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Sam Sewell

Design Portfolio


“This is a question of the unmeasurable and the measurable. Nature, physical nature is measurable. Feeling and dream has no measure, has no language, and everone’s dream is singular.” - Louis Kahn


The Union For Exchange And Propaganda Manhattan, KS.

Sutton Place Ferry Terminal East Midtown Manhattan, NYC.

Ad Astra’s Baseball Stadium Topeka, KS.

Cico Park Pavilion Manhattan, KS.

Selected Works


The Union for Exchange and Propaganda Project Date Client Project Size

Distinguished Speaker Lecture Hall Spring 2018 Kansas State University 25,000 s.f.

College Campus’s across the country are experiencing a wave of social clash between political and idealogical groups. The rise in tension between groups is further exacerbated by the rapid propagandization of information. News outlets and social media platforms are systematically creating extremist group based rabbit holes. In an attempt to buffer Kansas State’s students and Manhattan’s community members from the scourge of group identification, I propose to build a distinguished speaker lecture hall, a propoganda art gallery, and video/audio recording and production studios. The Union for Exchange and Propaganda is an exploration of the power of propaganda to establish consensus. The program will effectively bring the power of rapid information spreading into the hands of K-State students and Manhattan’s community members.

Site Plan


A Place of Exchange

Architecture as Propaganda


Historically, architecture has been used as propaganda by tyrannical states to emphasize their power over the masses. The designs of Albert Speer reveal that scale, monumentality and the carving of the urban landscape all emphasize that a building and a site are extremely significant. However, I do not believe that layering the program with this motif of power will give the Union of Exchange the kind of atmosphere that reinforce the events that will take place there. In order to approximate a modern architectural propoganda we must assert that every piece of the built environment sends a message, and the message is an embodied and emotional sensibility, transmitted throught the atmosphere of a building or place. And it’s through the use of scale, monumentality, and urban arrangement that gives a place it’s propagandistic potential. My preliminary investigations sought to understand how a mood could be set in a place, and how I could place the building on the site in order to give ita specific urban significance.

New Entrance onto Campus


Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of captivity. But one hundred years later, we must face the tragic fact that the Negro is still not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize an appalling condition.

America has given the Negro people a bad check which has come back marked "insufficient funds." But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. So we have come to cash this check -- a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to open the doors of opportunity to all of God's children. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood.

In a sense we have come to our nation's capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men would be guaranteed the inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation,

Section

First Floor Plan


In order to explore how the form of a building could create an atmosphere that would reinforce it’s meaning, model building became the primary design method. The program was divided into working parts, where the lecture hall and art gallery took hiearchy in the composition, and the recording studios and production labs began to take a cellular form. As the models developed, opportunities to create outdoor spaces with the building emerged, and soon the idea of a public square was adopted into the design program. The building began to take a more aggressive posture, suggesting that the lecture hall and art gallery were competing in hierarchy.

Final Design Model


Schematic Design Model

Array of Study Models


Site Diagrams


Recording Studio Parti Diagrams


Art Gallery Parti Diagrams


Auditorium Parti Diagrams


Collage image of Gallery Space

Collage image of Propaganda Corridor

Collage image of Auditorium Circulation


Steel Channel Wall System

Exhaust Air Fan

LED Lights in Cavity

4” Rigid Insulation 4” Rigid Insulation Interior + Exterior Panels Fixed to Steel Channels Weathered Steel Exterior Panel Text Perforated Interior Plastic Panels Air Cavity

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of captivity. But one hundred years later, we must face the tragic fact that the

Steel Runner Fixed to Floor

It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check which has come back marked "insufficient funds." But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. So we have come to cash this check -- a check that will give

Negro is still not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize an appalling condition. In a sense we have come to our nation's capital to cash a check. When the architects of

our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men would be guaranteed the inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to open the doors of opportunity

Steel Beam Cantilever

Weathered Steel Window Frame Double Glazing Window System

Wall Section Through Art Gallery

Wall Section Through Art Gallery 1/4”=1’


The design uses material presence, scale, and monument to establish the mood of the space. The propoganda art gallery floats out onto the square, offering shaded cafe seating underneath its cantilever. The speaker halls facade is a backlit wall of punctured steel which read passages from great texts and speeches. The building forms create the new ceremonial square onto K-State’s campus. Weathered steel has a diurnal characteristic where it will be warm and charming in the sunlight, and heavy in darkness. A weathered steel monument at the end of the square excentuates the length of the square. The Art Gallery utilizes a weathered steel circulation corridor which runs parralel to the individual gallery spaces. The corridor is finished with cortens steel and painted plastic panels. The panels are back lit, allowing artists and curators the option to organize displays and texts within the dark circulation corridor.

View of Auditorium


Final Model

Section


Sutton Place Ferry Terminal Project Date Client Project Size

Ferry Terminal Transit Hub Spring 2015 New York City Transit Authority 15,000 s.f.

The design studio established a network of stops for a hypothetical ferry service which would service the East River in New York City. The site, “November”, is located at 55th St. above the underpassing FDR. This neighborhood is known as South Sutton Place. The terminal design seeks to make place which is well situated into it’s urban context, by arising naturally from the site and contending gracefully with the rivers edge. Analysis of the urban situation revealed how the site is settled within the larger fabric, and how traffic flows currently affect the site. Certain desires were established according to the context related issues, such as continuing urban edges onto a platform sitting on the water.

Collage Image of Terminal Space


Site Context

FDR Road

Terminal Site Queensboro Bridge

Map of Proposed Terminal Network. Novermber Hilighted

Site Plan


Urban Fabric

Urban Flows

Urban Edges


Program Diagram

Circulation Diagram

Structure Diagram


One design challenge which greatly influenced the character of the terminal was the under-passing FDR road. Building the terminal on land isolates the contact moment with the ferry from the main terminal experience. This constraint forced the building out of the urban fabric and onto the East River itself. Thus, the buildings atmosphere is thresholded by a sense of traveling directly onto the East River. The building program responds to this constraint by establishing a strata of activity linking the street and dock levels. These strata were then ordered further by a structural module. This module is adhered by the different assembly methods used, and reflects a larger order that the terminal belongs to. Precast concrete is used to make the an exhibition space which floats above a filigree and permeable waiting hub on the dock level.


Exploded Axon - Key Drawing

Hero Shot


Collage Rendering

View of Outdoor Concourse


The terminal services front loading ferries. From the loading area, the patron is physically compressed by the cantilevered concrete mass, yet visually released through the filigree waiting hub. The concrete creates another perceptual threshold, where the experience has shifted from exiting the ferry, to traversing through the terminal itself, until leaving the water all together. The elongated form stretches across the water, just down the East River from the Queensboro bridge, and creates a unique place in the South Sutton neighborhood. The terminal creates an environment of transition. The terminal actively warps the flow of urban energy within the city, and does so as a unique environment, separate from the urban fabric.

Transverse Section


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Ticket Purchasing Zone


Longitudinal Section

Multi-Purpose Community Spaces

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Cafe

Exhibition

Ground Floor Plan


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Project Collage


Ad Astra’s Baseball Stadium Project Date Client Project Size

Minor League Baseball Stadium Summer 2016 City of Topeka,KS 60,000 s.f.

The design studio located an area of 4 square city blocks in Topeka, KS to be the site of a new minor league baseball stadium and accompanying master plan. The site is located north of the I-70 overpass and south of the Topeka River. The river bank to the north of the site will be redeveloped into a riverfront park which becomes the centerpiece of the masterplan. The intention of the design was to create a layering of experience from the everyday mundane to the event of gameday. The entrance plazas of the ballpark are oriented towards the river front development and the adjacent commercial district. An area for recreation will create a relationship between ballpark site and the riverfront development. The park plazas on the south and east side of the site work as retention sites for stormwater runoff. However, the plazas also create urban nodes for the people of Topeka.


Site Axonometric

Section through the Concourse


CIRCULATION TO SITE TOPEKA RIVER FRONT PARK I-70 OVERPASS

BALLPARK ENTRIES BALLPARK PLAZAS CIRCULATION THROUGH PARK

BUILDING MASS DIAMOND ORIENTATION CIRCULATION THROUGH PARK

PRE-EXISTING CONDITIONS

SITE RESPONSES

CIRCULATION & BUILDING FORM


STORMWATER RETENTION PATHS

PLANTERS & GREEN TERRACES

BALLPARK PLAZAS STORMWATER PLAZAS RECREATION PLAZA

RAINWATER CAPTURE

VEGETATION

SITE FORM


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The program layers backwards from the facade of the stadium, creating a series of depth preceptions to the field. The plan provides a glance into the procession through the various concourses, to areas of concession, and to the stadium seating. The facade can be seen undulating into the concourse spaces and creating a unique overhead plane. The entry plaza offers layered views into the stadium concourse. Extrusions in the facade reveal circulation elements and opportunities for views and photography moments for the citizens of Topeka.

View of the Exterior Plaza


The section through the service wing shows another system of rainwater capture. An internal roof drain guides roof runoff through a cavity behind the limestone brick veneer. The downspout releases the runoff into a planter bed situated at the base of the wall. The use of planters for rainwater capture is used in several locations in the project. In all cases, secondary drainage pipes flow from underneath the planter to site drainage areas. 1 2

Legend 1. Precast Concrete Sandwhich Panel w/ 6” Insulation 2. 4” Stone Brick Veneer 3. 6“ Rigid Insulation 4. Precast Concrete Column 5. Precast Concrete Girder 6. DN Spout in Cavity of Wall 7. DN Spout Emptying into Planter 8. Planter encased in 3” Concrete

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The wall section through the facade shows several key elements found throughout the stadium design. The roof is constructed with a hidden gutter for rainwater capture. The facade detail shows how the perforated metal panel is fixed onto a subframe via the use of double c-chanels and pin connections.

Legend 1. 5” Corrugated Steel Roof 2. Perf. Mtl. Panel w/ Woven Wire Mesh Cover. 3. 5mm Aluminum Gutter Box 4. 24” x 1’ Steel Beam 5. 5mm Aluminum DN. Spout 6. W10 x 26 Steel Column 7. Perf. Mtl. Panel w/ Woven Wire 8. 8” Concrete Floor Slab 9. Suspended Perf. Mtl. Panel Cieling 10. Gravel Filled Water Capture Basin 11. Planter attached to Water Capture Basin

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Cico Park Pavilion Project Date Client Project Size

Public Park Pavilion Fall 2014 City of Manhattan,KS 3,000 s.f.

The project for the Cico Park Pavilion was written to enhance understanding of structural fundamentals while developing digital skills. The task was to develop a structural scheme which could achieve an open span of the width of the site. Next would be identifying where lateral bracing was likely needed. Steel beams span nearly 60 ft across the short edge of the pavilion, while steel tubes were utilized as bracing members. Intersecting the entire pavilion is an observation enclosure, which took of the same material essence of the pavilion, yet was radically contrasted in it’s form.

Longitudinal Section


 

Floor Plan

-- -

UP

Longitudinal Section

UP


A simple material pallete was chosen to reflect the structural elements. Steel columns and girders comprise the primary elements. A masonry retaining wall contains the hull of the pavilion while curtain wall glazing provides an ephemeral experience on the pavilions upper level.

The project was geared towards the development of digital modeling skills. The structure housed within the pavilion was conceived because of it’s complicated form. The objective was to digitally recreate a structure which would test the technical abilities of the student.


Elevation

Transverse Section

View of Interior Pavilion


Section Perspective Through Pavilion


Professional Experience Firm Position

Spillman Farmer Architects Student Intern

Location Dates

Bethlehem, PA Jan 2017 - Aug 2017

During my 4th year in school I had the opportunity to take an 8 month internship with Spillman Farmer Architects in Bethlehem, PA. At the office, I was working on the schematic design phase of projects, as well as feasibility studies. I had the opportunity to layout floor plans, to create site plans, to create 3D models, and digital renderings for these projects. However, I have an insatiable curiosity whcih meant that I would continually find a new task to tackle, even if it wasn’t obvious that I should be doing it. So in the end, I worked in the SD, DD, and CA phases of multiple projects, helping with construction details, Revit models, CAD backgrounds, digital renderings, graphic design, and even video editing.

Renderings for ACCHS Practice Field Feasibiltiy Study


Construction Drawings for Millersville University Net Zero Welcome Center

Logo Design

Site P{lan for Seton Hill University Housing Project.


Sketches & Art Sketching with my papermate pens is how i think best about any design decision. Over my final year in school, I’ve committed to sketching as a free association exercise, and as a problem solving methodology. Sketching is great for working a problem out, but I also enjoy creating art through physical and digital medium. I look forward to exploring these avenues of expression and finding room for my own style and interests.

Papermate Marker


Photoshop Airbrush


Digitlal Art


Watercolor


Thank You

Sam Sewell Portfolio hi res  

Design portfolio of academic and professional work.

Sam Sewell Portfolio hi res  

Design portfolio of academic and professional work.

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