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TOPEKA'S PREMIER 'ZINE FOR ART, ENTERTAINMENT, LIFESTYLE + LOCAL FLAVOR FALL / WINTER 2018VOL. XIII ISSUE I

FREE HANDLE THAT


Burgers. Beer.

Hospitality.

THE BURGER STAND COLLEGE HILL 1601 SW LANE | 785-783-8900 For large table or private reservations: collegehill@burgerstandrestaurants.com

@BURGERSTANDTOPEKA / THE BURGER STAND AT COLLEGE HILL

OPEN | 11 - 2am (Sunday 11am - 10pm)

HAPPY HOUR | 2 - 5pm


WE GIVE YOU WHAT NO OTHER THEATRE CAN...

STEEL MAGNOLIAS

WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION

ELF THE MUSICAL

FOX ON THE FAIRWAY

IN THETHE HEIGHTS EXPLORERS CLUB

THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK

SINGIN’IN THE RAIN

ULTIMATE FLEXIBLITY A Topeka Civic Theatre Season Membership comes with 8 Mainstage tickets - but YOU CHOOSE which shows to see, what night to see them and how many tickets to use. You could see all eight Mainstage productions, you could take a friend and see four or get the whole gang together for one night out. No more waste. No more conflicting schedules. This is a membership that fits your life.

BECOME A TCT SEASON MEMBER AND GUARANTEE A YEAR OF GREAT LIVE THEATRE. Memberships start at $199. That’s a 20% savings. Get your Season Membership today. Call TCT Box Office at 357.5211 or visit topekacivictheatre.com


Prognosticatio with

Ruprecht Roosterdamus The Psychic Chicken

TM

Oct - Dec

2018 Chicken Dude, The little woman is getting a little touchy about me hanging out too much with my buddies. We only go hunting a couple of weekends a month and a few nights a week out drinking but she keeps saying I care more about being with them than I do with her. What should I do? (FYI, I’m not a fan - she insisted I email you...) - Hunter Guy Dear Not a Fan/Hunter Guy, Good news? Very soon now ya get to hunt all ya want. Bad news? Yer camo pickup with the naked ladies on the mud flaps and the gross little bag with the trailer hitches hanging on the rear bumper? Yeah, she gets it in the divorce. - RR ____________________________

THANK YOU

TOPEKA! DAYCARE

BOARDING

GROOMING

DOG DAY AFTERNOON DOGDAYINC.COM

A R I E S Yoga. Meditation. Valium. Do them all. Now. You’ll feel better and some of us will live longer. T A U R U S Ya know those weird little secret sex movies that keep playing in yer head? Well, they’re still weird but now that yer talking in yer sleep - not so secret. G E M I N I Think again. Twice. C A N C E R Okay, Bucko, the spandex and peacock feather thong is gonna have to remain our little secret. Trust me. We’re talking career impact here. L E O Don’t do it. Don’t do it. Don’t do it. Got it? Good. V I R G O Been a while since the good old days, but do ya really miss the poison ivy, chiggers, late night digging and washing blood out of yer van? Don’t answer that.

PROGRESSIVE seveneightfive.com WEB APP

No App Store Download | Works Offline | 100+ Events | No Storage Stealing


L I B R A I finally remembered what I was going to warn ya about issue before last (to watch out for last issue?) but now that it’s already happened... NEVER MIND! S C O R P I O I’ve been trying to come up some bit of constructive criticism to help Scorpios be better... Nope. I got nothing.

It's the people that make our community unique and to celebrate this, we have asked several folks to take over our Instagram account. Follow us @seveneightfive and see Topeka from their point of view. Go to seveneightfive.com for our upcoming takeover schedule.

#785InstaTakeover

THANK YOU!

Adrian Revels Angel Romero Amber Farmer Ashley Wallace

Ballet Midwest EJ Drake Jen Goetz Luke Domme

Steven Stanek Tobias Harvey Andrew Wiechen Blake Benton

S A G I T T A R I U S If ya ever felt I was saying yer sexual tastes were scary and yer choice in partners hasty, let me be perfectly clear - that is exactly what I was trying to say. C A P R I C O R N Over the years we’ve talked about yer challenges dealing with ex future exes (read that again - it really does make sense) and yer unsavory tendency to hang on for far too long even when all hope is gone. Ring any bells? Well, yer doing it again right now. A Q U A R I U S Words to live by: 1. A spider on yer nose will crash yer car. 2. Trump is far worse than Nixon. 3. Never eat anything bigger than yer head. P I S C E S Good instincts will never overcome bad judgement. ___________________________ Question for the Blue Guru? Something on yer mind? Looking for an answer to a burning (and itching) personal question? Do not hesitate! Fire up an email... Ruprecht@PsychicChicken.com ___________________________ Pop Quiz: Who do you think wrote the New York Times anonymous op-ed claiming White House staff has to do sneaky things to save us from Trump’s bad judgement and erratic decision making? A. Melania Trump B. Rudolph Juliani C. Vladimir Putin D. Joseph Goebbels E. All of the above FYI - Don’t worry, there is no wrong answer. – RR.


FINAL CUT

by Susan Haley an Interactive Murder Mystery November 10, @ 7:30

Director Eddie Cheek is looking for backers for his new movie, ”The Zombie was an Alien.” Then there is a MURDER!

December 7, 8 & 9 BALLETMIDWEST.NET

7:30 pm shows Friday & Saturday 1:30 pm shows Saturday & Sunday TOPEKA PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

Tickets: TPAC Box Office • Ticketmaster outlets • 1-800-745-3000 www.ticketmaster.com • Barbara’s Conservatory of Dance

Join us for wine, hors d’oeuvres and MYSTERY! You are encouraged to wear your finest red carpet costume to play this game. This event is a FUNdraiser for the Theatre Department students. Tickets: $50 Location: The Vinewood eventbrite: FINAL CUT interactive murder mystery game


WHO + WHERE CONTRIBUTORS Sunshine Blue Robin Bonsall Mandy Daniels Jeff Carson EJ Drake William Domme Rio Cervantes-Reed Amber Farmer Jennifer Goetz Tobias Harvey Daryl Hendrix Martinez Hillard Benjamin Hooper Tom Krebs Huascar Medina (Lit Editor) Karen Morse Noah Neff D O'Brien Gary Piland Rebecca Radziejeski Ashley Reynolds Ni’Col Revell Martie Rison Angel Romero Keith VanSickle Ashley B. Wallace Liz Bell - accounting Kerrice Mapes - owner / editor

SEVENEIGHTFIVE .COM + @ GMAIL

An American classic starring James Stewart and Donna Reed! Tickets on sale at Vintage Stock Nov. 5 and @ the Jayhawk Theatre day of the event.

DISTRIBUTION seveneightfive is FREE thanks to our Advertisers. See their ad in the magazine and be sure to stop by their business next time to pick up an issue (and say thank you). For a complete distribution list + list of our Business Partners, go to seveneightfive.com

Jeremiah Allen realtor

CHEERS! THANKS FOR READING.


A HAUNTED HOUSE EXPERIENCE

FALL / WINTER 2018 | VOL XIII • ISSUE I

INSIDE SCOOP 10 // PARTY FOR A CAUSE 12 // 'TIS THE SEASON 19 // THEATRE TO GO SEE 20 // HUASCAR'S LOVE 24 // THAT'S DOG CHURCH 25 // WHEN CREATION FALLS 27 // BEHIND THE SCENES W/ YOUR CITY'S BOSS 32 // OP-ED:

FRESH BREEZE OR THE SAME OLD STENCH

33 // VOTE DAMNIT! 34 // WOMEN WHO ROCK:

DOROTHY THOMAS SCHOOL OF DANCE

BATHHouse of

Blood

37 // STOMPIN' AT THE JAYHAWK 38 // KANSAS YOUNG [CONTINUES] 42 // THE LAST OF THE BASIL 46 // LAST THOUGHTS: LUNCH BOX

IN EVERY ISSUE 04 // PROGNOSTICATIO w/RUP 28 // MUSIC + EVENTS CALENDAR 40 // MUG SHOT @TOPEKABEER

COVER ART by NOAH NEFF SPECIAL ISSUE: WOMEN WHO ROCK // FEB seveneightfive print dates: MARCH // JUNE // OCT ALWAYS RELEVANT: seveneightfive.com

A HAUNTED HOUSE EXPERIENCE HELEN HOCKER THEATER | GAGE PARK FRI & SAT NIGHTS PLUS HALLOWEEN HOURS 7 - 11pm TICKETS $15

ProjectTerror.net #ProjectTerror | For Mature Audiences Special Thanks to our Sponsor: OFG Financial Services, Inc. Lou Allen & Thomas VanDerSluis


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noto/north topeka

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First Friday

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artwalk map

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& shopping guide

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OCTOBER Shawnee County Democrats 5350 SW 17th | 4-7p

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Support Topeka’s art community!

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ArtsConnectTopeka

Dandelions | Brookwood Shopping Center The Linen Tree | Brookwood Shopping Center Southwind Gallery | 3074 SW 29th Street Tasteful Olive | Brookwood Shopping Center Ethan + Anna Children's Boutique Brookwood

surrounding

Donate at: www.artsconnecttopeka.org/donate

OCT

Alice C. Sabatini Gallery | 1515 SW 10th Beauchamp’s Gallery | 3113 SW Huntoon Easterseals Capper Foundation | 3500 SW 10th Josey Baking Co. | 3119 SW Huntoon Mulvane Art Museum | 1700 SW Jewell Porterfield’s | 3101 SW Huntoon PT’s Cafe College Hill | 1635 SW 17th Soho Interiors | 3129 SW Huntoon

brookwood

complete exhibit information at artsconnecttopeka.org

SEP

712 Innovations | 712 S Kansas Absolute Design | 629 S Kansas Boho Mojo | 631 S Kansas Creations of Hope Gallery | 727 S Kansas First Presbyterian Church | 817 SW Harrison Hazel Hill | 724 S Kansas Juli's Coffee & Bistro | 110 SE 8th Leaping Llamas Artisan Shop | 725 S Kansas NexLynx | 123 SW 6th Ave Platform 785 | 929 S Kansas Prairie Glass Studio | 110 SE 8th Two Wolves Studio & Artist Den | 114 SW 8th Wolfe’s Camera | 635 S Kansas

westboro/midtown

21ST

29TH FAIRLAWN

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CALIFORNIA

TOPEKA! 21ST

39 West Gallery | 909 N Kansas aMUSEd Gallery | 907 N Kansas Ballet Folklorico | 814 N Kansas Faces by Mayfield | 802 N Kansas The Firehouse | 2705 NW Topeka Blvd Generations Antiques | 918 N Kansas Kaw River Rustics | 901 N Kansas Kaw Valley Bank | 1110 N Kansas Matryoshka Tattoo | 902 N Kansas Norsemen Brewing Company | 830 N Kansas NOTO Arts Center | 935 N Kansas NOTO ArtsPlace | 905 N Kansas Portico | 900 N Kansas Prairie Fire Winery @ Local Depot 907 N Kansas Rusty Haggles Antiques | 826 N Kansas Patina Paint Parlor | 826 N Kansas Studio 831 | 831 N Kansas Stutzman Leather | 840 N Kansas The Open Window | 927 N Kansas

@artsTopeka

Glaciers Edge Winery | 1636 SE 85th (Wakarusa) Prairie Meadow Greenhouse | 7321 SE 45th Topeka Art Guild | 5331 SW 22nd Prairie Fire Winery | 20250 Hudson Ranch Rd


PARTY FOR A CAUSE WHEN FUN + PHILANTHROPY COLLIDE

OCT 13+14

OCT 27

2018 ARTY AWARDS

BONE APPÉTIT

THE VIBE: ARTSConnect honors the best and the brightest of the arts in Topeka. THE DETS: The preHalloween pop art extravaganza is more than an awards night, it's a pARTy. (Be sure to vote for the People's Choice Award, now 'til OCT 6)

THE VIBE: Celebrate the human-animal bond and help raise funds for HHHS. It takes over-$4,000 a day to run the center, learn how you can help and hear about their 2020 vision. THE DETS: Dinner, comedy show, auctions and table-side visits from some adorable, furry, adoptable pets.

BENEFIT: ARTSConnect Topeka + Various Art Initiatives @Jayhawk Theatre | Tkts: $55+

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BENEFIT: Topeka Symphony Orchestra @The Cottonwood Villas at Brewster Place Tkts: $10+

BENEFIT: Helping Hands Humane Society @Prairie Band Casino + Resort | Tkts: $50+

DEC 01

NOV 17 + 18

FRUGAL HOUSE THE VIBE: An open house showcasing four to five local designers who stage each space with donated, repurposed and sustainable furnishings, at affordable prices. THE DETS: Affordable tickets get you into the open house where you shop / view at your own leisure (bring cash for some wine). All items are for sale (at affordable prices). Consider upgrading your ticket for the VIP preview night.

OCT 27

HOMES FOR THE HOLIDAYS

HOLIDAY PUB CRAWL

THE VIBE: Nothing will get you more into the holiday spirit then touring multiple homes decorated to the max, while raising money for children in our community who have been removed from their home, making sure they are not navigating the court system alone and don’t feel all alone. THE DETS: 31st Anniversary of event, six exquisite homes.

THE VIBE: Be part of Topeka's largest ugly Christmas sweater pub crawl. It's the largest, because it's the only one, but that small detail undermines the fun. THE DETS: Afternoon bar crawling in Downtown Topeka while raising funds for Toys for Tots. That's a Saturday Funday.

BENEFIT: CASA | Tkts: $15+

BENEFIT: Toys for Tots @Downtown | Tkts: $30


a fresh new take on a

lunchbox from your old friend RowHouse

(785) 235-1700 RowHouseRestaurant.net


'TIS THE

SEASON for artistic giving and receiving. The 2018-19 season announcements for Topeka Jazz Workshop, Topeka Symphony, Topeka Civic Theatre, On Stage Live and Last Minute Folk Series are out. Here is information on each season membership package and why you should consider joining. by Kerrice Mapes | images provided by arts groups

Season Members and season ticket packages are the blood line of most fine - and performing - arts organizations, and it's no surprise that the median age of their member is on the rise, causing arts groups to aggressively seek and court young professionals, who they hope will become members and they can begin cultivating their relationship, with hopes they will become significant donors in the future. But why is membership so important and why should you join? Season members / tickets provide predictable revenue for arts groups which in turn allows them to strategically plan future seasons and growth. Without a membership base to build a budget from, growth is stifled. As for why you should become a member, it's all personal preference. Some young professionals are already members and perhaps come from families where supporting the arts is an important venture. Others are paving their own legacy and understand that membership to these groups not only provide predictable and unique entertainment opportunities, but you save money, support the organization and have the chance to brush elbows or talk jazz with current community leaders. In the end, all arts group's missions include furthering public appreciation of its' medium. Classical music, jazz, live theatre...they are important art forms that continue to enrich lives. In order for them to thrive for future generations, it is imperative that we, the succeeding generation, nurture them. Becoming a season member or ticket holder is the first stanza. aseveneightfive


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he roots for Topeka Jazz Workshop were planted in the 1950s when a local drummer/piano tuner/band leader named Mel Kime started a "Jazz at the Jayhawk" series of concerts in the Roof Garden of the Jayhawk Hotel.

#785 ART LIVE

Mel proceeded to organize a big band consisting of area musicians who had regular daytime jobs but liked to get together at night and play jazz for kicks. Their first concert was presented under the name "Topeka Jazz Workshop Band" in 1960 at Washburn's MacVicar Chapel.

1 CELEBRATING THEIR 50TH ANNUAL CONCERT SEASON. All concerts are 3 - 5p at the Topeka Downtown Ramada Hotel TJW has presented 330 concerts and awarded 318 scholarships to young musicians for summer jazz camps and college jazz studies.

TOPEKAJAZZ.COM COST PERKS

$170, plus tax, for membership to all 9 concerts plus two (or more) guest coupons. Concerts are for Season Ticket holders only. So unless you know a Board Member or a season ticket holder with guest passes, you'll need to pony up the dollars for the jazz.

Years passed and in 1969 the official "Topeka Jazz Workshop Inc. Concert Series" launched hosting concerts at White Concert Hall. The '70s were an era of the Big Bands and Topeka Jazz Workshop had them all - Stan Kenton, Count Basie, Woody Herman, Maynard Ferguson, Buddy Rich, Dizzy Gillespie, you name it

SCHD

(except for Duke Ellington, who, according to TJW, died before they could book him). Now roll the calendar along for 50 years - the upcoming Topeka Jazz Concert Series has a full roster of exciting artists that promises to entertain and touch both jazz aficionados and other arts and music lovers. According to Steve Waugh, TJW president, the nine-concert season will feature "old friends and new faces; big brassy sounds and subtle piano work; artists from across the country as well as international award winners." Every once in a while in life, something really great comes around that one should not miss. Waugh believes their upcoming 50th concert season is one such event. aseveneightfive

AUG 19 - TJW Band with special guest, Jim Seeley, Trumpet SEPT 23 - The Bill Mays Trio OCT 21 - The KCJO7 NOV 18 - The Katie Thiroux Trio DEC 2 - Harry Allen's All-Star Saxophone Band

JAN 20 - Stan Kessler's K.C. Jazz All-Stars FEB 17 - BRIA SKONBERG QUINTET MARCH 10 - Larry Fuller Trio APRIL 7 - Diego Figueiredo (Guitar) Carol Welsman (Piano + Vocal)

Noted as a millennial “shaking up the jazz world,� (Vanity Fair), trumpeter Bria Skonberg has played festivals and stages the world over. This one concert may be worth the entire price of a TJW membership.


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TOPEKA CIVIC THEATRE

ith a diverse schedule of live theatre ranging from hit musicals to hilarious farces to thought-provoking, historic and culturally significant dramas - Topeka Civic Theatre (TCT) provides a year of high quality entertainment. The best part of becoming a member at TCT, however, is the ultimate flexibility their membership provides. Each Season Membership comes with a "bank" of eight tickets, which you may use as you choose during the season. You can see all eight Mainstage shows, take a friend to four or just go to one with the whole family. The best part, no more "missing out" because you have plans. You get to pick what you see and when you see it, and with whom. That's correct - your season membership allows you to bring a guest. It's literally eight tickets to use as you choose. When you add in the cost savings, the support you offer the theatre and the perks of early reservations, it makes sense that they sell over 1,500 memberships each year. aseveneightfive

THE WHOLE 36 SHOWS movement. That's three events When (or if) you become a season member / season ticket holder to all five featured arts groups...

a month. You've got something fun happening 70% of your weekends. BAM!

THE JOY OF LIVE THEATRE. Topeka Civic Theatre was established in 1936, making it the oldest continuously running community dinner theatre in the nation.

Over-40,000 people visit TCT each year, which is located in the old Gage School and houses two performance stages. TCT also manages Helen Hocker Theater in Gage Park.

TOPEKACIVICTHEATRE.COM COST

$199 and up for 8 Mainstage show tickets

PERKS

20% savings. Flexible tickets, you choose how to use your eight tickets. SEPT 7 - 29 - Steel Magnolias OCT 19 - NOV 3 - Witness for the Prosecution NOV 23 - DEC 23 - ELF The Musical JAN 18 - FEB 9 - The Fox on the Fairway MARCH 1 - 30 - In the Heights APRIL 19 - MAY 4 - The Diary of Anne Frank MAY 31 - JUNE 15 - The Explorers Club JULY 5 - AUG 10 - Singin' in the Rain

PRODUCTIONS

$20.55

$740

BUDDY PASS

Average cost of ticket to each show. Tickets for Last Minute Folk are $20 + tax, all others are $25 or more, or not available.

Base cost to be a member of all five organizations. That breaks down to $61.66 a month, or $14.23 a week. (Skip a Starbucks and treat your ears.)

TCT's membership is flexible and includes 8 Mainstage tickets. Buy a membership with a friend ($100 for 4 tickets). Get the Flex Pass at TSO for 4 flexible admissions.


#785 ART LIVE

CULTIVATING APPRECIATION AND SUPPORT OF FINE MUSIC. The Topeka Symphony is entering its 73rd season of presenting classical and pops concerts in the capital city. Music Director and Conductor Kyle Wiley Pickett begins his sixth season at the helm of this dynamic community arts organization. In addition to its regular concerts, the TSO also sponsors three Youth Orchestras for area students, elementary through high school. These youth ensembles present two concerts for the public each season.

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TopekaSymphony.org

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COST

Starting at $176 for 7 concerts. Design your own season membership from three to seven concerts or purchase a Flex Pass, good for four admissions to use any way you choose.

PERKS

10% discount on single tickets plus seating priority and/or keep the same seats for the entire season (and future) if you'd like. New members receive 25% savings (not on Flex Pass).

PRODUCTIONS SEPT 29 - What is the meaning of life? French

poets / philosophers plus Bernstein's Candide Overture NOV 3 - Does art give life meaning? Featuring Mozart's Clarinet Concerto and Hindemith's Symphony: Mathis der Maler DEC 12 - The Capitol FederalÂŽ Holiday Concert featuring the Shawnee Choral Society Christmas at the Movies.

JAN 19 - Who am I, and where am I going?

Featuring some of the most beautiful and haunting melodies ever written for orchestra. FEB 16 - Will you be my Valentine? Simply Sinatra with Steve Lippia APRIL 6 - Will you marry me? Copland and Maxwell Davies, Young Artist Competition Winner MAY 4 - What is my fate? Featuring Brahms' Double Concerto and Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 6


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ON STAGE LIVE

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CONTINUING THE TRADITION, PASSION AND HISTORY OF THE TOPEKA COMMUNITY CONCERT ASSOCIATION. Celebrating their 88th Season with the return of fan favorites. All concerts at White Concert Hall, Washburn University.

OnStageLive.org ACOUSTIC, FOLK, ROOTS, AND TRADITIONAL MUSIC IN A COMFORTABLE LISTENING ROOM SETTING Established in 2003. Moved venues to The Historic Jayhawk Theatre, located at 7th + Jackson, in 2016. No seat is more than 40 feet from the stage, offering you one of the most intimate concert experiences.

LastMinuteFolk.org OR JayhawkTheatre.org

I

was first introduced to the Last Minute Folk Series when I purchased tickets to hear my friends from Truckstop Honeymoon. For me, this powerhouse duo could have played in a truckstop - I still would have purchased tickets. Fortunately, it wasn't a stop for trucks, but a well-organized concert in a spectacular listening room located in the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Topeka. Attendance was satisfying but sparse when you factored for the rich acoustic musical experience at hand. Today, the concert series holds all their shows at the historic Jayhawk State Theatre Gallery Space, still offering an intimate listening room setting to experience and revel in acoustic, folk, roots and traditional music. aseveneightfive

O

n Stage Live (formerly known as the Topeka Community Concert Association) is the oldest non-profit performing arts organization in the Topeka area, providing outstanding live, affordable, cultural entertainment and educational experiences to a diverse audience; promoting appreciation of the performing arts; and enhancing the quality of community life. I​ n 1927, an idea destined to revolutionize the performing arts in America sprang up. Community Concerts grew to be the largest, most enduring network of performing arts presenters that has ever existed. Today there are nearly 400 Community Concert Associations across the country. The goal of On Stage Live remains, as it has always been, “to offer every man, woman and child in this country the opportunity to experience the magic of live performance by bringing artists and audiences together.” Since 1931, the Topeka Community Concert Association has allowed Topekans to take a world tour of the finest entertainment without leaving town. In that tradition, On Stage Live continues to sponsor an outstanding list of musicians, artists and entertainers. aseveneightfive

COST

$100 for 6 concerts

COST

$80 for 5 concerts

PERKS

Six concerts for the price of five. Most concerts feature a local opening act. AUG 11 - The Skirts SEPT 8 - Truck Stop Honeymoon SEPT 29 - Beth Wood OCT 26 - Alright, Alright NOV 10 - Hiroya Tsukamoto DEC 8 - Dana Cooper

PERKS

Check out their Family Season Subscription for $160 you get 5 concerts for 2 adults and all children in household age 5 - 18. SEPT 18 - Nashville Legacy OCT 6 - Celissimo NOV 30 - Thomas Pandolfi FEB 12 - Saxsational APR 13 - Andy McKee

CONCERTS

CONCERTS


THE

atre

TRANSCEND AND TRAVEL WITHOUT LEAVING TOPEKA. CHECK OUT THESE EXCEPTIONAL THEATRICAL WORKS ON STAGE.

ELF THE MUSICAL NOV 23 - DEC 23 | TOPEKA CIVIC THEATRE This hilarious fish-out-of-water comedy follows Buddy the Elf in his quest to find his true identity; while reminding us all what the true meaning of Christmas is all about. This modern day holiday classic is sure to make everyone in your family embrace their inner elf. After all, the best way to spread Christmas cheer is singing loud for all to hear.

THEODORE'S LOVE OCT 11 - 14 | AD ASTRA THEATRE - THE JAYHAWK THEATRE After an exhaustive search and multiple submissions, Ad Astra's 5th Annual Homegrown Playwright Project features local Topeka playwright Huascar Medina and his beautiful and touching family drama "Theodore's Love." This production will be directed by upand-coming Topeka director an choreographer Sheri Rippel.

NOËL THE MUSICAL

HOT JERSEY NIGHTS

HELIUM

OCT 19 | TOPEKA PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

NOV 9 - 18 | TOPEKA CIVIC THEATRE

Take a nostalgic trip down memory lane to celebrate the hit songs of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons. Hit Songs include ‘Sherry’ ‘Big Girls Don’t Cry’ ‘Walk Like a Man’ ‘Big Girls Don’t Cry’ ‘Walk Like a Man’ and many many, more!

A moving and uplifting story of a brilliant, humorous and creative chemistry teacher who braves the mysterious and unfathomable clouds of dementia. "...the kind of play that can leave a lump in your throat." wrote The Post and Courier. Stay after the show for a Talk Back hosted by Stormont Vail every Friday and Saturday.

“NOËL” is a new musical by world renowned creator of the Artemis Fowl series, author Eoin Colferand movie composer, Liam Bates. It's a beautiful story of a young girl who loses her joy of performing with the disappearance of her mother. On a journey to find her, NOËL meets a motley crew of characters who want to help and in doing so they rediscover their belief in the magic of Christmas and in themselves.

THE WILD PARTY

FINAL CUT

SEASONAL ALLERGIES

NOV 9 - 18 | AD ASTRA THEATRE - THE JAYHAWK THEATRE

NOV 10 | WASHBURN UNIVERSITY THEATRE - THE VINEWOOD

NOV 30 - DEC 9 | HELEN HOCKER THEATER - GAGE PARK

Manhattan. 1920s. Queenie, a vaudeville chorine, hosts the blow-out, wild party with her vicious lover. The jazz and gin soaked night rages to a mounting sense of threat as artifice and illusion are stripped away. When midnight debauchery leads to tragedy at dawn, the high-flying characters land with a sobering thud, reminding us that no party lasts forever. The award-winning musical written by George C. Wolfe and Michael John LaChiusa will be directed by Darren Canady, Topeka.

An interactive murder-mystery game by Susan Haley. Ticket proceeds benefit theatre student scholarships at Washburn University. Enjoy hors d'oeuvres, mystery and more at The Vinewood. Go to Washburn.edu and then the Theatre Department to learn more and purchase tickets.

The holidays are all about family, right? That is 'til you take in your heartbroken brother, offer him a place to stay for a few days, only to turn around and find your home flipped upside down and your brother taking an extended vacation - on your couch. Find out what really happens when a little brother outstays his welcome, and a loving family tries to show him how to move on. 19

NOV 29 | TOPEKA PERFORMING ARTS CENTER


#785 lit + theatre

HUASCAR'S LOVE An interview with playwright of "Theodore's Love" Huascar Medina. interview by William L. Domme photo by Mandy Daniels MD Studio


"THE TITLE OF THE PLAY CAN ALSO FUNCTION AS, 'GOD'S GIFT LOVE'. THIS IS DELIBERATE ON MY PART AND HELPS FACILITATE ANOTHER AVENUE OF INTERPRETATION." -HUASCAR MEDINA Are you a Topeka native? If no, and if it’s not out of line, what events brought you ‘round to Topeka or its environs? No, I wasn’t born in Topeka. I wasn’t even raised in Kansas. I do call myself a Helianthus. I blossomed here; that’s special to me. I was born in Killeen, Texas on an army base. My father was a Drill Sergeant. I moved to Topeka in 2001 after graduating high school. Initially, I was going to go to St. Edwards University, a liberal arts Roman Catholic private institution to study journalism. As a senior in high school, I didn’t follow through with my confirmation; so it didn’t feel right. Confirmation is the third sacrament of initiation into the Catholic Church. At the time, some believed I was having a crisis of faith. I think I was just reading too much Heidegger and Sartre. To be honest, I just really missed my siblings. My maternal mother lived in Kansas with my two sisters and brother, and by that point, I had been away from my family for almost four years. Any thoughts on the history and future of writing, writers, and the writing community in Topeka and its environs? I want our talented writing community to prosper in and beyond Topeka. I consider myself a proud member of this writing community. We have numerous dedicated allies in the Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library, Washburn University, Kansas Authors Club, the Ad Astra Theatre Ensemble and seveneightfive magazine. They are invested and want our writing community to prosper as much as I do. A vibrant writing community is beneficial for everyone. It builds culture and enriches our daily lives. A vibrant writing community is more likely to police itself. It has the ability to peacefully disarm and defend. A vibrant writing community encourages activism and diplomacy. We must continue to develop this important line of communication through accessibility to the public which leads to profitability for the writer. How do you keep your butt in the chair writing? Incentives, penances, etc? My penance is a day job that is not writing. That keeps me in the chair writing. My incentive is no longer having to pay penance for doing what I love and what I am good at.

If you could tell your younger writing self anything, what would it be? Criticism is part of the process. If you don’t want to be criticized by someone else, then go write for yourself; be a diarist. You’ll still be criticized but it will be you and it won’t matter as much. Have you observed any synchronicity or parallel in writing poetry and plays? Besides the power of archetypes, no. I don’t give it much thought. I treat each as a completely different discipline. I will say, poetic language and imagery can elevate both disciplines. Your new play is titled "Theodore’s Love." What layers of meaning brought you to that title and have any new layers of meaning been unearthed in the process of bringing this play to life? The name Theodore is Greek. Its derived from Theódoros which means “God-given” (theós) “God” and (dōron) “gift”. So, the title of the play can also function as, “God’s Gift Love”. This is deliberate on my part and helps facilitate another avenue of interpretation. What is the balance between challenging the audience and caring for the audience? Give enough to get their attention, but not so much that they become distracted. Underwhelming the audience is as detrimental as overwhelming them. To be clear, I believe in a more postmodernist approach. I want to allow the audience to draw their own individual conclusions. I don’t believe in a grand truth. I want to produce work that deliberately involves the audience’s own interpretation. I believe this enriches the work and allows for greater acceptance. Its Roland Barthes, but the death of a playwright instead. Favorite Poet, Novelist, and Playwright (as of the time of this interview, of course)? My favorite poet is Rainer Maria Rilke. I refer to him as St. Rilke. His dedication to the craft was monastic. It showed in his work. He spoke with an inner voice. His spirit was able to traverse the seen and unseen. It’s why his work has permanence. His ideations are from a timeless space. I still read academic papers written about his work. Some of the disquisitions are extensive, in depth and strewed with German but I have Google translate

(thank God). Once you’ve read an accomplished poet’s complete works, you only really have two good choices; reread it or read what others have to say about it. My favorite Novelist is Haruki Murakami. He’s the only writer I actively follow to see what’s next. His work can be surreal and fatalistic. I don’t think anyone comes close today. I just don’t. If you enjoy Kafka or Vonnegut, read Murakami. If you enjoy Gabriel García Márquez or Jorge Luis Borges, read Murakami. He immerses you, in the first person, into the unbelievable. The moment you don’t believe it yourself, it’s too late. Now, you must find a way out for yourself. It’s not a matter of suspension of disbelief; it is the culmination of suspense and disbelief he built within you. It reminds me of Bastian in "The NeverEnding Story" when he’s asked to give the Princess a new name. The story becomes so compelling that an innate tendency to believe is born in the reader and they are unexpectedly forced to grapple with their own reality. Brilliant work. My favorite Playwright is Nilo Cruz. He’s the first Latino to be awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for “Anna in the Tropics”. His work has deep historical context and deals with Cuban Diaspora. He has a way with poetic imagery and an elegant simplicity to dialogue. I will always remember how I felt when I was reading “A Bicycle Country”. The play has three Cubans on a raft fleeing the island in hopes of making it to the United States. One character starts daydreaming about a place where he could just walk for miles. I thought about Kansas and my long runs on the weekends. He talked about being surrounded by the sea. He called it, “The jail of water”. And here I was, complaining about being landlocked. Perspective is everything.

THE NUTS + BOLTS THEODORE'S LOVE

written by Huascar Medina and directed by Sheri Rippel debuts Oct 11-14 at the Jayhawk Theatre, part of Ad Astra Theatre Ensemble Homegrown Playwright Project. TICKETS: AdAstraTheatre.com - $10 online / $13 a door. CAST: Candice Massie, Karen Bartlett, Larry Holland, Allan Hazlett, Cherokee Rose and Jayme Basinger.


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EVENTS

October Big Tent // RAVEN BOOKSTORE Poetry from Izzy Wasserstein, Jackie Hedeman and Judy Roitman. 7pm

OCT 25

Fall Poetry Showcase // TOPEKA + SHAWNEE COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY Featuring Annette Billings and Dennis Etzel Jr. 7pm

From There to Here: Immigrant Stories Writing Workshop // TOPEKA + SHAWNEE COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY Featuring Jose Faus. 2pm

OCT 26

OCT 26

Poetry Reading // THE WHEEL BARREL Featuring Mugabi Byenkya. 7pm

NOV 6

A curated list of lit events by Huascar Medina


AT THE JAYHAWK

photos by Jennifer Goetz | Activate the Alleyway OCT 2018

OCT 15 Documentary Screening

THE SOLOIST OCT 19 presented by Valeo. This is a story about a reporter who discovers a homeless man with schizophrenia who studied violin at Julliard. The film is based on the true story of violinist Nathaniel Ayers. Keynote speakers will be Valeo CEO, Bill Persinger and Jennifer AyerMoore, sister of Nathaniel. TICKETS: $15 event limited to 150 people LEARN MORE

like Jayhawk Theatre on Facebook for up-do-date events, movies and classes.

LAST MINUTE FOLK SERIES OCT 26 Sally and the Hurts opening for Alright, Alright

ARTY AWARDS OCT 27 presented by ARTSConnect. Awards ceremony featuring an interactive paint party. TIME: 7p TICKETS: $65

CASABLANCA NOV 3 in association with Keith the Critic. The Celtic Fox and Hazel Hill will be selling concessions. SHOW TIME: 6p TICKETS: $5

T-RELL NOV 24 presented by Deuce Alley Productions. The record release party / celebration for T-RELLs signing to NELLY's label DERRTY ENT. Featuring Young Cam, Houston Zizza, Silent Ave, KSP King Jables &+ G-Baby and JOey Da Spitta

A BIG BAND CHRISTMAS DEC 8 Topeka Swing Dance and 785 Big Band celebrate the holiday season with a swinging concert and social straight from the '20s.

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HEMP ROAD TRIP


#785 lit

THAT'S DOG CHURCH

A WOMEN'S STORY OF SOUL REVIVAL ON A RANCH

"Dogs approach each day with a great expectation. They live as if each moment is a miracle. I admire the courage they have to follow their instincts and let their hearts guide them. It makes me realize my own goals shouldn’t be aimed at making sure that everyone likes or approves of me. No! My goals should be aimed at expressing my own unique self and striving for my own definition of excellence."

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hen I first met Julie Castaneda, she was very energetic and excited. We were discussing working together to help grow her doggy daycare company, Dog Day Afternoon (DDA). I must admit at the time, I didn’t even know doggy daycare was a thing, I assumed if you owned a dog you just had to be around 24\7 to care for it. Apparently I was very wrong, as she explained about how she went from grooming dogs in the bathtub of her home, to operating two fully staffed facilities handling hundreds of clients a day. We sat in the conference room of 712 Innovations and went over some ideas on how to help strengthen her online presence in this now competitive doggy industry. As she went over the last twenty years since starting DDA, I was captivated by the authenticity of her struggle to success story. I related to so many words that paralleled my own path to entrepreneurship. She was a person who spoke direct and from the heart, so it was no surprise when I learned she was working on her first book publication, "Dog Church." Every Sunday, Julie would take the dogs she was caring for on a hike and subsequently post an inspirational Facebook status afterwards. Soon her followers began to expect her motivational words, and by 9:30 on a Sunday morning she was getting messages asking where was dog church.

“People wanted to know about it” Julie states, in our brief interview, at her South DDA facility. “There was a subtle need for those inspirational stories.” With a need for dog church to happen, Julie set out on a mission to complete an entire years worth of entries, and those 53 Sunday morning stories made up "Dog Church."

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Soon this idea outgrew her Facebook platform, and she moved her writings over to a Wordpress site. "Dog Church" continued to grow, but it wasn’t until Darlene Hurley

printed eleven of the stories out on paper that inspired Julie to write a book. "The idea for the book came from the people” Julie said, “I never saw myself as a writer but I was happy that this made other people happy.” Before long Julie's "Dog Church" went from simple Facebook statuses to a perfect bound book. While attending a business convention in Las Vegas, speaker Tony Robbins exclaimed to the audience “Someone in this room has a book laying around in their desk!” This could not have been more true for Julie, however the book wasn’t in a desk, it was now lost on an expired Wordpress site. With the help of a personal assistant, the content of the site was recovered and the book went to manuscript. “Initially I just wanted 200 copies for my clients at DDA” Julie tells me, but after shopping the book to a publisher it was clear; "Dog Church" could be much bigger than that. Kelly Caldwell of Scorpio Press fell in love with the writings and was convinced the book could be a best seller. She went to work trying to get it pressed up and moving on platforms like Amazon and Audible, and it wouldn’t be long before Julie finally had a hard copy of "Dog Church" in hand. Tears of joy came over her while she unboxed it on Facebook Live, quite the sight considering the books origin began on the same social media platform. All the Sunday hikes had led up to this moment, even if Julie didn’t know it when she started out. When I talked with her more after my questions, I could tell Julie truly wrote this book for the needs of other people. The book is a vessel aiming to perhaps bring some light into someone else’s life when they need it. On the back of the book a quote from Julie summarizes the context, “If unconditional love is the lesson we are here to learn, then dogs are our greatest teachers.” That’s Dog Church. aseveneightfive

by Tobias Harvey // CULT


"I AM CERTAIN OF ONE THING. FROM THIS TIME FORTH, WHEN OPENING THIS BOOK, I WILL READ ITS EPIGRAPH OF EPHESIAN 6:12 AS EPITAPH."

WHEN CREATION FALLS by IZZY WASSERTEIN, published by Meadowlark Books

This collection of poems brings to the fore, what we have been ignoring for far too long; a looming spiritual and physical demise. Wasserstein reaches out across vast expanses of time to admonish us of our fate. We are both warned and blamed for the malefic manifestations confronting us. The work is cryptic and suggestive, like the words of a bone reader in search of an omen.Yet, we are reminded, not only mystics can interpret the marrow of the dead; scientists study the past in fossils. The poems in When Creation Falls are divided into three separate sections: 1: Paleontology, 2: Eschatology and 3: Apocalypse.

Throughout the work, loneliness is rediscovered in new forms, in different places and times. “Night Shift at the Computer Lab” evinces technologies isolating capabilities in the age of Myspace. Already she knew, social media would not connect us and cyberspace would strand us: “It’s as if the Rapture has come/ or the last stars have burned out,/ and you check your watch. 11:17./ Forty-three minutes until reboot/”. Again, we are warned, time is running out and a new beginning is near. Eschatology was the most subversive of the sections. This branch of theology concerns itself with death, judgment, and the final destination of our souls and humankind. The pieces in this section evoked a type of religious declaim I’ve encountered in earlier work from Wasserstein; minus all the scriptural characters. I’m referring to Wasserstein’s, This Ecstasy They Call Damnation (Woodley Press, 2012), a 2013 Kansas notable book. The voice has changed in the new work, the past is not merely being recounted as testimony; it is given as proof of prophecy. Only Lot is directly referenced in Eschatology by name; reaffirming a waning closeness

with spirituality. The story of Lot is foreboding, he is directed to leave Sodom before its destruction. He then attempts to flee with his wife but she does not complete the journey in the end; another vision of abandonment. The poem “The Sacrifice Speaks”, acknowledges that even scripture cannot offer refuge: “If I could choose, I would be from a people/ with no written language.” In this piece, a sacrifice occurs on a mountain side similar to the story of Abraham on Mount Moriah with a ram and Isaac. The speaker confounds me, I’m not sure if it is the boy climbing or the ram entangled in the thicket that is sacrificed: “They say I did not know,/ but even a child can see death in his father’s eyes.” The boy, like a ram’s horns on Rosh Hashanah, must be heard; or souls in need of repentance will never be awakened. We need to take heed lest we fall of the emotional devastation innate in funerals, isolation, and rejection. We must take heed of the dehumanizing effects of technology and how not being able to give birth has the same effect. We must realize, that the demise of coral is as much a threat to our existence as the invention of the Atomic bomb. 3: Apocalypse is the final destination for the reader. In the final poem of the book, “Kansas Bible Camp” Wasserstein writes: “I’m patching my basement wall and telling you this now. It almost seems/ we should have seen what was coming,/ as if we only needed some eschatology of our lives.” I am reminded of an earlier poem in this collection titled, “Reconstruction” and the phrase: “Later, I tried to reconstruct the moment: your ever-present smile, small and crooked,/ like you knew something the rest of us/ missed, the book in your hand. “ And though I wonder whom is spoke of here, I am certain of one thing. From this time forth, when opening this book, I will read its epigraph of Ephesian 6:12 as epitaph.

by Huascar Medina // Literary Editor

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n Paleontology, Wasserstein unearths, excavates and examines the past, marking each foretoken; a hint of the future. In the poem “Married Student Housing”, signs of desolation reveal themselves in her youth. The image of a young child, fishing alone, in a mud puddle, with a toy rod is deeply dispiriting for a child and parent: “You were so lonely, my mother says./ I suppose it is true.” The child returns home with the rod broken and who broke it is left for the reader to surmise. The ambiguity consistently present in the text, urges the reader to delve deeper and look closer.


#785 lifestyle

BEHIND THE SCENES WITH YOUR CITY'S BOSS Mayor

MICHELLE

Interview by Angel Romero

Michelle De La Isla is a lot of things. Mother. Dreamer. Fighter. Survivor. She also happens to be the first Latina Mayor of the City of Topeka. To say she's hit the ground running could be a bit of an understatement. From downtown revitalization to establishing the Mayor's Task Force Against Domestic Violence, the new Mayor has set her sights on a lofty vision for the Capital City.

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rom an early age, Michelle’s life has been about persevering and helping others. (By the way- she’s quick to point out that unless you’re addressing her at a City Council meeting, it’s just “Michelle,” no need for titles). Early in life, her mom fled for safety with her and her brother to Puerto Rico to live with her grandparents. By age 17, she was homeless, and at 19, pregnant. Rather than feel sorry for herself, Michelle made a conscious decision to overcome her circumstances.

After moving to Kansas in 2000, she graduated from Wichita State University with a bachelor of science degree in biology (after eight years of trying, she notes). Her journey into community advocacy began in 2005 when she joined MANA National and traveled the country to educate women on financial literacy. This work ignited a spark that led Michelle to further community involvement, including eventually serving as the executive director of Habitat for Humanity, and being elected to City Council. Oh yeah, and she has a day job, working as the diversity and inclusion representative at Westar Energy.

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Michelle took some time out of her busy schedule to answer some questions for us. (Interview conducted summer 2018.)

Q: What has surprised you the most since taking office as Mayor? I think the biggest surprise was the community unrest after the fatal shooting of Mr. Dominique White. It was the most intense few weeks I had thus far. The raw effort of trying to get people to come together to talk, meetings after meetings, the conversations with law enforcement, with local organizers, church leaders, you name it. The heat and anger towards the issue that spilled over to me, staff and the elected leaders was rough. There were two days that I didn’t see the girls because I’d leave the house at 7a and would get home after 11p. I am so blessed by my village that supports me with the girls. This situation in particular was a crash course of how little power the role has when you need to make significant changes to administrative procedures and how delicate the fabric of community peace for ALL is, as well as the challenges of penetrating deep seeded bias on both sides of the issue, to come to a plan of action. It was like drinking water from a fire hydrant when you are given a straw to sip through. Q: What is an “average” week like for you? There is no average week. The only thing average about my week is that Tuesdays I will be at City Hall (or at least try) from 7:30a until the council meeting ends. Sometimes before 7:30p. Much of the work is in the community. I have various major projects at Westar that keep me hopping. In the end, my life is a meeting waiting to happen.


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We are the nation's best kept secret.

Listen Live to Hits from the - Davis 50s 60s 70s 80s wrendigitalmedia.com

Q: What is the biggest challenge facing our community? Like many communities nationwide, we are losing population and are trying to support the needs of families who have to work more than one job to sustain their livelihoods. This, in and of itself, makes our revenues less than we need. At the same time, community demands and needs continue to increase including roads, public safety, infrastructure, etc. It is a great time to have community conversations about becoming a community with the capability of being an “adaptive community or a smart city” where we focus on data and technology to increase services and demand for our city. Q: What is the biggest opportunity facing our community? MOMENTUM 2022! When we look at our community as a vehicle for service to our citizens and understand what it takes to grow our population and become attractive and livable to ALL, we have a spectacular framework in the Momentum 2022 plan. Our community engagement is phenomenal and the fact that this plan has the private, public and nonprofit sector involved in creating equity, quality of life, diversity and shared prosperity is a huge opportunity for success. Q: For people who want to get active in local government, how do you recommend they get started? Find the nonprofit organization you believe in. Volunteer. Learn about the mission and how it accomplishes its goals and then get on a Board. The training you get by serving on a Board of Directors is amazing and sets you up for success. Did you know the City has various Boards you can talk to your council member about being appointed to? [For a full list of city boards and commissions check out Topeka.org/government/boards-commissions/

Locally Owned and Operated

Q: What are you most looking forward to going forward in your term as mayor? Changing what people say about Topeka, seeing the Downtown corridor populated with more businesses and increasing population and shared wealth in our city. Q: Because this is seveneightfive, we also have to ask…Name your favorite local restaurant. RowHouse. Greg has a great thing going there. The food is spectacular and the environment is charming. Q: What are the top three places every Topeka visitor MUST see? Three? Really? Nah… GAGE PARK when the roses are in bloom and the pond behind it. Our amazing CAPITAL, it’s legen…wait for it… I hope you’re not lactose intolerant because the last part of that word sounds like dairy - legendary; the capital building is legendary. Thank you Jim Rinner for that jewel! NOTO is fun and zings with art and creativity. And for the running geek in me I have to add two more… LAKE SHAWNEE, running, cycling, kayaking… ah and the GOVERNOR’S MANSION – again Kayaking, hiking, running and just a good ol’ fashion picnic place. Q: Why do you love Topeka? THE PEOPLE! We have the kindest, hardest working, creative, compassionate and engaged populous any city has in the US. We are the nation’s best kept secret. aseveneightfive

To advertise contact Roger at RogerR@WrenRadio.net 3601 SW 29th Suite 207 • STUDIO: 785.783.2151


a curated list

MUSIC + EVENTS


EVENTS CALENDAR


HALLOWEEN SKATE BASH

OCTOBER FORD THEATRE REUNION / SISSY BROWN FREE STATE The Trap SHAWN AMES + THE DEAD CITY 17 ORCHESTRA The Celtic Fox Irish Pub ODELL BREWING TASTING The Wheel Barrel BE A VOICE - OPEN MIC 18 POETRY SPEAK OUT Washburn University - Memorial Union NOTO ZOMBIE CRAWL NOTO Arts District THE SOLOIST featuring Q+A 19 Jayhawk Theatre PROJECT TERROR: A HAUNTED HOUSE EXPERIENCE - OPENING NIGHT Helen Hocker Theater HOT JERSEY NIGHTS TPAC WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION Topeka Civic Theatre BLACKTOP THUNDER Sideways Bar + Grill CAROUSEL RENDEZVOUS DANCE CLUB 6th Avenue Ballroom JIMMY CARPENTER Uncle Bo's

at Mousetrap Skatepark

OCT 27 Image by Noah Neff during an ARTSConnect community paint project at Mousetrap Skatepark, April 2018.

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HOT IN TOPEKA BURLESQUE Quinton's DUELING PIANOS Arab Shriners JAZZ CIGARETTES Crooked Post Winery DMC'S TIM BURTON TRIBUTE BDAY BASH The Boobie Trap VINEWOOD VINTAGE Vinewood (Shop. Arts. Eats.] MOVIE NITES IN NOTO "The Book Of Life" MIDWEST ZOMBIE FEST Topeka Haunted Woods VINTAGE BIKE FEST + SWAP MEET Historic Harley-Davidson ELVIN GRAVES Happy Basset Brewing Co. JOSH HOYER + SOUL COLOSSAL Uncle Bo's DOWNTOWN HISTORY CRAWL Leaping Llamas Art Studio TOP CITY GROOVE BAND The Dugout Sports Bar + Grill RSC FALL JAM Norsemen Brewing Co. EDDJ 21 Crooked Post Winery 20

BRZOWSKI The Trap FORGE VIP TOURS 24 Kansas Ave Lofts BREW HA-HA 26 Vaerus Aviation DEPARTURE The Lazy Toad CULT HALLOWEEN Quinton's RODNEY CARRINGTON TPAC VILLAINS DANCE Skinny's Sports Bar + Grill TRICK OR TREAT IN THE PATCH Gary's Berries Fall Festival ANTHONY GOMES Uncle Bo's Blues Bar AL JOLLY Happy Basset Brewing Co. SILENTS IN THE CATHEDRAL KS Silent Film Festival | Grace Cathedral ALRIGHT ALRIGHT W/SALLY + THE HURTS Last Minute Folk Concert Series PATIO SOUL JAMZ Faces by Mayfield FALL POETRY SHOWCASE TSCPL 23


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WILD'N OUT #785 EDITION The Boobie Trap LINDY HOP DANCE SESSION Jayhawk Theatre Plaza Glow Westboro Mart TOPEKA PILOTS GAME KS Expocentre HOUSE OF LIBRA Book Launch Party Norsemen Brewing Co. THE NACE BROTHERS Uncle Bo's ILLUSIONIST RICK THOMAS @ TPAC TERRY QUIETT BAND w/ BRODY BUSTER Uncle Bo's Blues Bar ANNA P.S. (INDIE FOLK) The Boobie Trap TOPEKA HOLIDAY GIFT MART KS Expocentre BEERS OF THE KAW Abe + Jake's Landing VOTE DAMNIT! PARTY The Burger Stand TALK ABOUT TOPEKA LIVE TPAC BLIZZARD BASH DEMO DERBY The KS Expo Centre MAHAN Faces by Mayfield LAUGH LINES Topeka Civic Theatre DELTA HAZE Gayle's Bar TWISTED FIBER FESTIVAL St. David's Episcopal VETERANS PARADE Downtown

THERE IS SO MUCH MORE! Go to seveneightfive.com (save to your home screen) and use our progressive web app to plan your next big night out (or save money on drinks).

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SPOIL ME SILLY The Brownstone FESTIVAL OF CRAFTS Oakland Comm Ctr HAIRBALL TPAC HOMES FOR THE HOLIDAYS TOUR HOT IN TOPEKA BURLESQUE SHOW + BROWN SUGAR CABARET Jayhawk Theatre THE JEREMIAH JOHNSON BAND Uncle Bo's MIKE BABB + FRIENDS Uncle Bo's KATIE THIROUX TRIO Topeka Jazz Workshop Ramada Inn MIRACLE ON KS AVE PARADE Downtown CHOCOLATE NUTCRACKER TPAC THE OAK RIDGE BOYS TPAC FESTIVAL OF TREES KS Expocentre NOEL - THE MUSICAL TPAC GALLERY CONVERSATION WITH LARRY + BARBARA WATERMAN-PETERS Mulvane Art Museum ADULT GAME NIGHT The Break Room THOMAS PANDOLFI White Concert Hall JADE + GLORY Gayle's

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HOLIDAY PUB CRAWL Downtown Topeka TOPEKA DONUT FESTIVAL Vinewood Venue HARRY ALLEN'S ALLSTAR SAXOPHONE BAND The Ramada Inn PRAIRIE WINDS FLUE CHOIR Topeka Art Guild + Gallery DELTA HAZZ Gayle's HOLIDAY COOKIE WALK + BAKE SALE Ronald McDonald House A BIG BAND CHRISTMAS Jayhawk Theatre THE NUTCRACKER Ballet Midwest TPAC THE NUTCRACKER Kansas Ballet + Topeka Symphony at TPAC 31

DIA DE LOS MUERTOS COCO FILM SCREENING Mulvane Art Museum BONE APPETIT Prairie Band Casino + Resort 2018 ARTY AWARDS Jayhawk Theatre THE COPPERHEADS BAND The Lazy Toad DANNY GOKEY: HOPE ENCOUNTER TOUR TPAC HALLOWEEN SKATE BASH Mousetrap Skatepark FUZION FEST Fuzion School of Dance EARL + THEM Uncle Bo's GUITARS + SPURS COUNTRY CONCERT Domer Arena - KS Expocentre COSTUME MADNESS Happy Basset Brewing Co. CATCH A VIVE COSTUME PARTY Quinton's LITERARY HALLOWEEN SPOOKTACULAR The Burger Stand HALLOWEEN BASH Abigails HALLOWEEN BLACK LIGHT BASH KnJ's Sports Bar HALLOWEEN PARTY LIKE A ROCK STAR Flamingo Bar + Grill THE ANCHOR + OUR LIVES YESTERDAY The Boobie Trap EVOLUTION WWE WATCH PARTY 28 Quinton's PROJECT TERROR: HALLOWEEN NIGHT 31 Helen Hocker Theater Haunted House Experience DJ SICK + FRIENDS J+J Brew + Brew Gallery Bar SHAWN AMES + THE DEAD CITY ORCHESTRA The Celtic Fox Irish Pub 27


#785 op-ed

FRESH BREEZE OR THE SAME OLD STENCH? BE REGISTERED, BE INFORMED, AND BE A VOTER! So which is thinner: a razor blade, a piece of paper, a human hair, or Secretary of State Kris Kobach’s gubernatorial primary win on the Republican side over Governor Jeff Colyer? Well, it’s not even close.

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f the votes cast for the two, Kobach won with 50.068 percent of the vote to Colyer’s 49.931 percent, a difference of 14/100 of one percent. Both a hair and a piece of paper are about 40/100 of one percent of an inch thick and a razor blade is about 90/100 of one percent of an inch thick. The hair and paper are three times bigger than Kobach’s margin, and the blade is almost seven times bigger. So, what are we to take from these results? First; Kobach will be representing the Republican party on the ballot even though Colyer came close in securing the nomination, but remember, close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades. And second; Kobach is terrifyingly close to residing in Cedar Crest for at least four years. And if you thought eight years of Brownback/ Colyer were hard on the likely reader of seveneightfive, a Kobach administration could set back the state decades in terms of government spending on important social programs and infrastructure maintenance and improvement. Even worse will be the attacks in policy decisions on people of color, women, youth, the LBGTQIA community, religious minorities, and essentially anyone not a heterosexual, Christian, white male, preferably of affluence.

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Don’t be mistaken, Colyer’s differences with Kobach are minimal, but they are there. In seven and one-half years as lieutenant governor, he never did a thing to modify a Brownback policy or legislative directive. He, however, in my marginal contact with the two of them over nine years spent in

the Statehouse, seems to have a bit more empathy than Kobach, but that isn’t hard given Kobach’s lack of any empathy for other than the aforementioned groups. A little over 25 percent of registered voters voted in the primary Aug 7. And of that group, only 40 percent of Republican voters picked Kobach, so somewhere in the neighborhood of 12-15 percent of Kansas voters actively supported Kobach’s candidacy. Given the huge edge in Republican registered voters in Kansas, Kobach is the likely winner, unless…. Independent voters and moderate Republicans show up and vote for Laura Kelly, the Democratic nominee. Simply put, Kelly, a state senator since 2005, is a public servant. I’ve seen her work in committees and on the Senate floor. She comes to work prepared, is thoughtful, and is looking to help regular Kansans lead more productive and healthy lives. She exemplifies Kansas values of hard work, fair play, and empathy for the less fortunate in the state. Conversely, Kobach is an opportunist of the worst kind. His incompetence in running the Secretary of State's office or acting as an attorney in a court of law are well documented. Even scarier are his efforts, both statewide and nationally, to suppress voter registration in a way that favors the most conservative of candidates. He successfully kept about 35,000 potential voters off the Kansas polls, most of them young and/ or of color. I suspect, deep in his heart, he’d like to return to the days where only

white, male property owners had the right to vote. (It should be noted Kobach’s main funder is Wink Hartman, his running mate. Essentially, Hartman put up $1.5 million dollars on the hunch Kobach will run to DC at the first opportunity, letting Hartman step into the governor’s office, which he couldn’t win on his own.) The term “Kansas values” gets primo air-time during elections and it is hard to imagine that what we mean when we speak of “Kansas values,” no, not hard to imagine, it is patently anachronistic to suggest that “Kansas values” means you buy your seat at the table instead of earning it. Kobach has vowed, among other things, to set the state on the path to financial ruin through deep tax cuts as well as attacking public schools in the state by removing constitutional guarantees to ensure students get the resources they need to become successful, productive citizens. To sit on the sidelines or vote for independent candidate Greg Orman, is essentially a vote for Kobach. BOTTOM LINE: VOTE! And vote for Kelly. The irony is Kobach, a Trump wanna-be, could be elected in an election year where Trump and his policies are repudiated nationwide through an election of a House of Representatives that could easily start impeachment proceedings against him. And you can help that effort by electing Paul Davis in the Second Congressional District and Sharice Davids in the Third Congressional District. Both would be huge improvements over the two currently holding the seats…unless you’re a corporate CEO, in the upper One Percent, or both! - continued


VOTE DAMNIT! VOTER REGISTRATION INFO.: myvoteinfo.voteks.org FIND YOUR POLLING PLACE: myvoteinfo.voteks.org/VoterView/PollingPlaceSearch.do

Another important statewide race is for the Secretary of State with Democratic hopeful and Kansas wunderkind turned research professor, Brian McClendon, hoping to win that seat and bring his skills which helped to build ubiquitous educational and lifestyle tools like Google Earth and Google Maps to make improvements here, at home, for Kansans. The Kansas Senate is not up for re-election this year, but members of the House of Representatives are. One current local rep aligned with the Kobach agenda is Ken Corbett. He is being challenged by Democrat Sarah Coats for the 54th District. No stranger to challenging the status quo, Ms. Coats is deserving of your vote, as well, stating recently, her run for this seat is an opportunity for Kansans to have a House of Representatives that more accurately reflects its citizens by replacing Mr. Corbett with a single mother, who supports labor and isn’t afraid to question authority. Progress doesn’t have to be slowed by continuing to elect those politicians who enact regressive social policies that attract big money from corporate elitists while leaving the majority of us sidelined in the political arena. And victories of these politicians who can set Kansas back on the progressive course it was born into don’t need to be done by skin of your teeth, razor’s edge, paperthin margins. Grab your neighbor, grab your friend, time to head to the polls again. This is a critical election. It is time for Kansans to stand against those who support bigotry and hate in all their forms. Racism, misogyny, and homophobia are three of the most evil. Don’t let Kobach take the state down a dark and dangerous path. The most effective way? VOTE for Laura Kelly! Op-Ed by Tom Krebs with collaboration from William L. Domme and Kerrice Mapes. Article is not representative of all contributors of seveneightfive magazine.

GET OUT THE VOTE artist Michelle Leivan ArtPrintExpress.com

HOW DO WE SAY THANK YOU? WITH FREE BEER. SEVENEIGHTFIVE / FORGE YOUR FUTURE "VOTE DAMNIT PARTY": Exercise your right to vote and then enjoy a beer (21+) or soda on us. It is our way of saying Thank You. (We don't care or ask who you voted for, just that you voted. Wear your sticker for easy recognition.] ELECTION NOV 6 | 4:30 - 7p @ THE BURGER STAND | College Hill

@FORGEFUTURETOPEKA


#785 women who rock

DANCE BEFORE THE MUSIC IS OVER. D LIVE BEFORE YOUR LIFE IS OVER.

THEATRE DANCE WORKSHOP instructor: Jennifer Walker show: The Band's Visit OCT 27 | 10 - 11:15a TICKETS: $13 for 75-minute class. Ages 13 and up Learn more on DTSOD FB page or call the studio

I’ve known Sally Glassman for over 30 years through the theatre world, but most importantly, as one of my best friends. I’ve had the opportunity to meet her wonderful family, see her work her magic at DTSOD and was fortunate enough to work on stage with her at TPAC in Jesus Christ Superstar. Her eyes always light up when I’m at her home, having dinner and perhaps a cocktail as she tells me about her amazing grandmother, Dorothy, and what she brought to the dancing world. Her mother, Carolyn, is also quite a character and gives me more hell than anybody around. They are an inspiration to all. I’m proud to call them friends and honored to share their story. orothy Lewis Thomas went into Vaudeville in 1934 with two of her best friends. “The 3 Dorothy’s” was the name of their act. Dorothy, Dotty and Dot (was our Dorothy’s name). Dorothy starred in several shows and fundraisers for the Jayhawk Theatre. Her mother, Florence Lewis, used to play the piano at the Jayhawk ever Saturday during the silent movie matinée. Dorothy Thomas left Vaudeville and married Larry Thomas. She started teaching dance in exchange for their daughter, Carolyn, to go to preschool. This was in 1942. Dorothy's first revue was in the spring of 1943 at the Woman's Club downtown. Larry turned the basement of their home into a dance studio. Dorothy Thomas School of Dance (DTSOD) was one of only a few studios in town for many years. Many former students of Dorothy’s became dance instructors all over the country. And several performers have come out of this dance studio such as Sandy Rings, Miss Kansas 1971, winner of the talent portion in the Miss America pageant and in the top 10. Tommar Wilson of Broadway, film (as a troll in "Disney’s Frozen") and TV (Netflix original Movie and "Law and Order"). Tommar starred on Broadway in "Hairspray" and "Hair" and for years in "Book of Mormon." He is now starring in Chicago in the musical "Hamilton" as Alexander Hamilton.

DOROTHY THOMAS SCHOOL OF DANCE

TAPPING FOR 75 YEARS Daryl D. Hendrix | photo provided

Jeff Kready is another performer out of the DTSOD studio who has been seen on Broadway in “Le Misérables," "Billy Elliot” and “Gentleman‘s Guide To Love and Murder.” Antwayn Hopper, who has done a Netflix original TV series and was in the Broadway musical “Hair.” (He just happened to take Tommar’s place when he went on to do “Book of Mormon.”) Antwayn is now in Chicago performing in “Jesus Christ Superstar.”

DTSOD has been a Topeka tradition for 75 years. The little studio on Anderson Terrace (not in city limits at the time) where a woman started her own business in the early ‘40s, has continued to grow even since her passing in 1988. Her successors, three successful women, including her daughter, an impetus for the little studio. Carolyn Glassman, Dorothy’s daughter. took over the business with her daughter Sally. When Carolyn’s middle daughter Susan Weber graduated from college, she also entered the family business. Carolyn’s youngest, Janet has been the stage manager of every dance recital since 1989. And they couldn’t put the show on without her. All four of Dorothy’s grandchildren and five great grandchildren performed in the 75th recital this past June. Susan takes students to NYC for dance classes at studios on Broadway. She also took a group of students to London to dance for the 2012 Olympics. Both Carolyn and Sally have choreographed numerous musicals in and around Topeka, including Helen Hocker Theater, Topeka Civic Theatre (TCT), TCT's Academy and several high schools. Sally recently choreographed TPAC’s "Jesus Christ Superstar." The former classroom in Helen Hocker’s Theatre was dedicated to Dorothy Thomas while Carolyn and Sally were choreographing “Damn Yankees” in 1989. DTSOD has since moved out of the little basement on Anderson; their current studio is located at 2603A SW 21st Street. Dorothy Thomas School of Dance is a three generation business, built by women, celebrating 75 years of love and dedication. We should consider every day lost on which we have not danced at least once!


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I'll Be Seeing You / On The Sunny Side [of Jackson Ave]. Big Band, Flappers + Moonshine and Swing.

STOMPIN' AT THE JAYHAWK Natalie Davis | photos by Denise J. Long / Long Lasting Memories Photography

we needed to get swing dancing in Topeka. Luckily, Taryn knew Robin Bonsall, one of the board members with the Jayhawk Theatre. We quickly started brainstorming on the logistics of bringing this historic dance to the capital city. Not only would this be sharing our love of jazz music and dance with more people, but this could also benefit Topeka in a bigger way. Topeka Swing Dance was born!

Fast forward to the present. I was processing a friend’s application for a non-profit that I helped facilitate. Under “other activities,” she wrote swing dancing. I immediately stopped what I was doing and messaged her asking to take me to a lesson with her. She happily obliged and my fate was sealed.

The Jayhawk Theatre was built in 1926, bringing a venue for movies and entertainment to downtown Topeka. After a long run, in 1976 the theatre closed and remained so until 1993 when supporters of the theatre formed a 501(c)(3) nonprofit called the Historic Jayhawk Theatre, Inc. This nonprofit works to restore the Jayhawk Theatre and once again to provide the community with entertainment options in downtown Topeka.

A few weeks later, I found myself at a beginner’s swing dancing lesson over in Lawrence. The focus for evening was on the “Charleston.” This is the swing dance that involves a ton of kicking and flapping arms. I tripped my way through the lesson, trying to stay on beat and in rhythm. I laughed for the entirety of the lesson; two hours and many sore muscles later, I was hooked and haven’t looked back since. Within weeks of learning the Charleston, I had learned East Coast swing and the Lindy Hop. As a musician, East Coast swing threw me for a loop. East Coast swing and one of its fraternal twins, the Jitterbug, is a six-count dance. Training my brain to do a six-count rhythm to an eight-count song was difficult at first, but with a few hours of practice I had the hang of it. I started inviting everyone I knew to lessons and we started forming our own community focused on dancing and having fun. Swing dancing became a way for me to get out of my head, move my body, and connect with others around me in a way that I had never done before. Swing dancing was born in the 1920s out of Harlem as a dance that was paired with big band music. The Savoy Ballroom was one of the main event spaces for jazz music and dancing events. It’s of note that the Savoy was one of first ballrooms in the nation that had a nodiscrimination policy. The only thing the people wanted to know there was if you could dance. From the Savoy, the Savoy Lindy Hoppers emerged. Subgroups from this group would go professional, such as “Whitey’s Lindy Hoppers,” and would perform on Broadway or even in films. This is where we get some of the only authentic footage we have from this time. Frankie Manning, one of Whitey’s Lindy Hoppers, added an aerial move to his Lindy hop, starting another subsect of the Lindy Hop that can still be seen performed today. There is a place in Kansas City called The Chesterfield that has swing dancing just about every Friday night of the week. The first time I went, I traveled with new-to-me friends from the swing group. As a stay-at-home mom at the time, traveling with an aerospace scientist, mathematician, and woman studying underdeveloped countries and anthropology, I was floored that we all had come together for the love of dancing. I knew I had found something special and wanted to nurture that connection and community that I had found within swing dancing. Enter meeting Taryn Temple. Another Topekan, she and I connected every once in a while at Lawrence or Kansas City events. Once our group got off the ground in Lawrence, Taryn started traveling more and more to these events and after talking several times, we realized

Robin, Taryn, and I met a few months ago to decide on how we would bring our love of swing to the Jayhawk theatre. The theatre has been putting on a third Saturday event in the Jayhawk Walk, the hallway that connects the theatre to the tower. This event focuses on movement throughout the day with classes being offered to the community in Zumba, line dancing, and even kitten yoga. We figured that offering a swing class that night would be the perfect fit for this event. Taryn and I dance because we love everything about it, from the history of it to the exercise we get. We want to share this relic of a dance with as many people as possible. We really didn’t realize that there were so many other people hungry to learn how to swing dance. Taryn made a Facebook event to get the word out and quickly realized that the Jayhawk Walk was not going to suffice for our event. There were just too many people interested in it! With so much interest, we moved our event to the auditorium in the theatre. Hazel Hill Chocolates offered to cater our event and the Celtic Fox brought in their portable bar. It was a community effort that really showed us that Topeka is ready for swing to become a thing that people look forward to. That first event Topeka Swing Dance held at the theatre planted some seeds for our scene and for the theatre. Because the event went so well and that we have similar goals in mind, Topeka Swing Dance is now working with the Jayhawk Theatre to both build a swing scene in Topeka and to raise funds to help in the rehabilitation of the Jayhawk Theatre. I recently asked a bunch of my dancer friends what their favorite things about swing were and more people answered than anything, the connection with other people that they otherwise would never have met before. That spoke volumes to me. Dancing is so valuable in our present, fast paced, disconnected world; slowing down and connecting with a person for a three to four minute dance is life giving.

GET INTO THE GROOVE

Topeka Swing Dance Events. Get more, follow them on Facebook. Continuing 8-count Lindy Hop (Three Lesson Series) NOV 1, 8 + 15 A Big Band Christmas DEC 8 37

I

started playing the clarinet in the fifth grade. From as early as I can remember, I loved playing jazz music. To me, it seemed to have more soul than any other genre. Though I never played in the jazz band that my high school had, I tried to never miss one of their concerts. Once they started playing, you couldn’t help but pulse with them, swinging from note-to-note.


#785 lifestyle

[THE STORIES CONTINUE]

KANSAS YOUNG DAVIS This is Davis Hammet. When I spoke to him he has been awake for 32 hours straight, working. Part 1 Davis was the Director of Operations for Planting Peace. He co-created and lived in the Equality House for five years and is the founder of Loud Light, an organization that seeks to empower underrepresented communities in Kansas and promote youth civic participation. “Being attracted to more than one gender added some difficulties growing up. I didn’t come out to my parents until the week I was driving up here to create the Equality House. I didn’t want my parents to learn that I was bi on CNN, but I had always put it off because I thought, ‘Well, what if I marry a woman? Why would I go through all those difficulties?’ When I was younger, even as early as elementary school, whenever I would get same sex attraction, I would hate myself for it. Around fourth or fifth grade I attempted suicide a couple of times. I now understand that I didn’t want to die. I had these feelings that I was attracted to someone who was the same gender as me and I hated those feelings and I wanted that to die. I was born in the 1990s, so there weren’t that many icons telling me that this was okay or safe. I’m also the youngest of five kids, almost all boys and male culture is very homophobic and so even growing up around guys everyone was making queer jokes. I don’t hold it against anyone because everyone was doing it. I believe that to some degree everyone is racist, sexist, homophobic, is sick with prejudice and it’s everyone’s struggle to

challenge that prejudice every day. Everyone wants to say, ‘Well, I’m not racist, I’m not sexist,’ but the thing is that I was once so homophobic that I tried to kill someone for same sex attraction and that person was me. That was what my suicide attempt was; it was homophobia. I’m lucky enough to have a really amazing family that when I was beginning to attempt suicide I remembered constantly thinking, ‘I can’t do this to my parents.’ I wanted to kill myself, but it would be so unfair to my parents who had given me so much. There’s no note I could write, there’s nothing I could do. If a child commits suicide, the parents struggle with that forevermore. I kept all that completely hidden, buried in for a long time. First I came out to my mom and she cried, but she hugged me and said, ‘I don’t understand this at all, but I’m going to figure it out and I love you so much.’ The dream situation of coming out to a parent, right? Then I went to tell my dad and he just started laughing and he just goes, ‘Well, you’re such a people person.’ That was his response. It was so unfazed. Some people come out to their parents and they’re like ‘We always knew,’ but my parents were shocked. Still, my mom said she was going to figure it out and my dad just laughed and they still love me and this didn’t change anything. It was such a blessing. Having to be in the closet about anything is such a burden. Being in the closet about something fundamental to yourself causes so much harm. And then I came out to the whole world. After I lived in the rainbow house for five years there’s no closet big enough in this world that I can go back into at this point." aseveneightfive

Read Part 2 at KansasYoung.com | by Isreal Sanchez | original post MAY 2018


photo by EJ Drake // e drake photogrpahy

MARTY This is Martinez Hillard. He goes by Marty. | Part 3 HOW CAN WE BEST PUT INTO PRACTICE THE IDEA OF BEING ACTIVE IN OUR COMMUNITIES, NOT JUST BEING VOCAL ON SOCIAL MEDIA? “I think the easiest thing people can do is ask each other how they’re doing. Whether that’s your coworker or close friend or family members, one way to put that in to practice is to ask how we’re doing and be okay with whatever people say for an answer. We have an obligation to one another, to acknowledge each other and acknowledge each other’s humanity and to be kinder to one another and to give room for one another to grow. I don’t think we have enough space or time in this world to just cancel each other out. That’s not to excuse behaviors. There are a lot of gaps in our society and a judicial system that doesn’t hold people accountable the way that they need to be held and I think it’s good that we’re having those conversations. I think it’s good that people are given platforms to be able to speak freely about what they’ve experienced. I know for me that’s very important. But I also know that before the Internet was poppin’, I had plenty of people in my life as a young man that were willing to correct me but not throw me away. And if I didn’t have that, I wouldn’t be the person that I am today. So everyday I’m trying my hardest to be that person to other people, just short of tolerating their hatred, bigotry or racism. I’m trying my best to extend as most grace as possible, knowing that there are a lot of people who gave it to me when I needed it the most and didn’t deserve it. That’s my biggest advice. Just start there and then follow your heart, wherever it takes you, in terms of filling other needs in your community. Figure out what you have a passion for and do it.” aseveneightfive Read Part 1 & 2 at KansasYoung.com | by Isreal Sanchez | original post FEB 2018

"I'm Israel Sanchez and I'm a writer, photographer, blogger, podcaster and storyteller. Kansas Young is a passion project/ community where I photograph and interview young artists and entrepreneurs living in Kansas. By telling their stories, not only do I showcase the ever-growing talent pool of creatives in Kansas, but I also hope to bring the community together, one post at a time." Israel Sanchez and Kansas Young was featured in the spring issue of seveneightfive. Israel has a gift of drawing out the stories of others. He has a passion for discovering what makes this city great. Each voice is uniquely powerful and sometimes uncomfortably raw. We humbly continue our feature by providing you a sound bite of two of those voices. To read the full articles and meet other Kansas Young, go to KansasYoung.com. 39

‘‘

When our generation takes over, it'll be a completely different world...There's this revolution all around us that hasn't been activated because it has been misled to not know its most powerful weapon is the vote." - Davis


MUG SHOT

BEER EVENTS Odell Brewing Tasting THE WHEEL BARREL OCT 17 | 6p BREW HA-HA 2018 Vaerus Aviation Forbes Field OCT 26 | 6p 2018 BAR OLYMPICS: LABOR EDITION Norsemen Brewing Co. OCT 27 | 2p BEERS OF THE KAW Abe + Jake's Landing NOV 4 | 3p TOPEKA BREWFEST South Kansas Ave [b/w 7th + 8th Streets] NOV 17 | 12p

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Follow @TopekaBeer Facebook + Twitter

BOTTOM OF THE NINTH

I

MUG SHOT |William L. Domme

t’s Fall in Topeka. Cars hiss along damp roads strewn with red, gold, and green leaves that might remind you of that old ‘80s song, Karma Chameleon, as they paper the pavement. It’s time for a beer, or two. And coming up, which you can see on the opposite page, are some seasonal releases from some of the breweries making great beers that taste, smell and feel better than the more famous brands that saturate the market. In eager anticipation for those releases, I went out in search of a few to find that they have not yet hit the shelves this season. The heat of the summer dragged on for so long, I was hoping that cracking open a New Belgium Accumulation would bring on the year’s first snow sooner. Timing is everything and though the brews on my list were not yet available, the folks at Meyer’s Wine + Spirits in Barrington Village did point me to the tasting that they have from 1-7p every Saturday. And, oh my readers, I was smack in the middle of that window. They had Apothic

Brew (a coffee infused red wine) and Five Farms Single Batch Crème Liqueur (think Bailey’s Irish Cream) and think again. Five Farms is rich and creamy, warming, with a bit of coconut and coffee. Five Farms should be in every cup of coffee now as the weather settles towards winter. Adaptation is king. I took the show on the road and headed to Happy Bassett to pick up a growler, The Gatsby IPA, to go. I then ran over to Norsemen Brewing in NOTO and was going to get a growler and head home but ran into a friend and we sat down for a pint or two, discussing goings on around town, his upcoming play, Theodore’s Love, and the joys and trials of raising young kids. Now, to the point. It is October and that means the World Series is coming. Competition is heightened. The air is crisp. You probably can’t throw a bottle cap without hitting a glowing fire pit. (It’s closing in on the election, as well.) But, tonight was for baseball. Red Sox versus the Yankees. Classic matchup. Kept my Royals hat on, but we can talk about them next year. And, in the house it was Odin’s One EyePA(Norsemen) versus Gatsby (Happy Basset). Little secret, by the end of the night they were great friends. They are both well-recommended and fit the autumn well. So, if you catch yourself heading to a gathering, keep an eye out for Odin’s or have a great Gatsby. Rest well in the knowledge that good people are making great beers in this community. aseveneightfive


BEER NOTES NEW BELGIUM HEMPORER American IPA (ABV 7%) Yes, it’s from Colorado. Yes, it’s dank. But, no, you won’t be stoned out of your gourd. It’s lovingly called an HPA and the H is for hemp. The folks at New Belgium have taken the best of IPA and married it to the natural aroma some of our readers may be more familiar with than others.

NEW BELGIUM ACCUMULATION Belgian IPA (ABV 6.20%) A go to when the mercury starts to fall and hopefully the snow, too. The coincidence is, this beer is great ice cold. Some IPA’s are enjoyable a little more on the cool to room temperature side. But, stick these in the snow and crack ‘em open for a nice solstice party.

ODELL ISOLATION Winter Warmer (ABV 6%) Don’t let the name fool you. It’s not going to have you seeing redrum in the hotel you’re supposed to be taking care of while the mountain’s closed down. Low carbonation, medium amber, and solid but not overwhelming bitterness beneath a frothy head that sticks to the glass.

DESCHUTES JUBELALE Winter Ale (ABV 6.7%) Near to Isolation with a darker amber body, coffee colored head. A softer bitterness at the end of each drink to balance the sweeter caramel-like entry.

SIERRA NEVADA CELEBRATION

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American IPA (6.8%) Coming from California, this is a smooth talker that has a rich flavor capable of switching to the bitter end. Price is likely more economical than a few of the others, but it holds its own just as well.


#785 flavor

An animated poeticism simmers in the RowHouse. Like a poem whose meaning can change depending on the reader; the same patron on any given night will be, however free to pursue their culinary happiness, bound to perceive, breathe, taste, and hear the RowHouse in a way unique to that moment, naked to that taste bud, never to be recreated or imitated from that point on.

THE I LAST OF THE BASIL

t reminds me of Robin Williams’ role in "Dead Poets Society;" how Greg Fox lifts up what has gone before, what’s currant, I mean current, and what’s to come. Carpe Diem. But it is The House which whispers to us those fateful words, not the teacher. Or, perhaps, The House feeding the teacher.

The soil in the garden yields fresh herbs only steps away from the kitchen. The house sits proudly, having weathered many a storm, natural and not. And, so it goes for the RowHouse. As the last of the basil for the year garnishes the featured drink, Blastini, and we settle in for an evening meal amongst friends and family, the heat of the summer lingers, hopefully just this one last day. The calendars set to October belie the unseasonably hot afternoon; these days, many moons ago, referred to as Indian Summers. This writer is not so sure that term shouldn’t go the way of the dodo. I bet that was a delectable bird at one time. Maybe. A diner can dream, can’t he? Improvisation and adaptation are qualities common to every living species on this planet we call home. Apparently, qualities not harnessed by the extinct dodo. As eating is crucial to a person’s survival it should be no surprise that the most rewarding dining experiences are had when improvisation and adaptation are key ingredients. Transformation happens inside and outside and what’s transformed first is dependent on variable circumstances and strategies. A philosophical examination of progress

will excavate truth and nourish an understanding of how it comes to be that at some point you have a being in a form familiar and understandable and as time goes by and life works its magic upon the being, it becomes something renewed and made more interesting for the passage of time. AND SO, WE COME TO THE ROWHOUSE. There is a very vital sense of life these days as you approach on the front walk. In the warm seasons, trees rustle and shade the walk and potted plants stand ready to greet you atop the front steps. The Restaurant stands out from the whole of the row with its pale facade stuck between the incarnadine bricks of the rest. Tall doors open to a narrow, deep hall beset on one side with stairs and entry to one of three levels of dining areas on the other side. A sense of ease is given from first greeting to last plate that words like pretentiousness and posturing need not be brought in past the threshold. Obviously, table manners are always appreciated, but this is not the place where your head needs to be screwed on with a tie or ruby necklace. The people inside making this place hum want very much to share their House with you; share their culinary creations with you and yours. The RowHouse is both rooted in Topeka history and unusual to its present surroundings. The building breathes and if you find yourself in its environs, you will participate in its circulatory system, inhaling herbs growing in the garden and exhaling to feed the same.

by William L. Domme // photos provided


A TOAST TO THE HOUSE [and Greg Fox].

THE ROWHOUSE HAS A NEW HEAD OF HOUSE.

Greg Fox welcomed seveneightfive into his home to discuss a transformative process underway albeit alluded to his dinner guests for the past several years, now.

"Change is constant, embrace it,” Greg said of his approach to life. He has announced that he has stepped away from the day-to-day operations to allow the skilled cooks the ability to breathe their life into the building, much the way he did back in 2007. And they’ve been at it for years; working together to plan each new week’s meals, working quickly to meet the demands of patrons with dietary concerns, and putting their heads together to see what new risks might pay off for the RowHouse and its diners. With Anna Springer, Steven Stanek, Pablo Martinez and Ryan Wills steering the ship, Greg looks toward a six-week culinary stint in Malaga, Spain. When you talk with Greg you get a great sense of the importance of life and of living things; along with that, the critical ability to nurture growth. Greg has a pleasant

smile when he describes creating a living restaurant, “and as a living thing, new life comes in.” Like a gardener, tending, watching, waiting, the garden full of plants that could well grow on their own but given a little help, a little direction, the garden grows well and the produce make ingredients. The staff he says, not just the four mentioned above, realizes the beauty of a well-functioning restaurant. In talking with the new heads of the house: Anna, Ryan, Steven, and Pablo, the idea of risk was something they were very keen to embrace. The willingness to jump out of patterns or ruts if they saw the hint of their deleterious effects. And jump they have; adding weekday lunch hours, evolving the current prix fixe dinner menu to offering items a la carte, and their newest risk the RowHouse LunchBox, a catering service devised to accommodate groups of 10 or more. < continued on next page

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A work depicting this house of edible art would meet the level of foreshadowing in works by Coleridge, Longfellow, Shakespeare, and the like. Not technically “dinner theater,” but if you were keen to the clues’ a-ha moments abound. In this chrysalis, from the menus to the cooks, “The House,” as they affectionately call it has been speaking to patrons of this transformative process for years.


< continued on next page

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;

Change is constant. Embrace it."

The RowHouse was born in 2007. The House was born in 1878.

- Greg Fox


this is the recipe of life said my mother as she held me in her arms as I wept think of those flowers you plant in the garden each year they will teach you that people too must wilt fall root rise in order to bloom. —Rupi Kaur

We know this for sure, the RowHouse is a sustainable venture and provides wanted and needed stimulation to palettes and gastronomy in this city. The HOUSE becomes a gift; one that has been reworked, transformed and sustained to be given to the community again. The building first rose on the site under the ownership of the first mayor of Topeka. Through various owners it came to a state of disrepair and in the early 1990s was set to be condemned and demolished. I can only imagine its old bones shuddered and felt the sunset on its back hoping for one more morning as its square-eyed windows looked east. One more spring. That it had so much more life to give but was looking upon a fate of impending non-existence. It could be said that the RowHouse was past its wilting and was set to fall, as the flowers in Rupi Kaur’s poem, so must this thing follow the recipe of life. Don’t fret, come spring the basil will return.

In the meantime, enjoy the warmth and heartiness of all the dishes that autumn and winter bring to the RowHouse. With a staff of around 20, the future of the RowHouse is on track to turn over another productive year. Greg has set his heart and hands on the building on Van Buren. He has tended it as a caretaker, ready to place it in capable hands that would carry it into a new season. With Anna Springer, Ryan Wills, Pablo Martinez, and Steven Stanek and the rest of the gang, the future looks as rosy as the garden lights through a nice glass of Montebuena, a Spanish red that could toast a job well done. Salud to the dedicated staff of the Row House who see it through its daily, weekly, yearly, and decades of changes. To the House!

come ye lovers of culture and progress But the RowHouse Restaurant offers a delightful irony: No matter how contemporary the atmosphere, the art, or the menu the place has Topeka history etched inherently in every brick and doorstep. A cabinet near the kitchen is salvaged from the old Norva Hotel (an early Topeka brothel). The staircase is lined by a stunning hand-carved wooden banister beneath a modest chandelier with an intricate art nouveau fixture...Besides the delights of its 1878 architecture, the RowHouse Restaurant has aesthetic permanent collections, including

early Topeka photography (picture the 19th century owners of the Dibble's Grocery Store on North Kansas Avenue staring stoically out from their frame as you powder your nose in the bathroom) plus original works of art like the twisted clay torsos and meditative faces... Its location in one of the oldest surviving structures in Topeka bodes well for the new RowHouse Restaurant. "It's time to have the place where the lights are low and the music and the food is good," says Fox. "The walls were begging for it."

45

The next generation of delicious. Circa 2018.

excerpt from FEB 2007 seveneightfive by Leah Sewell // photo by Matt Porubsky


LAST THOUGHTS

B O X LUNCH F

rom oiled goatskin to synthetic fibers; the way you carry lunch from the home fire to the worksite says a lot more to the archaeologist than the co-worker.

As the Industrial Revolution moved full steam ahead workers digging treasures down mines or walking high rises on skeletal iron tightropes - tooled around for sturdy pails to carry food from the home to work. This due to the restrictions of time or fortune to stop work long enough to clean up, dress up, dine out, and hob-nob when the noonwhistle blew. These workers scrapped coffee and tobacco tins and stuffed them with the day’s lunch. Lunch pails no doubt, begrimed with grease, grit, ink, and dust, yet opening at lunchtime, whatever time of day the shift might sing its dinner squeal, bright with bread, meats, and what-have-you’s of our industrial forebears. From there, it’s told, that children emulating their working parents stocked their own little pails for school and from there grew a fledgling industry of character-driven lunch boxes capitalizing on the fleeting popularity of pop culture icons. This all born from blue collar workers’ needs to get their food from home to lunch intact and protected from the arduous journeys below or above ground. What a wonderful homage to the blue collar worker that the lunch box has taken another iteration and found its way into boardrooms and conferences, cubicles and committee meetings.

William L. Domme | photo by RowHouse Restaurant

THE LOCAL LUNCH BOX ANSWER INSIDE THE BOX. THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT ALL 3 Front PLACES:

Door

Minimum order of 10 24-hour notice required Offer delivery or pick-up Will individualize boxes with names Offer vegan, vegetarian and Glutenfree options Offer online ordering or email submission

FIELD OF GREENS The lunch box Godfather of Topeka, Field of Greens has been boxing and delivery individualized lunches for over a decade. Offerings include sandwich, wraps and salads and prices start at $7.50. 785 RECOMMENDED: Cali Club on Croissant (turkey, Swiss, bacon, sprouts and Ranch) with a small side salad and potato salad.

FRONT DOOR CATERING Food made with love, seasoned with humor, Front Door Catering started out as award-winning BBQ turned caterers and the food truck turned your go-to for your next business lunch. All lunches are $10 and include sandwich, side, chips and a homemade brownie. 785 RECOMMENDED: Tie between the Cuban Sliders and Smoked Chicken Wrap with pesto aioli.

ROWHOUSE RESTAURANT A fresh, elevated take on the old lunch. All lunch boxes come with snack mix, brownie and Quinoa salad. Sandwiches are served on 21 Grain Bread and lunches are $14.50. 785 RECOMMENDED: Veggie Deli (cured and sliced beets + roots vegetables, mayo, lettuce, pesto].


$50 OFF SUBMERSIBLE SUMP PUMP WITH INSTALLATION

“ Don’t Wig Out, Call Iwig!”

785-608-1233

iwigplumbing.com

10% OFF SUMERSIBLE SUMP PUMP AND WATER-POWERED BACKUP WITH INSTALLATION


ATTENTION! THIRD SHIFT BEER DRINKERS Drink Specials - Beer - Pizza REJOICE.

NOW Serving at 6am! SELF-SERVICE LAUNDRY

Laundry Attendant Always Available

DROP-OFF LAUNDRY SERVICES 24-hour Turn Around $1 per lb, 15lb min.

Ask About Our Commercial Rates

21st & Washburn | OPEN AT 6am CLOSE 2am | Daily Specials - Go to LouiesTopeka.com Gift Cards Available

Profile for seveneightfive magazine

seveneightfive FALL / WINTER 2018 XIII VI  

SEFM XIII VI

seveneightfive FALL / WINTER 2018 XIII VI  

SEFM XIII VI

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