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THE SUBVERSE MONUMENTS TO HYPERTEXTUALITY

BOOK ONE

THE MANUSCRIPT


PART ONE

BOOK ONE

THE MANUSCRIPT PLAYBILL PROLOGUE A Synopsis An Exposition Credits *Curtains Open* PART ONE Act One Semantics and Semiotics Scene 1: Cognition Scene 2: Once Upon a Frozen Moment Scene 3: Play Act Two Doctored Monument, Monitored Document Scene 1: The Other Side of the Story of the Other Side Scene 2: Setting the Scenery Act Three Transformation Tactics: The Board Game Scene 1: Stratagems Scene 2: Enactment INTERMISSION HTD Masterclass: Storming Castles in the Sky


ACT ONE

SCENE ONE

PART TWO

{

Act One The Fountain Scene 1: Dancing to Another Tune Scene 2: Revolution Scene 3: Schemes and Schematics Scene 4: Pathways Scene 5: Choreography Scene 6: Converge and Converse Act Two The Tea Room Scene 1: Tunnel Vision Scene 2: Smoke and Mirrors Scene 3: Pandora’s Box Act Three The Garden Scene 1: Down the Garden Path Scene 2: See the Forest from the Trees Act Four The Bandstand Scene 1: For the Record Scene 2: Broadcast Act Five The Citadel Scene 1: Curtain Walls Scene 2: Lights. Camera. Distraction Act Six The Sentinel Arch Scene 1: A Monument by any other Name Scene 2: Epigraph to Epitaph Grand Finale The Performance 1 November 2017 Final Review *Curtains Close*

}

* DRP


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PROLOGUE


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A SYNOPSIS WELCOME TO THE SUBVERSE

“With cities, it is as with dreams: everything imaginable can be dreamed, but even the most unexpected dream is a rebus that conceals a desire or, its reverse, a fear. Cities, like dreams, are made of desires and fears, even if the thread of their discourse is secret, their rules are absurd, their perspectives deceitful, and everything conceals something else.” Italo Calvino, Invisible Cities THE SUBVERSE: MONUMENTS TO HYPERTEXTUALITY is a series of six stage sets that harness the dual nature of fiction and theatre to confront the sensitive themes of privilege, patrimony, corruption, and collusion in post-apartheid South Africa. Theatrical tactics, such as metaphor, diversion, juxtaposition, absurdity, and fairy tale, are used to deliberately reconfigure the known narratives of historical events, landmarks, monuments, and accounts in order to reveal an alternative narrative, the sub - verse, of past and present South African politics. “Hypertext” describes embedded links and the endless layers of information that form a vast web of cross-referencing between sites – in this case, between my six stage sets. Each layer of meaning conceals another, and with each tactical transformation, the resultant architecture is a stage on which a new story is enacted.


AN EXPOSITION ENTER. STAGE LEFT.

Once upon a time, there was a little girl who built castles in her dreams, and built walls in her reality. As a child, fairy tales are a gateway to meaning - to making sense of the complexities of the real world. My earliest memories are of teaching myself to read and it was in fairy tales that I first encountered architecture. THE SUBVERSE manifests itself as a series of six stage sets that use fiction and fairy tale confront the unresolved legacy of colonialism after 23 years of democracy. The layer beneath is more personal, THE SUBVERSE is challenging my story, my place in the context of post-apartheid South Africa and a way to confront feelings of guilt, shame, anger, resentment, self-entitlement, and empathy. As the year comes to a close, I have been able to reflect on the journey - beginning with a little book about learning to read and ending with a series of architectural propositions that ask more questions than they answer - I can see that there is yet a deeper, unconscious layer. THE SUBVERSE has been a right of passage. At the age of 27, I am taking a battle ram to my castle. Truth is so hard to tell, it sometimes needs fiction to make it plausible.� Francis Bacon


CREDITS QUEUE OSCARS ACCEPTANCE SPEECH BACKGROUND MUSIC “The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude.” Friedrich Nietzsche This has been the most inspiring, the most challenging, and the most rewarding 2 years of my life and I would never have been able to get through it alone. Always first, I thank God Almighty for Your steadfast love, for the many blessings that You have granted me, for giving me the strength and fortitude to push myself beyond my limits, and for surrounding me with truly amazing family, friends, and mentors. To my husband, Michael, there aren’t words that can capture my appreciation. You are my steady, unmoving touchstone; the string to my balloon. And of course, to my parents for arriving at the 11th hour with a hole-saw, miniature hinges and chocolate. Thank you. I would like to extend my deepest gratitude and appreciation to my mentors who have guided me through this thrilling adventure: To Sumayya Vally and Stephen Hobbs for pushing me, for telling me when I am being stubborn, for believing in me, and for being wholeheartedly invested in each and every one of your students. I cannot imagine my M2 year without you both. To Stephen Steyn for re-awakening my love for writing. To Lesley Lokko and the Safe Space team, for providing a platform for self-reflection, uncomfortable honesty, and critical thinking. Finally, to my Unit 11 peers: you guys are awesome. *Exit stage right*


PART ONE


ACT ONE

SCENE ONE

CURTAINS OPEN


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PART ONE


.


PART ONE

ACT ONE SEMANTICS AND SEMIOTICS: Semantics. n. sɪˈmantɪks/

1. The branch of linguistics and logic concerned with meaning. The two main areas are logical semantics, concerned with matters such as sense and reference and presupposition and implication, and lexical semantics, concerned with the analysis of word meanings and relations between them. 2. The meaning of a word, phrase, or text. Semiotics. n.

siːmɪˈɒtɪks, sɛmɪˈɒtɪks/

1. The study of signs and symbols and their use or interpretation.


ACT ONE

SCENE ONE

COGNITION

Cognition. n. kɒɡˈnɪʃ(ə)n/

1. The mental action or process of acquiring knowledge and understanding through thought, experience, and the senses. 2. A perception, sensation, idea, or intuition resulting from the process of cognition.


Phonetics


PART ONE


ACT ONE

SCENE ONE


PART ONE


ACT ONE

SCENE ONE


PART ONE


ACT ONE

SCENE ONE


ACT ONE

SCENE TWO

ONCE UPON A FROZEN MOMENT

A Fairy Tale An Absurd Landscape A Political Subtext * Based on an almost true story

Reading. n. ˈriːdɪŋ/

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

The act of reading. A particular version. Data indicated by an instrument. A particular interpretation of something (such as a law). A performance of something (such as a musical work). An indication of a certain state of affairs.



PART ONE

O

nce upon a frozen moment, there was a world abounding in colour: grass was green, bricks were brown, the rooves were red and the walls were white. Every day, the Oodits went about their ooditting: miners mined, and builders built while pirates would plunder the ferry that ferried on boats that would float on a river that ran.

Everything was just as it should be.


ACT ONE

SCENE TWO

In the fair land of Prodge, one could hear the chiming chatter of children, the flipping and flopping of feet, the clickety clack of the train and its track. And the faces! Oh! Those little Oodit faces were forever painted with a smile.


PART ONE

There were big faces too, the heavenly Honants who watched over the realm. Each day, as the sun began to sear and scorch, the Honants provided reprieve from the unrelenting heat. Passing as fluffy white clouds drifting through the endless blue sky, they would hover for a moment, casting their cool shadow, before moving along to hover elsewhere. At each passing, the Oodits would stop in their tracks, frozen in awe, to gaze at the benevolent protectors above. And so this glassy bubble of idyllic bliss thrived outside of time itself‌ until one fateful day: the bubble was burst.


ACT ONE

SCENE TWO


PART ONE

It was a dark and stormy afternoon, and the clouds were black with fury and thunder. The frantic Oodits, having never seen a black cloud before, were petrified. The cloud descended upon them, drawing closer and closer until the Oodits could spy the whites of this Honant’s wide eyes. It peered down at them as if surveying a bowl of berries. With an aching slowness, a massive hand broke through some invisible barrier and gripped a bright yellow bus, plucking it from the road to raise it to its terrible drooling mouth. Covered in slobber, the battered bus was carelessly dropped from a dizzying height to collide with the tarmac.

This was no Honant, but a dreaded Demihing!


ACT ONE

SCENE TWO


PART ONE


ACT ONE

SCENE TWO

The Demihing continued in its path of devastation: it lifted the Church from its wispy foundations to look into the hollow underside before plonking it back on the straight and narrow path beside its gigantic rubberclad feet. With just a prod, a single chubby finger was able to topple the colourful Ferris wheel, crushing the fragile carnival grounds below.

The behemoth then summited the Monumental Mountain with ease and violently rapped on the roof of the Proud Palace. With each blow, the resounding echoes could be heard throughout the realm, ringing in the ears of the stunned Oodits.


PART ONE

Finally, the Demihing approached the Silent Spire, a stately ivory tower beside the tumultuous tides of the sea-pond. It wrapped both hands around the solemn steeple and, with the strength of a thousand ants, shook the tower to its very core. It was then that something finally clicked in the fantastical land of Prodge. For the very first time, the Silent Tower made a noise. A soft ‘tick’ followed by a quiet ‘tock.’ With each ‘tick’ a window would crack and with each ‘tock’ an empty tower would topple.

‘Tick.’ An Oodit fled to a land down under. ‘Tock.’ A police station was torn asunder. ‘Tick.’ A faded layer of paint would flake. ‘Tock.’ An island was swallowed by a lake.


ACT ONE

SCENE TWO


PART ONE

The incessant ticking and tocking grew louder and louder, only to be drowned out by the deafening, clangorous tolling of bells from the tower. ‘Ding.’ The black clouds bellowed and bled, until finally… ‘Dong.’ The land of Prodge is dead.


ACT ONE

SCENE TWO

And, at last, everything was just as it should be.


ACT ONE

SCENE THREE PLAY

Play. n. /pleÉŞ/

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

A dramatic composition or piece; drama. A dramatic performance, as on the stage. Fun or jest, as opposed to seriousness. A pun. The playing, action, or conduct of a game.



PART ONE

HOW TO PLAY: Step 1: Select words from “The Fair Land of Prodge” and divide into Sites, Onomatopoeia, Nouns, Adjectives, and Verbs. Cut them out and group them, then turn them face down.

SITES

NOUNS

ADJECTIVES

ONOMATOPOEIA

VERBS

Step 2: Fill in the following sentence structure by selecting random words from those categories and turning them over in their place in the sentence. Create 3 sentences, one for each of the sites.

ADJECTIVE_SITE_VERB_ADJECTIVE_ONOMATOPOEIA_NOUN


ACT ONE

SCENE THREE

Step 3: Replace 2 words per sentence to manipulate the meaning closer to the intended undertone of the story.

Step 4: Add articles and change tenses to complete the sentences

A glassy Tower plundered the endless chiming chatter of the realm. An empty Ferris Wheel swallows dark clickety-clack children. The drooling Palace peered at the ivory tick-tock finger.

Step 5: Turn these absurd sentences into absurd stage sets that further articulate the intended, or scripted, undertones of each site based on it’s history, connotations and conditions.


PART ONE


ACT ONE

SCENE ONE

A glassy Tower plundered the endless chiming chatter of the realm.


PART ONE

The Campanile Tower in Port Elizabeth celebrates the landing of the 1820 British settlers on the coastline of Algoa Bay – known for its great white shark population. The tower is styled after a Renaissance clock tower – a “campanile”. This stage set plays on the irony of having an Italian tower on the coastline of South Africa to celebrate the English colonisers. By highlighting the language differences between the two acquainting people, it asks the question of “who is the alien?”


ACT ONE

SCENE THREE


PART ONE


ACT ONE

SCENE ONE

An empty Ferris Wheel swallows dark clickety clack children


PART ONE

The clock/wheel represents the Giant Wheel of Gold Reef City Theme Park, Johannesburg. The park is styled after turn-of-thecentury Johannesburg during the Witwatersrand gold-rush. Built on top of a defunct gold mine, it offers tours into what was once the dark, sweltering hell of thousands of black miners. The stage set plays on the two worlds: the perpetual cycle of fortune and privilege at the expense of the “vermin� that toil in the mines below.


ACT ONE

SCENE THREE


PART ONE


ACT ONE

SCENE ONE

The drooling Palace peered at the ivory tick-tock finger.


PART ONE

The rook piece represents the seat of power of the South African Government: the Union Buildings in Pretoria. “Union” originally meant the collaboration between the Afrikaans and English in the governance of South Africa. On the base, the chess board represents the conflict of black and white while the overlaid maze speaks of the “rigged” game where the rook piece has a better vantage. The gun alludes to the violence during the clashes between protesters and police during apartheid but can also symbolise a race. The word race can either mean a classification of ethnicity, or a contest of speed – a race against time. The chess clock shows 1994 – the time at which the game ended, the race was over.


ACT ONE

SCENE THREE


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PART ONE

ACT TWO DOCTORED MONUMENT MONITORED DOCUMENT


ACT TWO

SCENE ONE

THE OTHER SIDE OF THE STORY OF THE OTHER SIDE

History is constantly being re-scripted. Each of the fourteen selected historic sites, monuments, and landmarks have undergone a change - a translation - during the course of history. The book is designed to narrate, subvert, conceal and reveal these alternative narratives through juxtaposition, metaphor and absurdity... ... and a bit of a magic trick.

PLAY VIDEO 01




The Other Side of the Story Unfolds


PART ONE The Other Side

Campanile Then Then Then District 6 Now Then Now

The Other Other Side

District 6 Then Now Then Campanile Then Now Then


ACT TWO

SCENE ONE

Flip or Fold Formations


PART ONE

How to:

MANIPULATE MEANING


ACT TWO

SCENE ONE

How to:

CONCEAL AND REVEAL NARRATIVES


PART ONE

THE OLD FORT PRISON COMPLEX JOHANNESBURG 1899 | CURRENT

THE RADIUM BEER HALL JOHANNESBURG 1929 | 1980’S

THE RAND CLUB JOHANNESBURG 1904 | CURRENT

From one of Johannesburg’s most hated buildings, to the seat of South Africa’s visionary Constitution.

The oldest surviving bar in Johannesburg. An ‘innocent’ tearoom-cum-shebeen becomes a subversive jazz-bar.

From an exclusive gentleman’s club to a sort-of exclusive venue for hire.


ACT TWO

SCENE ONE

LESEDI CULTURAL VILLAGE CRADLE OF HUMANKIND 1904 | CURRENT

TOWER OF TERROR, GOLD REEF CITY 1887 | CURRENT

From ancestral homelands to false territory, and now a tourist spectacle.

A terrifying decent into a hot, dark, and dangerous 12-hour shift, becomes an adrenalin-fueled joy-ride.


PART ONE

THE ANGLO-BOER WAR MEMORIAL SAXONWOLD, JOHANNESBURG 1914 | 1999

NELSON MANDELA SQUARE SANDTON, JOHANNESBURG 2004 | CURRENT

From “Rand Regiments Memorial” topped with Nike, Goddess of Victory, to the “Anglo-Boer War Memorial”, topped with the Angel of Peace.

A monument to a national hero or a clever marketing campaign?


ACT TWO

SCENE ONE

CECIL JOHN RHODES STATUE UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN 1934 | 2015

THE CAMPANILE TOWER PORT ELIZABETH 1920 | CURRENT

The man at the centre of 20th century South African history became the centre of the #RhodesMustFall revolution.

Built in 1920 to commemorate the 1820 British, with 1600’s Renaissance architecture. Now surrounded by highways, traintracks and machinery.


PART ONE

THE GREAT HALL, WITS UNI. JOHANNESBURG 1920 | 2016

THE UNION BUILDINGS PRETORIA 1913 | 1956 | 1994 | 2013| 2016

SOWETO JOHANNESBURG 1930 | 1976 | CURRENT

From exclusive education for wealthy whites, to political activism and open doors, to exclusive education for wealthy whites.

A place of peace and unity, of colonialism, of protest, of celebration, of mourning, of remembrance, or a pleasant picnic spot?

Squalid streets for protest or squalid streets for a cool photo backdrop?


ACT TWO

SCENE ONE

DISTRICT 6 CAPE TOWN 1867 | 1968 | CURRENT

JOHN VORSTER SQUARE JOHANNESBURG 1958 | 1960’S AND 70’S

A home, a ruin, a utopian memory.

From a monument to power, order and control, to a blue and grey gravestone.



Manipulating Meaning



Concealing and Revealing Narratives


ACT TWO

SCENE TWO

SETTING THE SCENERY

One of the sites in THE OTHER SIDE OF THE STORY OF THE OTHER SIDE was the Anglo-Boer War Memorial in Saxonwold, Johannesburg. The Monument was commissioned by Sir Lionel Phillips, a Randlord of British descent, and was privately funded by various wealthy benefactors. Completed in 1914, the Rand Regiments Memorial was dedicated to the fallen British soldiers. Johannesburg City Council had contested that it should be dedicated to all those who had died in the war, but Phillips had refused and proceeded with the build anyway. As a concession, the statue that topped the memorial would be renamed – Nike, the Goddess of Victory became the Angel of Peace. In 1999, the memorial was renamed The Anglo-Boer War Memorial and rededicated in “memory of the men, women, and children of all races and all nations who lost their lives in the Anglo Boer War.” Both the statue and the inscriptions on the walls are exactly the same as they were in the original blueprints. It was this subtle shift in meaning that drew me to Saxonwold as a site.

“A [MONUMENT] BY ANY OTHER NAME WOULD SMELL AS [COLONIAL].” This site- (or set-) model, called SETTING THE SCENERY, starts to explore some of the nuances of Saxonwold through it’s landmarks, histories, and idiosyncrasies.



PART ONE


ACT TWO

SCENE TWO


PART ONE

1

2

3

6

7

8

11

12

13

16

17

18


ACT TWO

SCENE TWO

STORY[BOARD]

1. 2. 3. 4.

box of tricks out into the open trapdoor throw one’s toys out of the cot 5. money tree 4

5

6. barking up the wrong tree 7. branching out 8. out on a limb 9. can’t see the forest for the trees 10. elephant; tank; bathtub 9

10

11. picnic basket; policetaxi; giraffe 12. knight in reflective armour 13. four windows of opportunity 14. lolly-pops; arm-chairman 15. pull up a musical-chair 14

15

16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 19

20

under the table tea room in a tree-house beady eyes signpost; teapot hang ups about misogyny


PART ONE

SETTING

THE

SCENERY

identifies six sites within Saxonwold that are relevant to both past and present political narratives: three factual sites, namely the Anglo-Boer War Memorial and adjacent Military Museum, the Bandstand in the Johannesburg Zoo, and Zoo Lake; alongside three semi-fictional sites that are based on the Gupta’s massive compound, the urban legend of the Saxonwold Shebeen, and the trees and gardens of Johannesburg’s affluent northern suburbs.


ACT TWO

SCENE TWO


PART ONE

The build-it-yourself nature of the model and the arrangement of the board, divided into six parts with streets between, sets itself up for an inserted narrative. Each time SETTING THE SCENERY is built, it will have a different composition. To do this, however, one needs a narrative to insert. The six sites of the model became the foundation of the TRANSFORMATION

TACTICS

board game that follows.


ACT TWO

SCENE TWO


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PART ONE

ACT THREE TRANSFORMATION TACTICS: THE BOARD GAME


ACT THREE

SCENE ONE

STRATAGEMS

My Major Design Project, as a whole, alludes to a vast array of sociopolitical conditions, events, stereotypes, idiosyncrasies, and histories. Through the use of satirical references, the TRANSFORMATION TACTICS Board Game is able to take complex abstract concepts and make them tangible and coherent. The game begins by assigning characters: the oldest white male holds colour-coded straws of various lengths and the other players draw their straws. “Drawing the short straw�, in this case, assigns the player to the Thief, the lowest ranked character in the game. The longest straw is the King. Each character then has their own personal Pass Book which stipulates their unique rules, privileges, restrictions, and interactions between other characters and sites. One example of such a restriction is each character must use their assigned die, which is loaded. The King and the Madam use the white die which is weighted to almost always land on a six, conversely, the black die tends to land on a one, and is used by the Knight, Herald, Maiden and Thief. The entire game is rigged through a very carefully designed system of interactions, privileges, and conditions with the intention of transforming the Tea Room into a Shebeen. While the game is not architectural in spatial terms, it is architectural in its meticulous arrangement of system, strategy, and scheme.



PART ONE


ACT ONE

SCENE ONE

Board Game Components


PART ONE

F = 1 Point T = 2 Points G = 5 Points I = 10 Points * = 50 Points The game is completed when all 6 of the Collusion Coins * have been dealt out. Each player’s assets are tallied up and the player with the highest net worth wins.


ACT THREE

SCENE ONE

Assets


PART ONE

The Thief enters the Sentinel Arch and looks at the PRIVILEGE PASSES in his hand. A sly smile crosses his face. He places A little birdie on the table.

“I hereby accuse the Herald of having Dirty Laundry. Herald, how do you plead?” “Ah ****. I was just about to reach the Garden to drop it off! So I go to Jail now?” “Indeed... Now that you’re there, I would like to play It’s a slippery Soap.” “What does that mean?” It means you slipped on some soap while you were in jail. You’re dead now. Please hand over all of your money.”


ACT THREE

SCENE ONE


PART ONE

Dirty Laundry

the private jet

Strike a woman, strike a rock

If the Knight lands beside you while you have Dirty Laundry on your hands, you will go to jail. Drop your laundry at the Garden and leave 2x G for the Maiden.

Play this card at the Sentinel Arch. Roll a 6 to climb aboard your very own Private Jet. You can land wherever you like and all entrance fees are waived.

Play ‘Rock, Paper, Scissors’ with the player who placed No Girls Allowed. Win to remove it for the remainder of the game.

Warm the throne

radio Revolution

No Girls Allowed

Need a job at the Citadel? Your new boss is an ass, but at least it’s a job. Warm up the seat for 1 round to earn 2x G

Play this card at the Fountain. Invite any player to join you for a chilled afternoon listening to radio broadcasts on the grass. Each player gets 2x I

It’s a man’s world. Place this card on any of the locations to prevent the Madam and the Maiden from entering. This card can only be removed using the Strike a Woman, Strike a Rock card.

Oh, Put a sock on it

It’s a slippery soap

Brick by Brick

You seem to have picked up a virus! I’ve heard that garlic works wonders. Pay 3x F and roll a 6 to be cured, otherwise pay 2x F at the beginning of every turn for the remainder of the game.

Play this card at the Sentinel Arch. Pay 5x G and 2x I to eliminate any player currently in the Jail. You receive all of the eliminated player’s assets.

Need a job at the Citadel? The Citadel wasn’t built in a day. Build a gigantic wall, the bigger the better, for 1 round to earn 2x G


ACT THREE

SCENE ONE

Shoe Shine

Tata Ma Chance

The Arms Deal

Need a job at the Citadel? Are you fit to shine shoes? Well, put your back into it and buff them takkies for 1 round to earn 2x G

Play this card at the beginning of your turn. Using your assigned die, roll a 6 to collect 6 of assets of your choosing. Didn’t roll a 6? Eish, sorry for you.

Play this card at the Sentinal Arch. Roll a 6 to challenge any player to an arm wrestle. Win: steal all of their Privilege Passes relating to the Sentinel Arch. Lose: go to Jail.

Spread ‘Em

The Nyala

Top Secret tea Party

Play this card at the Tea Room. Using your assigned die, roll a 6 to collect 1 asset from each player. They spread their cards face-down and you pick one.

Play this card at the Sentinel Arch. Roll a 6 to place the Nyala on any location, everybody inside is evacuated to their home square and nobody can enter the location for 1 round.

Play this card at the Tea Room. Invite any player to join you in the Tea Room for a quick brew while discussing the weather or politics. Standard entrance fees apply.

Shisanyama en alles

the Tree house

A little Birdie

Play this card at the Fountain. Food always bring people together. Invite another player to the fountain, you each receive 2x F and 2x I

Play this card at the Garden. Climb up a tree to do a bit of snooping. Choose one player to reveal all of their Privilege Passes to you.

Play this card at the Sentinel Arch. Pay 1x G and 1x I to accuse a player of Dirty Laundry. The accused displays all of their Privilege Passes. If they have Dirty Laundry, they go to jail. If not, the accuser gets a slap on the wrist.

Privilege Passes 1-18


PART ONE

A good brew, my bru Play this card at the Tea Room. Maize, maize malt, sorghum malt, yeast and water. The perfect ingredients for an extra special tea blend. Sell your brew for 2x G

Row, Row, Row your boat Play this card when leaving the Fountain. You get 2 extra moves, as long as you are moving downwards.

Trolley Pusher Play this card at the beginning of your turn. The road is yours! You may move diagonally for one round only.

Privilege Passes 19-27

There’s Music in the air

Spit ‘n Polish

Play this card at the Bandstand. Smash an epic air-solo. Keys, sax, bass, drums, whatever. Make it up on the spot for 2x I

Need a job at the Citadel? Things can get a little dirty ‘round here. Give the (door)knob a thorough rubbing for 1 round to earn 2x G

Sho’t left

Get Out of Jail Free

Play this card at the beginning of your turn. Thumbs up to hail a taxi. The taxi can drive right over the middle island if it wants to. Pay 1x G for every 4 moves.

Play this card when arrested. They seem to have lost all of the evidence, and your Dirty Laundry has disappeared onto the discard pile. Wierd...

What a lovely ‘Pot’ Plant

To the Bandwagon!

Play this card when leaving the Garden. It’s been said that gardening is very relaxing but can give you the munchies. Take 2x F for the road.

Play this card when leaving the Bandstand. Hop on the Bandwagon and move directly to the Tea Room. Standard Tea Room entrance fees apply.


ACT THREE

SCENE ONE

Coded Straws, Game Pieces, Dice


PART ONE

The King arrives at the Citadel, his home location, as his first stop. He opens his PASS BOOK to check the location entry controls.

“Hey Madam, have you seen that we can buy the Citadel? You have to roll a 6 so these other suckers don’t stand a chance. Ha!” “What? Mine doesn’t say that? Apparently I need your permission to get in. I’d like to see you try stopping me.”

The King rolls a 4 and cannot buy the Citadel. In the next round, the Madam enters the Citadel, rolls a 6 and purchases it, earning her 2 G at the beginning of every round. If the King had kept his mouth shut, she would never have known. From then on, he kept his privileges to himself.


ACT THREE

SCENE ONE


PART ONE

Pass Books - Front Covers


ACT THREE

SCENE ONE

Pass Books - Identification


ACT THREE

SCENE TWO

ENACTMENT

THE ROUND TABLE The table at which King Arthur and his knights sat so that none should have precedence. An international charitable association which holds discussions and undertakes community service, open to men between the ages of 18 and 45, typically from business and professional groups. BRING SOMETHING TO THE TABLE To provide something that will be a benefit. THE TABLES HAVE TURNED A major change has happened, especially one that results in the opposite of an earlier situation. UNDER THE TABLE Intoxicated; - or - Secret; clandestine. COME TO THE TABLE To meet in order to negotiate or discuss how to resolve a particular issue or situation. LAY ONE’S CARDS ON THE TABLE Be open and honest, reveal one’s position or intentions.

PLAY VIDEO 02



PART ONE

Game Play - Saturday 30-09-2017


ACT THREE

SCENE TWO


PART ONE


ACT THREE

SCENE TWO


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INTERMISSION


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INTERMISSION

HTD MASTERCLASS TRANSFORMATION TACTICS: STORMING CASTLES IN THE SKY THE BOARD GAME

In 2016, M1’s were required to take the History and Theory Dissertation Module (the resulting dissertation can be found in Addendum A) and from these submissions, about a dozen of the most promising writers were invited to partake in the voluntary HTD Masterclass, overseen by Stephen Steyn and Dr. Caroline Kihato, during the first semester of 2017. Participants were given the option of further developing their original essays or to start a new piece that runs parallel to their M2 design proposal. I opted for the latter. STORMING CASTLES IN THE SKY is a short opinion piece that echoes

my interest and exploration into the interplay between fiction, architecture, and politics.


INTERMISSION

STORMING CASTLES IN THE SKY Mary Fitzgerald (1890 – 1960), or ‘Pick-handle Mary,’ was South Africa’s first female trade unionist, the first female printer and the first female member of Johannesburg’s City Council. She lobbied against miners’ working conditions, led protests and sit-ins, made rousing speeches, and fought for women’s equality and the right to vote. It is no wonder, then, that the Irish-born trailblazer would have a public square named in her honour. I have been to Mary Fitzgerald Square in Newtown, Johannesburg, exactly three times. The first was on a remarkably average Thursday morning. I walked diagonally across the centre of the Square, scattering pigeons in my wake while a silent audience, idly enjoying their smoke-break, watched from the fringes. I was drawn to the Square a second time in October, 2013, for a concert featuring the indierock band, alt-J. It was a spectacle of flashing lights, heavy base, and enthusiastic flocks of hipsters sporting beards, lumberjack shirts and the newest iPhone at the time. My third and most recent experience of Mary Fitzgerald Square was on the 7th of April, 2017, during the #ZumaMustFall march. I listened to a charismatic and impassioned performance from the DA’s Mmusi Maimane, and had a patriotic lump in my throat as I sang the national anthem with my right hand upraised and held by that of the middle-aged black man beside me. Standing ovation! Encore, encore! Architecture became the stage, literally, on which each scene was played out. With every event, the props, sets, scripts and players had changed, and the square was transformed from an agoraphobic expanse, to a claustrophobic, throbbing arena, to a compelling colosseum. Once the audience had filed out and the sets were packed away, the square became what it had always been – blank. Waiting for the next performance. Architecture is defined and transformed by the audience it hosts - without people, it is the proverbial fallen tree in the forest. In turn, physical architectural form shapes the performance - the stage is positioned for maximum visibility, the walls that line the space faintly echo the words of the monologue, narrow passageways slow the crowds, level ground is a dance-floor, stairs are seats, and bollards are personal galleries. There is a tangible interaction between an individual and the physical space that they occupy – but can architecture have a broader scale of interaction? Can architecture be political? Firstly, architecture does not necessarily mean what you think it means. It goes without saying that it is more than beautifully designed facades with triple-glazed e-coated arctic-tested animal-friendly eco-glazing; fire escapes that have to comply with every safety standard imaginable; and masses of emails from indecisive clients with ‘you-need-to-lower-your-expectations’ budgets. Instead, architecture is, in many ways, a ‘concrete’ form of fiction. It is a new, imagined world built from the subjective reality, experience, memory, and references of a single mind, all of which had been molded by an entire culture.


HTD MASTERCLASS

STORMING CASTLES IN THE SKY

A writer will spend hour upon hour crafting a thought, agonising over a single phrase, drawing up perfect metaphors, hammering out a rhythm, and, bit by bit, construct a story that can capture the imagination and toy with emotions. Good writing, like good architecture, does not flaunt its intense technical detail, but is apparently effortless, and its manipulation is subtle. A reader will pour themselves into a narrative, blurring the lines between reality and fiction, and generating an insight that would otherwise be inaccessible or inconceivable. One can find themselves falling in love with the ‘insufferable’ Mr Darcy; rooting for the borderline psychotic stalker, Jay Gatsby; or laughing at the serial womanising conducted by Barney Stinson. This is the power of fiction. Fiction has the capacity to influence perception, not only at an individual level, but at the scale of the masses. A carefully written speech, an evocative advert, a subversive comic strip, the words that aren’t in a news article, and a guerrilla billboard on the façade of a prominent building – removed in a matter of hours – are all works of fiction designed to evoke, sway, and manipulate their audience. Power balances on the nib of a pen as it writes out a deliberately drafted script. German playwright Bertolt Brecht said that “art is not a mirror held up to reality, but a hammer with which to shape it.” The word politics stems from the Greek work politikos, from politēs ‘citizen’, from polis ‘city’. The title of Aristotle’s book, Politika, can be translated into ‘affairs of the city’. The story of a city and its citizens can be told through its architectural timeline: forts are built during war, monuments during mourning, and prisons during struggle. In this way, architecture is a series of props and backdrops to inform the narrative. Yet, the fort defended the soldiers, securing their victory. The victors then built monuments in honour of their fallen on the very land that was soaked in the blood of the defeated opposition. The war captives were imprisoned and held hostage, ensuring that a new wave of rebellion is quelled before it has even begun. In a more modern context, the Constitutional Court, built on the site of the Old Fort was built to conciliate peace, equality, and justice, and to set right the devastating wrongs of the past; the Apartheid Museum ensures that the story is never forgotten, and mass housing tells of the need to accommodate an influx of people in search of opportunities in the big city that had been denied to them in the past. In all of these scenarios, architecture helped to write the story. It is more than the stage on which history is played out, it is also a player in the grand narrative of society – of politics - and has the ability to construct civilisation.


INTERMISSION

Architecture has the capacity to intimidate, seclude, separate, and suppress; but also to comfort, include, unify and liberate. By nature, architecture is a hammer in the hands of the powerful. It is difficult for architecture to embody metaphor, to carry a message, in the same way as literature. Written words are forever fixed in the time in which they were created – Georg Orwell’s Animal Farm will always be an allegory of the Russian Revolution of 1917 and the Stalinist Era of the Soviet Union. Architecture, however, is defined by those who use it rather than those who create it, and so it will always be drawn forward into the contemporary. A wall is just a wall until there are people on either side of it. In describing medieval fortifications, the pomerium, a contraction of the Latin phrase post moerium, literally meaning “behind the wall”, was originally an open area of ground on both sides of a city’s curtain wall, stripped of vegetation to give a clear view of any encroaching threat from the outside, and provide a staging area for battalions on the inside - behind the curtain, so to speak. It was the suppressed that mined the stones to build the walls of their suppressors, the ramparts and watchtowers designed to survey them, the electric fencing and security cameras that monitor the streets below. Inside and outside, hidden and exposed, vulnerable and secure, public and private, us and them. Walls are as political as it gets, or, more accurately, the spaces that lie behind the walls – whichever side that may be. It is on the ‘outside’ - in the streets, the squares, and the parks - that wars are waged and the story is written; where citizens gather with pitchforks and flaming torches, with siege engines and battle rams, with placards and megaphones. The scene is set, the plot unfolds. A sonorous voice will recite the script that has been so carefully written, and the chorus is amplified by the echoes that reflect off of the walls that surround them - the walls with electric fencing and security cameras: the silent audience. Perhaps the curtains will close on a story that ends in victory and defeat, perhaps in a stalemate, perhaps a peace treaty? Perhaps the #WallsMustFall? But where there are walls, there are sides; and where there are sides, there are people with stories and the other sides of those stories. There are other sides. There are others. With each stroke of the pen, the architect draws both the castle wall and the scaling ladder.


HTD MASTERCLASS

STORMING CASTLES IN THE SKY

Protesters outside of the Gupta compound in Saxonwold. Tweeted by Milton Nkosi @nkosi_milton on 3 April 2017


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PART TWO


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PART TWO

ACT ONE

THE FOUNTAIN


THE FOUNTAIN

SCENE ONE

DANCE TO A DIFFERENT TUNE

The Madam picked up her shopping bags, adjusted her tutu and alighted the tram at stop 17 - the Fountain. She was little disgruntled that nobody had offered to help her with her burdens. Where is a Knight in Reflective Armour when you need one? She quickly suppressed a sigh and continued her sashay to the Fountain. She could not be late for the performance. The path seemed to twist and turn it’s way through the straight lines of trees. The canopies above formed lofty arches and the dappled shade disrupted the steady rhythm of her dance. Step-step-tree. Step-step-column. Step-step-stair. Step-step-stage. .....

Some years later, the Madam lounged on the rolling lawns, watching the Herald play his whistle, attracting a mixed crowd. It’s one thing for the rats to follow the piper, she thought to herself, but there is really no need to get the ducklings involved as well. Fortunately, her ducklings where with the Maiden, raiding the picnic basket. Unknowingly, she tapped her foot to the Herald’s beat.



THE FOUNTAIN

SCENE TWO

REVOLUTION

Revolution. n. rɛvəˈluːʃ(ə)n/

1. A forcible overthrow of a government or social order, in favour of a new system. 2. An instance of revolving. eg. “one revolution a second” ·· Synonyms: single turn, turn, rotation, circle, whirl, twirl, spin, wheel, roll, round, cycle, circuit, lap.

PLAY VIDEO 03



PART TWO


THE FOUNTAIN

SCENE TWO


PART TWO


THE FOUNTAIN

SCENE TWO


PART TWO


The Inner Workings


PART TWO

Compose Components


THE FOUNTAIN

SCENE TWO


THE FOUNTAIN

SCENE THREE

SCHEMES AND SCHEMATICS

Scheme. n. skiːm/

1. A large-scale systematic plan or arrangement for attaining some particular object or putting a particular idea into effect. 2. A secret or underhand plan; a plot. 3. A particular ordered system or arrangement. Schematic. a.

skiːˈmatɪk,skɪˈmatɪk/

1. (Of a diagram or other representation) symbolic and simplified. “schematic diagrams” 2. (Of thought, ideas, etc.) simplistic or formulaic in character.


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PART PART TWO ONE


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THEACT FOUNTAIN ONE SCENE SCENE ONE THREE

Plan Section Elevation


THE FOUNTAIN

SCENE FOUR

PATHWAYS

Each revolving platform was assigned to a character based on their rank and ease of access to the Fountain. The platforms were then renamed and coloured coded. THE KING’S PROMENADE • n. A paved public walk, typically along the seafront at a resort. • v. Take a leisurely public walk, ride, or drive so as to meet or be seen by others. THE MADAM’S CATWALK • n. A platform extending into an auditorium, along which models walk to display clothes in fashion shows. THE KNIGHT’S PATROL • n. An expedition to keep watch over an area, especially by guards or police walking or driving around at regular intervals. THE HERALD’S BROADWAY • n. A street in New York City, famous for its theaters, restaurants, and bright lights. • n. A large open or main road. THE MAIDEN’S PAVEMENT • n. A raised paved or asphalted path for pedestrians at the side of a road. THE THIEF’S BYPASS • n. A road passing round a town or its centre to provide an alternative route for through traffic. • v. To avoid or circumvent an obstacle or problem.


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PART PART TWO ONE

The above table details the angles at which the platforms intersect, and, as a result, the possible points of interaction between characters as they pass from one platform to another to reach the centre. Each intersection is given a code. FC - for example, is the point or moment at which the “Forum” aligns with the “Centre”. While H2 is the angle at which the Maiden’ Pavement docks at her home position.


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THEACT FOUNTAIN ONE SCENE SCENE ONE FOUR

Constructed Correlations


PART PART TWO ONE


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THEACT FOUNTAIN ONE SCENE SCENE ONE FOUR

Intersections of Incidence


PART PART TWO ONE

Each character has the choice of up to four different routes to reach the Centre. PATHS OF POSSIBILITY annotates the sequence of intersections and movements across the rotating platforms for each of those routes. Characters are able to traverse the Fountain by moments of apparent serendipity but their tracks are, in fact, predetermined. There is method to the madness.


THEACT FOUNTAIN ONE SCENE SCENE ONE FOUR

Paths of Possibility - King, Madam, Knight

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PART PART TWO ONE


THEACT FOUNTAIN ONE SCENE SCENE ONE FOUR

Paths of Possibility - Herald, Maiden, Thief

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THE FOUNTAIN

SCENE FIVE

CHOREOGRAPHY

Choreography. n. kɒrɪˈɒɡrəfi/

1. The art of composing ballets and other dances and planning and arranging the movements, steps, and patterns of dancers. 2. The technique of representing the various movements in dancing by a system of notation. 3. The arrangement or manipulation of actions leading up to an event. Each platform turns at a different rate: some accelerate at certain angles while others rotate at a constant speed. The necessary angle of incidence is not guaranteed with every revolution. There is no reliable sequence of intersections along a route. A character may have to wait 3 revolutions before moving to the next platform. The resultant recorded choreography seems to be a result of coincidence - a system of entropy - but it is founded on a sub-layer of detailed manipulation and calculation. “It turns out that an eerie type of chaos can lurk just behind a facade of order - and yet, deep inside the chaos lurks an even eerier type of order.” Douglas R. Hofstadter

PLAY VIDEO 03


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PART PART TWO ONE

See next page...

A recording of the Fountain model’s actions was analysed and segmented into 25 regular “beats”. The characters’ possible paths were superimposed onto the recording, and then traced, calculated and manipulated.


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THE ACT FOUNTAIN ONE SCENE SCENE ONE FIVE

...Choreography continues below

Choreographed Coincidence


PART TWO

Beat 0

Beat 1

All characters are at their home positions

The King steps onto his Promenade, the Knight to his Patrol, the Thief to his Bypass, and Herald steps onto his Broadway. Men first, you know... The Madam and Maiden stay remain at home, looking after the kids.

Beat 6

Beat 7

The Knights crosses from his Patrol to the Forum and the Thief moves from his Bypass to the Crossroads. The King is still rotating on his Promenade, the Herald on his Broadway, and Madam pirouettes on her Catwalk. The Maiden is still at home.

The King steps from the Promenade onto the Broadway while the Herald moves from his Broadway to the Promenade. They cross paths, doing that double side-step thing. It was awkward. The Madam is still on her Catwalk, the Knight at the Forum, and Thief at the Crossroads. The Maiden is still at home.


THE FOUNTAIN

SCENE FIVE

Beat 2, 3, 4

Beat 5

The King, Knight, Thief, and Herald are rotating on their platforms. The Madam and Maiden are still at home.

The King, Knight, Thief, and Herald are rotating on their platforms. The Madam has finished her make-up and steps onto her Catwalk, the Maiden is still at home with the kids.

Beat 8, 9

Beat 10

The King rotates on the Broadway, Madam on the Catwalk, Knight at the Forum, the Herald on the Promenade, and Thief at the Crossroads. The Maiden is still at home.

The Herald joins the Knight at the Crossroads, they stand a little apart from one another. The King remains on the Broadway, Madam on the Catwalk, and Thief at the Crossroads. The Maiden is still at home.


PART TWO

Beat 11

Beat 12, 13, 14, 15

The King is still on the Broadway, the Madam on her Catwalk. They are starting to get impatient. The Knight and Herald share the Forum, and Thief is still alone at the Crossroads. The kids are finally asleep and the Maiden steps onto her Pavement.

The King, Madam, Knight, Herald, Maiden, and Thief are still rotating on their respective platforms.

Beat 20

Beat 21, 22, 23, 24

The King steps onto the Crossroads to stand beside the Thief - they discuss politics. The Maiden joins the Madam, Knight, and Herald at the Forum. She stands beside Knight to discuss the word on the street.

The King and Theif conspire at the Crossroads, while the Madam, Herald, Knight and Maiden engage in friendly chit-chat at the Forum.


THE FOUNTAIN

SCENE FIVE

Beat 16

Beat 17, 18, 19

The King stays on the Broadway, the Maiden is enjoying the fresh air on her Pavement, and Thief is still rotating at the Crossroads. The Madam joins the Knight and Herald at the Forum. She stands beside Herald and they make small talk about music.

The King, Madam, Knight, Herald, Maiden, and Thief are still rotating on their relative platforms. It’s pretty dull.

Beat 25

End

The King and Theif step off the Crossroads to make their way to the Centre. The Madam, Knight, Herald, and Maiden move from the Forum to the Centre.

All of the characters are standing the the Centre, but are still trying to find “middle ground”.


THE FOUNTAIN

SCENE SIX

CONVERGE AND CONVERSE

Drawing from the choreography of the characters as they traverse the Fountain, each beat that resulted in a moment of meeting has been transcribed using the recorded interactions from the “real life” enactment of the board game.



PART TWO


THE FOUNTAIN

SCENE SIX


PART PART TWO ONE


THE ACT FOUNTAIN ONE SCENE SCENE ONESIX

Dual Scale - God Complex vs. Lilliputian Landscape


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PART TWO

ACT TWO

THE TEA ROOM


THE TEA ROOM

SCENE ONE

SECRET VAULTS

The Thief sits back in his plush leather armchair and twirls a cigar between his thumb and forefinger. The smoke rises, forming a small storm-cloud in the vaults above. Breaking the eerie silence, a rat scurries from column to column, always just out of sight. The sound echoes through the tunnel, reflecting off the walls and the columns, off the floors and arches. It seems to come from everywhere and nowhere all at once. These rats again... Forever sniffing around in my affairs. I thought I had dealt with this problem! He makes a mental note to call his lawyer in the morning. At the end of the hazy tunnel, a door is outlined by a sliver of bright light. The golden arch catches the smoke, creating a second tunnel within the first. It is an architecture of duplicity and a construct of illusion. The Thief looks up from his cigar as the door swings open.



THE TEA ROOM

SCENE TWO

SMOKE AND MIRRORS

Smoke and Mirrors. n. smok ænd mɪrərz/

1. The obscuring or embellishing of the truth of a situation with misleading or irrelevant information. 2. Something intended to disguise or draw attention away from an often embarrassing or unpleasant issue. 3. The tactic of trickery used by stage magicians to pull off their illusions.



PART TWO


THE TEA ROOM

SCENE TWO


PART TWO


THE TEA ROOM

SCENE TWO


PART TWO


ACT ONE

SCENE ONE


PART TWO


THE TEA ROOM

SCENE TWO


THE TEA ROOM

SCENE THREE

PANDORA’S BOX

Pandora’s Box. n. pændɔrəz baks/

1. A process that once begun generates many complicated problems. 2. An artifact in Greek mythology, taken from the myth of Pandora’s creation in Hesiod’s Works and Days. The “box” was actually a large jar given to Pandora, containing all the evils of the world. Pandora opened the jar and all the evils flew out.



PART PART TWO ONE


THEACT TEA ONE ROOM SCENE SCENE ONE THREE


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PART TWO

ACT THREE

THE GARDEN


THE GARDEN

SCENE ONE

DOWN THE GARDEN PATH

Each morning, before sunrise, the Maiden is awoken by the shrill cries of Hadeda Ibis’ from their tree-top roosts. Perhaps from that height, they can see the light before it reaches the shadowy lawns of the Garden below, the Maiden thought to herself, wouldn’t that be nice? She closes her creaky cottage door behind her and walks down the garden path, past beds of roses and fountains of youth, on her way to the Madam’s kitchen door. At mid-morning, while the Madam is out for brunch, the Maiden prepares a cup of tea and sits at the spotless kitchen table with nothing but the radio for company. Just one Garden over, another Maiden with another cup of tea sits in another kitchen listening to the same radio broadcast. The Maiden daydreams of a canopy city that spans the garden walls; where tall trees are radio towers, branches are bridges, and leaves are tablecloths. The Maiden smiles to herself as she takes a sip of her tea. From that vantage point, I might catch a glimpse of the Madam bleaching her stiff upper lip through the bathroom window.



THE GARDEN

SCENE TWO

SEE THE FOREST FROM THE TREES

Can’t see the forest for the trees. id. /kɑːnt siː ðə ˈfɒrɪst fɔː ðə triːz/

1. An expression used of someone who is too involved in the details of a problem to look at the situation as a whole.



PART TWO


THE GARDEN

SCENE TWO


PART TWO


THE GARDEN

SCENE TWO




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PART TWO

ACT FOUR

THE BANDSTAND


THE BANDSTAND

SCENE ONE

FOR THE RECORD

The Herald stands on a stage of one hundred and forty characters. From his pedestal, he looks down his trumpet at the audience as they sit around picnic benches, partaking in group-chats. From this stage, he could change the world. If only his audience would listen. Look at all those sheep... do they even hear me? Sure, they tap their feet and snap their thumbs-up to the beat of his drum, but do they really understand the message behind it all? Do I have to shout it from the tree-tops? Broadcast it over every frequency? And so, day by day, year by year, the piper keeps harping on, blowing his whistle, in the hopes that the time comes to be paid.



THE BANDSTAND

SCENE TWO

BROADCAST

Broadcast. v. /ˈbrɔːdkɑːst/

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

To transmit from a radio or television station. To speak, perform, or present a radio or television programme. To cast or scatter broadly over an area, as seed in sowing. To spread widely; disseminate. To indicate unwittingly to another one’s next action.



PART TWO


THE BANDSTAND

SCENE TWO




PART TWO


THE BANDSTAND

SCENE TWO


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PART TWO

ACT FIVE

THE CITADEL


THE CITADEL

SCENE ONE

CURTAIN WALLS

The streets are covered in a sweeping carpet of purple - a royal promenade lined with towering curtain walls and jacaranda trees in full bloom. An audience of security cameras watch from their turrets as the Maiden pushes a pram full of ducklings up and down the pavement. She briefly nods at the Knight, standing at his post beside a looming portcullis. Between the heavy steel bars, one can briefly glimpse the Citadel: magnificent marbled towers, elaborately carved columns, lofty domes, arched windows draped with velvet, a red door... As the sun begins to set, the purple promenade fades to black and, behind the wall, the citadel lights up like a beacon. Under the shade of night, the Thief casually saunters past the Knight, heading towards the red door. The watcher has no way of knowing what lies behind the walls of the Citadel. They are a backdrop to the stage of the street before them, and a veil to the unknowable mysteries behind. All the while, the watcher is being watched as the King surveys his realm on a mosaic of little black and white screens.



THE CITADEL

SCENE TWO

LIGHTS. CAMERA. DISTRACTION

Distraction n. /dɪˈstræk.ʃən/

1. The act of distracting. 2. Mental distress or derangement. 3. That which distracts, divides the attention, or prevents concentration. 4. That which amuses, entertains, or diverts. 5. Division or disorder caused by dissension; tumult.



PART TWO


THE CITADEL

SCENE TWO


PART TWO


THE CITADEL

SCENE TWO


PART TWO


THE CITADEL

SCENE TWO


PART TWO


THE CITADEL

SCENE TWO


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PART TWO

ACT SIX

THE SENTINEL ARCH


THE SENTINEL ARCH

SCENE ONE

A MONUMENT BY ANY OTHER NAME

The Knight walks in circles past the same unchanging walls each day. The shadows may spin and stretch as the sun vaults through the sky, but the walls remain - cold stone pillars that rise to meet in a grand arch. He walks around the heavy walls, past the names of fallen soldiers carved in stone and, between the arches, he sees a scene of bloody battle, of men cowering in stone blockhouses as the enemy attacks with savagery. A comrade lies in a pool of blood at their feet. He walks around the heavy walls, past the names of murderers carved in stone and, between the arches, he sees a scene of starving women and children with empty eyes, lined up beside white tents dotting the veld. He walks around the heavy walls, past the names of heroes carved in stone and, between the arches, he sees a scene of victory - men clasping each other by the arm, smiling and talking of home. A century passes and again, he walks around the heavy walls, past the names of the enemy carved in stone and, between the arches, he sees a scene of peace and unity. The dead men, the broken children, the women who have run out of tears, all standing shoulder to shoulder with men in crisp uniforms, badges of honour emblazoned on their breasts. It is a scene of gilded glory. It is said that history repeats itself.



THE SENTINEL ARCH

SCENE TWO

EPIGRAPH TO EPITAPH

Epigraph n.

\ ˈe-pə-ˌgraf \

1. An engraved inscription. 2. A quotation set at the beginning of a literary work or one of its divisions to suggest its theme. Epitaph n.

\ ˈe-pə-ˌtaf \

1. An inscription on or at a tomb or a grave in memory of the one buried there 2. A brief statement commemorating or epitomizing a deceased person or something past



PART TWO


THE SENTINEL ARCH

SCENE TWO


PART TWO


THE SENTINEL ARCH

SCENE TWO


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PART TWO

THE GRAND FINALE FINAL REVIEW


THE GRAND FINALE FINAL REVIEW

01 November 2017 Good afternoon, my name is Sarah Treherne. I am a second year Masters student in Unit 11 and my Major Design Project is titled THE SUBVERSE: MONUMENTS TO HYPERTEXTUALITY. I would like to raise the curtain with a quote by Francis Bacon: “Truth is so hard to tell, it sometimes needs fiction to make it plausible.” Once upon a time...





PART TWO


THE GRAND FINALE


PART TWO


THE GRAND FINALE


PART TWO


THE GRAND FINALE




PART TWO


THE GRAND FINALE


PART TWO


THE GRAND FINALE


PART ONE


ACT ONE

SCENE ONE

CURTAINS CLOSE





ADDENDUM C

“ALT PRAC”

DECLARATION OF ANTI-PLAGIARISM ASSIGNMENT TITLE: FULL NAMES: STUDENT NUMBER: LECTURER: MODULE CODE: DUE DATE:

THE SUBVERSE: MONUMENTS TO HYPERTEXUALITY SARAH TREHERNE 201477429 STEPHEN HOBBS and SUMAYYA VALLY MAAP19X (M2) 2017-11-01

1. Plagiarism is to present someone else’s ideas as my own. 2. Where material written by other people has been used (either from a printed source or from the Internet), this has been carefully acknowledged and referenced. I have used the Geneva Convention for citation and referencing. Every contribution to and quotation from the work of other people in this essay has been acknowledged through citation and reference. 3. I know that plagiarism is wrong. 4. I understand what plagiarism is and am aware of the Faculty’s and University’s policy in this regard. 5. I know that I would plagiarise if I do not give credit to my sources, or if I copy any written or graphic part(s) from a book, article or Internet source without proper citation. 6. I know that even if I only change the wording slightly, I still plagiarise when using someone else’s words without proper citation. 7. I declare that I have written my own sentences and paragraphs throughout my essay and I have credited all ideas I have gained from other people’s work. 8. I declare that this assignment is my own original work. 9. I have not allowed, and will not allow, anyone to copy my work with the intention of passing it off as his or her own work. 10. I understand that if someone else submits work that is copied from my own, I may be held equally liable. SIGNATURE:

DATE: 24 OCTOBER 2017

The format of this declaration is taken from the University of Johannesburg’s Plagiarism Policy: Appendix B (2008:14)



FUN FACT: Shweshwe cloth is not, in fact, South African. It originates from Germany; the blaudruck (“blue print”) was brought to Africa by 19th century German and Swiss settlers.



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