned Wert. Anna, who is a long-time fan of Ned Wert’s work, selected a grouping of his newest, most dynamic acrylic paintings on canvas and paper. “It’s a meeting of the minds, a celebration of the arts, and a colossal collaboration between two outstanding talents from Western Pennsylvania,” says Molly. Molly will donate partial proceeds of the show to benefit Global NIM, an organization founded and managed by Andrew Nimick. House of Two Sisters is located at 432 Beaver Street in Sewickley. The gallery is open Tuesday-Saturday from 11-5. For info, call 412-805-6659.

1978 Andrew Nimick ’78 took a somewhat spontaneous spring break trip to Haiti in mid-March. Not long after arriving at Port-au-Prince, he found himself with few and dear friends, Pastor Ezena and his family, along with 20 orphaned children all living under several tarps and sheets just a block or two from the now destroyed Presidential Palace. The joy shared

During Sewickley Academy’s traditional freshman trip to Linsly Outdoor Center, students write themselves a letter to be opened four years later. A few months ago, Carolyn Devens ’05 found her letter from 2002, and the dreams she put on paper as a 15-year-old have come true in the last several years. She wrote, “My dream is to become an environmental person … ultimately helping to keep animals off of the endangered species list.” Carolyn has packed a lifetime of Carolyn Devens ’05 with a young cheetah experiences into the last year. Just at the Tshukudu Game Lodge in Hoedfive weeks after graduating from spruit, South Africa. Franklin & Marshall College, she traveled to South Africa for an internship with the Global White Lion Protection Trust. Her home for the next month was a tin shack in the middle of a 700-hectare plot of land, a reserve near the town of Hoedspruit, about 100 kilometers from Kruger National Park. Meals were prepared in the bush kitchen, and daily encounters with zebra, buffalo, and other wild game became the norm. Carolyn and the other interns were part of a scientific field monitoring team, using GPS telemetry to locate the lions and record physical observations at 6:00 AM and 3:30 PM. Her last day at the Trust would prove to be most memorable as a family of five lions approached the interns’ Land Cruiser late in the day. The group watched as the cubs played with one another and mimicked their parents’ gestures. For the next three months, Carolyn volunteered with the African Dream Horse Safari on a big five game reserve in Hoedspruit. Part of the week was spent in the bush where she performed a range of conservation work including the installation of drainage trenches, animal tracking, and clearing brush. Other days Carolyn worked as a stable manager and taught local children to ride, but the most fulfilling experience with the Safari was the weekly outreach program for local orphans. The trail rides Carolyn led brought daily observations of rhinos, giraffes, and warthogs. Now back in the states, Carolyn will soon venture off to graduate school in England to study at the Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology through the University of Kent. She says that Sewickley Academy helped prepare her for her adventures by instilling a love of other cultures and travel. As an Academy student, she traveled to Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and Liechtenstein. From Dr. Barnes’ AP European history course to Mr. Wardrop’s photography classes, Carolyn talks with passion and appreciation as she remembers the foundation that has served as a springboard for her dreams.

Timmy MacDonald ’11, Alec MacDonald, and Parry MacDonald ’06, children of John ’75 and Gail MacDonald.

To see photos and read more about Carolyn’s adventures, please visit http://travelstimbavati.blogspot.com

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CLASS NOTES 1984 was instantly tangible as Andrew pulled clothing, shoes, toys, and treats from his bags. The place known as Champs de Mars has become “home” for many thousands of Haitians, but for Ezena & Co., the shelter was temporary because Andrew’s 6-year-old organization, Global Network of Independent Missions, Inc. (www.globalnim.org), helped to relocate them to the rural village of Les Anglais and is now in the process of helping rebuild the orphanage and school. If you have any interest in participating in this endeavor, please send an email to Andrew at globalnim@cox.net. He would love to hear from you. (You can also read about his recent trip experience at www. globalnim-haiti.blogspot.com.)

1983 Latonya Pettus Lucas’ (’83) son, Garrett Hicks ’12, was recently accepted to the National Youth Leadership Forum on Medicine. The forum will be held in Boston, Massachusetts, at Bentley University in July 2010. Latonya, her parents, and her brother Eric Pettus ’84 are all excited and extremely

proud of Garrett. Latonya wrote, “Though he is no longer attending SA, we know that the education he obtained at SA helped make this possible.” David Bonnett ’83 and his family have traded the mountains of Colorado for the beaches (and mountains) of the South Island of New Zealand. “My wife, 9-year-old daughter, and I moved to Nelson in 2008 and are happily becoming Kiwis. We love the hiking, biking, sailing, and lack of ice on the roads, but do miss powder skiing and the Crested Butte Fourth of July parade. After about 18 months on sabbatical, I am setting up a new software and consulting company. I have also become involved in search and rescue, which is a great way to see the wilder parts of this country, although often at night or in the rain. My wife is working as a research chemist for a local scientific institute, and our daughter has gone a bit horse-mad and rides as often as she can. We love having visitors, so any SA alums are encouraged to drop us a note if you are coming to New Zealand.” You can reach David at hdbonnett@gmail.com.

Heather Semple ’78 and Andrew Nimick ’78 reminisce this past spring.

Kym (Stephan) Rambo ’84 started a private jet charter company. To learn more, visit www. independentjets.com. Eric Pettus ’84 writes, “Things have been going great in South Florida. On March 18, 2010, Pettus & Dawkins Financial Group was recognized by the Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce as the Small Business of the Year. We have continued our expansion by opening a branch office in Baltimore, Maryland, as well as becoming licensed in Pennsylvania, Georgia, and Tennessee. My youngest, Ciana, is now 13, and my oldest, Cierra, is 18.”

1985 Craig Senovich ’85 and his wife Suzan welcomed their daughter, Sophia Maria Senovich, into the world on January 8, 2010.

1986 Wil Tolentino ’86 has been living in West Virginia for the past 15 years with his wife Diana and 5-year-old daughter Persephone. He works as a physician’s assistant specializing in pain management and still paints when time permits.

David Bonnett ’83, daughter Fiona, and wife Anne Cargill at Fiona’s first riding competition in New Zealand.

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1988 assignment for her husband’s work. She writes that they are very thankful for the experience to travel and explore together as a family. They moved to Sewickley just before leaving for the U.K. and are returning home late summer.

George Long ’88 was recently promoted to chief governance counsel and corporate secretary at PNC Financial in Pittsburgh, with responsibility for corporate governance, compensation, and shareholder issues throughout the company. George writes, “I had a chance to visit the Academy recently, and it looks fantastic. But with all the changes, it now feels like I graduated in the 1950s!” John Fincke ’88 and his wife, Beth, had a daughter, Quinn, on January 26, 2010. “She has been a great joy!” This year, Ben Guzzle ’88 and family celebrated Ben’s 40th birthday together in Tampa, Florida.

1989 At the Hofbrauhaus in Pittsburgh, Amy Symons Hughes ’89, Larry Hall, Scott Fernsler ’91, and David Street ’93 had a great time cheering for Germany in the World Cup semifinals. Sadly Germany lost, but they all still enjoyed themselves.

David Street ‘93, Larry Hall, Scott Fernsler ‘91, and Amy Symons Hughes ‘89 cheer on Germany in the World Cup semifinals.

1990

Kimberley Stuart Disque ’91 writes, “It’s been ages since I wrote in so thought I would send a quick update. Maxime Stuart Disque was born in December of 2008. Chris and I like to think that our Max was the reason the Penguins won the Stanley cup last year. His big sister, Evie, is now 4 and has been having fun in her new role. We have a fun summer ahead of us and both kids can’t wait to see Aunt Jess (Jessica Stuart ’94) at the beach in a couple of weeks.”

Claire Lang ’90 recently relocated to Philadelphia from Washington, D.C., and is now working at the Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital at the University of Pennsylvania in emergency service.

Jennifer Iserloh ’91 released her first cookbook, Secrets of a Skinny Chef, in March 2010. Check it out at www.secretsofaskinnychef. com.

1991

1992

Michelle Helena (Cokrlic) Denk ’91 and her family are living in London during a temporary

Ben Guzzle ’88, wife Wendy, and their two children celebrate Ben’s 40th birthday.

Alex Ball ’92 recently appeared on the network television programs, Cougar Town and All My Children.

Michelle Denk ’91 and family in London.

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PUTTING IT IN PERSPECTIVE

Tommy Kehoe ‘04 (right) plays for the Chicago Machine, a pro lacrosse team.

2010

Tommy Kehoe ’04 is known around the globe as a star lacrosse player. He received numerous and prestigious awards while playing at Sewickley Academy and Gettysburg College (All-American, Player of the Year) and went on to be drafted by a pro lacrosse team, the Chicago Machine. He was also selected and qualified to play for the South Korean team in the World Games this summer. He never thought he would reach this level of play when he picked up a lacrosse stick for the first time in sixth grade.

But Tommy has also been putting this all in perspective. Winning awards means something different to him today than it did just a few years ago. He credits all of his individual success to his teammates and says he would give up any award 100 times over if he could just replay the national championship game in his senior year at Gettysburg – one in which the team unfortunately fell short of their ultimate goal. He is proud of the awards, but he also recognizes that with or without the awards, he is the same player and person – a guy who is currently thinking about his future and where his life will take him. The bio on his Twitter page reads, “I’ll always love where I came from, but I’m always curious as to where I’m going next...” He wrote these words upon leaving his most recent job as a writer with Inside Lacrosse. “‘I love where I came from’ basically references my intense passion for Pittsburgh and our sports teams,” explains Kehoe who recently moved home from Baltimore. “I love this city, I love my old friends from SA and I love everything about being home in this area.”

Kristen Ropp ’92 is thrilled to announce the latest addition to her family. She and her husband Chris welcomed Daniel John on December 7, 2009. Danny joins his very proud big brother Henry, who is 4 years old. Kristen is working as the vice president and general manager of U.S. Bank Arena and the Cincinnati Cyclones of the ECHL Hockey League. She was recently voted the Executive of the Year for the entire ECHL.

1993 Amie Rose Rotruck’s ’93 second book for children will be released September 14, 2010. Young Wizards Handbook: How to Trap a Zombie, Track a Vampire, and Other Hands-On Activities for Monster Hunters is a middle-grade activity/craft/recipe book with information about all sorts of monsters. It’s being published by Mirrorstone, which also published Amie’s first book, Bronze Dragon Codex (as R.D. Henham) in 2008. Whitney Wells Rubenstein ’93 and her husband, Todd, welcomed the birth of their third son in October. Keegan Todd Ruben-

As the self prescribed “poster child” for liberal arts education, he has not committed to any one direction yet, but he has a passion for travel. His Sewickley Academy “network of awesomeness” helped him land an internship in South Korea in the summer of 2008, which further inspired his love of travel and connected him to the South Korean team. “I am the kind of person,” he writes, “that wakes up one place and then works my hardest to ensure I fall asleep somewhere different.”

Henry Ropp with new brother Daniel John, sons of Kristen ‘92 and Chris Ropp.

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communications firm focused on high-tech companies called VSC Consulting and AppLaunchPR. He has also continued his love of music by touring across the country with his band BlackMahal. Vijay is also the founder and chairman of Project Ahimsa, a global effort to empower youth through music. Project Ahimsa has delivered over 80 music education grants to schools in 14 countries since 2001. Gavin, Keegan, and Owen Rubenstein, children of Todd and Whitney Wells Rubenstein ’93.

Alden LaPointe, son of Dalene (Varney) LaPointe ’95.

stein joined his two big brothers, Owen (7) and Gavin (3). Whitney took a year off from teaching, but will return to her fourth grade classroom for the next school year. The Rubensteins are residing in Aurora, Colorado.

Lindsay B. (Guttshall) Jackson ’95, husband Brian, and daughter Alice welcomed the arrival of Anne Best Jackson on August 28, 2009, a mere two weeks after they moved into their first house in University Park, Maryland. Lindsay is an attorney in Alston & Bird, LLP’s Washington, D.C. office, specializing in tax and employee benefits.

1995 Dalene (Varney) LaPointe ’95 welcomed her new son, Alden Baker LaPointe, on July 4, 2009.

Vijay Chattha ’95 lives in Marin, California, with his wife, Archana, and two children, Amrik (3) and Taj (8 months). Vijay runs a

Anne and Alice Jackson, children of Lindsay (Guttshall) ’95 and Brian Jackson.

Alison Breeden ’95 was promoted to the rank of major in the U.S. Air Force, then separated active duty and joined the U.S. Air Force Reserves.

1996 Kristel Folcik ’96 is currently working as a benefits retirement analyst for a national recruiting company, SFN Group, Inc. SFN Group is ranked No. 7 of the largest direct hire staffing firms in the U.S. and has approximately 600 locations nationwide. Kristel works in the corporate human resources department, located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. She graduated from Ohio University in 2000 with a Bachelor of Science in organizational commu-

Archana and Vijay Chattha ’95 with children Taj and Amrik.

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CLASS NOTES nication and a minor in business and human resource management. She is also a member of the National Association of Professional Women. Kristel is now working on starting her own online business doing resumes and offering job assistance and tips. Natalie Gielata Friel ’96 and her husband, Jamey, are proud to announce the birth of their son, Sebastian Richard Friel, on March 21, 2010. Natalie writes, “He was a big boy at 9 pounds, 9 ounces, and has been very happy and easygoing.” Natalie returned to work at the end of June and is still working for Genentech as a shift manager at one of its biologics manufacturing facilities in northern San Diego County.

1997 Alice (Stein) Briggs ’97 and her husband, Lash, welcomed their baby boy, Burton, into this world on December 26, 2009. Amy Eger Rice ’97, husband Jason, and 2-year-old son Brody, welcomed Trevor Tate Rice on December 10, 2009. Amy and Jason reside in Jacksonville, Florida.

Sebastian Friel, son of Natalie ’96 and Jamey Friel.

living in Scottsdale, Arizona, and enjoying the amazing winter/spring weather we are having right now. Are there any other SA alums out here?” Ryan Heddleston ’98 and his wife welcomed their daughter Emma Elizabeth Heddleston on April 9, 2010, in Dallas, Texas. She was 7 pounds, 8 ounces, and 21 inches long.

1999 Brody and Trevor Rice, sons of Amy Eger Rice ’97 and husband Jason.

1998 Andrew “Drew” Leety ’98 finally decided to take root in D.C., and purchased a condo in March. “I’m still contracting to the federal government, and still enjoying it. Life is busy but great!”

James “Jim” Leety ’99 graduated from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law on May 14, 2010. Alexis Beattie ’99 recently graduated from the Yale School of Public Health with a Master of Public Health in health policy and administration. She looks forward to returning to Philadelphia to complete her fourth year of medical school at Jefferson Medical College.

Stephanie (Madey) Morton ’98 writes, “Hi everyone! What a great new tool the Alumni Portal is for all of us. I am looking forward to reconnecting with classmates and friends here soon. My husband Peter and I are still

2000

Burton Briggs, son of Alice (Stein) ’97 and Lash Briggs.

Emma Heddleston, daughter of Ryan ’98 and Ashley Heddleston.

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Emily Bunce ’00 will begin her residency this fall at Brigham & Women’s Hospital in Boston for obstetrics and gynecology.


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Andrew Coleman ’01 was recently engaged to Sewickley Academy alumna, Kendall Thornburgh ’03. Andrew proposed to Kendall on the steps of Sewickley Academy’s Lower School in March 2010. Plans are being made for a 2011 wedding.

2002

Nick Smyth ’01 joins the U.S. Treasury Department as a policy analyst.

2001 Nick Smyth ’01 joined the United States Treasury Department as a policy analyst in January. “I’ve been working on the team that is helping Congress design new consumer protection laws for credit cards, mortgages, and other consumer financial products. Ever since Dr. Barnes got me involved in the mock election and debates for the 2000 election, I’ve wanted to work on public policy in a progressive administration. I feel so grateful to work with the brilliant and selfless people who President Obama attracted to public service.”

Ben Harris ’02 moved back to Pittsburgh in early June after graduating from Duke Medical School on May 15. He will spend his first year training at West Penn Hospital System as a general medical intern before beginning his residency in radiology at Allegheny General Hospital. Ben’s ultimate career goal is to work as a neuroradiologist in a private hospital system where he can divide his time among teaching residents, small research projects, and clinical radiology. Divya Kaushik ’02 graduated from the George Washington University School of Medicine on May 16, 2010. “I am moving from D.C. to New York City to start my residency training in internal medicine at Albert Einstein/Montefiore Medical Center. I am excited to start the next step in my career and would love to catch up with any Sewickley alumni in New York.”

Maureen Kennedy ’02 and her new husband, Ryan Macel, at their April 2010 wedding.

Amy Aloe ’02 graduated from the Graduate School of Public Health at the University of Pittsburgh, earning her master’s in human genetics/genetic counseling. “I hope to find a job as a genetic counselor in the next few months!” On April 24, 2010, Maureen Kennedy ‘02 married Ryan Macel at St. Bernard Catholic Church in Mt. Lebanon, Pennsylvania. Maureen, a Franklin & Marshall College graduate, is a research assistant at KIT Solutions. Ryan, a Pennsylvania State University graduate, is an electrical engineer at Philips Respironics. The couple resides in Shaler, Pennsylvania. Stacy Kehoe ’02 graduated from New York University with a major in political economic theory and education reform. She returned to Pittsburgh to complete a Coro Fellowship in public affairs in 2009 and then returned to New York to manage enrichment programming for a public high school in Brooklyn.

2003 Leslie Frey ’03 received her juris doctorate from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law in May 2010.

Leslie Frey ’03 with her parents, Mark Frey and Diane Sabo, and her brother, Ian Frey ’08, at Leslie’s graduation from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law.

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CLASS NOTES 2005 Sally Smyth ’03 is currently living in the sunny Mission District of San Francisco, which she loves because she has a relatively flat bike ride to work everyday. Since graduation from Wesleyan University in 2007, Sally has been an analyst for the Center for Effective Philanthropy where she helps philanthropic funders evaluate their work through gathering feedback from various types of stakeholders. Sally is also a burgeoning urban farmer, and hopes to next use her evaluation skills to do research and advocacy in the food and agriculture policy world. After completing a master’s degree in history at the University of Virginia in 2008, David Flaherty ’03 is continuing work toward a doctorate with a focus in colonial American history. David writes, “I’m preparing to begin research on my dissertation, which will look at the ways in which the British government attempted to oversee the colonies from London.” He received month-long research fellowships to look at British government documents at the Huntington Library in Pasadena, California, and the Lewis Walpole Library in Farmington, Connecticut, and will be traveling there this fall before returning to Charlottesville, Virginia, in the winter.

At Allegheny College, George Raftis ’05 finished his collegiate basketball career as the fifth all-time leading scorer and second all-time rebounder.

George Raftis ’05 graduated from Allegheny College with a Bachelor of Arts in economics. He finished his collegiate basketball career as the fifth all-time leading scorer and second all-time rebounder in school history. He was named to the All-North Coast Athletic Conference first team for the second year in a row and the National Association of Basketball Coaches 2010 Great Lakes Region second team. He also received the Career Achievement Award that is given to the studentathlete who had the greatest impact on the climate of Allegheny College athletics.

2006 David Bevevino ’06 writes, “My senior year at Carolina has been a whirlwind of big challenges, exciting opportunities, and great memories. After being involved in campus leadership through the Roosevelt Institute, a national student public policy organization, and then student government, I had the opportunity to serve as the Roosevelt Institute’s vice president for policy research while also serving as the vice president of the student body. At the Roosevelt Institute, I had the chance to oversee eight policy research

centers that focused on topics ranging from women’s affairs to educational policy to foreign policy and international relations. Our chapter received the Most Outstanding Chapter of the Year Award at the Roosevelt Institute’s national conference.” David was also appointed as an undergraduate representative to the Academic Plan Steering Committee that will write a new vision for the University’s academic mission for the next five to seven years. When the steering committee began discussing its need for staff research and communication support, he jumped at the chance to work on this exciting project and began his new job on May 24. Brittany Urick ’06 graduated Phi Beta Kappa and magna cum laude from Princeton University in June 2010. Named as an alternate Fulbright Scholarship awardee, Brittany received a Woodrow Wilson School Prize for her senior thesis and a Quin Morton Prize for her freshman writing seminar paper. During the summer of 2009, Brittany lived in Togo, West Africa, where she worked in a branch United Nations office, and later lived and conducted research for her thesis in Rwanda. Brittany is moving to New York City where

Alex Benestelli ’06 with his mother Adrienne Kenney (right) and former Governor of New Jersey Christine Todd Whitman (left) after a recent performance.

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HAVE YOU LOGGED ONTO THE ALUMNI PORTAL YET? she will begin working as an analyst with an international law firm. Alex Benestelli ‘06 recently graduated from Westminster Choir College with his Bachelor of Music in organ and sacred music. With the Westminster Symphonic Choir this past semester, Alex performed choral works of Beethoven and Mahler with the Orchestra of St. Luke’s and the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Sir Roger Norrington and Michael Tilson Thomas. His performance was featured in a live broadcast from Carnegie Hall on New York City’s WQXR FM, and praised by the New York Times for its “majestic sound.” He plans to move to Los Angeles this August where he will enroll in the Master of Music program in choral music at the University of Southern California’s Thornton School of Music.

Hundreds of your former classmates have already logged on to update their contact information, share news about their lives, and network with one another. Use the username and password information we sent you in February to login to your own personal and class pages. Your fellow alumni are eager to hear from you! If you have questions about your username and password, please contact the Office of Alumni Relations at alumni@ sewickley.org or 412-741-2230 ext. 3044.

THROUGH THE NEW PASSWORD-PROTECTED ALUMNI PORTAL, YOU ARE ABLE TO: UPDATE

2008

• Maintain and update your secure personal information

Vaughn Wallace ’08 writes, “I’ve been pretty busy this semester. At the end of March, I spent nine days in and around Port-au-Prince, Haiti, documenting the work of a Spanish non-governmental organization, Infancia sin Fronteras. At the beginning of May, I started a four-month internship at Time magazine’s picture desk. I’m freelancing for various clients and pursuing a career in photojournalism. My portfolio is on my website: www.vaughnwallace.com.”

• Select certain profile information to be “published” in the online alumni directory • Post Class Notes

COMMUNICATE • Email your classmates and friends directly • View and share photos • Read Class Notes

NETWORK & CONNECT • See what’s going on at Sewickley Academy

WE WANT YOUR NEWS! Just married? Found a new job?

• Register for alumni events • Search the directory for your classmates and friends • Network and make connections when moving or job searching

Took an exciting trip? Moving away or back to the area? Whatever your news is, we want to hear it! Send your news to alumni@ sewickley.org or post it in the Class Notes section of the Alumni Portal.

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As of June 30, 2010

ALUMNI ELIZABETH CRAMPTON SHEPERD ’31

ROBERT M. FOSTER ’50

Elizabeth “Lib” Crampton Shepherd ’31 died at home on April 6, 2010, at the age of 95. Born in Evanston, Illinois, she was the daughter of the late Richard L. and Gertrude Congdon Crampton. In 1929, Lib and her brother Kenneth Crampton ’36 moved to Glen Osborne, Pennsylvania, where they were raised by her uncle and aunt. She attended Sewickley Academy and The Hartridge School and graduated from Radcliffe College in 1936. Returning to Sewickley, she received a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Pittsburgh. While an instructor in art history at Pitt in 1941, she married Donald A. Booth with whom she had a family of seven. After his death in 1966, she returned to Pitt once again, earning a Master of Library Science, and retired from there in 1980 as head of the Frick Fine Arts Library. In 1983, she married the late Charles “Toby” Shepherd. Lib is survived by her seven children: Elizabeth Ezerman ’57, Donald Booth, Kenneth Booth, Alexander Booth, Anne McLean, Virginia Morrow ’71, and Catharine Pederson, six grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Over the years, she enjoyed memberships in the Child Health Association, Sewickley Academy’s Home & School Association, Sewickley Music Club, PTA, Query Club, Village Garden Club, and the Women’s Club of Sewickley. She was an elder of the Presbyterian Church of Sewickley.

Robert M. Foster ’50 of Delaware, Ohio, passed away January 12, 2010. He attended Sewickley Academy and then St. Andrews School in Middletown, Delaware. He went on to The University of Virginia and graduated from Pennsylvania State University. He was in the Columbus radio and television sales business for his entire career and retired as general sales manager at WBNS-10TV. Robert is survived by his wife, Molly; sister, Julia Beckman; daughters, Marti Corna and Nicole DeVere; and son, Richard L. Foster. He was a former member of the Agonis Club and Scioto and Riviera Country Clubs and past president of the Touchdown Club of Columbus. He took great pride in being a 40-year member and past board member of the Athletic Club of Columbus.

HAROLD ROBERTSON BROOKS ’52 Harold Robertson “Robbie” Brooks ’52 died peacefully on May 2, 2010. Robbie grew up on Irwin Drive in Edgeworth. He attended Sewickley Academy, Southern Arizona School for Boys, Culver Military Academy, The University of Arizona, and The Thunderbird School of International Business. After graduation, he worked at his father’s factory, The Chaplin-Fulton Manufacturing Co., and then at Allegheny Plastics. He then lived in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, for 15 years where he taught English to elementary school students. Robbie’s many years in Mexico gave him a familiarity with the Mexican culture and the Spanish language. He is survived by sister, Mary “Mimi” Brooks Woodbridge ’53, brother, Alexander Montgomery “Sandy” Brooks III ’59, and many nieces and nephews. In the family tradition, Robbie’s ashes will be placed in his favorite cookie tin, Scottish Shortbreads, and buried next to the resting place of his infant twin brother on a wooded hill in the Sewickley Cemetery.

LAURA LIGGETT OLIVER ’33 Laura “Lolly” Liggett Oliver ’33 died January 9, 2010, at the age of 92. Born and raised in Sewickley, Mrs. Oliver attended Sewickley Academy and Miss Porter’s School. Mrs. Oliver and her late husband, David B. Oliver II, had deep family roots in southwestern Pennsylvania. Her ancestors included Capt. James Sharp, a veteran of the French and Indian War and the namesake of Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania, and Col. John Irwin, a veteran of the Revolutionary War. Mr. Oliver’s grandfather, David Brown Oliver, and his great-uncle, Henry W. Oliver, formed the Oliver Iron and Steel Co. The couple was married for 60 years until Mr. Oliver’s death in 1999. Both were active in charitable and community organizations aiding the arts, religion, education, and historical preservation. A talented restorationist, Mrs. Oliver restored three 18th and 19th century log cabins in the Ligonier and Sewickley Heights areas. Mr. and Mrs. Oliver, who lived for many years in Sewickley Heights, also were involved with efforts to preserve open space and improve wildlife habitats. Mrs. Oliver is survived by three daughters, Sydney Palitti ’57, Elsie MacKenzie ’58, and Trudy Hetherington ’60, 10 grandchildren, and 14 great-grandchildren.

ALTHEA GEORGE ROSS ’52 Althea George Ross ’52 died February 11, 2010, at the age of 73, after a brave four-year battle with lung cancer. Born in Sewickley, she moved to Toronto as a newlywed married to the late David Ross. She will be greatly missed by her three girls: Mary, Kelley, and Robyn; her longtime companion, Zeke O’Connor; her sisters, Eleanore “Nonie” (George) Wyckoff ’56 and Madeline (George) McCrady ’61; her brother, Dick; and her grandchildren, Drum, Walker, Lockie, Patch, Charlotte, Brooks, and Mimi.

WILLIAM SCOTT MCCUNE ’62 William Scott McCune ’62, died February 4, 2010, at the age of 63. Born and raised in Sewickley Heights, he was a resident of Sewickley, Providence, Rhode Island, and Mayville, New York. He attended Sewickley Academy, Marvelwood Preparatory in Connecticut, and Parsons College in Iowa. A Purple Heart veteran of the Vietnam War, he drove tanks during the firefights of combat. He will be missed by his wife Kris P. McCune, son Dr. David E. Mateer, daughter Jenee Cromwell, son-in-law Lawrence Cromwell, and grandson Alexander Cromwell.

JANE GRAY STARCK ’42 Jane Gray Starck ’42 died peacefully at her home on January 3, 2010, surrounded by her children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren. She was born on May 12, 1926. She graduated from Sewickley Academy and went on to attend Sweet Briar College in Virginia. She earned many equestrian awards during her prep school and college years. She was married to the late Philip Adam Starck, the past president of the P.A. Starck Piano Company in Chicago. Upon his retirement, Philip and Jane managed Arrowwood Farm where they raised Standardbred horses. She is survived by her four children; James Phil Starck, Mildred Starck Dill, Daniel Gray Starck, and Frederick Behn Starck; three stepchildren, Philip Starck, Diane Wharton, and Elizabeth Heitman; nine grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Jane was a Power Squadron member and a Flotilla Commander in the Coast Guard Auxiliary in Arizona where she taught training classes and performed vessel safety examinations. Jane had many accomplishments in her life, but her proudest was her family.

PHIL CARSON ’67 The Office of Alumni Relations recently learned that Phil Carson ’67 passed away on May 2, 2010, from acute respiratory failure due to complications from pneumonia and esophageal cancer.

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S E W I C KLEY

F R I E N D S O F T H E SCHOOL

SPEAKING

SUMMER

2010

SUPPORT STUDENTS FOR YEARS TO COME BY PLANTING THE SEED TODAY

WILLIAM “BILL” PFLUGH Former Sewickley Academy baseball coach, mentor, and friend William “Bill” Pflugh died on March 15, 2010. He is survived by his wife Elizabeth Doerper and children Carol Jean Smith, Joanne Pflugh, Bernice Zewe ’82, Glenn Pflugh ’84, Erin Pflugh ’05, Ashley Pflugh, Katherine Pflugh, and Jay Pflugh.

FA M I LY O F A L U MNI JOHN G. CRAIG, JR.

Father of Peter Craig ’85, Lindsay (Guttshall) Jackson ’95, Emily Craig ’01 LARRY FREITAG

Husband of Annie (Hays) Freitag ’61 JUNE JONES

Mother of Jeffrey Jones ’66 SARAH MURDOCK

Aunt of Mary (Murdock) Schaeffer ’66, Peter Murdock ’70, Catherine Murdock ’70 EMILY (FREW) OLIVER

Mother of Henry Oliver III ’54 CALVIN RICHARDSON WIGTON

Brother of Fredericka (Wigton) Achin ’47

When you make the decision to support Sewickley Academy, it’s important to align your charitable giving with your overall financial and estate plans. When you make a plan, you ensure the greatest impact on our students and the greatest benefit to you. Gift planning is easy with our online tools available at www.sewickley.org/giftplanning. IS THIS TYPE OF GIFT RIGHT FOR YOU? In general, a charitable bequest works for anyone who would like to support Sewickley Academy in the future. Because you can change your mind at any time and make your gift in relative proportion to bequests to family and friends, this type of gift has universal appeal.

PROFILE OF A GIVER • You want to support Sewickley Academy after your lifetime. • You have a will or living trust, or are ready to create one. • You are young or old, wealthy or middle-class. • You want to make a charitable gift while ensuring family is taken care of first. • You want to maintain the flexibility to change your mind at any time. • You want—or don’t need—estate tax relief. Visit www.sewickley.org/giftplanning to make a plan specific to your age, plug in numbers to a gift calculator, and discover answers in the gift planning tool box. If you have other questions, please contact Director of Advancement Sharon Hurt Davidson at shdavidson@sewickley.org or 412-741-2230, ext. 3042.


SEWICKLEY SPEAKING T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

S E W I C K L E Y

A C A D E M Y

S ew i c k l ey A c ad e my 315 A c ad e my Ave n u e S ew i c k l ey, PA 15143

COMM E N C E M E N T 2 0 1 0

Graduates process into the tent for the commencement ceremony. This year’s ceremony was the first outdoor ceremony since 1992. Read more about the Class of 2010 on Pages 24 and 25.


Sewickley Speaking Summer 2010