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VALLEY RECORD SNOQUALMIE

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Fatal Fall City shooting ends ‘end of the world’ tirade Homeless man dies after confrontation with deputy BY CAROL LADWIG

SPORTS

Mount Si cheer squad flying high on its way to state, national events Page 11

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Staff Reporter

Snow falls, Santa ho-ho’s in city’s grand holiday party Page 10

INDEX LETTERS 4, 5 7 CALENDAR 8 MOVIE TIMES ON THE SCANNER 13 14 LEGAL NOTICES 15-18 CLASSIFIEDS

Vol. 99, No. 29

A King County sheriff ’s deputy shot an out-of-control man in Fall City early Monday morning. The man, a homeless resident of the community, was

taken to Harborview, where he later died. According to sheriff ’s spokesperson Cindi West, the man began an hours-long rant around 2:30 a.m. Monday in the Fall City Mobile Park in the 4300 block of Preston-Fall City Road, and became so aggressive by about 6:30 that “multiple” neighbors called 911. “We understand from a witness that about 2:30, he was

outside yelling ‘it’s the end of the world!’” West said. Cheryl Hagen and her daughter, Christina, said they were wakened by the man’s screams. They were familiar with him, saying he walked by their neighborhood almost every day, talking to himself, but this morning, they were afraid. SEE SHOOTING, 3

Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

Cheryl Hagen, a 12-year resident of Fall City, gives an interview to several television stations about what she saw before Monday’s fatal shooting.

She’s the face of the place

On the back burner: Interchange growth County comp plan changes omit proposed I-90 Snoqualmie retail site

After long, varied career connecting Valley citizens, Jeanette Busby ready to retire

BY CAROL LADWIG Staff Reporter

Snoqualmie won’t be expanding its retail sector any time soon, even if it wins an upcoming legal appeal of a King County decision. The city of 11,000 people has twice attempted to expand its urban growth area, or future annexation boundaries, to include 85 acres along Interstate 90 at the Highway 18 interchange. That land, now zoned as rural, would have become a retail development serving the still-growing community, in Snoqualmie’s most recent proposal to modify its UGA through the King County Comprehensive Plan. SEE INTERCHANGE, 6

BY SETH TRUSCOTT Editor

Seth Truscott/Staff Photo

A lifetime of Valley connections and a stuffed Rolodex have helped Jeanette Busby keep Encompass running smoothly. Busby, the organization’s front desk receptionist and office manager, retires December 20. Both Upper Valley cities have dubbed that occasion “Jeanette Busby Appreciation Day.”

For 15 years, Jeanette Busby has been, more often than not, the first face when you walked in the doors of Encompass. That means that the Snoqualmie woman is always prepared for anything—from excited children to families in crisis. “You never knew what need was going to come,” said Busby, Encompass’ office manager and receptionist. She’s slated to retire Thursday, Dec. 20, after a career that’s taken her to Valley institutions as varied at the Snoqualmie Valley School District, the Snoqualmie Valley Record and the former Milk Barn grocery store. SEE BUSBY, 3

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SHOOTING FROM 1 “That’s why I called 911. We’ve never heard him like this before. His voice was so scary,” Cheryl said. When the deputy, a 20-year veteran of the sheriff ’s department, arrived,

BUSBY FROM 1 Encompass, formerly known as Children’s Services of SnoValley, offers early learning, pediatric therapy, parent education and community activity programs. For decades, it’s also had a strong family support program, today run out of a satellite campus in the city of North Bend. Word gets around about the support that families can find. Most mornings, Busby greets smiling students and their families. Today, as children file past her desk, she greets them, and asks how their week is going. Her young visitors give plenty of side glances to a nearby Christmas tree. “It’s hard to pass those toys,” says Busby. It’s not always smiles, though. In this job, Busby sometimes encounters people with serious needs—no housing, no food, domestic violence, or children who had been taken away by the state. “You just start calling around and seeing what you can do for them,” says Busby. “They heard this was the place,” she added. “I would try and do my best... We stepped up to the plate we needed.” “That need, it’s never going to end,” she continued. “Encompass is such an important part of the community. And the Valley knows it.”

Face of Encompass Arlene Lousberg had a year under her belt at Children’s Services when Busby came on board in 1998. Lousberg still remembers, in awe, how Busby ran the front

West said he saw the man lying down under a porch, but still screaming. Hagen said the officer approached the man “and was just trying to calm him down,” but the man may have lunged at the officer. “The deputy tried to Taze the subject,” West said, but she had only a preliminary report and wasn’t sure

office for the first six months without a desk to call her own. “She is such a smooth person,” says Lousberg, a former office manager who is now the organization’s data coordinator. To Lousberg, Busby is the heart of Encompass. “She keeps us scheduled and on track… She fills every day to the max,” she said. “She is the face that everybody knows. I think it’s gonna take two people to replace her.” In her many roles at Encompass, Busby taps a lifetime of Valley connections to handle the day’s duties. And she never knows quite what a dat will bring. As a facilities manager, she’s confronted everything from moles to clogged pipes. One evening, she was confronted by jam in the septic system. Trying to track down the septic serviceman, Busby couldn’t find him, but she did manage to call a family member and arranged to have him come as soon as possible. “Bless his heart, he made it here,” said Busby, who held a flashlight so the serviceman could find the place in the dark. “This is the kind of stuff they’re going to miss when she leaves,” Lousberg said. “If there’s a problem, she knows everybody in the Valley who can get it fixed, and probably for half the price. She knows where the plumber is at six o’clock.” Busby’s skills with her wellfilled Rolodex in part come from her lifetime of work in the Valley, in and out of the home. As a teen, she worked at the now-demolished Nelems Hospital near Snoqualmie. “That was the day when you could work in deliveries,

the stun gun’s electrodes made contact with the man. Both the Hagens thought the man had been stunned, but it didn’t seem to slow him down. “He was not going down for nothing. He wasn’t stopping,” said Cheryl. West said at some point, the man gained control of the officer’s stun gun and the officer retreated. The Hagens saw the man begin lunging at the officer, who was backing away, but didn’t see anything in his hand. Christina Hagen said, “The guy was charging the cop like this,” holding her fist cocked above her shoulder. “He was going to hit him.” “He was yelling at the cop, too, ‘go ahead, do it!’” said Cheryl. The retreating deputy fired at least one shot from his weapon, West said. He was not injured in the incident. Both the Hagens thought they heard two gunshots. They were shaken up by the incident, and by the dramatic change in the man that they saw almost every day. “He used to have longer hair, but he recently shaved his head, which is why we didn’t recognize him at first,” said Cheryl. She added “Nothing like this ever happens in our little town.”

Courtesy Photo

Encompass Executive Director Gregory Malcolm presents Jeanette Busby with a 2012 Excellence in Inspirational Giving award on December 3. Her husband, Pat, looks on at left. emergency and on the floor,” she said. “Sometimes, at night, it was just an RN and myself. They trained you for everything.” She married into the big Busby family of the Valley. With husband Pat, she’s been married 46 years. They raised three boys, Jason, Cory and Zach. As a mom, Busby was part of a tight knit group of Valley mothers. She helped plenty of other families’ children get off to school, and never paid for a babysitter. For her, the time to enter the workforce came in the 1980s, when her boys were teenagers. She took a position as a deli operator and cashier at the Milk Barn, the small grocery store at Meadowbrook. Later, she worked for a friend’s furniture store, and as a special education assistant with the Snoqualmie Valley School District. In the 1980s, she was advertising manager with the Snoqualmie Valley Record.

“That was a fun one. I loved that job.” She remembers driving the Record’s big tan van through high water to Carnation: “That paper must always go through.” It’s a different Valley today than when Jeanette entered the work force. “The Valley has grown so much,” she says. “I miss the openness—space, and really knowing everybody. You could not go anywhere without running into somebody. It took forever to go home. People had more time. You took time for family and friends.” The main reason for her departure is to spend more time with her father, John Meyers, who is 91. “I need to start taking care of myself, so I can take care of him,” Busby says. Thursday, Dec. 20, is Jeanette Busby Appreciation Day, and Jeannete’s last day of work. Encompass hosts a reception from 1 to 3 p.m.

In Brief

Search warrant from Kittitas County leads to Valley home Snoqualmie police were part of a four-agency search last week at a Valley home, seeking the subject of an Eastern Washington warrant. Shortly after 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, Dec. 6, local police joined Kittitas County Sheriff’s Deputies, Seattle Police detectives, and King County SWAT team members to serve a warrant at a residence in the 8500 block of 384th Avenue Southeast near downtown. The warrant stemmed from crimes committed in Kittitas County and had possible connections in the Seattle area, according to police. No one was home. Police investigated the home for several hours. The Snoqualmie Police Department does not have any charges pending from the search.

Snoqualmie Valley Hospital board OKs early closure deal for former Leisure Time camp Snoqualmie Valley Hospital’s board voted Thursday, Dec. 6, for an early closing agreement with Equity Lifestyle Properties, Inc., for the former Leisure Time campground site on Snoqualmie Ridge. Effective Friday, Dec. 7, the agreement allows the district to pay $7.5 million for the 22-acre property, originally purchased for $12 million, more than two years ahead of the original closing date of May 2015. In exchange, Equity Lifestyle Properties, Inc. raised a previously agreed profit sharing basis for the site to $10 million. The former Leisure Time campground was the subject of a 2008 $12 million purchase and sale agreement by the hospital district for construction of a new campus. That plan fell through, the parties went into litigation, and both sides agreed to a $6.7 million settlement in 2010. According to the earlier settlement between the hospital and property owner, if the district sells the property within five years of the closing date, they share any net profits above the purchase price on a 50/50 basis with Leisure Time. With the new deal, the hospital district expects to save more than $5 million and reduce debt by almost $7 million. Additionally, the site comes with valuable water rights, which the city of Snoqualmie has expressed an interest in as it grows. “This will put the hospital district in a stronger financial position,” said Rodger McCollum, the hospital’s CEO. “It will also put us in a position to maintain the site and offer the potential for various community activities. The bottom line is that the early settlement and possession allows us to put to use what will be a valuable asset to the District and the community.” As of December 7, the hospital district takes immediate possession of the property and will develop a plan for its use, maintenance and restoration.

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Snoqualmie Valley Record • December 12, 2012 • 3

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SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

LETTERS

4 • December 12, 2012 • Snoqualmie Valley Record

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Community Christmas festivals

Merry and bright

VALLEY RECORD SNOQUALMIE

To: The many folks who helped make Snoqualmie’s Tree Lighting, Art Walk and Holiday Open House (held Dec. 1), so special; the City of Snoqualmie Arts Commission, Parks Department, and the Ridge Owner’s Association. From: Santa and the downtown Snoqualmie merchants and businesses. owntown Snoqualmie was merry and bright, ready to host a holiday open house night Lampposts and storefronts decorated so festively Welcomed the season and beckoned invitingly Artworks were hung by the fireside with care In hope that admirers would soon be there There was no rain, not a drop from the sky Organizers breathed a much-relieved sigh Children, their parents, friends and relatives, too All the community gathered as the train whistle blew Railroad Park glimmered with colorful light The gazebo’s glow warmed the cool winter’s night From musicians and choirs, carols did ring Then the crowd joined in and started to sing On came the engine with Santa full of glee Everyone clapped and cheered as he lit up the tree Wagon rides, treats, warm drinks did delight It couldn’t have been a more wonderful night!

D

What’s your preference, a real tree, or a fake tree?

As dictated to Santa’s elf, Wendy Thomas, at Carmichael’s True Value Hardware in Snoqualmie.

Thursday, Dec. 10, 1987

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Advertising David Hamilton Account dhamilton@valleyrecord.com Executive Circulation/ Patricia Hase Distribution circulation@valleyrecord.com Mail PO Box 300, Snoqualmie, WA 98065 Phone 425.888.2311 Fax 425.888.2427 www.valleyrecord.com Classified Advertising: 800.388.2527 Subscriptions: $29.95 per year in King County, $35 per year elsewhere Circulation: 425.453.4250 or 1.888.838.3000 Deadlines: Advertising and news, 11 a.m. Fridays; Photo op/coverage requests in advance, please. The Snoqualmie Valley Record is the legal newspaper for the cities of Snoqualmie, North Bend and Carnation. Written permission from the publisher is required for reproduction of any part of this publication. Letters, columns and guest columns do not necessarily reflect the views of the Snoqualmie Record.

SEE LETTERS, 5

PAST This week in Valley history

Homeless camps in the Valley

After the recent local meeting about the homeless in North Bend, and not being invited (I can guess why), I found a need to do something I don’t do very often for an opinionated guy like myself—write a letter to the editor. We usually try to keep a relatively low profile in the community, except for the work of our non-profit group, Friends of the Trail. After being in North Bend 20 years now, and cleaning up public lands in Washington state for 17-plus years now—most notably the Snoqualmie Middle Fork Basin, the Sultan Basin, and the Stossel Creek area between Carnation and Duvall, as well as ongoing projects all over Washington state for a variety of government agencies—we are the group that picks up after the homeless in the area, from the river by the Pour House to Meadowbrook and beyond. I started to write this letter while waiting for the second time today on King County deputies to respond to problem tweakers on public land by the bridge closest to the Pour House. This particular bunch causing today’s problems for my cleanup crew aren’t new to me. Back and forth across North Bend they go, stealing road signs and whatever they can to construct their “tweaker camps.” I understand from the first responding deputy today that the kids in North Bend say these yahoos have got the “goods”, and I guess most of the kids know it. I don’t agree that giving problem people free stuff helps them—but rather, keeps them in the community and enables them. Free tents, food, clothes, whadaya need? So much of it goes right in the landfill. They have no problem leaving free, wet stuff behind. And they do. These tweaks are threatening to sic their pit bull on me, the same one that attacked an officer last year. My crew is a little uncomfortable, and that’s certainly understandable. A first tweaker wasted no time getting the heck out of there when the first cop drove up.

OUT of the

“Real tree! It’s not Christmas without a real tree.” Barbara Scott North Bend

“This year I put up lights, candles, everything else but the tree, … and I went with my son and his family to cut their tree, so I got my decorating in!” Patty Valentine North Bend

• The North Bend Planning Commission fears that shoddy developments may take place in the city before a new community plan is completed. • The Snoqualmie Valley Christmas Club is asking locals to help make Christmas special for needy residents. Donations of food and clothing are being assembled at the North Bend ShopRite and Thriftway groceries, BellAnderson Insurance, the two branches of SeaFirst Bank, and the Coast to Coast store in Snoqualmie.

Thursday, Dec. 13, 1962

“Real tree, always a real tree. I love the smell, you can select it yourself, and it doesn’t look the same every year. We go together as a family to cut it, too.” Loretta Herman Snoqualmie

“We’re having a real tree. We usually cut them on our own property, so some years it may look like a Charlie Brown tree.” Deannine Thoreson Snoqualmie

• Theft of an 800pound safe and a new truck to haul it away was accomplished some time between Wednesday, Dec. 5, and the following morning, from Fred Lewis Ford in North Bend. The truck was found by Lake Marie in Monroe Friday, and the safe discovered the next day on an isolated road between Yakipa and Duvall.


WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

After the election

The first deputy says Big Baldy with the pit bull is unfriendly and carries a 12-inch kitchen knife. Hmm, another day at the office. I get no love letters anymore for the work we do. We’re old news. I just get ragged by the local deacon for harassing meth-heads. Don’t think I don’t watch my back everywhere I go. I’ve made some lovely friends through the years. That’s because people who know me know that I tell you what I think. And I think that these problem people shouldn’t be allowed to live on public land. The police know who the problem people are. I’m not so cold-hearted to suggest that we dislodge and bug all the “campers” we come across. But people who threaten walkers and work crews need to go. It scares away normal people who have a right to be there. I would imagine the agencies who manage these lands realize the possible legal ramifications should the worst actually happen. I’ve been threatened in the area along the river toward Meadowbrook many times, as well as the area in Fall City where the officerinvolved shooting happened Monday. Why are these people allowed to stay? Leave the friendly normal folk if you want, and get rid of the rest. Too much huggyfeely isn’t always a good thing. Some people you just can’t help. Wade Holden North Bend

• Editor’s note: “Tweaker” is slang for a methamphetamine user. According to local police, while problems with alcohol, chiefly, and drugs are known among transients and local homeless, not all local homeless are substance abusers, and it’s inaccurate to lump them all together.

Remain involved in your government It’s been just weeks since the 2012 elections, and I imagine many of you welcome the reprieve from campaign advertising. You may have been disappointed regarding the ballot box results. However, I encourage you to accept the voice of the people and to become more engaged in the process. Washington elected to retain single-party rule for at least another term. It remains to be seen, though, if our new elected leaders will change course from a path that brought us declining quality of public education and fiscal uncertainty. In representative government, we must articulate the citizens’ priorities to our leaders. That task knows no rest, both in and out of election season. Leadership in Olympia must steer another course and place governing ahead of games. Rather than managing Washington’s citizens, the new governor and legislature should strive to serve the people. Private enterprise must have the confidence to invest and hire employees, and it’s time for elected leaders to take this seriously. That must be immediately followed by fullyfunding our public education system with the already-existing dollars in the budget. While speaking of education, I am pleased that public education leaders will be charged with bringing more flexibility to our system with the implementation of charter schools. Finally, the legislature must honor the voters’ wishes in requiring a two-thirds majority to raise taxes. This necessitates bi-partisan support for future budgets and requires government to live within its means. If Olympia tries an end-run, we must hold them accountable.

In the aftermath of an election like 2012, it would be easy for cynicism to set in. It has been said that cynicism is full of naïve disappointments that cause people to disengage from government and politics. But we can ill afford the citizenry’s decoupling from its government. There are still millions of people in Washington state who believe as you do. So now is not the time to succumb to doubt.

Rather, it is time to remain both involved and informed so that you can speak with a reasoned voice. I am committed to work shoulder to shoulder with those who choose this route. I hope you are, too. Brad Toft Snoqualmie

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However, when the King County Council adopted its four-year update to the comp plan on Dec. 3, Snoqualmie’s request for this property was denied,

says City Attorney Pat Anderson. “We’re quite disappointed,” Anderson said the following week. “All that would have done would allow us to start a process.” Specifically, Snoqualmie’s request was not to add the land to the city’s UGA now, but to allow for the possibility of it before the county’s next comp plan update, scheduled for 2016, Anderson said. Between the time the land was added to the city’s UGA and its eventual annexation and development, Anderson said there would have been a “long and arduous process.” The county’s decision, says Anderson, shows “willful disregard” for the state of Washington’s Growth Management Act, which calls on counties and cities to plan for growth, including the development of sufficient retail and other services to support the population. “It puts a big crimp in our ability to do that,” Anderson said, of the county’s rejection of their request. Snoqualmie just doesn’t

have the space for that type of development right now, both Anderson and City Planner Nancy Tucker say. “We had every lot in the city and in the urban growth area looked at for suitability for retail,” Anderson said. Historic downtown is prone to flooding, Snoqualmie Ridge is governed by a master plan, and the recently annexed mill site is too remote for a successful retail project. “There isn’t any other location within the city that isn’t already developed, or subject to a development agreement,” said Tucker. Concerns about both the visual impact of a retail development on that spot and the types of retail it would house were raised at a Dec. 3 public hearing on the issue, and Tucker explicitly addressed some of those concerns. “We are not looking at major big-box retail,” she said. “Our interest is in having sufficient area, and welllocated for retail… it would allow for retail development, a grocery store, a hardware store, maybe a pharmacy.”

Regarding how the development would look, Tucker said the county was concerned with maintaining “the undeveloped character” of the site. She also said the consortium of property owners, which requested the comp plan amendment with the city’s support, would take on that responsibility. The land is owned primarily by three parties, Mike Griffiths, Puget Western, Inc., and the Snoqualmie Valley Hospital District. Anderson said the city plans to file an appeal on roughly 20 issues related to the GMA in the county’s comp plan in January, and hoped to have a decision by May. A successful appeal

would invalidate the questioned sections of the comp plan and refer them back to the county for revision. Snoqualmie’s other comp plan amendment request, the removal of roughly 68 acres of land from its urban growth area, was approved. The land is an active mining site, currently leased through 2099, and therefore not subject to any urban growth within the next 20 years.

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Snoqualmie Valley Record • December 12, 2012 • 7

CALENDAR SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

In Brief

Lambert to host open house on county service area

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 12

King County Councilwoman Kathy Lambert hosts a District 3 unincorporated Community Service Area (CSA) open house for the Snoqualmie Valley, 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 19, at Carnation Library, 4804 Tolt Avenue. Also present will be the Assistant Deputy County Executive, Rhonda Berry. Residents living in unincorporated King County can meet with County officials and their Community Service Area (CSA) program representatives. At the open house, residents can learn more about the draft CSA work plan for their area, discuss community priorities, speak with program staff and obtain information about county programs and services. The open houses are also an opportunity for the public to offer feedback on the CSA program in general and the proposed work plans for 2013. To learn which CSA you’re located in, visit the CSA website for a description and map of the CSAs at www.kingcounty.gov/exec/community-service-areas.

ANIME & MANGA CLUB: Teens can watch anime movies and practice anime drawing, 3 p.m. at Snoqualmie Library. TALES: Young Toddler Story Time is 9:30 a.m. at Snoqualmie Library, for children ages 6 to 24 months with an adult. TALES: Preschool Story Time is 10:30 a.m. at the Snoqualmie Library for ages 3 to 6 with an adult. STUDY ZONE: Students in grades K-12 can drop-in during scheduled Study Zone hours for free homework help in all subjects from volunteer tutors, 3 p.m. at Snoqualmie Library. TALES: Move and Groove Story Time for Toddlers is 10:30 and 11:30 a.m. at the Carnation Library; for toddler-age children with an adult. TALES: Pajamarama Story Time is 6:30 p.m. at the North Bend Library. All ages are welcome with an adult. ONE-ON-ONE COMPUTER ASSISTANCE: Get extra help on the computer, 1 p.m. at North Bend Library.

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WINTER CONCERT: The Mount Si High School Winter Choir Concert is 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the high school auditorium, 8651 Meadowbrook Wat. Admission is free, enjoy a night of music from Mount Si’s award-winning choir. Concessions are by the Choir Boosters. LIVE MUSIC: Open mic night is 7 to 9 p.m. at Sliders Cafe, 4721 Tolt Ave., Carnation. TALES: Pajama Story Time is 7 p.m. at Snoqualmie Library. CHESS CLUB: Snoqualmie Valley Chess Club meets at 7 p.m. at North Bend Library. Learn to play chess or get a game going. All ages and skill levels welcome. A CHRISTMAS CAROL: Dickens’ classis is 7:30 p.m. at Valley Center Stage, North Bend.

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FRIDAY, DEC. 14 A CHRISTMAS CAROL: Dickens’ classis is 7:30 p.m. at Valley Center Stage, North Bend.

SATURDAY, DEC. 15 SANTA TRAIN: Families can ride a vintage train on a holiday adventure through the Valley. Board at the depot in North Bend; departures run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; $20, www.trainmuseum.org. AGING BOOK TALK: The Aging Well with Consciousness Book Club

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MONDAY, DEC. 17 MIDDLE SCHOOLERS ONLY: Middle school students can do snacks, homework and fun, all rolled into one, 2:45 p.m. at the Fall City Library. SCHOOL SAFETY: Survivors of Snoqualmie Valley School District No. 410 Foundation meets at 7 p.m. at the Snoqualmie Valley YMCA. FAMILY FILM NIGHT: Families can enjoy snacks and watch How the Grinch Stole Christmas, 6 p.m. at Snoqualmie Library. E-READER ASSISTANCE: Learn how to download KCLS ebooks to your e-reader or computer during this digital downloads demonstration, 6 p.m. at the North Bend Library.

TUESDAY, DEC. 18 TALES: Toddler Story Time is 10 a.m. at the Fall City Library, for newborn children with an adult. TALES: Preschool Story Time is 11 a.m. at the Fall City Library for children ages 3 to 6 with an adult. TALES: Get Ready for School Story Time is 1:30 p.m. at the Carnation Library, for children ages 3 to 5 with an adult. HISTORIAS EN ESPAÑOL: Spanish/English Story Time is 6:30 p.m. at the North Bend Library. All ages are welcome with an adult.

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 19 ANIME & MANGA CLUB: Teens can watch anime movies, eat popcorn and practice anime drawing, 3 p.m. at Snoqualmie Library. TALES: Move and Groove Story Time for Toddlers is 10:30 and 11:30 a.m. at the Carnation Library, for toddler-age children with an adult. ONE-ON-ONE COMPUTER ASSISTANCE: Get extra help on the computer, 1 p.m. at North Bend Library.

THURSDAY, DEC. 20 CHESS CLUB: Snoqualmie Valley Chess Club meets at 7 p.m. at North Bend Library. Learn to play chess or get a game going. All ages and skill levels welcome.

FRIDAY, DEC. 21 E-READER ASSISTANCE: Learn how to download KCLS eBooks to your e-Reader or computer during this digital downloads demonstration, 4 p.m. at Fall City Library.

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& Conversation group discusses “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” by Deborah Moggach, 10:15 a.m. at Snoqualmie Library. Come for a book discussion and conversation on aging. A CHRISTMAS CAROL: Dickens’ classis is 2 and 7:30 p.m. at Valley Center Stage, North Bend.


8 • December 12, 2012 • Snoqualmie Valley Record

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SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

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• RISE OF THE GUARDIANS, 11 A.M. $5 MATINEE • FREE CHRISTMAS CLASSICS, ‘WHITE CHRISTMAS’, 7 P.M.

• THE HOBBIT, 6 P.M.

Duvall seeks gateway art The year 2013 will mark the city of Duvall’s centennial, and to commemorate the event, the city is seeking an artist or artists to create sculptures to be placed along a promenade leading to the historic railroad depot and McCormick Park. The Duvall Cultural Commission is now accepting proposals for the project. The concept should include three or five sculptures, representing Duvall’s history, or the river theme, both of which were highlighted in public art during a 2008 Main Street remodel. The city wants to extend these themes to the park entrance. A budget of $35,000 is available, which must include design, fabrication, and installation. All applications are due by 4:30 p.m., Wednesday, Dec. 12. For more details, visit http://duvallculture.org, or contact Kass Holdeman at (425) 939-8069 or send e-mail to du-vall.art@duvallwa.gov.

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• THE HOBBIT, 2, 5, 8 & 11 P.M.

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• THE HOBBIT, 1:30, 5 & 8:30 P.M.

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Difficulty level: 4

NORTH BEND THEATRE SHOWTIMES

See answers, page 13

Seth Truscott/Staff Photo

Christmas carolers

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ast members of Valley Center Stage’s “A Christmas Carol” explore the North Bend Holiday Festival, Dec. 8, in costume. Pictured in front of the community tree are, front row, Greg Lucas, Lauren Weaver, Allison Fitzpatrick; back row, Bill Stone, Gary Schwartz, Craig Ewing, Ed Benson. Charles Dickens’ Christmas ghost story is entering its final weekend, Dec. 13, 14 and 15, with two shows, including a 2 p.m. matinee Saturday. The show is Valley Center Stage’s most popular, and is going well, says Center Stage Director Gary Schwartz. Buy tickets early, it can sell out. Thursday is “Pay What You Will” night at the show. With 29 actors, it’s the biggest cast ever to take the stage in North Bend. Tickets are $15 for adults and $12.50 for seniors and children. You can purchase tickets online at www.valleycenterstage.org.

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22. “___ Cried” (1962 hit) 25. Ratty place 27. Lifeboat lowerer 29. Hip bones

20. “Comprende?”

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22. Young haddocks split and boned for cooking

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33. Daughters’ husbands (hyphenated)

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27. Big game 28. Afflict 31. The final irritation 35. Small hand drum in India 37. “Thanks ___!” (2 wds) 38. Overhangs

The Hipsters, a high-energy dance rock band, perform at 9 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 15, at Finaghty’s Irish Pub, Snoqualmie Ridge. Comprised of four talented vets of the regional scene (Jason Starkey, Craig Cessna, Tod Hobart, Jess Hamilton) this group is geared to get the floor packed and pounding. Finaghty’s is located at 7726 Center Blvd. S.E., Snoqualmie. Learn more about the Hipsters at http://www.thehipstersrock.com.

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Photo by Joe Orsillo

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Hipsters bring the dance-rock to Finaghty’s pub

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Down 1. Category 2. Life of ___ 3. Architectural projection 4. Video maker, for short 5. Member of a religious community

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34. ___ O’Reilly on “M*A*S*H” 36. Bloodless 39. Leisurely walker 42. Blow up 44. “Things ___ be worse.” 47. Moray, e.g. 50. ___ list (college) 51. Invoke misfortune 52. Hindu deity

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40. Big loser’s nickname? 41. Recipient of a gift 43. For a song (2 wds)

61. “Awesome!”


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Snoqualmie Valley Record • December 12, 2012 • 9

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10 • December 12, 2012 • Snoqualmie Valley Record

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Holidays in the Valley A downtown holiday Photos by Seth Truscott

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Seth Truscott/Staff Photo

Clockwise from top left, Caden Bachelder, second from left, blows out a fiery marshmallow, with sister Kylea, Fiona Fursman and Staci Sutton; Bernie Clark shares her Christmas wish with Santa at Boxley’s; Frosty meets the younger set; Val and Jamie bring Dally and Swagger, their dogs, dressed festively; Kylea Bachelder, in red bow, dances with IGNITE; Todd Erikson of Snoqualmie Pass is a Pioneer Coffee living nutcracker; Lace Lawrence of Fall City, with nephew Tristan, right, judge gingerbread houses.

he snow began to blow shortly after Santa arrived Saturday evening, Dec. 8, in North Bend, here to help turn on the community Christmas tree. That tree, gaily decorated and about 20 feet tall, overlooked from its spot at Chaplin’s Chevy dealership a street scene on North Bend Way crowded with well-bundled families, performing choirs and dance teams, and the local Snoqualmie Valley Unicycle Club. Merchants and organizations set up booths with treats for the big crowd, which kept warm at wood-burning braziers. Snow blew in courtesy of a special machine on the roof of Boxleys, where Santa settled in for portraits with families shortly after his big moment at the town Christmas tree. The afternoon was a grand experience for little Emmalee Rowley, only 10 months old and experiencing her first Christmas, who toddled around the downtown with dad Jason Rowley. They were loving the occasion, Jason said. Bernie Clark, of Kent, came with friends to watch their grandson perform in “A Christmas Carol” at North Bend’s Valley Center Stage that evening. She was talked into sitting on Santa’s lap, where she shared her Christmas wish. “I just want happiness,” Clark said. “He said, ‘That’s the one I like to hear the most.”

We believe every child should be treated the way we would like our own children to be treated.

Sing Handel’s Messiah in Carnation Love to sing the Messiah but don’t have anyone to sing it with? Just for fun, take part in the third annual Messiah Sing-Along in Carnation, 3 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 16, at the Tolt Congregational United Church of Christ.

It is our goal to implement the highest standard of care at every patient encounter whether it is a child’s first visit to the dental office, a teenager who is headed off to college or a special-needs adult patient we’ve been seeing for decades.

Santa breakfast at Moose Lodge Santa will visit North Bend for a breakfast Saturday, Dec. 19, at the North Bend Moose Lodge, 108 Sydney Avenue South. Breakfast will be served at 10 a.m. The meal is free for children, by donation for adults. Santa will arrive at 11 a.m.

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Late Hobbit movie showing benefits MSHS wrestlers A special 11 p.m. showing of “The Hobbit” at North Bend Theatre on Friday, Dec. 14, supports the Mount Si High School wrestling team. Tickets are $15, and include the show, a small popcorn and pop. To purchase your tickets early, contact, Lisa Newell at newelll0517@gmail.com. See the prequel to the “Lord of the Rings” movies and support the team and the local theater.

Goucher to lead holiday baseball clinic Steve Goucher gives a Pro Baseball Holiday Clinic, 10 a.m. to noon on Thursday and Friday, Dec. 20 and 21, in the Valley. Goucher, a former Atlanta Braves pitcher, covers all aspects of the game, such as throwing, fielding, pitching and hitting. Goucher’s been teaching the game for 15 years. This camp is for ages 9 to 14, and costs $50. To learn more, e-mail to goucher15@hotmail.com or call (206) 230-9011.

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Snoqualmie Valley Record • December 12, 2012 • 11

Mat mastery Headed into‘true test’at Sedro Woolley, Mount Si wrestlers on a roll BY SETH TRUSCOTT Editor

Tim Corrie wasn’t expecting his Interlake opponent to take a shot right at the whistle. He reacted fast, all the same. The 182-pounder, Jonathan Palagashvili, went for Corrie’s legs. Tim went for the headlock, and made his pin in a minute-55. It was his third in a season that’s included two decisions and four occasions when he was unanswered on the mat. “I want to keep my undefeated streak,” the senior says. Something’s clicking for the Mount Si wrestling team right now. After the team’s eighth straight win, Corrie ponders the string of success. “We’ve got six seniors,” he answers. “We’re working a lot harder in practice,” says senior Mitch Rorem, Mount Si’s 195-pounder. “As a team, we’ve bought in to what our coaches are doing for us.” He boasted a few scabs on his brow, war wounds from a wrestling season that began 12 hours after he finished linebacker duties for the Wildcats. Rorem is a leader on this team, and he’s the first to attend an intensive two-week skills camp. “Wrestling is one of those things that takes over your life,” he says. Against Interlake last Thursday, Dec. 6, Rorem pinned his man, Stanley Ruvinov, in 36 seconds. “I was aggressive off the bat,” Rorem said. “Before he could get a feel for me, I was already in on his legs.” As a team, Mount Si has been dominating its Seth Truscott/Staff Photo Mitch Rorem is finding league and non-league opponents since matches success on the mat this began, thanks to strong numbers as well as talent. season, with three pins, a The Wildcats felled Juanita, 66-18, on Nov. 29; majority decision, as well Skyline, 48-28, Eastlake, 58-21, and Issaquah, 46-27, on Dec. 1, as part of a big dual match; Newport, 75-3, as several forfeits. His loss on Dec. 2; and Inglemore, 45-31, on Dec. 4. to Inglemore was against a state-ranked foe. SEE WRESTLE, 19

Seth Truscott/Staff Photo

Mount Si’s Hunter Conway, 106, grapples with Interlake’s Albert Chen during match action Thursday, Dec. 6. Conway pinned in three and a half minutes.

The high flyers Mount Si’s cheer squad’s tumbling prowess sending them far BY SETH TRUSCOTT Editor

For a second, Miranda Gillespie is flying through the air. She holds her breath. Her mind clears. Then she’s down, cradled in the arms of her teammates. Miranda is a flyer, one of the Mount Si cheerleaders who perform aerial stunts for spirit routines and competitions. This breathtaking moment is a lot of fun for her, and the senior is confident that she’ll come down just fine.

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“I trust the people that I’m flying with,” she says. On the Wildcat squad, she adds, the whole team’s got everyone’s back. “We’re all there for each other,” she says. “It takes everyone doing their job to make the routine happen.” As a sophomore, Miranda came late to cheerleading, and to the sport of tumbling, the inner art of athletic moves like flips and rolls that define the best cheer teams. But the newcomer threw herself into the routines, and today is one of the team’s success stories. She’ll be with the Mount Si red squad when they head back to national competition this February. “Once I found what I love to do, I worked really hard for what I wanted, and got where I intended,” the senior said. Tumbling requires exactly this kind of hard work and consistency, says head coach Jessii Stevens. It brings a whole extra level of athleticism and competition to cheer. Of the red squad, 12 of 15 cheerleaders have stand-

MOUNT SI CHEER SCHEDULE Saturday, Dec. 15 Holiday Invitational at Kentwood Saturday, Jan. 12 Sequoia Competition at Kentwood Saturday, Jan. 19 Wintercheer at Skyline HS Saturday, Jan. 26 Washington Cheerleading State Championships Saturday, Feb. 2 Sweetheart Classic at Kentwood Feb. 7 to 11 National High School Cheerleading Championships, Orlando, Fla.

Seth Truscott/Staff Photo

Miranda Gillespie, a flyer, soars in practice routine, held up by Katy Black, Nicki Mostofi, Mikaelyn Davis and Amanda Antoch ing tumbling skills, while 11 have running tumbling skills. At the beginning of the season, Mount Si forms two teams based on tryout scores, looking at each cheerleader’s individual skill.

The red nationals team is tumbling-focused, while the competition squad, called silver, is for varsity nontumbling. Some cheerleaders come in with gymnastics skill, and have been working on moves like these for years.

Others come in without that experience, and work to pick it up, just like Amanda Smith did. Amanda, a senior, never tried any kind of cheerleading before her junior year. SEE CHEER, 19


12 • December 12, 2012 • Snoqualmie Valley Record

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Grange gives turkey dollars to food bank

Courtesy photo

Left, Sallal Grange Master Larry Houch presents a check for turkeys to Food Bank Director Heidi Dukich. The Sallal Grange recently donated more than $300 to the Mount Si Food Bank to buy Thanksgiving turkeys for their clients. The Grange itself donated $250, with additional funds coming from Dairy Drive donors. The dairy drive is a weekly event at QFC, when shoppers are asked to buy cheese and other dairy products for the food bank. Before Thanksgiving, donors were also encouraged to pitch in funds for turkeys.

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OBITUARIES

Robert James Swenson Former Valley resident Robert Swenson, age 88, died Sunday, Dec. 2, at the LaVilla Grande Care Center in Grand Junction, Colo. Robert was born on June 23, 1924, to Ralph and Hazel (Stewart) Swenson, of Monte Vista Farm, Snoqualmie Falls. He spent his childhood at the family dairy farm and graduated from Snoqualmie High School in 1943. He served as a Marine in the South Pacific and China from 1944 to 1946. Robert married Wanda Thompson of Snoqualmie; they had four children, and later divorced. He married his wife, Lola, on September 15, 1972, in Port Angeles, Wash. He held a variety of jobs over the years during his residence in Washington state and Grand Junction, Colo., including: an inspector at Boeing in Seattle; a lumber grader at a Weyerhaeuser Mill, owner of an Exxon service station, and a custodian at Monroe Elementary in Port Angeles. Robert is survived by his wife, Lola; his sons: Bob (Robin) Swenson, of Lake Tapps, Wash.; Jim (Patty) Swenson, of Port Angeles; Earl (Vicki) Locke, of Glendale, Ariz.; Berl (Kelly) Locke, of Phoenix, Ariz.; his daughters: Sue (Bruce) Beamer, of Oak Harbor, Wash.; Sharon Yakanak, of Anchorage, Alaska; Gala (Bill) Case, of Clifton, Colo.; Mavis (Joe) Bounds, of Grand Junction; his sister, Trudy Thompson, of San Antonio, Tex.; also 21 grandchildren, 32 great-grandchildren, and two great-great-grandchildren. A memorial service for Robert was December 11 at the Bethel Assembly of God Church in Grand Junction, Colo. Bob’s memory book is available at: www.martinmortuary.com/ dm20/en_US/locations/25/2549/index.page.

Darin Johnson Darin Nicholas Johnson, 41, was born February 10, 1971, in Vancouver, B.C. to Dolores and Jerry Johnson. He died November 28, in West Seattle. Darin was raised in Carnation and attended St. Louise Elementary and Redmond High School. He received his bachelor of arts degree after attending Western Washington University and the Evergreen State College in Olympia. Darin was a journalist, and specialized in non-fiction literature. He wrote, “Big Dead Place, Inside the Strange and Menacing World of Antarctica”, a book about the history, politics and the lunacy of day-to-day life while working at McMurdo Base on the South Pole. A world traveler who called Carnation his home, Darin was employed as a contract employee in Iraq and Afghanistan, has taught English in South Korea and worked in the fishing industry in Alaska. He is survived by his father Jerry “Jay” Johnson, mother Dolores Johnson, sister Jacci Johnson and brother Jay-Michael Johnson. Share memories, view photos at www.flintofts.com.

Mount Si Lutheran Church

ON THE SCANNER

North Bend Sheriff’s Substation TUESDAY, DEC. 4

BREAK-IN ATTEMPT: At 3:12 p.m., police were called to an office in the 200 block of Main Avenue South, where someone had attempted a break-in. The suspect had apparently attempted to pry open the locked metal door.

SATURDAY, DEC. 1 BURGLARY: At 6:50 p.m., police received a burglary report from a business in the 100 block of West North Bend Way. A burglar had pried open the front door, then took the cash which was sitting in plain view in a glass cabinet. CAR PROWLS: At 4 a.m., a car prowl victim reported that someone had opened the unlocked door of her vehicle, parked in the 1400 block of Forster Boulevard South, and stolen several items. Police also heard from a victim in the 900 block of 11th Court Southwest at 8:51 a.m., and the 1400 block of Southwest 10th Street at 9:54 a.m.

FRIDAY, NOV. 30 CONSTRUCTION JOB: At 8:30 a.m., police received a theft report from a home under construction in the 1600 block of Tannerwood West. The thief just walked into the home through the open garage, and stole a jackhammer and rolls of copper wire.

MONDAY, DEC. 3 OUT OF GAS: At 1:45 a.m., an officer patrolling at Southeast Jacobia Street and Swing Avenue Southeast saw a subject

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carrying what looked like gas siphoning equipment. He stopped the subject, who said he was looking for a gas station, and his car was on the Interstate near the casino. He gave a false name to the officer, who took him to the police station for fingerprinting and a detailed records check. On the way, he asked the officer to stop and take the keys from his car, about 100 yards from where he was stopped. Across the street from the subject’s vehicle was a white pickup truck with a gas cap lying on the ground. The subject was charged with attempted theft and providing false information to a police officer. SPOOKED: At 12:45 a.m., a caller in the 7700 block of Douglas Avenue Southeast called police about a suspected break-in attempt. He said he heard the front gate open, then heard someone try to open his front door. Police searched the area but found no one.

FRIDAY, NOV. 30 PERSISTENT KNOCKER: At 11:05 p.m., a caller in the 3500 block of Southeast Sequoia Place told police her mother’s drunk boyfriend was pounding on the door to their home for 10 minutes. Police arrived and found the subject asleep in the hallway. They arrested him for an outstanding warrant and booked him into the King County Jail.

Carnation Police Department WEDNESDAY, NOV. 28 DRUGS: At 9:25 a.m., a caller in the 3700 block of Tolt Avenue contacted police about a student in possession of marijuana.

TUESDAY, NOV. 27

Snoqualmie Police Department

WI-FI ONLY: At 11:50 p.m., a caller reported a suspicious vehicle in the 4800 block of Tolt Avenue. Police responded and contacted a driver who was parked outside the library, using their free wi-fi network access.

MONDAY, NOV. 26 FAMILY ARGUMENT: At 3:51 p.m., police were called to a heated family argument in the 31600 block of Northeast 40th Street. A family member had called 911 to calm the situation down, which they did. PARKING PROBLEM: At 1:30 a.m., a caller in the 32300 block of East Rutherford Street called police about dispute with his neighbor over parking. A guest of the caller had parked, legally, in front of the neighbor’s residence, but the neighbor was angry and parked both his vehicles around the offending visitor, blocking it in. Police contacted the neighbor, who agreed to move his vehicles.

CARRIER OF THE MONTH Hunter Franklin started as a sub for the walking routes. Hunter has demonstrated a strong work ethic with attention to service. Subscribers on his route appreciate the door delivery and the dry paper.

411 NE 8th St., North Bend Pastor Mark Griffith • 425 888-1322 mtsilutheran@mtsilutheran.org www.mtsilutheran.org 711598

Snoqualmie Valley Record • December 12, 2012 • 13

Sunday Worship: 8:15 a.m. Traditional, 10:45 a.m. Praise Sunday School/Fellowship 9:30-10:30 a.m. Dir., Family & Youth Ministry – Lauren Frerichs “Like” us on Facebook – Mt. Si Lutheran Youth

Place a paid obituary to honor those who have passed away, call Linda at 253.234.3506 paidobits@reporternewspapers.com Paid obituaries include publication in the newspaper and online at www.valleyrecord.com All notices are subject to verification.

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PUBLIC NOTICES PUBLIC NOTICE #715732 FALL CITY WATER DISTRICT INVITATION TO CONTRACTORS FOR REGISTRATION ON SMALL WORKS ROSTER NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the BOARD of Commissioners of Fall City Water District of King County, Washington that the District is updating its Small Works Contractors Roster pursuant to RCW 57.08.050. The District occasionally requires the services of responsible contractors to make minor repairs, additions and improvements to the District’s water system. All contractors interested in being included upon the District’s Small Works Contractors Roster should submit an application to the District Clerk at the following address; Fall City Water District PO Box 1059 Fall City, WA 98024 The application should include a brief resume which includes the contractor’s qualifications to perform work upon municipal water systems, together with references, copies of the contractor’s license and bonding information. Members of the Roster must be financially able to undertake and complete the construction contracts, the estimated cost of which exceed $20,000.00 but less than $300,000.00. Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record on December 12, 2012. PUBLIC NOTICE #715738 FALL CITY WATER DISTRICT A & E SERVICES Fall City Water District of King County, Washington is requesting Statements of Qualification from firms that can provide professional architectural, underground utility and structural engineering, geotechnical services, electrical design, landscape design and surveying services during the year 2012. If you are interested in submitting a Statement of Qualifications for any of these services, please submit to the following address: Fall City Water District PO Box 1059 Fall City, WA 98024 WE ENCOURAGE MINORITY AND WOMEN’S BUSINESS ENTERPRISES TO APPLY. Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record on December 12, 2012. PUBLIC NOTICE #715821 SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE NO. 821 of the City of Carnation, Washington On the 4th day of December, 2012, the City Council of the City of Carnation, passed Ordinance No. 821. A summary of the content of said ordinance, consisting of the title, provides as follows: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARNATION, WASHINGTON, ESTABLISHING TEMPORARY OPERATING HOURS FOR CARNATION CITY HALL DURING YEAR 2013; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The full text of this Ordinance will be mailed upon request. DATED this 5th day of December, 2012. CITY CLERK, MARY MADOLE Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record on December 12, 2012.

PUBLIC NOTICE #715746 FALL CITY WATER DISTRICT INVITATION TO VENDORS FOR REGISTRATION ON VENDOR’S ROSTER NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the BOARD of Commissioners of Fall City Water District of King County, Washington that the District is updating its Vendors Roster pursuant to RCW 57.08.050. The District occasionally purchases supplies, materials and equipment. All vendors interested in being included upon the District’s Vendors Roster should submit an application to the District Clerk at the following address; Fall City Water District PO Box 1059 Fall City, WA 98024 The application should include a brief resume, which includes the vendor’s name and a list of supplies, material, and equipment the vendor can supply. Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record on December 12, 2012. PUBLIC NOTICE #715828 SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE NO. 822 of the City of Carnation, Washington On the 4th day of December, 2012, the City Council of the City of Carnation, passed Ordinance No. 822. A summary of the content of said ordinance, consisting of the title, provides as follows: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARNATION, WASHINGTON, AMENDING CHAPTER 3.70 CMC PARK IMPACT FEE PROGRAM; REVISING THE CITY’S CODIFIED PARK IMPACT FEE SCHEDULE BASED UPON THE CITY’S UPDATED PARKS IMPROVEMENT PLAN; ESTABLISHING AN IMPACT FEE CLASSIFICATION FOR ACCESSORY DWELLING UNITS; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The full text of this Ordinance will be mailed upon request. DATED this 5th day of December, 2012. CITY CLERK, MARY MADOLE Published in on Snoqualmie Valley Record on December 12, 2012. PUBLIC NOTICE #715840 SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE NO. 824 of the City of Carnation, Washington On the 4th day of December, 2012, the City Council of the City of Carnation, passed Ordinance No. 824. A summary of the content of said ordinance, consisting of the title, provides as follows: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARNATION, WASHINGTON, ADOPTING THE ANNUAL BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2013. T he full text of this Ordinance will be mailed upon request. DATED this 5th day of December, 2012. CITY CLERK, MARY MADOLE Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record on December 12, 2012. PUBLIC NOTICE #715756 CITY OF NORTH BEND Notice of Application Proposed Project: Twin Falls Subdivision Application Comment

Deadline: Dec. 26 The applicant has submitted a preliminary plat application for the division of parcel 1323089037, located immediately east of the Wood River neighborhood, into 12 single family residential lots. Owner/Applicant: Goldsmith Land Investments, LLC, 1215 114th Ave. SE, Bellevue, WA 98004, (425) 462-1080 Application Type: Preliminary Plat Approval Date Application Received: November 9, 2012 Date of Notice of Complete Application: December 4, 2012 Date of Public Notice of Application:December 12, 2012 Other Necessary Approvals Not Included In This Application: • SEPA Threshold Determination • Certificate of Concurrency • Stormwater Management Approval • Clearing and Grading Permit • Right-of-Way Use Permit • NPDES Construction Stormwater General Permit • Final Plat Subdivision Approval Environmental Review: A State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Determination and 15-day comment period will be completed for the project. Existing environmental documents to evaluate the project include a SEPA checklist, a Level One Downstream Analysis and Preliminary Drainage Plan, a Subsurface Exploration and Infiltration Testing Report, and site plans. Local Government Contact Person/Availability of Documents: Additional information concerning the application can be obtained from Mike McCarty, Senior Planner, North Bend Community and Economic Development Department, 126 E. Fourth Street, North Bend, WA 98045; (425) 888-7649, fax (425) 888-5636, mmccarty@ northbendwa.gov. Relevant documents, including the application and site plan materials, can be reviewed at the same office. Applicable Development Regulations and Policies: The application will be evaluated for consistency with, and mitigation will be required pursuant to, the following City of North Bend development regulations and policies: North Bend Comprehensive Land Use Plan; North Bend Municipal Code Chapter 14.04 (SEPA), 14.16 (Stormwater Management), Title 17 (Land Segregation), Title 18 (Zoning), and Title 19 (Development Standards). Applicable permits and approvals governing the above referenced municipal code chapters will be required prior to development of approved short plat lots. Submittal of Public Comments: Public comments must be received in the North Bend Department of Community and Economic Development by 4:30 pm on the date shown above. Comments may be mailed, emailed, personally delivered, or sent by facsimile, and should be as specific as possible. Any person may request a copy of the decision once made by contacting Senior Planner Mike McCarty at the address, email and phone number set forth above. Public Hearing: The application will require a public hearing before a hearing examiner, to be scheduled at a future date. Notice will be provided a minimum of

15 days prior to the date of the hearing. Appeal Rights: Any party of record may initiate an appeal of an administrative or quasijudicial decision within 21 days following issuance of the final decision, per NBMC 20.06. Posted at the site and in public places, noticed on the City’s website, published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record, and mailed to all property owners within 300 feet of the boundary of the subject property, and to potential agencies with jurisdiction. Published in the Snoqulamie Valley Record on December 12, 2012. PUBIC NOTICE #715835 SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE NO. 823 of the City of Carnation, Washington On the 4th day of December, 2012, the City Council of the City of Carnation, passed Ordinance No. 823. A summary of the content of said ordinance, consisting of the title, provides as follows: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARNATION, WASHINGTON, AMENDING CHAPTER 5.04 CMC BUSINESS AND OCCUPATION TAX; IMPOSING A THREE PERCENT UTILITY TAX UPON THE OPERATION OR PROVISION OF CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE WITHIN THE CITY; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; ESTABLISHING AN AUTOMATIC SUNSET DATE; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The full text of this Ordinance will be mailed upon request. DATED this 5th day of December, 2012. CITY CLERK, MARY MADOLE Published in the Snoquamie Valley Record on December 12, 2012. PUBLIC NOTICE #715849 SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE NO. 825 of the City of Carnation, Washington On the 4th day of December, 2012, the City Council of the City of Carnation, passed Ordinance No. 825. A summary of the content of said ordinance, consisting of the title, provides as follows: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARNATION, WASHINGTON AMENDING SECTION ONE OF ORDINANCE NO. 812 AND THE ADOPTED 2012 ANNUAL BUDGET OF THE CITY; AND PROVIDING FOR SUMMARY PUBLICATION. The full text of this Ordinance will be mailed upon request. DATED this 5th day of December, 2012. CITY CLERK, MARY MADOLE Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record on December 12, 2012. PUBLIC NOTICE #715966 LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF NORTH BEND King County, Washington Notice is hereby given that the North Bend City Council at its December 4, 2012 City Council Meeting adopted the following Ordinances. The summary titles are as follows: Ordinance No. 1471 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF NORTH BEND, WASHINGTON, AMENDING CHAPTER 13.36 NBMC RELATING TO CONNECTIONS TO THE PUBLIC SEWER

SYSTEM AND RELATED EXCEPTIONS; ADOPTING A NEW CHAPTER 13.37 NBMC ESTABLISHING A SEWER CONNECTION INCENTIVE PROGRAM AND PROVIDING FOR THE PAYMENT OF UTILITY GENERAL FACILITIES CHARGES AND CONNECTION FEES OVER TIME UNDER CERTAIN CONDITIONS; PROVIDING FOR LIENS AND MONTHLY CHARGES; AMENDING PROCEDURES AND PENALTIES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE Ordinance No. 1472 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF NORTH BEND, WASHINGTON, AMENDING NORTH BEND MUNICIPAL CODE CHAPTER 5.05, ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS FOR BUSINESS AND OCCUPATION TAXES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE Ordinance No. 1473 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF NORTH BEND, WASHINGTON, AMENDING THE 2012 BUDGET ORDINANCE 1446 TO REFLECT CHANGES IN REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES AND PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY Ordinance No. 1474 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF NORTH BEND, WASHINGTON, AUTHORIZING 2013 PROPERTY TAX LEVIES CONSISTING OF THE CITY’S REGULAR LEVY AND A VOTER-APPROVED EXCESS LEVY FOR UNLIMITED GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS INTEREST AND REDEMPTION AND ADOPTING THE 2013 BUDGET AND SALARY SCHEDULE; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE Ordinance No. 1475 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF NORTH BEND, WASHINGTON, UPDATING WATER RATES AND AMENDING THE TAXES, RATES AND FEES SCHEDULE; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE Ordinance No. 1476 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF NORTH BEND, WASHINGTON, REPEALING NBMC CHAPTER 15.44 SHORELINE MANAGEMENT, IN ITS ENTIRETY AND REPLACING THE CITY’S SHORELINE REGULATIONS WITH AN UPDATED SHORE-

LINE MASTER PROGRAM CODIFIED IN A NEW CHAPTER 14.20 OF THE NORTH BEND MUNICIPAL CODE; ESTABLISHING A NEW SHORELINE ELEMENT IN THE CITY OF NORTH BEND’S COMPREHENSIVE PLAN WITH NEW POLICIES AND REGULATIONS FOR THE CITY’S SHORELINE JURISDICTION TO INCORPORATE THE GOALS AND POLICIES OF THE UPDATED SHORELINE MASTER PROGRAM BY REFERENCE; ADOPTING LEGISLATIVE FINDINGS; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE Ordinance No. 1477 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF NORTH BEND, WASHINGTON, REPEALING NORTH BEND MUNICIPAL CODE CHAPTER 5.04 RELATING TO BUSINESS LICENSE AND BUSINESS AND OCCUPATION TAX, AND ADOPTING A NEW CHAPTER 5.04; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE The full text of the above Ordinances may be viewed on the web at http://northbendwa.gov, at the North Bend City Hall, 211 Main Ave., N. or to request a copy by mail please contact the City Clerk at (425) 888-7627. Posted: December 5, 2012 Published in Snoqualmie Valley Record: December 12, 2012. PUBLIC NOTICE #717092 Legal Notice City Of Snoqualmie King County, Washington 98065 Notice Is Hereby Given That the Snoqualmie City Council, on the 10th day of December 2012 passed the Following Ordinances: Ordinance No. 1106 Ordinance Adopting the 2013 and 2014 Budgets Ordinance No. 1107 Ordinance Amending Ordinance No. 1089 Adopting The 2012 Budget Copies of these Ordinances in complete text are available at the City Hall located at 38624 SE River Street between 9 AM and 5 PM, Monday through Friday, on the city website www.ci.snoqualmie.wa.us, or by calling the City Clerk at 425-888-1555 x 1118. ATTEST: Jodi Warren, MMC City Clerk Publish/Post : 12/12/12 Effective Date: 12/18/12 Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record on December 12, 2012.

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Snoqualmie Valley Record • December 12, 2012 • 19

Seth Truscott/Staff Photo

Mount Si cheerleaders practice routines in the school commons; back row, Josephine Owens, Carina Castagno, Rachel Walker, Tanner Lakeman, Kate Krivanec, Avery Dahline, Sofia Caputo, Isabella Villanueba; front row, Anamika Gilbert, Karley MacMillian, Jannel Rasmussen.

CHEER FROM 11 “I decided I wanted to try something new.” Senior friends persuaded her to try it. “I absolutely love it,” she says. “It gives me a lot of happiness. It’s my passion.” Amanda is a base for flyers like Miranda, and also does tumbles and jumps. She’s always working on new moves, and she never thought she’d be doing something like this. “Tumbling is the hardest thing,” she said. “It’s those nerves inside me that freak me out, but make me do it. Because I really love it.” To get ready for nationals, she’s doing more tumbling classes with assistant coach Travis Peterson, and is stretching at home, outside of practice, and working out daily. Balancing this routine is challenging— Amanda squeezes in homework where she can—but it’s a priority. “I knew I wanted to focus on cheer my senior

year,” she says. “Cheer is a big commitment, but it’s really worth it.” The team’s first competition was Nov. 17, and both squads had really clean routines. Now, it’s important to keep the momentum going, and push for harder skills. Red team has already qualified for state, and the silver squad is expected to follow soon. State is January 26 at Comcast Arena in Everett. “Just keep in your head what the goal is: State,” says Miranda. “We want to take the energy we had from the first competition and not let it go.” “We need to come together as a team to achieve success,” Amanda said. “Team bonding can be hard, especially with as many girls as there are on this team,” she added. “But, everyone doing their own skills, practicing outside, will definitely improve our competition.” • You can follow Mount Si cheer at http:// mountsicheer.weebly.com/.

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WRESTLE FROM 11 Now, Mount Si goes this weekend into the tough Spud Walley Invitational tournament in Sedro Woolley. In a league with limited competition right now, Spud Walley will be a true test. “It’s one of the toughest we see,” said head coach Tony Schlotfeldt. “Tahoma, Enumclaw, Hanford... Sedro’s right up there.” Schlotfeldt praised his 145-pounder, Bruce Stuart, who is wrestling well in a class with tough competition. He also singled out Tanner Stahl, who fell Thursday to a state returner in Mount Si’s only loss, but is wrestling phenomenally, all things considered. “He’s wrestling smart, making good decisions,” says his coach.

Mount Si saw several second-string athletes get time on the mat Thursday. At 170, JD Hanners stepped in for Cole Palmer and Jimmy Morris. Both Hanners and Morris have a lot of promise, the coach said. Younger wrestlers are stepping up, says Rorem. “They definitely drill harder and go harder line than most of the freshman groups we’ve had,” said the senior. • Mount Si wrestles this Thursday, Dec. 13. at Sammamish and next Tuesday, Dec. 18, at Maywood Middle School versus Liberty and Lake Washington. You can follow Mount Si wrestling online and on Facebook at http:// w w w. f a c eb o o k . c o m / p a g e s / M t - S i - Wi l d c a t Wrestling/170525102964411.

Mt Si vs Interlake: • Hunter Conway, 106 pounds, pinned Albert Chen; 3:25 • Griffin Armour, 113, won by forfeit • Eli Clure, 120, won by forfeit • Gunnar Harrison, 126, majority decision over Grant Cole, 11-1. • Tanner Stahl, 138, pinned by Interlake’s Daniel Montoya, 3:09 • Bruce Stuart, 145, majority decision over Kevin Richardson, 9-0 • Tye Rodne, 152, won by forfeit • Max Kenagy, 160, pinned ChungChen Huang, 3:35 • JD Hanners, 170, pinned Seung Lee • Tim Corrie, 182, won by pin, 1:55 • Mitch Rorem, 195, pinned Stanley Ruvinov, 0:36 • Cameron McLain, 220, won by pin, 0:37 • Nate Whited, 285, pinned David Khanatayev, 0:39

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2009 Honda Civic 2dr cpe (R12896A)..........$15,871

*Prices include manufacturer rebate until 12/26/2012. Pre-Owned pricing expires12/26/2012.

HAPPY HOLIDAYS! 2006 Honda Pilot EX 4WD (R12332C) .........$15,871 $15,871 2008 Saturn Sky Red Line conv (27393)....... $20,971 2007 Chevrolet Tahoe LTZ SUV (4179A).........$25,971 $25,971 2010 Chevrolet Suburban SUV (4089A).........$29,871 $29,871 2012 Chevrolet Sonic LT hatch (27343) .......$15,972 2009 Volswagen Jetta TDI (V1795A)............. $21,871 2010 Chevrolet Equinox LTZ (R13341A)........$26,971 (R13341A) 2012 Subaru Outback 2.5i Ltd (27424) ..........$29,871 2007 MINI Cooper hatch (V1054B) .............$16,871 2011 Chevrolet Cruze LTZ sedan (27287) ..... $21,971 2007 Chevrolet Avalanche LTZ (27153)..........$26,971 2007 Ford F-250 SD Lariat 4x4 (V1499B).......$29,971 2010 Honda Insight EX hatch (V1445A) ......$17,571 2004 Chevrolet SSR 2 dr conv (27227) ..........$20,971 $20,971 2005 Chevrolet Corvette cpe (27216)............$27,571 (27216) 2012 Chevrolet Equinox LTZ (27367) ................$32,671 2010 Chevrolet Malibu LTZ (R13599A) ........$17,871 2008 Subaru Tribeca Ltd SUV (R13480A) .......$22,871 $22,871 2007 Chevrolet Suburban LTZ 1500 (V1824A) .. .$27,971 2007 Cadillac Escalade ESV (4258A) .................$32,671 2004 BMW Z4 3.0i conv (4197B) .................$17,971 2010 Jeep Wrangler Sport AWD (R12950A) ..$23,871 $23,871 2010 Ford F-150 XLT 4x4 crew (27472).............$27,971 2008 Chevrolet Corvette cpe LT (R13346A) .....$35,971 2010 Chevrolet Malibu 2LT sedan (27443)..$18,971 1957 Chevrolet 210 Hot Rod (27125) ............$24,871 $24,871 2011 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 crew (27196) $28,571 2010 Ram 3500 Big Horn 4x4 (R13568A).........$39,771 2007 Jeep Wrangler 4WD (V1828A) ............$18,971 2008 Hummer H3 SUV (27333) ......................$24,871 $24,871 2010 Ford Ege Ltd AWD (4146B) ....................$28,871 2007 Chevrolet Corvette conv (4228A) ............$39,871 2006 MINI Cooper S hatch (27394) .............. $19,871 2010 Mazda CX-9 SUV (R13526A)..................$24,971 (R13526A) $24,971 2011 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 LT (27469)....$28,971 $28,971 2011 Chevrolet Suburban LTZ 1500 (27459) ....$47,571 $47,571

CHAPLINS SERVICE SERVICE DEPT. CHAPLINS SERVICE DEPT CHAPLINS DEPT.

ASK US ABOUT OUR FREE PICKUP & DELIVERY 5:30pm • Sat 8:00am 2:00pm 5:30pm • Sat 8:00am-2:00pm SERVICE

ASK US ABOUT A USCAR ABOUT FREE ASK LOANER

A FREE LOANER CAR

Mon-Fri 8:00am - 5:30pm • Sat 8:00am-2:00pm

Mon-Fri8:00am 8:00am Mon-Fri WE SERVICE MOST MAKES & MODELS SERVICEMOST MOST MAKES WEWE SERVICE MAKES&&MODELS MODELS

Spend $50-$99.99.................$5.00 OFF Spend $100-$199.99..........$10.00 OFF Spend $200-$299.99..........$20.00 OFF Spend $300-$399.99..........$30.00 OFF Variable Discount-Service, Spend $400-$499.99..........$40.00 OFF Spend $500 or more...........$50.00 OFF Parts & Accessories

CREATE YOUR OWN SERVICE COUPON

Expires 12/26/12

ASK US ABOUT OUR FREE PICKUP & DELIVERY SERVICE

WINTER SPECIAL

95 Special $129Brake Front or Rear OIL CHANGE SPECIAL 99 95 Coolant Flush

Includes power flush & replacement of fluids

Visit our quick lube

+ TAX

$39$ Expires 2/15/11

229

Expires 4/13/11

+ TAX

• Replace Front Brake Pads or Rear Spend $50-$99.99.................$5.00 OFF Brake Shoes FREE OIL WIPER BLADES Spend $100-$199.99..........$10.00 OFF • Machine Rotors or Drums 00 Vehicles) Check Connections and Lines for plus Installation FOR •(Most Spend $200-$299.99.......... $20.00 of OFF with purchase a new vehicle. Expires 2/15/11 CHANGE pair Leaks Most vechicles • Adjust Parking Brake Spend $300-$399.99..........$30.00 OFF A YEAR • Add Brake Fluid as Needed WE’RE YOUROFF LOCAL SOURCE FOR ALL YOUR TIRE NEEDS Spend $400-$499.99.......... $40.00 with purchase of 106orMain Ave. N, North Bend • 425-888-0781 • www.chevyoutlet.com a new vehicle Spend $500 more...........$50.00 OFF

FREE OIL CHANGE FOR A YEAR

Oil changes must be completed at North Bend Chevrolet

$15

Packing of wheel bearings caliper/wheel cylinder service additional charge. Includes GM cars and 1/2 ton pickups. Some models may be slightly higher. Non-GM vehicles may incur extra charge. Coupon must be presented when vehicle is dropped off for service. Not good with any other offer. Expires 12/26/2012.

WE’RE FORALL ALLYOUR YOURTIRE TIRENEEDS NEEDS WE REYOUR YOURLOCAL LOCALSOURCE SOURCE FOR 106 Main Ave. N, North Bend • 425-888-0781 • www.chevyoutlet.com

Snoqualmie Valley Record Dec. 12, 2012, issue  

Valley Record's Dec. 12 edition, contest entry

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