a product message image
{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade

Page 1

ART, ENTERTAINMENT, LIFESTYLE + LOCAL FLAVOR WOMEN WHO ROCK 2020 • VOL. XIV ISSUE II

WOMEN WHO ROCK

FREE FOR YOU AND ME


WE ARE

mothers, dog moms, community activists, partners, artists, authors, fitness gurus

Our standards of quality far surpass fresh produce, it’s the core ingredients in everything we do. These are just a few talented, hardworking and creative Women Who Rock, and It is a privilege to say these women work for The Burger Stand. Help us celebrate these women (and all), for who they are and what they do. Cheers!


A New BEGINNING FOR THE TOPEKA COUNTRY CLUB

TO

.

P E K A C.C EST. 1905

Come & Experience

OUR $7.5 MILLION TRANSFORMATION

membership - golf - tennis - health & wellness - swim - dining www.topekacc.org

CONTACT GINA PATTERSON FOR A PRIVATE TOUR (785) 354-8561.


WOMEN WHO ROCK 2020

|

VOL XIV • ISSUE II

IN THIS ISSUE 11 // TRANSCENDENT DELI

16 // WINDMILLS, CUPID + TRUE LOVE

19 // ST. PATRICK'S DAY - TOPEKA STYLE 22 // SUNFLOWERS

24 // CELEBRATING MAKERS

26 // TALKING + WALKING TOPEKA 27 // HARDBACK HEROINES 30 // A NATURAL SPARKLE 32 // SERIOUS SWING

34 // FROM BOOKWORM TO HUMMINGBIRD 36 // STYLIN' NOTO

PRINT DATES: MARCH // JUNE // SEPT // DEC ALWAYS RELEVANT: seveneightfive.com

IN EVERY ISSUE 08 // PROGNOSTICATIO WITH RUP 10 // FILM

12 // MUST READ - LOCAL AUTHORS 13 // PARTY FOR A CAUSE 14 // THEATRE

18 // MUSIC CALENDAR 38 // KANSAS YOUNG

52 // MUG SHOT @TOPEKABEER

38 // KANSAS YOUNG

40 // DEAR BLACK WOMEN 42 // CAPE BREAK

44 // CHOCOLATE SUNSHINE

46 // A SPOONFUL OF AWESOME

48 // ORANGE YOU GLAD - DINER 24 50 // LIFE DU JOUR

52 // CRAFT THEORIES CRUSHED 53 // COCKTAIL PARTY TIME 54 // BLINTZE BRUNCH

COVER ART BY CHRIS OMNI seveneightfive magazine

| est. 2006 | seveneightfive.com


DISTRIBUTION Advertisers + Business Partners are BOLDED. Please stop by their business and thank them for their support. seveneightfive magazine is FREE because of them!

DOWNTOWN

The Celtic Fox HANOVER PANCAKE HOUSE Juli’s Bistro LUIS’ PLACE Ramada Inn ROWHOUSE RESTAURANT The BreakRoom TPAC Topeka Blue Print Warehouse 414 THE GLOBE MIDWEST BARTER

WEST

La Rocca’s Pizza Southwind Gallery The Lazy Toad Pizagels Yuki HELEN CROW / KIRK + COBB

SOUTH + EAST

Abigail’s Blind Tiger The Landing Tacos el Mexicana THE VINEWOOD TOPEKA COUNTRY CLUB CROOKED POST WINERY AMIGO'S DOG DAY AFTERNOON BLUE DOT STRATHMAN SALES CAPITAL CITY GAMES + MUSIC

NORTH / OAKLAND / NOTO

Bradley’s Cafe NOTO Burrito Matryoshka Tattoo Wellers ARTSCONNECT BRASS RAIL TAVERN FRONT DOOR CATERING GAYLE'S STUDIO 62 WREN RADIO

COLLEGE HILL / MIDTOWN

Oscars Louie's Lounge Mulvane Art Museum PT's College Hill The Trap BACKS BY POPULAR DEMAND The Dutch Goose Live Music Institute Speck's Tavern TSCPL (LIBRARY) BALLET MIDWEST Topeka Civic Theatre THE BURGER STAND

5


COLOPHON • ISSUE 91 EST. JUNE 2006 ONLY LOCALLY OWNED. PERIOD.

Only locally owned businesses are allowed to advertise in seveneightfive print. We proudly print at Mainline Printing in Topeka, KAN

MISSION

DISTRIBUTION + SUBSCRIPTIONS

To be the premier lifestyle guide for adults in Topeka, featuring the finest offerings in entertainment establishments, art and nightlife. We seek to refine area information and offer suggestions to empower Topekans and guests with a variety of choices.

seveneightfive is FREE thanks to our advertisers. See their ad, then patronize their business and pick up your next issue. Get a complete distribution list on our website. Business subscriptions are $40/year for >40 copies per issue

VISION

SUBMISSIONS + DEADLINES

Create an incomparable publication rich in design and content Positively impact our community Give a voice to local entertainment, businesses and venues

We are always interested in your point of view. Please send ideas to seveneightfive@gmail.com ***ALL ROADS LEAD TO SEVENEIGHTFIVE.COM

CONTRIBUTORS Alison Beebe @TopCityFlavorista

Tobias Harvey Writer, Photography, CULT

Gary Piland Rup, Roaring Rat Films

Liz Bell CPA / Jackson-Hewitt

Martinez Hillard Writer, Ebony Tusks

Rebecca Radziejeski Editor + Writer

William L. Domme ATypeOfWriter.com

Tom Krebs Writer, Political + Music Beat

Martie Rison Graphics + Writer

EJ Drake e.drake Photography

Kerrice Mapes Owner + Editor

Angel Romero Writer + Community

Amber Farmer Photography

Huascar Medina Poet Laureate of KS + Editor

Israel Sanchez

Jennifer Goetz

Karen Morse Social Media + Distribution

Tyler Strunk Strunk Photography

Marcelino Gonzalez III Photography, CULT

Noah Neff

Keith VanSickle Keith the Critic

Andrew Gutierrez Writer, Operations

D O'Brien Copy Editor

Photography, Creative

Photography, AD Astra DJ

Kansas Young

Ashley B. Wallace Writer, Hot in Topeka

THANKS FOR READING. CHEERS!

YOUR ROOM. YOUR TEMP. BECAUSE YOUR YOU.

Kansas weather is unpredicatable, the temp in your home shouldn’t be. DON’T PUT UP WITH ROOMS THAT ARE TOO HOT OR TOO COLD. Maintain ideal temperatures in individual rooms. Blue Dot and Mitsubishi Electric provide energy efficient, affordable solutions. 0% financing available. Systems start at $75/mo with approved credit

seveneightfive magazine

785-272-1633

| est. 2006 | seveneightfive.com


Listen Live to Hits from the 50s 60s 70s 80s wrendigitalmedia.com

Locally Owned and Operated

To advertise contact Roger at RogerR@WrenRadio.net 3601 SW 29th Suite 207 • STUDIO: 785.783.2151


Prognosticatio with

Ruprecht Roosterdamus

99 YEARS AND COUNTING

The Psychic Chicken

TM

1st Edition

2020 Mr. Roosterdamus, Since you are a psychic I’m not going to bother sending my question... Go! - True Believer Finally! Here goes (heh heh - I kill me.) A. No one saw that will tell. B. Duct tape. Definitely. C. It‘s not what ya feared, but yer still gonna need the shots and some ointment. - RR ______________________________ A R I E S New year, new attitude, Bucko! Stop telling people yer sorry. They know ya did it on purpose, so why bother? Next, stop doing it on purpose. T A U R U S There are 2 things people can’t get too much of - time and coupons. Unless yer the next person in line. G E M I N I Why do they call it breaking the law? It’s not like the law doesn’t keep right on being the law, right? Think about it. C A N C E R First there was junk mail, then spam, phishing attacks, online scams, hackers, Fox News and now the worst offense of all... FAKE PROFILES ON TINDER. Ugh! L E O Ya bought all those cool outfits on Amazon only it turns out to be Chinese sizes which means they don’t fit. Ever. How is this improving yer life again? V I R G O Every year about this time yer bestie starts getting that far away look in her eye. Don’t worry, it’s not you. It’s David, Jim, John, that random guy in the BMW and Janet. Now, doesn’t that make ya feel better?

A

EMPOWER + DEFEND LETTER FROM THE EDITOR: Kerrice Mapes

smattering of events celebrating the progress our country has made in voting rights are scheduled this spring. All are unique and have distinct goals, unified by Americans celebrating the 150th anniversary of the 15th Amendment, the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, that won women the right to vote, and the 55th anniversary of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which cemented voting rights for Black citizens – all in a presidential election year.

150 years ago, the existing power structure was threatened by the addition of Black men as voters, and while the 15th Amendment is an honorable accomplishment, it's worthy of conversation and thought about our country and state's implementation of that law today. The story of how women gained the vote in Kansas in 1912 (nationally in 1920) is a reflection of American attitudes towards women and its Civil War history. It's a reflection of our country's underlying racism. It's worth examining how the women's suffrage movement, while monumentally successful, failed in regards to equal treatment. The portrait of suffrage was not painted from the same color palette for all women. It's also a time worthy of celebration; celebrating leaders that emerged like Carrie Langston Hughes and Lilla Day Monroe. The serial novella continues, as civil liberties and equal, human rights for all persons are challenged daily. "If you don't know where you're going, any road will take you." Take the time to stop, reflect on our past, learn and engage in meaningful conversation. Forge the road ahead with open eyes. aseveneightfive

MARCH 8 TOPEKA + SHAWNEE COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY

19th AMENDMENT CENTENNIAL PANEL DISCUSSION

Historians Deborah Dandridge and Valerie Mendoza, and Shelbie Konkel, Chief of Staff for Lt. Gov. Rogers will discuss the women's suffrage movement and the experiences of women of color. Consider where we've been, where we are, and where we're going as women in society. This event will be intersectional and represent many points of view. Inspired by the exhibit that examines how the women's suffrage movement failed in regards to equal treatment, this panel will look at the experiences of women of color. Discussion will include strategies for how to avoid the mistakes of the past as women organize and move forward. Introduction by the League of Women Voters of Topeka and Shawnee County.

MARCH 27 + 28 // WASHBURN

99 YEARS OF THE RIGHT TO VOTE At the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, Washburn University will host an academic conference focused on the past and present of suffrage around the globe. Undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, legal scholars and professionals, and independent scholars are invited to submit proposals to present. Events will be open to the public. Learn more at suffrage.wuhistory.com

seveneightfive magazine

| est. 2006 | seveneightfive.com


EMPOWHER CONFERENCE

I

by Rebecca Radziejeski

n this monumental centennial year of women’s suffrage, the Greater Topeka Partnership is excited to unveil their inaugural Women’s Conference, EmpowHER, on March 26. Female community leaders will come together at Rocking V Ranch in Wakarusa for a day to listen, learn, and get inspired to be positive forces in their own lives, their jobs, and their communities. The event will feature a workshop led by keynote speaker Tara Renze, a Kansan entrepreneur and speaker who combines her “expertise in emotional intelligence, success in corporate leadership and experience in social sales along with her roles as a wife and a mother to offer her audience an experience and a message that are sincere, motivating, relatable and game changing.” Her passion project, authentiCITY (co-founded with Amanda Thompson) aims to help women redefine what success looks like for the modern-day female entrepreneur. Programming for the conference also includes exclusive screenings of two recorded segments from the 2019 Leadercast conference, a compelling leadership event featuring worldrenowned expert speakers. The 2019 theme of “Take Courage” invites listeners to learn from pioneering women leaders, take courage from their compelling stories, and move forward with the courage to conquer daily leadership challenges. “Whether you need tools to lead yourself, your team or your organization, Leadercast will build you into a leader worth following.” Hosted by WIBW’s Melissa Brunner, a panel discussion with local leaders will further engage attendees on topics relating to women in business, leadership, and personal and professional growth. This day-long retreat also correlates with the theme of 2020 International Women’s Day (March 8): Each for Equal, a campaign which encourages each individual each day to challenge stereotypes, fight bias, broaden perceptions, improve situations and celebrate women's achievements. Tickets are $60 and include a continental breakfast, lunch, and EmpowHER signature cocktail. Join the GTP and a litany of leading ladies in the community on March 26. You can register for the event by visiting visittopeka.com/rsvp and selecting EmpowHER. aseveneightfive

WU-MESTER an initiative at Washburn University aims to foster university - and community-wide conversation on timely topics. "Citizenship and Suffrage" is the spring 2020 topic with focus on the upcoming election, the 150 anniversary of the 15th amendment that recognized the voting rights of African American men, and the 100 anniversary of the 19th amendment that did the same for women. Four programming events remain, including an academic conference, WIFI Film Fest, an exhibit and symphonic performance.

MARCH 16 - 20 // WASHBURN

99 YEARS OF EMPOWERING VOTERS AND DEFENDING DEMOCRACY An exhibit by League of Women Voters.

JUNE 19 - 27 WHITE CONCERT HALL

SUNFLOWER MUSIC FESTIVAL The debut of an original composition by Libby Larsen for a work for chamber orchestra with narration, focusing on the evolution of women's voting rights.

L I B R A Your spring words to live by: 1. Believing something does not make it true. 2. The people who say, “Don’t do anything I wouldn’t do!” are probably the people with the most bodies in their backyards. 3. Joining a political campaign is a great idea. Just make sure yer candidate isn’t evil or orange. But I repeat myself. S C O R P I O Ya got five OMGs last time, so, I guess OMG OMG OMG OMG OMG OMG should do nicely. S A G I T T A R I U S Ebay the hood and plastic wrap. It’a bad idea, Bucko. A very bad idea. C A P R I C O R N Ya do not now nor have ya ever had the Corona Virus. It’s a head cold, Bucko. A head cold. A Q U A R I U S Last issue we were discussing the rules - so, here’s one - when in doubt, mull. P I S C E S Now that all yer New Year’s resolutions have, uh, begun to fade into the sunset - maybe it’s time to reconsider the one ya always manage not to make? (Yeah. That one.) Maybe this is the year. I mean, what’s the worst possible thing that can happen? Besides the incarceration bit, I mean. ___________________________ Question for the Blue Guru? Something on yer mind? Looking for an answer to a burning (and itching) personal question? Do not hesitate! Fire up yer email... Ruprecht@PsychicChicken.com ___________________________ Q: Assuming America has finally had enough of the impeached Orange-a-tang, who’s yer bestie? A: Pete, Bernie, Liz, Amy, Joe or literally anyone else. There are no wrong answers. Ruprecht@PsychicChicken.com. Thanks for playing! – R.R. 9


FILM

MUSIC + A MOVIE

FRIDAY + SATURDAY

B+B THEATRES / WHEATFIELD 9 Live music every Friday and Saturday night from 6:30 - 10:30p at the Marquee Bar + Grille at B+B Theatres. No cover. No movie ticket required. Enjoy dinner, drinks and some sweet sounds.

SILENT FILM FESTIVAL

FEB 28 + 29 , FEB 27 24th Annual Event Free public event. Silent short subjects and features shown with live musical accompaniment. Visit kssilentfilmfest.org for more information and show times.

DOUBLE FEATURE MARCH 13 @ 7p NORSEMAN BREWERY

Join Keith the Critic for a double feature showing "A Fish Called Wanda" and "Monty Python's The Meaning of Life." Tickets are $10 per person and may be purchased in advance at Vintage Stock or the day of the show at Norseman Brewery.

APRIL 2 - 4 // JAYHAWK THEATRE

WIFI FILM FESTIVAL

WIFI is dedicated to promoting and celebrating film production, stories from the Midwest, and education at Washburn University, in the Topeka community and state of Kansas. The 2020 WIFI Film Festival corresponded with WU-mester's theme of "Citizenship and Suffrage." The three-day film festival will feature films by amateur and professional filmmakers from around the world and will include films both by and about women. Artist talks, workshops and panels will be hosted throughout the festival and are free to attend. Topics include scriptwriting, directing, Walt Disney's Kansas City Legacy and historical documentary film making. Register and more at washburn.edu/wifi/education.html


THE LITTLE DOCUMENTARY THAT COULD 10th ANNIVERSARY SCREENING OF TRANSCENDENT DELI by William L. Domme // atypeofwriter.com artwork by Justin Marable // anniversary edition

A stone’s throw from the railroad tracks that run through Little Russia in North Topeka sits the deli/tavern most folks with any years on their soul know. As Porubsky’s gets nearer and nearer to the century mark, that audience has expanded from Topeka around the state and around the country. It's the coziest spot to warm up with some top shelf chili and a few chunks of Porubsky’s hot pickles (there’s a fire station nearby if the incendiary hors d’oeuvres get the best of you).

The film, "Porubsky’s: Transcendent Deli" is in its 10th Anniversary in 2020 and as such a fête is planned with a viewing on the big screen, May 8 and May 9, at the historic Jayhawk Theatre. Tickets go on sale March 1. Showings are May 8 at 7p and 9p and May 9 at 2p. The film was created by Matthew Porubsky and a cadre of local artists and technicians to explore the historical impact of the little deli that could. Travel to the tavern and get some good food and a couple of drinks and savor a landmark in the Golden City. aseveneightfive

THE ROAD TO TOPEKA RUNS THROUGH PORUBSKY'S. 11


READ. IMMEDIATELY. ENJOY. KEEP HER IN YOUR MOUTH by Huascar Medina, literary editor + Poet Laureate of Kansas

P

oet and musician Steph Castor’s latest publication will come out of Philadelphia in August through Thirty West Publishing House. The chapbook is titled, Keep Her in Your Mouth. A strong follow up to her debut full-length poetry book Bedroom Music released in March 2019 through Stubborn Mule Press. Steph Castor’s words are a lit fuse burning towards I love you. Truth bombs exploding in the heart of the reader, explosions from within— fireworks. Each poem an organized display of epiphany ignited by tenderness. When you love this hard, the only collateral damages worth collecting are beauty, light and acceptance. Steph manages to remain brutally honest and hopelessly romantic and I admire that. aseveneightfive

Get a copy of the book this summer at: stephcastor.bigcartel.com

MAKE THE TIME [and read more lit crits and view lit events at seveneightfive.com]


ROAR+ POUR

ANIMALS, WINE AND A GREAT TIME APRIL 26 TOPEKA ZOO

This sell-out Party for a Cause event features a variety of wine tastings, appetizer and dessert samplings, live music by Departure and a unique art action of animal/artist collaborative works. This 21+ event is in it's fourth year and promises to be better than ever. Highlight wine and food stops from BlueJacket Crossing Vineyard + Winery, Bodine Wine Co., Hazel Hill Chocolate, Qdoba Topeka, Blue Moose Topeka, 2 Chefs Catering, Engroff Catering, Cookies by Gayla and Stumpy's Smoked Cheese. The human/animal art collaborations are sponsored by aMused Gallery and featuring the following artists:

PARTY FOR A CAUSE

COUTURE FOR CANCER MARCH 7 AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY

A unique women's event combining compassion with fashion. It is a joint effort between the American Cancer Society, local, national, and global retailers and fashion designers to provide businesses to fight one of the most dreaded diseases of our time. Join philanthropists and shop for a cause at the 16th Annual Couture for Cancer.

DIRTY POUR FOR CHARITY JEFFERSON COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY

APRIL 3

Kick-off a monthly long giving event at Crooked Post Winery. Stop by during First Friday to shop the Dirty Pour Acrylic masterpieces, enjoy games, BBQ from Tod's and music from PastTense bluegrass band. Art will be sold 'til April 25, CPW's Earth Day celebration with 100 percent proceeds (artists donated all art supplies) benefiting the Jefferson County Humane Society.

EVENING AS A CHILD APRIL 25 CAPPER FOUNDATION

Reflect on your childhood and revel in the activities that made growing-up so special, while raising muchneeded funds to support the services and pediatric scholarships provided by Capper Foundation. Stepping Back to the Future, the theme of the 19th annual event includes dinner, wine and craft beer board, silent and live auctions and of course, lots of games.


WE WILL ROCK YOU Featuring more than 20 hit songs from the rock band Queen, "We Will Rock You" follows two revolutionaries as they try to save Rock in a postapocalyptic world.

MARCH 6 - 15

ALICE IN WONDERLAND, JR Travel down the rabbit hole and join Alice, one of literature’s most beloved heroines, in her madcap adventures.

MARCH 9

SONS OF SERENDIP Unique Billboard charting quartet consisting of a harpist, cellist, pianist and lead vocalist. The quartet was a finalist on Season 9 of "America's Got Talent" gaining popularity by offering their fresh interpretations of popular music.

Eventful Years at a Certain School of Magic and Magic For seven years a certain boy wizard went to a certain Wizard School and conquered evil. This, however, is not his story. This is the story of the Puffs... who just happened to be there, too. Written by Matt Cox, this clever and inventive new play isa hilarious new perspective of a familiar adventure.

APRIL 17 - MAY 2

AS YOU LIKE IT Shakespeare’s beloved romantic comedy follows heroine Rosalind as she flees persecution. Disguised as a shepherd boy, Rosalind tests the purity of love.

APRIL 24 - MAY 9

STORY OF MY LIFE Nominated for four Drama Desk Awards, including Outstanding Musical, "The Story of My Life" is a Broadway rarity: an intimate musical that candidly explores the simplicity of human need and the complexity of emotions under which it lies buried. Playful, touching and dramatic, this musical inspires audiences to reconnect with those who were part of the earliest chapters in our own life story.

seveneightfive magazine

WHITE CONCERT HALL | Washburn University

PUFFS, Or: Seven Increasingly

HELEN HOCKER THEATER | Gage Park | GA Seating / no food

FEB 28 - MARCH28

MARCH 26 - 28

TOPEKA CIVIC THEATRE | 3008 SW 8th Ave | Dinner Theatre

THE ATRE

Broadway's best-selling touring magic show full of hilarious magic tricks, death-defying stunts and acts of breathtaking wonder.

WASHBURN RURAL HIGH SCHOOL THEATRE | 5900 SW 61st St. | MUSICAL $6 - $9, Reserved Seating PLAY: $5 GA

THE ILLUSIONISTS

TOPEKA PERFORMING ARTS CENTER | 214 SE 8th Ave

MARCH 12

| est. 2006 | seveneightfive.com


BRUNCH IS BACK BLUE MOOSE

32ND + WANAMAKER –– SUNDAY | 10a-2p Buffet with highlights including the bagels and lox and Eggs Benedict. Boozy Special $3.5 Bloody Marys + Mimosas

THE BAR'N'GRILL

2121 SW BELLE AVE –– SUNDAY | 10a-12:30p Buffet with traditional offerings plus DIY Bloody Mary Bar

ANNIE'S PLACE

4014 SW GAGE –– SATURDAY+ SUNDAY | 7a-9p A la carte offerings, must try Grandma's Old Fashioned Bread Pudding plus $4 Salty Dogs.

THE BURGER STAND

COLLEGE HILL –– SUNDAY | 11a-2p Menu Proc: Breakfast Burger Boozy Special: $4 Bloody Mary, Mimosas + Sangria

CLASSIC BEAN

FAIRLAWN PLAZA –– ANYTIME MENU PROC: Bagels + Lox

THE WHEEL BARREL

NOTO - 925 N KS AVE –– SUNDAY | 10a-3p Handcrafted sandwiches mixing sweet and savory ingredients to kick-start your morning. Boozy Special: $6 Bloody Mary Bar [DIY] + $4 Mimosas

TACOS EL MEXICANA 2002 SE CALIFORNIA –– DAILY | 10a Menu Proc: Huevos Rancheros

TAMMY'S BILLARD AIRPORT 3600 NE SARDOU –– SAT + SUN | 7a-2p

Breakfast buffet. Cash only. Menu Proc: On Sundays at 11a, they add friend chicken and mashed potatoes.

THE WEATHER ROOM

CYRUS HOTEL –– SATURDAY + SUNDAY | 9a-2p (photos to right by Alison Beebe)

THE SHACK BAR + GRILL

Always in-style here at sevenightfive, a resurgence of quality, creative brunch menus are springing up around Topeka. #BrunchSoHard #SundayFunday

2842 SE 29TH –– OPEN DAILY | 6a True blue American breakfast. Must try breakfast sandwich.

ABIGAIL'S GRILL + BAR

3701 SW PLAZA DR. –– SUNDAY A la carte breakfast with great Bloody Marys and a variety of Sunday Sangrias.

HILTON GARDEN INN

1351 SW ARVONIA –– SATURDAY + SUNDAY | 7-11a Breakfast buffet

POP-UP BRUNCHES

The following places do some great brunch items, but not on the reg, so be sure to check their schedule ______________________

TOPEKA CIVIC THEATRE SUNDAY MATINÉE SHOW + BRUNCH BUFFET

THE VINEWOOD

LADIES' BRUNCH AND LIVE MUSIC ______________________ SUNDAY | MARCH 29 + MAY 10 | 11a - 2p Buffet featuring Front Door Catering Boozy Special: Sangria and "bottomless" Mimosas* come with brunch ticket

DIALOGUE COFFEE HOUSE WAFFLE SATURDAYS

CHEZ YASU

CREPES AND EGGS BENEDICT

15


TOPEKA PREMIERE

DON QUIXOTE BALLET WILL ENCHANT, INSPIRE AND EXHILARATE

WINDMILLS, CUPID AND TRUE LOVE LOVE AND IDEALISM ARE UNIVERSAL THEMES THAT TRANSCEND LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND TIME. One hundred and fifty years after its astonishing Moscow opening, Ballet Midwest will present the Topeka premiere of “Don Quixote,” a virtuoso ballet, at Topeka Performing Arts Center on April 18 and 19. Artistic Director Lacee Sandgren chose the ballet for both its endearing love story and for the demanding dance technique and style. "Don Quixote has a Spanish flair throughout that is invigorating and unique. Ballet Midwest has always been known for being a theatrical ballet company that has an intense focus on classical technique,” said Sandgren. "The current company dancers of Ballet Midwest are a perfect fit to take on the challenge of this ballet. They are dedicated, driven and passionate!” The production will also include special effects including a large, moving windmill. The ballet includes three acts, based on episodes from the epic novel “Don Quixote de la Mancha” written by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. The plot centers on a love story between Kitri and Basilio, whose marriage is opposed by Kitri’s father. Some helpful Gypsies conspire to help the two lovers, while Don Quixote and his hilarious sidekick Sancho Panza have adventures of their own, with dryads, their beautiful queen and Cupid. In the

end, Don Quixote continues his quest with honor and courage to find his ideal, his Dulcinea. Don Quixote (translated into English, “The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote de La Mancha”) is considered by literary historians to be one of the most important books of all time, and it is often cited as the first modern novel. It has inspired generations of writers, thinkers, artists, musical compositions, films, theatre productions and more. In the world of classical ballet repertory, Don Quixote poses some of the most challenging roles. It’s argued that the first ballet production of Don Quixote dates back to 1740, paving the way for dance as an independent, dramatic expressive art form. But it is Marius Petipa’s version of “Don Quixote” with music composed by Ludwig Minkus that serves as the basis for productions today and of Ballet Midwest this spring. Designed to entertain with a heartfelt story and technical dance prowess, Sandgren hopes that audiences will leave Don Quixote "with a new respect and admiration for the performing arts that we hope will inspire them to be a lifelong lover of the arts and a regular audience member for our ballets.” aseveneightfive

by Kerrice Mapes + Alexandra Reilly | photos provided by Ballet Midwest


Ballet Midwest is excited to dance the premiere performance of Don Quixote in Northeast Kansas. “This Spanish-themed ballet is fun for the whole family,” states the company who invites you to join the man of La Mancha as he encounters a cast of colorful characters while searching for adventure. This feel-good ballet ends in a glorious celebration of love, chivalry and eternal friendship.

DON QUIXOTE

[ full length performances ]

April 18 - 7:30p | April 19 - 1:30p Tickets are $20 ($12 for age <18) Purchase tickets through TPAC, Ticketmaster or in person at Barbara’s Conservatory of Dance. A four-pack is available exclusively at Barbara’s Conservatory of Dance and includes two adult and two youth tickets for $55. All performances at Topeka Performing Arts Center and GA seating.

MY FIRST BALLET [ a special performance ]

April 18 at 1:30p

If you have little ones, make plans to attend an enchanting afternoon at Ballet Midwest’s My First Ballet. The special narrated performance is interactive and perfect for young audiences, with special activities following the production including cookies, picture opportunities, meet the dancers, face painting and more. Tickets are $10. Believe us when we say we’ve witnessed first hand the life-changing experience introducing performing arts has for young, creative minds.

ABOUT BALLET MIDWEST Since 1977, Ballet Midwest has been sharing the art of classical ballet in Topeka and surrounding communities. Ballet Midwest is a 501(c)(3) non profit organization dedicated to promoting the art of classical ballet. As part of this mission, Ballet Midwest presents numerous programs including a free performance of the Nutcracker to area fourth grade students. 17


LIVE MUSIC DAILY SEVENEIGHTFIVE.COM

"turn it up...so you know

it's got soul." - Van Morrison

MARCH 6

MARCH 13

APRIL 3

FOX + WILLS // Dirty Girl Adventures

PASTOR TROY // 45th Street

CHICAGO // TPAC

BLACKTOP THUNDER // Kick Start

SOUTH FORK BAND // The Vinewood

RADKEY W/THE MANY COLORED DEATH, DROP A GRAND // The Trap

MARCH 20

MARCH 7 ALL THINGS TRUMPET // with Dr.

Michael Averett // TSCPL

OMB PEEZY // with supporting acts:

Bird, Bizzy, Kimg Mane + K9 // Jayhawk

CRAIGZLIST KILLERS // Kick Start

MARCH 8 MEGAN LUTTRELL // Prairie Fire Winery

PRETEND FRIEND // Kaw Valley Public House

DUO DU JOUR BAND // Classic Bean BLACKTOP THUNDER // Gayle's POCKET VINYL W/REELING // The

Legendary Boobie Trap Bar

MARCH 21 MAD MACHELLE // Gayle's TRI-REGIONAL KS METAL THROWDOWN // The Trap

MARCH 27 GODZILLIONAIRE W/EBONY TUSKS // Bourbon Cowboy RAILROAD EARTH // Knuckleheads DANNY CORWIN + AMBER WAVES // Weather Room - Cyrus Hotel

MARCH 28 SOUL 2 SOUL - JOSH VOWELL + WHITNEY FROST // B+B Theatres SANTIAGO BROTHERS // The

Weather Room - Cyrus Hotel

THE CROOKED KICKS // The

Woodshed

GRAVEHUFFER / OUR LIVES YESTERDAY / TURNIPHEAD // Trap

APRIL 4 WOMEN'S SONGWRITER SHOWCASE // The Kaw Valley Public House (Lawrence)

APRIL 10 SHOOTING STAR with PATRIARCH // V100 40th Birthday Bash // TPAC

1029 NASH ICON COUNTRY NIGHT featuring NO GOOD JOHNNY // Vinewood (2nd Friday)

APRIL 18 LEFT WITHOUT NOTICE / OCEANSIDE HOTELS / FOR THE BIRDS / LWN + FTB //

A Taste of ICT Rock // The Boobie Trap

APRIL 20 GORILLA OMEGA // 4-20 Hip-Hop Showcase // The Boobie Trap

MAY 16 DATING SARAH // Gayle's THE HOUSE JUMPERS // Vinewood

MAY 23 GRIZFEST featuring THAT DAMN SASQUATCH, TOP CITY RAMBLERS + LILY B. MOONFLOWER // The Vinewood


TOPEKA CELEBRATES

ST. PATRICK'S DAY 03.14.20

Please keep your hands and candy inside the float at all times.

PARADE HIGH NOON

WHENEVER

FINISH

5th + KS DUTCH GOOSE 10a ABIGAIL'S 4p BRASS RAIL 5p GLAZED GOOSE 6p

6th + KS

HAPPY BASSET 6:30p VICTORIA'S 7p BRASS RAIL 8p

7th + KS ST. PAT'S PARTY HEAD QUARTERS

Irish inspired brunch at The Burger Stand, followed by a bus ride to the St. Paddy's parade, downtown, followed by a trip to Norseman and then back to the stand. Tickets are $30 and include the safe ride and swag bar. Reserve at the bar.

BLOODY REBEL // Cyrus Hotel

The Celtic Fox

JACKSON AVE

GREEN BEER ENVY PUB CRAWL // Burger Stand

GAYLE'S 8:45p

Featuring music by Sloppy But Lucky, a funk / punk band formed in 2018. If you like camping + whiskey, you might know [the guys] Sloppy But Lucky. If you like the music of Bloodhound Gang, you might want to be sure you're still standing to see this show. Party at 8th + Jackson.

MARCH 14

8th + KS

9th + KS

Pre-parade brunch, Bloody Mary or Irish coffee specials during, and three local bands after. 2p: Swift Kick, 6p: DJ S. Ranx (TopRanx SoundSystem), 8p: Soul Rebel and the Beast. $10/pp - come and go as you please, as long as you keep your braclet on your wrist.

SCOTCH WHISKEY TASTING // Crooked Post Winery

Eight varieties of Single Malt Scotch Whiskey, one from each of the six Regions of Scotland plus an extra from The Highlands and Speyside Regions. Lots of history at Crooked Post Winery tasting events, always learn something new. Tickets are $40 and only 30 available tasting spots. (Mates are always free.)

10th + KANSAS AVE 19


SWOON E A T

(785) 235-1700

|

W I T H

A

RowHouseRestaurant.net

“The Worst Kept Secret in Town.”

Private Dinners and Catered Events Friday Dinner Reservations Required Open for Lunch Friday 11am - 1:30pm

20

Wine Tasting & Tapas First Wednesday 5pm

LUIS’ PLACE

5TH & KANSAS | 350.2028


WOMEN WHO ROCK 117 WOMEN AND COUNTING....

2020

FEATURES Jennifer Bohlander

Harrison Charlson

Angela Warren

Ashley Dassinger Carson

Angie Grau

Tameka McCray

Nicole DeGennero

Darcella Goodman Lauren Myers

Noah McFarland Ellan Tweeddale

Taryn Temple

Heather DiDomenico Graves Staci Dawn Ogle

Chris Omni, MPH Phelica Glass

Deborah Dawkins Michelle Wilson JoVonka Marks Laura Cluke

Lisa Davis

Antonette Coffee Anna Springer

Kimberly Mattox Caitlyn Halsey

Dr. Janet Haynes

21


You are both Nature & nurture Garden & earth Art & living Beauty Begetting Beauty Bold & vibrant Yellow gold Priceless to our city Rooted in our city Shining in our city Giving as much As you have grown Bringing blooms To blossom Tending to all As sun & flower -HM

WOMEN WHO ROCK


SUNFLOWERS poem by Poet Laureate of Kansas Huascar Medina, seveneightfive literary editor written for and inspired by Women Who Rock Jennifer Bohlander and Nicole DeGennaro

Two women have been nominated year-after-year, nomination after nomination for Women Who Rock. Both are quick to submit nominations of others and to refute having the spotlight shone upon them, pushing the space to be used to highlight others. The two are dynamic, successful business owners, residing in NOTO. They are friends, they are community cheerleaders, and they have no idea we decided to feature them. Thank you, for your continuous years of quietly giving back and championing those around you. The poem to the left was written for and inspired by Nicole and Jennifer. Below is just a seed of what makes them both Women Who Rock. NICOLE DEGENNARO "Nicole kicks ass, plain and simple," wrote one nominator. "She is generous, bends over backwards for her neighbors and is always there when anyone needs help, all while being the best mom she can be. She is an inspiration for those who travel difficult roads." Nicole is the co-owner of Front Door Catering, in the process of becoming owner of The Historic Vinewood, is a mother of two and an active philanthropist. When her oldest son survived a driving while distracted car accident, which left him with a traumatic brain injury, Nicole began campaigning for safe driving, specifically anti-texting and driving, including writing an annual blog for KDOT and speaking to community groups.

JENNIFER BOHLANDER "She gives to everyone that comes to her shop for donations. She painted every mural in NOTO (for free). She is a Veteran. She sold her house and moved to NOTO to help with the future of the district," wrote one nominator. "She tattoos everyone and you tell your tattoo artist more than you tell your shrink. It's time for some more ink," said another. "Often inspired by the combustion of a challenge and the spark of motion and life found in living things, Jennifer paints or draws what moves her to create," wrote Woman Who Rocks, author of ARTitude and owner of Art Print Express Michelle Leivan. "She celebrates all aspects of life...Jennifer capturers her subjects with a sense of rhythm as if to a song." Jennifer is owner of Matryoshka, co-owner of The Wheel Barrel, mother, friend, local art and music enthusiastic and a humble donor and catalyst for cultural inclusiveness. aseveneightfive

[left] Sunflower Wall in NOTO, painted by artist Jennifer Bohlander, located on the east wall of Front Door Catering, co-owned by Nicole Degennaro 23


WOMEN WHO ROCK


CELEBRATING MAKERS MAKERS + ASH BOUTIQUE, THE HEART OF ENTREPRENEUR IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN

A

shley Dassinger Carson has created a retail power couple, that generates commerce in the core of downtown and supports women, artists and local creators. Opening in Spring 2020, Topeka will have two new stores gracing downtown: Markers, with unique artisan products and ASH Boutique, offering contemporary women's fashions. Topeka entrepreneur Ashley Dassinger Carson is at the heart of both store concepts and operations, which will flank the north and south sides of The Pennant restaurant, located on the 900 block of Kansas Avenue. “We’re thrilled to be part of downtown Topeka’s burgeoning retail and restaurant scene,” said Ashley, "I'm excited to bring something brand new to downtown Topeka...to continue making the area more vibrant, walkable and shoppable than ever.” Makers has been a passion project of Ashley's for several years, but she felt now was the right time to bring the new concept to downtown. "There's an exciting shift happening in retail with a focus on handmade merchandise," said Ashley, "a maker's movement." Locally designed, handmade gift and lifestyle items are what shoppers will find at Makers. It will also feature a curated selection of jewelry, clothing, baby gifts, furniture, soaps and lotions, stationery items, candles and artwork by Kansas artisans and books by Kansas authors. The store will also offer fresh florals.

Makers is all about, the makers inquivatably, and will reinvent the concept of the co-op. Vendors will not pay rent for shelf or booth space, but instead operational and marketing fees plus a commission on sales. “I’ve been part of co-ops before and felt the frustration of paying for a business that was based on my rent, not on sales of my products. Makers will be a win-win for all involved because we’re all invested in the success of these carefully selected items,” says Ashley. Ashley will hand select creators and Makers will market and display products throughout the store, in a beautifully integrated and merchandised set up, a stark contrast to the traditional vendor box booths. Ashley believes this team approach will help everyone: customers get a seamless store experience and creators get the compound benefit of each other’s artistry. As a veteran retailer and entrepreneur, Ashley is leveraging her almost 20 years of retail experience and success in marketing ASH Boutique into the launch of Makers. “I know my customers very well. I know what they want,” said Ashley. “Shopping is more than just a purchase, it’s an experience. Customers are looking to buy something that has a story, has style and has roots in this area.” High quality and locally made are what they are seeking. The 2,500 square foot treasure trove will be located on the north side of The Pennant, at 913 Kansas Avenue. Currently in the midst of renovations, Ashley anticipates a public grand opening in

Spring 2020. Interested in selling your unique creations at Makers? Makers is currently accepting applications from creators and artisans at MakersKS.com A similar sized retail space, located on the south side of The Pennant, will be dressed in new digs come spring. ASH Boutique, Ashley's flagship business, has been threading rockin' Topeka ladies for the past five years. Located in the historic Westboro Mart, the decision to move their storefront to downtown was of necessity and growth opportunity. "Frankly, we need the room because we've outgrown the space at our current location," said Ashley. The move downtown will double the boutique''s current retail space and add much-needed warehouse space, allowing them meet the needs of the shop's expanding e-commerce. "This is crucial to us meeting customer demand," said Ashley. "More room means we’ll offer more brands and variety. We’ll also have more sizes including more plus sizes [ASH for All is the tagline for their line of plus size clothing] and, more shoes!" As a female entrepreneur, Ashley Dassinger Carson has been rockin' Topeka for over six years, but it's her "why" that makes her a seveneightfive Woman Who Rocks. ASH Boutique, which opened in 2014, has a mission and purpose to help women feel great in their clothes. "When we feel great in our clothes, then we feel we can accomplish anything - with family, career and community," said Ashley. "That's what ASH is all about!" aseveneightfive

by Kerrice Mapes | photo by Shelley R. Jensen / Studio Bloom by Shelley

25


TALKING + WALKING: TOPEKA by Alexander Lancaster | photos provided by Lauren Myers (surprise)

T

op City, Topeka Proud, Do It Downtown, Choose Topeka, Momentum 2022, Topeka: A Good Place to Work, Live + Play. A catchy slogan indicative to place must capture something real, authentic and evocative, for it to be successful, and that's a whole lot harder than it looks. Unless, of course, you are Lauren Myers, a walking talking billboard for loving where you live and living where you love. Lauren, a transplant from Thomasville, GA moved to our capital city a mere two years ago and encapsulates all the vigor and positive self Topeka has been seeking for most its life. What does it mean to be Topeka Proud? For Lauren, she said it's beyond just loving where you live. It's the whole community coming together, to be proud of what they've built and are building. Lauren is #TopekaProud, a downtown cheerleader and loft resident. She is a manager at Reliant Apparel, a locally owned shop in the same district. With help from some of her fiber artists friends, she hangs warm scarfs, hats, gloves etc in the pocket parks on Kansas Avenue. Lauren is also the lead model for Two Wolves Studioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bi-weekly Life Drawing Session. She has expressed that she believes modeling is a body positive action, a way to feel good about herself. She has the challenge of sitting very still while the artists in the room draw her figure, the extra challenge is she has Tourette syndrome that can cause her to make sudden movements, in her case small movements. She doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let it affect her ability to strike perfect poses. Lauren is a quintessential model for loving life, loving your community and neighbors. Thank you. aseveneightfive

WOMEN WHO ROCK


In Topeka, as a small child, my mother took me with her to the little vine-covered library on the grounds of the Capitol. There I first fell in love with the librarians, and I have been in love with them ever since–those very nice women who help you find wonderful books! The silence inside the library, the big chairs, and long tables, and the fact that the library was always there and didn’t seem to have a mortgage on it, or any sort of insecurity about it–all of that made me love it. And right then, even before I was six, books began to happen to me…” - Langston Hughes, autobiography, “The Big Sea”


HARDBACK HEROINES THE LEADING LADIES OF THE LIBRARY, A STORY THAT BEGAN 150 YEARS AGO.

I

ssues of professional equity, services to women among the general public, and the importance of preserving the history and writings of women, themselves, have long been pillars of focus in librarianship, since… the 1970s, when feminist activism, particularly in relation to American libraries, brought issues of gender inequality strongly to the fore. Perhaps the Progressive Era, which saw the number of library positions more than triple during the first two decades of the 20th Century, offering women opportunities for economic independence. Or as early as 1882 when this advocacy was documented describing a “women’s meeting” at the 14th American Library Association Conference. I’m uncertain if Noah McFarland, Ellan Tweeddale or Harrison Charlson attended said conference or “women’s meeting,” I presume not, staying home in Topeka to ensure that their “Ladies’ Library Association” doors were open that Saturday afternoon, from 3 to 6p, as they had for the past decade. The Ladies’ “only” Library Association would become the Topeka Library Association in 1872, allowing men to attend meetings for the first time. Kansas’ history swells with progressive thinkers and adopters of changes for the betterment of personhood, sometimes well before the rest of the country

WOMEN WHO ROCK

Myriads of stories and folklore make an irrefutable case that library leaders were among, perhaps catalysts for change, thus strengthening progressive spines. Yet there is a great gap created by the failure of historians, so far, to make a systematic analysis of the part played by women’s associations in creating public libraries and filling library leadership roles, according to Anne Firor Scott. In Scott’s Abstract for “The Journal of Library History” (1974-1987, Vol. 21, No. 2, Spring 1896) she further claims “perhaps 75 percent of such libraries were initiated by women’s groups, often originally for their own use. Close study of this phenomenon would reveal a good deal about the growth of self-education and adult education as significant aspects of American culture.” Indeed, Scott’s portrait of the early days of libraries is anything but abstract here in Topeka. November 3, 1870 the “Daily Commonwealth” newspaper describes the desire of the men’s military group, the Grand Army of the Republic of Topeka Post No. 2, to start a library: Let us have a place where young men can spend their evenings in reading or social amusements that will tend to improve the mind, and help keep them from saloons and other places of vice.

by Kerrice Mapes | photos provided by TSCPL

November 5, 1870 the newspaper prints a brief announcement about another library project proposed by some of the ladies: All ladies interested in forming a “Ladies’ Library Association” in this city are requested to meet at the residence of Mrs. T.L. King, corner of 8th and Monroe streets…. The attempts by the G.A.R. Post No. 2 failed, as had two previous attempts by men’s organizations. The Ladies’ Library Association was officially organized with McFarland, Spencer and King as executive officers. The historic meeting in which the committee prepared their constitution and bylaws took place in a second floor lodge room over the J.W. Davis Dry Good Store, on the east side of Kansas Ave, between 7 and 8 streets. December 10, 1870 the newspaper reported the following: The all-important committee charged with the selection and purchase of the association’s initial stock of books, was announced … LLA would spend the next four months recruiting members, who were assessed $3 a year, and pore over catalogues selecting the library’s initial stock of 150 volumes, works “suitable for the ladies’ library.” The 50 members of the LLA would be notified that their very own library would open on Saturday afternoon, March 11, 1871, for three hours and on Saturday afternoons thereafter, from 3 to 6p.


‘‘

...AS NO ONE COULD BE BENEFITED BY THE DESTRUCTION OF THE LIBRARY...

From those early days to present, our library has moved, rebuilt, expanded, and expanded. The impetus and commitment, to being a place of learning and providing equal access to all, has not shifted and stays true in hearts and minds today, perhaps more so than ever. If adaptable and steadfast are qualities of leaders, then the women who have led TSCPL over the past 150 years are the ultimate personification. In 1885, just two years after the new library building opened on Capitol Square, an attempt was made to burn it down. The newspaper reported, “The attempt was a bold and a uselessly wicked one, as no one could be benefited by the destruction of the library…If the would-be incendiary could be found, and the proof against him were strong, there would be little chance of his encumbering this sphere very much longer.” In 1925 Governor Ben Paulen, acting for a legislative commission, served notice on the library to vacate statehouse grounds, their home for the past 42 years. Plans for a new site and building, with voter approval, got underway. The vote failed, and the library remained on statehouse grounds. That year, the library had 15,000 borrowers and a yearly circulation of 135,656 books. The library wouldn’t move to her present location until December 14, 1953 - after an overwhelming majority vote in April of '47 approved a bond issue for $650,000 for construction of a new building. (Controversy arose when deciding the new library grounds, with some unhappy about the 10th and Washburn location, stating they felt it was just too far away from downtown, and people would not want to go “way out there” to visit the library.) A branch library system was established in cooperation with the Topeka school system in 1918. By 1932 there were branches at Curtis and Holliday junior high schools and Washington, Lafayette, Randolph and Gage elementary schools. Ten years later, due to lack of funds and the inability of the board of education to help with expenses, the branch libraries were forced to close.

What did the library do? It hit the road, that following year, in a Chevrolet coupe and converted horse trailer, becoming the first traveling library branch. The inside walls of the trailer were lined with shelves that could hold 1,200 books; at the front was an L-shaped desk for the librarian and cupboards for supplies. The trailer was heated with a kerosene stove and there were colorful curtains at the windows. The library on wheels made 10 stops each week. It was an unqualified success. Innovation continued when librarian Anna Muller announced a new list of can do’s at the library in 1946. Want to bring Fido along? That’s just fine, as long as he is well behaved. “…if he gets to cutting up, out he goes.” Want to bring your typewriter? Come ahead, there’s a special room in the reference area which makes an ideal spot for writing. Renew books by phone? You bet you can, call and it will be done. “And, last but not least, …you can leave your children at the Mulvane children’s branch…while mama goes downtown on a shopping spree.” Modern changes for the modern age! In 2016, the Topeka + Shawnee County Public Library was named “Library of the Year in the U.S. and Canada” by “Library Journal.” Today, the Library has a collection of more than 450,000 items and serves nearly 100,000 registered borrowers each year. Approximately 3,000 people walk through the front doors daily. Bookmobiles make 25 stops, six days a week, across the county. The Library provides services to 40 senior living facilities and 130 homebound individuals. The Digital Branch serves customers' needs 24/7. The recently renovated Alice C. Sabatini Gallery will reopen in spring, the Millennium Café serves hundreds, most recently under new leadership from Engroff 's Catering. Chandler Booktique, a used bookstore, fills a literary void. A multitude of meeting rooms are accessible to card holders, for free, in addition to computer training and internet access. All of this, still located in the heart of the city, from the hearts of some amazing women, who most certainly rock. Thank you. aseveneightfive

29


A NATURAL SPARKLE I've been a client of Darcella's for seven years, she's my superpower — helping keep sanity between work and home obligations. She's moved with me four times, knows my family, loves my dog and has a key to my home. I knew Darcella was active with Doorstep, serving on the board even. I also knew she sang in her church choir and was of Jewish faith. But in early 2018, Darcella could no longer sweep her accomplishments under the rug.

I

n 1989 Darcella Goodman longed for the ability to spend more time with her school aged son, James, while he was still in school — becoming her own boss was the answer. Darcella and her husband Danny started GPro Janitorial, a residential and commercial cleaning service. The duo focused on the fundamentals: providing quality service and fostering professional relations. Years of success and growth, Darcella's partner, in life and buisness, passed away. Determined to carry his legacy and pursue their shared goals, Darcella expanded GPro Cleaning into an industry training leader, providing online educational classes and entrepreneurial tools. She seeks persons with an interest in the industry and more importantly have a strong desire to obtain financial success and freedom, like she did 30 years ago. “Darcella is committed to making the world better. She believes strongly that we are all God’s children, and therefore, we need to make sure that all people are treated with respect and have opportunities to succeed,” said Rabbi Debbie Stiel of Temple Beth Sholom. Darcella has been an active member of Temple Beth Sholom’s congregation for years and serves as one of their liaisons to Doorstep.

WOMEN WHO ROCK

by Kerrice Mapes | photo provided

“Darcella is a very down-to-earth person. She is quiet and not one to draw attention to herself, but she is always ready to help out.” More than singing in the choir, Darcella is a retired board member of Temple Beth Sholom. Her faith helps guide her daily actions and core ethos; it also makes her the first African American Jewish woman to hold the position of president of the NAACP chapter. In her first year as president of Topeka NAACP she focused on increasing awareness of work and impact, historically and recently. An example of one such effort was resurrecting the Freedom Fund Banquet, which was once an annual event but had been on a four-year hiatus. Formulating and fostering a community relations program between local law enforcement agencies and citizens of Topeka and Shawnee County is also of high importance. She is passionate about boosting entrepreneurship opportunities for all. NAACP’s mission is to support AfricanAmericans and equal access to education and housing. The Topeka chapter has just shy of 100 members. Rabbi Stiel believes Darcella is someone who can bring people together and find

common ground. "Bridge builders make great organizational presidents." “Topeka unfortunately, like a lot of cities, remains more segregated than it should,” said Stiel in an interview with KCJC. “The NAACP has an important role to play in raising awareness about the need for things like affordable housing, good job opportunities for African Americans and good mentors for African American youth.” Darcella just concluded her two year term as the commissioner of The Topeka Human Relations Commission (Feb 1, 2020). The Topeka Human Relations Commission consists of nine members who represent citizens with disabilities or from diverse gender, racial, ethnic, commercial and industrial segments of our community. The commissioners are appointed by the mayor from council nominations. “When serving on the Topeka City Council, I always knew I could talk to Darcella about any Human Relations question. Commissioner Goodman has a heart of gold," said Elaine Schwartz. "As a member of Temple Beth Sholom, I know when she sponsors an Oneg, we are going to have good eats, and her lovely voice in our choir brings a smile to all our faces. She has a lovely smile, too.” aseveneightfive


SINCE 2013 81 FEATURES Sheyvette Dinkens Women Empowerment Martha Bartlett Piland Kelly Vanderpool Toni Vanderpool Nikki Sloup Jennifer Goetz Poca Kim Kelly Dempewolf Shana Cake Jennifer Pacha Christine Lopez Tammi Lopez Sarah Burtch Noami Kelley Ashley Young Michelle Leivan Jennifer Falley Sylverina Norman Annette Billings Siony Reyes Christina Turner Angie Kearney Wyndi Senogles Charlene Matheny Tess + Maria Cuevas Grace Brown Zoe Schuman Jam4Justice 9 Marlena Addison Martha Herrick Renelle Aytes Ellie Smith Eva Kathryn Rachel Louise Taylor Marjorye Heeney

Barbara Waterman-Peters Lois VanLiew Melanie Burdick Chris Grandmontagne Ginger Park Kacy Simonsen Cap City NOW Kymm Hughes Jamie Hornbaker Ronnie Wooten Jancy Pettit Carrie Proffitt Gale Nation Tara Wallace Christina Valdivia-Alcala Dorothy Thomas School of Dance Brenda Blackman Wasbhurn Athletics The Women's Fund Ashley B. Wallace Veronica Cruz Marni Schleuning Debra Mapes Sarah Fizell Lexi Rodriquez Elena Sanchez Courtney Turcotte Bond Elected Leading Ladies: Ethel Edwards Clarina Nichols Joan Finney Kathleen Sebelius Laura Kelly Michelle De La Isla

WWR COVER ARTISTS Martie Rison ('13, '14, '15, '16, '17) Jennifer Goetz ('19) // Chris Omni ('20)

DON

QUIXOTE

APRIL 18 at 7:30PM APRIL 19 at 1:30PM LACEE SANDGREN, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

TOPEKA PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

www.balletmidwest.net

Tickets: TPAC Box Office • Ticketmaster • Barbara’s Conservatory of Dance

My First Ballet: Pirates & Princesses APRIL 18 at 1:30pm


SERIOUS SWING

"IF YOU CAN WALK, YOU CAN DANCE. DANCING IS JUST WALKING WITH RHYTHM."

T

by Huascar Medina | photo by Noah Neff

here are no mistakes, only variations,” is the motto of Topeka Swing Dance and simile to Taryn Temple’s inclusive approach and outlook. Co-creator of Topeka Swing Dance club, Taryn is educating people about dance, bringing great attention to the historic Jayhawk Theatre and improving the health and wellness of the community through education and physical activity. “She meets everyone where they’re at skillswise (and humanity wise!) and I think she’s providing an incredible service to make Topeka better,” said one of Taryn's nominators.

WOMEN WHO ROCK


“Most people don’t try swing dance because they’re convinced they’re ‘bad dancers,’” said Taryn. “That’s nonsense! And if you don’t accomplish the move you're trying to do, that's great, you've just created a variation. The only way you learn something new is to get out of your comfort zone and accept that it's going to feel a little silly and awkward at first. Everybody has to start somewhere. But if you stick with it through the challenges it is so worth it.” Topeka Swing Dance was born in 2018 when six friends got tired of driving to Lawrence and KC to dance. “The Jayhawk Theatre generously offered us space for a kick-off event and to hold dance lessons. Initially we were only planning to exist for one summer but the community embraced us, turning out in big numbers,” said Taryn. “Swing dancing is fun, challenging, and great exercise. It's an opportunity to meet new people, then build a community with those people by dancing with them from week to week. In the culture of swing dancing we rotate partners during our lessons and ask a variety of people to dance during our social dances. This means you don't need to come with a partner to be able to participate. And leads and follows aren't assigned by gender, anyone can choose to

be either a lead or a follow, so it's a great new hobby to try out with a friend.” Topeka Swing Dance focuses on dance rooted in jazz music, created primarily by African American dancers in the '20s and ‘40s. While there are basic steps, swing is generated spontaneously by dancers through improvisation and creativity, alongside the music. “You and your partner are a team, exploring and expressing dynamic music by creating new combinations and variations of the basic steps. Because of this, swing dance culture is collaborative, creative, respectful and fun!” Taryn and Topeka Swing have built a welcoming culture that emphasizes fun, inclusivity and kindness. While learning to dance is a priority, the teaching staff and leadership team ensure that all people, regards of age or skill level are welcomed and have fun. “I’m proud of the age diversity of our dancers,” said Taryn. “We have a core group of friendly, kind people ranging from kids under 10 to adults in their 70s. Everyone is welcome. It's rare that you find spaces that encourage interaction and teamwork among people of different generations.”

“Personally, I love swing dance because even after doing it for seven years it continues to challenge me,” expressed Taryn. “There are a limitless number of ways to put together the basic steps to create new combinations, plus every dance is a collaboration with your partner to music, meaning every dance is different depending on the tempo and tone of the music, what your partner does, how you respond, etc.” There are no membership fees or registration needed to try Topeka Swing Dance Club. Just show up. Weekly lessons are Tuesday nights at Jayhawk Theatre from 7 -8p with 45 minutes following for practice and social dancing. TopCity Swing is a weekend-long workshop with three days of music, dancing, classes with international instructors, a jazz brunch, competitions and showcase performances, coming to the city September 25 - 27. “As long as you are having fun moving to the music and taking care of your partner, you’re dancing,” said Taryn. “And even if dancing isn't your thing it's enjoyable to sit back, listen to the music, and watch them cut a rug out on the floor.” aseveneightfive 33


FROM BOOKWORM T the story of paper june

he NOTO Arts district has a new ambitious addition on the block. Inspired by her parents, Angie Grau recently opened Paper June, a child friendly bookstore and arts studio. As you take a step inside, there are castles of shelves lined with books, a magical play tent, and a spacious area for children and parents to roam. Paper June is a perfect place to begin stirring the creativity of any child.

Flying into Paper June, it is clear to see it is a place for children to lean into their creative minds and express themselves freely and openly. Designed with a book store in the front and a creative room in the back, Grau plans to spark the imagination of those who need a safe space to create. As a child, Grau was a bookworm. Both of her parents were teachers and books were always an important part of her childhood. She stated, “I’m positive that seeing my parents read and having them read to me was a big reason for why I, myself, loved books as well.” Tapping into

WOMEN WHO ROCK

her creativity, she began to brainstorm how she could turn her passion into a local business that would help those who may be more in tune to their creative side. Grau feels there isn’t much of a community built for children who are more into the arts, compared to the numerous opportunities for children to pick up a sport, but a space to cultivate the imagination and create is limited. The burst of inspiration to develop the business came from her daughter, Charlotte. When Charlotte began school, Grau believed she would be getting the most experience with art, she was not. Charlotte's school was not providing adequate time towards the arts, Grau determined, and se began to feel a bigger pull to fill this void within our community. Reminiscing on her childhood, Grau began to brainstorm, work through business development, implement a small pop-up shop to get a feel for the opportunity, then taking the final jump to opening her own business, Paper June. The unique logo, which is a purple piece of paper, folded


TO HUMMINGBIRD

‘‘

...to come with something devoid, and you're able to create something amazing from that. origami style to make a hummingbird, was developed in memory of her mother. She further explained, “...a metaphor of a blank sheet of paper. You know you come with something blank and empty, or devoid, and you’re able to create something amazing from that.”

Originally from Scranton, a small town south of Topeka, Grau looks forward to developing her opportunity and helping the lives of others. When describing her journey of building the business, she explained she originally believed other entrepreneurs were competitive and wouldn’t be open to helping; luckily, she realized that is not the case. "So many business owners really are open and they want to share with people and they want to support other business owners because we are our own community," said Grau. The three most important motivators in her life are family, community, and God. Having a loving and supportive husband and three children, she is excited to continue to develop an open and inviting atmosphere for all children and families. Paper June is a "childhood dream store" for the creators. Aiming to be a safe place for children to express themselves, learn, grow, and build confidence, Grau hopes to build a community for children who want to tap into their creative minds. aseveneightfive by Kristen Shook | photos by Tobias Harvey // CULT


STYLIN' NOTO A

djacent Rosebud Park and a stone's throw from The Wheel Barrel in NOTO sits Onyx Salon and Wellness Spa. In true NOTO form, the fiercely unique salon brings organic hair color and styling to Topeka, a benefit for clients and stylists who have reduced chemical exposure, a leading factor of early retirement. Behind the lead chair, with no signs of retirement, is Woman Who Rocks Heather DiDomenico Graves. In addition to Onyx Salon and Wellness Spa, Heather co-owns The Tipsy Carrot, a Top Tank Competition creation and the merger of A La Carrot and Two Scoops Saloon. "Having The Tipsy Carrot in Topeka is so important to me for a variety of reasons," said Heather. "I used to weigh 240 pounds when I was in high school. I started educating myself about healthy foods and healthy eating and wound up losing 140 pounds. I have such a heart and passion for people wanting to learn about healthy eating and ways to take care of themselves and their families. It is actually heartbreaking to me the lack of healthy options and the lack of education about what truly healthy eating consists of.â&#x20AC;? The Tipsy Carrot exclusively offers healthy, fullnutrition food, made from scratch. "Even the ice creams are just like great grandma would have made," said Heather, "with real ingredients found in nature." Home made ice cream is Allyson Shove-Chard's niche who was also a competitor in Topeka's Top Tank competition. Two Scoops Saloon was an ice

Interview with Heather DiDomenico Graves | by Huascar Medina photo by Shelley R. Jensen / Studio Bloom by Shelley

WOMEN WHO ROCK


cream concept looking at opening in NOTO, so after the competition concluded the two women merged concepts, making both of their dreams come true. Tipsy was born mid-July 2019. "It was definitely a crazy year, opening two brick-andmortar businesses with six months of each other," said Heather, "but I supposed I thrive in chaos." Heather began working at the age of nine, delivering newspapers. She believes people are born with an entrepreneurial spirit, a spirit she sees in her son, who crochets and sells bracelets and ornaments on the streets of NOTO, when he's not attended elementary school. “What I would say makes women better business owners is their amazing ability to multitask, inspire and love their employees. People prefer to work in an environment where they feel loved, respected and understood." Female business owners are on the rise, with over 30 percent of Topeka's businesses owned by women. “Female business owners on the rise! YES!! This is what I live for, I love to empower women! Women are so absolutely important to our community; women are usually the biggest consumers. They normally are the ones making the choices for their families on purchases and lifestyle. So it only makes sense to me that they would come up with amazing businesses that other women would like to experience. It is so important that women feel like they are able to be in charge of their own destiny. Women in my opinion are the backbone of society and now with most women having careers and raising families it’s important that they be able to have the same opportunities as men.”

"Female business owners on the rise! YES!! This is what I live for." What's on the horizon for Heather in the next six months? “What’s next for me is more community involvement, doing my part to help Topeka grow in its positive self-image and helping empower others to join in on the renaissance era that we are going through at this time! As a business owner in NOTO right now I am looking forward to all of the growth that comes from the investments that have been put into our city. New parks, more amazing restaurants the buzz on the streets when hundreds of people are out walking around. It just makes me smile to see the amazing growth I have seen since I moved here from San Diego 10 years ago! Keep it up Topeka, I am proud to live here and grateful for this amazing city." aseveneightfive

BOXED LUNCHES • MORNING MEETINGS CORPORATE CATERING • WEDDINGS & SPECIAL EVENTS

Fro n t D o o r C a t e r i n g. c o m


Staci Dawn Ogle is a well-known name in Topeka's art community; her personal journey is not. Kansas Young featured Staci two years ago. Like great art, great stories transcend time and speak to a listening viewer. Staci's life canvas is splattered and layered with struggles and renaissances, under a sheen of aspiration. This is part one of her story.

KANSAS YOUNG by Israel Sanchez | writer, photographer, blogger, podcaster and storyteller

WOMEN WHO ROCK


"I FOUND HAPPINESS BY MAKING SOMEBODY ELSE HAPPY. THAT WAS THE ONLY TIME THAT I FELT THAT I WAS DOING ANYTHING GOOD. MY LIFE WAS SO BAD...

EVEN AFTER ALL THAT..I WOULDN'T CHANGE ANYTHING."

STACI DAWN OGLE

B

efore my son was born, I found out that he had a rare tumor in one of his lungs when I was 20 weeks pregnant. From that point on, we had doctor’s appointments every week and had many visits to a specialist. He was in intensive care for three weeks after he was born. He had surgery right away, so that was also a huge moment in my life. This was right before I started painting. The doctors at the time told me that he had a 50 percent chance of living after he was born and that I could terminate the pregnancy or just wait it out. There were some really rough moments during that time. Where do you find strength when you don’t have strength to find in the first place?

FIERCELY AUTHENTIC NOTO Arts Community is a nonprofit created to bring forth the fiercely authentic voice of the underrepresented artists. Staci handles program coordination and communications for the arts and entertainment district. This includes scheduling classes at the Art Center, curating shows in the Morris Gallery and coordinating district events, including Redbud Park. "To say I'm busy is a bit on an understatement," exclaims Staci. "I'm usually running around going 500 miles an hour, juggling all of the things that make NOTO awesome. I absolutely love my job and the opportunity to serve my community."

During those times after he was born and I was struggling, I started doing these random acts of kindness. I would

buy some stranger’s lunch in the drive thru or go drop a bag of groceries for a homeless person, just anything. My life was so bad that I found happiness by making somebody else happy and so that was the only time that I felt that I was doing anything good. Even after all that I went through, I wouldn’t change anything about my life because it gave me strength to be who I am today. After my son was born with his medical problems, I decided to stay home with him and do daycare, while still utilizing my education degree. I never imagined it would last as long as it has. I’ve learned a tremendous amount about being a woman, who is a small business owner. Doing it for so long by myself it’s also very much a reason for my success as an artist. It gave me the business skills necessary to make my art a business and also gave me the financial support I needed for my family.” >> cont. // Read Second Part at KansasYoung.com

THE STORIES CONTINUE AT KANSASYOUNG.COM Kansas Young is a passion project/community featuring young artists and entrepreneurs living in Kansas. "By telling their stories, not only do I showcase the ever-growing talent pool of creatives in Kansas, but I also hope to bring the community together, one post at a time," said KansasYoung creator Israel Sanchez. Finish this stories and read more at KansasYoung.com While you are there, be sure to click on Donate and become a monthly contributor, like seveneightfive, and keep the stories alive.

KansasYoung.com

39


DEAR BLACK WOMEN Chris Omni, a selfprofessed "health hippie" and founder of Kujima Health, is transforming the discussion about Black women's health in Topeka. Interview with Chris Omni - by Martinez Hillard photos by Marcelino Gonzalez III + Tobias Harvey, Create/Uplift

WOMEN WHO ROCK

K

ujima is a fusion of the two Kwanzaa principles, Kujichagulia (selfdetermination) and Ujima (collective work and responsibility). Omni embraces these principles wholeheartedly along with standing in her mother’s legacy, who passed away in 2016 after a 26-year battle with cancer. That became the impetus for Omni, to gather together a community of Black women with an acute focus on their experiences, encouraging them to “make their health a capital concern.” These efforts are culminating into Chocolate Sunshine, a multi-media experience that includes a stage performance, art exhibit and blogcast – all geared at shining a light on Black women’s health, which takes place on March 21 at Stormont-Vail’s Pozez Education Center. It offers space for Black women to give testimony of their personal journeys, and for attendees to bear witness, in many cases for the first time. The following are Omni’s words.

My Mom passed in 2016, she battled cancer for 26 years. That was the turning point for me. Up to that point I’d been doing community fitness, group exercise, and personal training to improve the health of our community, but when I realized that Black women were 42 percent more likely to die from cancer, I’m like “what else don’t I know?”


After Mama passed, I decided to work for the City [of Topeka] as the wellness coordinator. They had a tuition reimbursement program, and while I had already been in the field for about 17 years, something just said to "apply." I enrolled in a Master of Public Health program at K-State. The first class that I took in January 2017 was Strategic Health Communication. It opened my eyes to a whole new world of how I can improve health outcomes; and addressing Black women's health was the lens I wanted to work with. After being assigned to a group project, naturally I suggested we work on addressing Black women’s health. The group, the professor, everyone really liked the idea. I came up with the name Black Butterflyz and off to work we went, focusing on identifying barriers that impacted physical activity engagement among Black women.

‘‘

"It’s always important to me to shine a light on Black women - to create these safe spaces. Representation is critical and missing in the media. If I don’t like what’s occurring, I should be that change and I should create that change."

At the end, the professor said to me “you’ve put in all this work and you have a nonprofit...You should apply for this grant.” The grant was through Kansas Health Foundation and began a beautiful snowball into what’s occurring now. "How can we best make an impact in Black women’s lives?” I realized I’d spent two and a half years working on my thesis but I absolutely, positively didn’t want my research in an academic journal. Most people aren’t going to pick up an academic journal. What I did in my nonprofit world of Makin’ Moves was remove barriers. Everything that we did was free, family-friendly, and we moved it around the community. Everything that we need to do moving forward [with Kujima Health] is about removing barriers. The academic journal would have been one.

NEXT: #CAPEBREAK


There is this unspoken responsibility to take care of everyone else, which then turns into the Black womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stranglehold.

WOMEN WHO ROCK

photos by Marcelino Gonzalez III + Tobias Harvey, Create/Uplift

Lisa Davis

#CAPEBREAK


Black women have worked so long and so hard without catching their breath that it’s difficult to have conversations about self. It’s perceived as selfish. “I can’t take 30 minutes out of my day, every day, to take care of me!” Within #CapeBreak we wanted to give Black women permission, only 30 minutes. Sometimes all it takes is somebody to say “you have permission to take care of you first.” That’s the conversations around Chocolate Sunshine. Yes, we are shining a light on Black women’s health so that the entire community can understand why this is important, but it's also tying into these women [from #CapeBreak] who are gonna be on stage and say “I took me and made me a priority. I was not going to die under the stronghold of my cape and wear this mask that [suggests] everything is okay.” Our young girls need to be able to see that. aseveneightfive

THE IDEA FOR CHOCOLATE SUNSHINE While riding a Topeka Metro bike I stopped at a beautiful bush of yellow wildflowers. A bumblebee landed on the bush while I was capturing pictures; I decided to take a selfie of that moment. The way that sun picked up my chocolate skin...'now this is chocolate sunshine' I thought to myself. Everything started evolving from there. If I can shine that light on myself, happiness and being present with nature, I can shine a light on other Black women and let them be that bumblebee. Let them pollinate the community with knowledge in a way that is not normally heard. When you hear about health disparities that disproportionately impact Black women, you hear all the negative. I want to let people know that even though we do live with these disparities, it doesn’t mean we are without hope. Chris Omni, MPH – Kujima Health

Michelle Wilson + Deborah Dawkins JoVonka Marks + Tameka McCray

T

hrough my research I learned about ethics of care. Within the concept there is an unspoken responsibility to take care of everyone else, which then turns into the Black woman’s stranglehold. It is the “strong Black woman syndrome” where you have to put on this cape, to take care of the household, your daily responsibilities, your significant other, your kids, your aging parents. Even by me having this conversation with you and saying “take care,” I wasn’t breathing. I had to catch my breath there at the end.

Laura Cluke + Dr. Janet Haynes

"Black women are 42 percent more likely to die from cancer, 40 percent more likely to die from heart disease, and 30 percent more likely to die from a stroke. I’m looking at a room with 10 people and anywhere between three or four of them as Black women could possibly be dead. We’re living in Topeka, Kansas where barely five percent of the population are Black women. Nobody’s talking about that. Also, it’s a very sensitive subject. (We have to) name it. Give me a targeted focus. If you already know that this particular population ranks lowest, provide the interventions to specifically target this population."

Phelica Glass + Angela Warren

"THE WHY" KUJIMA HEALTH

NEXT: CHOCOLATE SUNSHINE


CHOCOLATE SUNSHINE

What is it like to live with diabetes? What is it like to live with hypertension? What is it like to be classified as obese? “You don’t know about my lived experience.” True enough, I don’t. Tell me. Let me lean in. Tell me your story. I’ve interviewed all the ladies and I’ve heard stories {of various symptoms} time and time again. If I’m starting to experience tingling sensations in my fingers, it might be that I need to go to the doctor. This becomes a trigger. Somebody in the audience might be like "I’ve had this tingling sensation over the last week, maybe I should go check it out” because three people on stage have already said that they’ve had tingling. That’s exactly why Chocolate Sunshine is there. All three of the health disparities discussed on stage: diabetes, obesity, and hypertension, are also addressed in the Kujima Report. This was intentional. I created Chocolate Sunshine to recognize that learning occurs in various forms and not everyone will pick up an academic journal nor want to read a report.

"Imagine Vagina Monologues and Ted Talks told through a Black women’s health lens. Chocolate Sunshine is the manifestation of that imagining."

Shining a light on the Black woman's health story. Antonette Coffee

The women participating in Chocolate Sunshine were part of #CapeBreak and Black Butterflyz, it really has been a family affair since 2017. All the women were very transparent and I was grateful for it. I’m thinking of one woman in particular, she said to me “I don’t talk to people like this. I don’t share my story like this.” And she did. And she did it in such a beautiful and connected way. I remember her saying “thickness is not celebrated here like it is in the South.” She’s from Baton Rouge. Or another woman, talking about obesity and what it was like to be a preteen on Weight Watchers. What they share will inspire at least one. You will connect with at least one person. aseveneightfive

REGISTER AT KUJIMAHEALTH.COM

WOMEN WHO ROCK

Chocolate Sunshine was supported in part by the Kansas Creative Arts Industries Commission, which receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency. Women’s Health Network of Kansas, Topeka Community Foundation, Stormont-Vail, Shawnee County Health Department. Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Washburn University’s Kinesiology Department and School of Nursing, and Greater Topeka Partnership..


Purchase your VOTE DAMMIT shirt at Shop.seveneightfive.com | Look for the 2020 FORGE Voter Guide this summer

Show Up to the Polls. Show Up to the Party.

YO UN G TALEN T

Tue NOV 3 POLLS OPEN

POLLS CLOSE

7 AM 7 PM ELECTION NIGHT PARTY 4:45 - 7pm | THE BURGER STAND

SHOW YOUR “I VOTED” STICKER AND GET A FREE DRINK *First 100 Guests: Soda, Beer or Signature Cocktail paid for by seveneightfive magazine and FORGE Your Future

45


A SPOONFUL OF AWESOME ANNA SPRINGER Chef, RowHouse

A

successful recipe is as much about the ingredients as it is about the equipment used and the method in which it is carried out. Anna is equal parts expertly skilled, methodical and highly imaginative. Be aware that you should read through the entire recipe before attempting to figure it/her out. Her response to rushing is hyper-focus and firmness. Her response to the opposite is boredom and frustration. Mix carefully and remember...over stirring could lead to an explosive result. Anna Springer, Chef Who Rocks

THINGS YOU WILL NEED: -Skills

-The right tools -Room for the unexpected

THE RECIPE: Gently fold together equal parts -Tenacity

-Imagination

In another bowl mix equal parts (careful not to spill) -Hard work

-Focus

COMBINE THESE IN A WARM ENVIRONMENT. Using a well-honed knife, precisely chop: -1 part whimsy

-1 part stubbornness

-1 part common sense

-1 part mystery

Add to the other bowl and stir. Add a pinch each of: -Sweet -Salt -Bitter -Spunk BRING THIS ALL TOGETHER AND LET SLOWLY RISE.

When the mixture is finished it will bubble with delight and smell intriguing and delicious.

SPRINKLE WITH LOVE AND FROST WITH TATTOO INK.

Throw the entire thing down a rabbit’s hole. Go in. Take a bite, and discover you’ve tasted someone “other-worldly” and be glad. aseveneightfive

WOMEN WHO ROCK

recipe and photo by Greg Fox + Ryan Wills of RowHouse Restaurant


DINER 24

ORANGE YOU GLAD

S

by Alison Beebe, seveneightfive FLAVORISTA

tepping into this 36 person diner, you’d never know Kimberly’s dream wasn’t restauranteur. She’s calm, real cool, can definitely kick your ass, but will love you just as much. I instantly adore her. She knows almost everyone by name, what they like to eat, where they work and the conversation is easy. The view is heavy with hunter orange, camouflage and it is cozy, cozy warm. Tuesday’s special is homemade chicken and noodles over creamy mashed potatoes--heaven on a plate. I order the side of green beans with bacon instead of the corn and pretend I’m not entering carbohydrate nirvana. My belly and my heart are full. Raised by a single father and later, in foster homes, Kimberly Mattox, “only knows self-employment. My Dad owned and worked at Petree's Propane, started by his dad, grandpa Petree, in Holton, so that’s all I learned. I’ve been a dancer, a telemarketer, daycare owner and ran a car lot - but never did I want to own a restaurant." Kimberly danced to pay her own tuition and became a Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE). But, owning a restaurant, "this was my opportunity to work for myself and keep my kids out of daycare," Kimberly said. "I just couldn't let them go." The restaurant has become a family affair. “I have my son Damon, who is 24 and amazing at the diner and my 17 year old, Trey, that works too. My 10 year old, Ashlyn, likes cleaning off tables and serving meals. She is very grown and professional. Jade, my 14 year old comes in to eat cheesy potatoes and steal brownies. Peanut is just the boss and everyone knows it." Peanut is Kimberly's two-year-old and namesake of "Peanut's Menu." Family doesn't stop there, "my best friend Laurie Rogers does all the bookkeeping, taxes, etc. She’s a huge part of my success," said Kimberly. "Louis Perry manages NAPA right next door and has eaten here twice a day since we opened. He’s family now. Once you walk in, you are family." This momma bear is not wrong about that. Diner 24 is a true, old-fashioned diner located at 2134 N. Kansas Ave. No frills needed because the food is fresh and handmade to order. “You want a cheeseburger at 7a, we’ll make you a cheeseburger.” Breakfast is served until 3p, Monday through Saturday. All I can tell you is “EAT HERE.” aseveneightfive

WOMEN WHO ROCK


LIFE DU JOUR: A PERFECT BLEND OF COFFEE + FRIENDS At the age of 18, Caitlyn Halsey submitted a business plan for Dialogue Coffee House as part of a college final. That plan and creator would later become a Top Tank Topeka finalist (top 20 in 2017). Today, it serves as the grounds for successful employment of 29 persons, all adults with disabilities, while fueling hundreds of Topekans with robust caffeinated beverages and fresh and delicious pastries.

Walking into Dialogue Coffee House is like stepping into JOY! WOMEN WHO ROCK

by Alison Beebe, seveneightfive FLAVORISTA


DIALOGUE COFFEE HOUSE 4009 SW 29TH ST

I

magine being 40-years-old having never been employed because your abilities were just- different and the world simply didn’t think you could, but never actually bothered to ask.

Caitlyn, owner of Dialogue Coffee House. recognized this disconnect and knew better. Her passion for people runs deep. During her senior year at Washburn Rural High School she ran operations at Common Grounds coffee shop, she was a peer-to-peer mentor and had set her professional sights on becoming a special ed teacher. Life has a way of revealing one's true direction and Caitlyn followed. "The first person I interviewed was 40 years old and had never worked," recalled Caitlyn. "Not because he couldn’t, but the opportunity wasn’t there." Dialogue Coffee House opened April 2019 with a mission of celebrating individuals of all abilities. Their mission is steeped with an employee base of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. "Now, everyone here has worked for 10 months, brought home pay checks and built their confidence," continued Caitlyn. "I hired all 29 people before we even opened and

they are all still here. They all love it." Employees of Dialogue Coffee House work three and one half hour shifts, creating and serving a variety of coffee, baked goods (the monster cookies are a must), soups, salads and more. They've partnered with PT’s Coffee Roasting Co. and supply all of their baked goods. “We’ll start doing catering soon on a small scale. We’ve had successful pop-ups and sell artwork and beautiful cards made from recycled paper. We’re definitely not just coffee.” I’m told the Chestnut Praline coffee is "the best." "I received many times the same question, 'Why do you want to do this now? You are so young, why don’t you just wait a few years.' I never had an answer to the question, other than my heart was telling me to wait no longer. I felt an urgency to begin today. This starts today. I reflect sitting in the corner of this little coffee shop, watching over the employees, and think how could I have waited? Have you seen the passion and joy they have? The pride they take in their work because

I took a risk, makes every fear disappear. These individuals have been waiting all their lives for an opportunity to arise, someone to take a chance and for many that means waiting forty plus years. Can you imagine waiting forty years for a job opportunity, for a chance to take pride in what you do, a chance to feel accepted by others? This is why I don’t wait, because they have waited long enough." Dialogue Coffee House does not strive for integration, but inclusion. "When integration is present, two separate groups are coexisting," said Caitlyn. "Instead, we strive for inclusion because inclusion suggests existing together in the same activities, in the same world, working together as one community. What a beautiful thing if we all live together in one community showcasing and focusing on our God-given talents instead of our difference." Caitlyn must make her mother proud. If you're not sure, stop by and ask; truly a family business as Caitlyn's mom and grandmother both work here, too. Three generations of women who rock!! I like it. I like it a lot. aseveneightfive

Your Local Tax Champion We’re in your neighborhood We take care of you We stand behind our work 610 NW Highway 24 Topeka, KS 66608

785-329-1212

51


MUG SHOT

BEER EVENTS 2020 KANSAS CRAFT BREWERS EXPOSITION MARCH 7 Abe + Jake's Landing

CRAFT THEORIES CRUSHED

Four course Beer Tasting Dinner at THE IRON RAIL MARCH 10

F

GET MORE EVENTS Follow @ TopekaBeer on Facebook and seveneightfive.com

MUG SHOT | Kerrice Mapes for @TopekaBeer

lavored malt beverages have been springing all around, many grown from craft breweries we know and love. I've tried them all, most, once. Meh-th.

When Deschutes Brewery was looking beyond beer, hoping to be the big innovator of 2020, they got damned close. The closest. Let's say, I'll purchase a six-pack. Modified Theory, a line of flavored malt beverages, comes in three flavors: Tahitian Lime Agave, Tarocco Orange Vanilla and Northwest Berry Lavender. Drink it straight, on the rocks or treat it as a mixer - but please be careful my summer beer lovin' friends, this "crafted hard bevy" checks in at 5.5 percent ABV. "In fact, Deschutes conducted more consumer research for Modified Theory than any product in the company's 31-year history," reported Bevnet Magazine. "What the company found was that consumers are intrigued by the prospect of mixing spirits with a malt-based beverage." (We could have told you that - for

a 12-pack, bottle of vodka and juice and a raft rental down Niangua River.) This research also indicated that Modified Theory will attract new legal-drinking-age and multicultural consumers. They recognize the value this consumer is to their core, thus releasing bilingual point-of-sale items. This crafted hard bevy will be available in March, but only throughout Deschutes' 32-state footprint, which includes Topeka. (And you say we don't get nice things?) You'll find it, most likely, not mingling with the crafts beers but sammied between other FMB and canned cocktails, attempting to make a name for its own. Differentiating from its' seltzers and canned cocktail friends, only natural flavors go into the gluten-reduced, no preservative FMB; and Modified Theory packs a flavor punch. Grab a six-pack of Tarocco Orange Vanilla, the first flavor released locally this spring. aseveneightfive

seveneightfive magazine

| est. 2006 | seveneightfive.com


by Kerrice Mapes + Alison Beebe| photo by Alison Beebe, seveneightfive Flavorista

COCKTAIL PARTY TIME

T

he first of six themed cocktail parties, hosted by The Burger Stand, took place in January and featured Gin. Perfectly poured, paired and presented - the event was a perfect 10. The BStand's passion for cocktail culture is prevalent, from preparation to presentation, cocktails and small bites were paired with significance. Attention was spent diving into the development of the spirit, on a historical and cultural level. The party took place in a slightly dressed-up (pong-bar) back room, making it semi-private. This is a must-do for 2020 - for cocktail enthusiasts and service industry professionals alike. You'll be intoxicatingly inspired. CHEERS! The Burger Stand Cocktail Parties are held on Thursday evenings, as noted below. $30/per person; includes three to four cocktails + bites. aseveneightfive

MAR 26: Belvedere + vodkas | MAY 7: Mexcal (liquor w/agave) + tequilas | JULY 30: rums | SEPT 10: Beam, Knob, Basil bourbons | DEC 3: Cordials, liqueurs, aperitifs + digestifs

53


55th Annual

BLINTZE BRUNCH

A

simple occasion in 1966 for the Temple Sisterhood to serve blintzes has become one of Topeka's most desired annual food events. Over 1,000 people attend Blintze Brunch at Temple Beth Sholom each year, with over 85 percent being outside the Jewish community. Beyond blintzes, guests enjoy items like stuffed cabbage, knishes, kugel, kosher hot dogs, bagels and much more. A silent auction and entertainment round out the brunch, all raising funds to support the mission of the temple. For those new, here is a run-down on some of our favorite nosh:

KNISHES: crispy pastry wrapped around a meat or potato filling // KUGEL: a sweet noodle casserole // ROLLED CABBAGE: beef rolled in cabbage leaves // BLINTZES: warm crepe filled with a cottage cheese/cream cheese mixture and cinnamon with fruit preserves as a topping


ADULTS ONLY LADIES ONLY DO NOT BRING THE WHOLE FAMILY

Ladies’ Sunday Brunch & Music Sunday, March 29 MUSIC BY WYNDI SENOGLES

11AM - 2PM

m

$30 / PER PERSON

co d.

o

FOOD BY FRONT DOOR CATERING

o ew

n

i V c i

r

sto i eH Th

m

co d.

o

o ew

oo ew

Bring the whole family!

Mother’s Day Brunch SUNDAY, MAY 10 MUSIC BY THE LAST SONGWRITER FOOD BY FRONT DOOR CATERING

11AM - 2PM

$30* / PER PERSON

* Age 5 years and under - $5

Th eH ist

or icV

in

Th

d.c

o

ist H e

om

in

V ric


FIRST FRIDAY ARTWALK MURALS GRANTS LEADERSHIP COLLABORATION

www.artstopeka.org

Original artwork by C. Dylan Barker.

Visit our new space at 909 N Kansas on First Fridays!

Profile for seveneightfive magazine

#91 - Women Who Rock - March 2020  

Annual Women Who Rock issue

#91 - Women Who Rock - March 2020  

Annual Women Who Rock issue

Advertisement