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Seth Kutnick Design Research + Innovation Strategy

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As a Design Researcher and Innovation Strategist, I go to where people live, work, and play to find meaning in how they interact with products, services, and experiences. By translating insights into practical recommendations, I enjoy helping organizations apply user-centered design principals to their overall strategy. Design has the potential to create order in the world but also chaos. I believe that great design ultimately leads to innovation - we all know it when we experience it, one of those things where you just can’t remember what you did before it and don’t know what you would do without it. this is some of my work.


For convenience, my work is divided into the following three categories; however, due to the complexity of the some of the projects, many skills and tools over lap between categories.

Service Design Exposure Studio: Exposing Youth to Potential Career Opportunities.................................................. 01 The Little Village Project: A Redesign of Public Services on the South Side of Chicago..................... 13

Product Design Radio Flyer: How To Enter the Multi-Stage Trike Market?.................................................................. 17 M Chicago: An Emergency Application For Mobile Devices............................................................... 21 Flying With Kids: Examining In-Flight Entertainment for Boeing.......................................................... 27 Our Pets vs. Our Furniture: Must We Choose?.................................................................................. 31 The Immersive Bathroom: A Smart Multi-Functional Bathtub............................................................. 35

Design Research and Innovation Strategy Methodology Rethinking Healthcare: Prototyping New Participatory Research Methods......................................... 39 Smokers vs. Non-smokers: Can’t We All Just Get Along?................................................................. 43 Trying to Wake Up Starbucks: Preparing For The Research............................................................... 47 Design Research and Innovation Strategy: The Way I See It.............................................................. 51


Service Design

Exposure Studio: Exposing Youth To Potential Career Opportunities Problem What do you want to be when you grow up? This is a very difficult question feared by many during their youth. It’s interesting how society expects people to pick a career without even trying it out first. Too many young adults are taking jobs and going into careers that they are just not informed about before hand. As a result, there is a high turnover rate and people are left perpetually searching for the career for them. Not to mention the millions of college students who switch majors after 2 years and go to graduate school because “they don’t know what else to do”. Employers also suffer by incurring unnecessary hiring and firing expenses. So, what if people knew about a job or career before actually committing to it?

Solution Exposure Studio is a new organization that exposes youth to different career opportunities. Traditionally in a classroom environment, students are evaluated based on tasks that someone else assigns them. By providing a new learning environment, Exposure seeks to take the evaluative nature out of education, turning it upside down and makes it more focused on ones strengths and interests. After youth are exposed to different career directions, they will be asked to reflect back on their own life and their own strengths and interests. Youth will began to ask themselves “Where have I seen this before?” “What else can I do with this?” and “What do I really want to learn about?”. Exposure is a different type of organization because it targets strengths and interests, offers a hands on experience, and has a no strings attached model. This is not an interview or an internship but an afternoon where a youth can experience what a career is like to some extent and evaluate if anything within that experience resonated with them. Seth Kutnick Design Research

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Exposure Studio: Exposing Youth To Potential Career Opportunities

KELLY

LAVAR

RENEE

Seth Kutnick Design Research

+ Innovation Strategy

CECI

RAY

JAMES ALEX

SAMANTHA

AMANDA

JAIME

SHARICE

TONY

3


fall 2008 - present

“HOW AM I SUPPOSED TO KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH THE REST OF MY LIFE?”


Exposure Studio: Exposing Youth To Potential Career Opportunities

THEATER

ADVERTISING

DESIGN PLANNING

CATERERING

MARKETING

BAKERY

PHOTOGRAPHY

ILLUSTRAT0R

ENTREPRENEUR

TOYS Seth Kutnick Design Research

SALON + Innovation Strategy

LAW

5


fall 2008 - present

/

“OH..........THAT S HOW.”


Exposure Studio: Exposing Youth To Potential Career Opportunities Background Research

Analysis and Design Principals

The underlying principals which led to Exposure Studio predict that youth are successful when motivation comes from within. When a youth identifies their own strengths and interests and can then see how these can be applied to real world careers, they are more likely to take action to get on the path to a career. In contrast to traditional education which is based on evaluative principals, Exposure seeks to ask the youth what they want to do and than provide relevant opportunities on how to achieve that goal. YOUTH

“HOW AM I SUPPOSED TO KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH THE REST OF MY LIFE”

first hand experience is a powerful way to learn

longer terms goals are difficult to accomplish if path is unknown

employers are road tested before longer commitment is made

simply telling them that their interests can lead to a career, is a motivator

self-diccovery leads to autonomy

powerful experiences can become turning points

rigid structures can be as much a handicap as too much freedom

sometimes it takes time to make a connection

commitment to passions combined with hard work can lead to a meaningful career

a sense of responsibility can generate enthusiasm and commitment

positive view and strong attitude will differentiate job candiddates

education comes from everywhere; school, friends, family, media

discovering a strength or a sense of purpose can be a strong motivator

youth's view of capabilities and actions are limited to what they have been exposed to external support can amplify intrinsic motivation

youth have a hardtime strictly being talked to

Self Discovery

Strengths + Interests

Reflection

Tangibility

Rapid Prototyping of the Organization with Users

BUSINESSES

While initially businesses were recruited for Exposure, we quickly learned that the focus should be on the individual and their story. The information about the business would inevitably come from the individual’s personal story. Seth Kutnick Design Research

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fall 2008 - present

Exposure Concepts

Top 5 Findings from Prototyping

EXPOSURE STUDIO

EXPOSURE EVENTS

1. FOCUS ON THE INDIVIDUAL, NOT THE BUSINESS 2. PERSONAL STORIES SHOULD BE INCORPORATED THROUGHOUT 3. EXPERIENCE MUST INCLUDE A HANDS ON ACTIVITY 4. DISCUSS BOTH POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE ASPECTS OF CAREER

A new way of thinking about learning environments, youth will be able to access various tools and, if work environments will not permit, individuals can come to the studio to tell their story and run an activity

In an effort to reach more of the community, Exposure can be run at local events

CONNECTION ENGINE

EXPOSURE AT BUSINESSES

5. BUILD A CULTURE OF INQUISITIVENESS Exposure Branding

Seth B. Kutnick User Researcher and Strategist skutnick@gmail.com 441 North Clark Street Chicago, Illinois 60610-4726 312.371.9642 www.exposurestudios.org

Exposure Studios EXPLORE INTERESTS - DISCOVER OPTIONS - MAKE CONNECTIONS

Bringing kids to businesses

Seth Kutnick Design Research

Web presence that enables further reflection after sessions

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Exposure Studio: Exposing Youth To Potential Career Opportunities Rapid Prototyping of a New Learning Environement: Implementing The Exposure Studio with Users

STORE FRONT IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN CHICAGO

STUDIO ENTRANCE

IN-STUDIO SPEAKERS

ACCESS TO TOOLS


fall 2008 - present

ACTIVITIES

IN-STUDIO DEMONSTRATIONS

ETHNOGRAPHIC INTERVIEWS

WORKSPACE

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Exposure Studio: Exposing Youth To Potential Career Opportunities

THIS IS JIMMY

WHATEVER MAKES YOU HAPPY.

JIMMY HAS NO IDEA WHAT HE WANTS TO DO WHEN HE GROWS UP.

ER

WY

LA

ER

H

AC

TE

ER

GN

SI

DE

OR

D

S

ES

N

SI

BU

T OC

WHAT DO YOU THINK MOM AND DAD?

HE ASKS HIS PARENTS, BUT THEY ARE NOT MUCH HELP.

G

N

SI

TI

ER

V AD

WHATEVER MAKES MONEY.

S

AT

BE

E

M

WHAT DO YOU GUYS WANT TO DO?

HE ALSO ASKS HIS FRIENDS, BUT THEY ARE A LITTLE

JIMMY IS MORE CONFUSED THAN EVER. HOW CAN PEOPLE BE SO SURE

TOO HELPFUL.

WHAT THEY WANT TO DO, BEFORE EXPERIENCING IT?

Seth Kutnick Design Research

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fall 2008 - present

Guidance Counselor

HIS GUIDANCE COUNSELOR TELLS HIM THAT IT’S NORMAL NOT TO KNOW

JIMMY’S PARENTS ARE MORE THAN HAPPY TO PAY FOR EXPOSURE

WHAT CAREER YOU WANT. HE SUGGESTS EXPOSURE STUDIO WHICH

STUDIO. JUST AS THEY PAYED FOR HIS S.A.T. COURSE, THEY THINK IT’ S

WOULD EXPOSE JIMMY TO MANY DIFFERENT TYPES OF CAREERS.

IMPORTANT FOR JIMMY’S FUTURE.

THROUGH EXPOSURE STUDIO, JIMMY HAS A VARIETY OF EXPERIENCES.

......BUT HE EVENTUALLY FOUND THE CAREER FOR HIM. JIMMY CAN NOW

SOME WERE GOOD, SOME WERE TERRIBLE....

MAKE BETTER DECISIONS ON HIS CAREER PATH.

Seth Kutnick Design Research

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Service Design

The Little Village Project: A Redesign of Public Services on The South Side of Chicago Problem The Institute of Design was approached by the City of Chicago to redesign the city’s existing public and social services in the Little Village community. The neighborhood is located on the south side of Chicago and has the highest population of Latinos in Chicago. The city wanted to know why Little Village residents were not utilizing the city’s public services and how best they could maximize the utilization of these services. We began by immersing ourselves in Little Village by visiting places of business, health clinics, panaderías (bakeries), walking through gang territory, visiting the parks, churches and community centers. We spoke with residents on the street and at bus stops. We gathered artifacts we found at grocery stores, currency exchanges and taquerías.

Solution After an analysis of our research, we generated some initial new concepts for the delivery of public services as well as a new distribution model. It is our hope that this model could be scaled to incorporate into other neighborhoods and cities as well. We then presented these findings and recommendations to the city and are hopeful that many will be implemented in the near future.

Seth Kutnick Design Research

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The Little Village Project: A Redesign of Public Services on The South Side of Chicago Primary Research

Analysis

8 RESIDENT INTERVIEWS, 1 HOUR EACH

COMPOSITE NARRATIVES After extensive interviews and observations, we began to see patterns emerge which we then grouped into composite narrative stories. “accessibility” story

I came to learn english and found out about the computer classes

“credibility” story

“empowerment” story

I really want a better life for my baby

“security” story

FIELD OBSERVATIONS

broken service signs

gang territory

Design Principals When it comes to the utilization of public services in Little Village, our research has shown that four key design principals must be considered.

credibility

accessibility

• service workers should be empathetic and speak Spanish

• if they don’t have transportation, they will not go

empowerment

safety

• past experience with offerings that turn out to be scams Our initial concepts were later tested with end-users at our front-line workers concept workshop. Constructive feedback was given about these prototypes which we later refined into a new service model package. The front-line workers were able to give us real-life scenarios that they had encountered. We never would’ve received such detailed information without their years of actual experience.

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a lot of these service places have a tendency to get raided

Polish park

WORKSHOP FOR FRONT-LINE WORKERS

Seth Kutnick Design Research

you can’t trust just anyone

• residents want a better life for themselves and their children

• people will utilize multiple services when under one roof

• services will not be utilized if residents feel threatened at all

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spring 2008

Old Service Model park

New Service Model church

centralized hub

library

park

school

church

centralized hub

library

The current model is composed of a centralized hub of services with various smaller service providers (parks, clinics, schools, churches) on the periphery. However, these organizations are not connected in any shape or form. Residents do not know the full spectrum of services that are available. Our proposed new service model (Hub and Spoke) extends existing services and trusted partners from within the Little Village community and builds upon an already successful service model.

school

Trusted Partner comm. org.

Exisiting Service

clinic

comm. org.

The service concepts are based around the design principals (accessibility, credibility, empowerment, and safety) derived from the analysis of our research. By leveraging satellite partnerships with trusted sources such as the local street vendors and organizations like libraries, churches and

clinic

Service Concepts ONE STOP SHOP MODEL

ALTERNATE ROUTE

high schools, laundry mats, bus stops and similar organizations, the centralized-dispersion model addresses issues which have prevented the utilization of public services.

Clinic

Job Training Center ESL Classes

BUS STOP SIGNAGE

INFO. CARITOS ¿Cómo esta tu

¿Cómo LUD?

esta tu

SA-

Nosotros te podemos ayudar a encontrar un mejor trabajo. Teléfo no: 555-1245

Seth Kutnick Design Research

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Product Design

Radio Flyer: How To Enter The Multi-Stage Trike Market? Problem As a Design Researcher, working for a classic iconic American toy company was a fantastic experience. There was virtually no one I encountered who had never heard of Radio Flyer. If they hadn’t, all they needed were three words to remind them; LITTLE - RED - WAGON. Both positive and negative, people always had an opinion about Radio Flyer. The name usually conjures up nostalgic memories from peoples past which can lead to some powerful insights about the brand itself. I worked as a Design Research Intern for Radio Flyer doing ethnographic research with parents and kids. As part of a multi-disciplinary team, we were tasked with performing research to uncover insights for a new multi-stage plastic tricycle.

Solution Traditional design research methods such as interviewing and field observations were used for the majority of the project. After visiting 12 homes, clear patterns were beginning to develop. We were able to provide the product development team and CEO with insights that would eventually lead to viable opportunities in the multi-stage plastic tricycle market. During this process, I informed the team of the idea of the user journey and how the experience with a tricycle is not limited to a kid riding it, but about an entire journey from becoming aware of the trike, to selecting it, to putting it together, and extending it’s use through other modes. Feedback I received said it was very helpful to see this product as a moving artifact through time as part of a the user journey. Seth Kutnick Design Research

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Radio Flyer: How To Enter The Multi-Stage Trike Market? In Home Research FISHER PRICE ROCK, ROLL, & RIDE vs. CURRENT RADIO FLYER TRIKES

10 MOMS, 1 HOUR INTERVIEWS AND OBSERVATIONS

Analysis LIST OF MAJOR INSIGHTS

USER DATA ANALYSIS

Foot to Floor

The Foot to Floor is a much more appropriate precursor to a Tricycle than a Rocker.

Trike with Handle

Solo Trike

Seth Kutnick Design Research

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summer 2008

Recommendations

Further Findings Not only does the Rock, Roll, and Ride enable early entry into the home, but barrs all other similar trikes by fulfilling the same functions.

By identifying key insights and how these insights could lead to opportunities, we were able to make design recommendations based on observable qualitative research.

INSIGHT

OPPORTUNITY

stages trike research:

if the tires are not rubber, they must be plastic

PVC, blow molded HDPE, foam, rubber tread cap‌.

1

Parents break tires down into 2 categories; rubber or plastic, with a general preference for rubber. Attention should be paid to utilizing materials that appear rubber.

User Journey Map

The User Journey map allows us to see the trike as a holistic experience, not just an isolated event, with potential for opportunities at various stages of the user journey. Seth Kutnick Design Research

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Product Design

M Chicago: An Emergency Application For Mobile Devices Problem The 2016 Olympic bid has been a major priority for the City of Chicago. In anticipation, the City’s Department of Innovation reached out to the Institute of Design to design a suite of mobile applications. They were interested in common applications ranging from tickets, maps, entertainment, and emergency. My group was tasked with developing an emergency mobile application for residents and tourists. Although this application may be used in the context of the Olympics, we were also told to think how such an application could be modified or scaled to a more general purpose.

Solution By not having a specific segment of users in mind, we were free to research who we thought would be the best target users to explore during this process. This ambiguity up front allowed us to take a journey with many twists and turns and we ended up designing for a problem that we never even thought of at the start. By reframing the issue of emergency, we were able to inform the city about other potential emergency situations that were being unmet. Instead of trying to replace a national institution like 911, we found that the best opportunity for the city would be to focus on ambiguous situations that usually go unreported.

Seth Kutnick Design Research

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M Chicago: An Emergency Application For Mobile Devices Framing The Problem

User Segmentation and Analysis

SECONDARY RESEARCH

FOCUS ON ACCESS

PEOPLE

Crime

Emergency

Health

OBJECTS

ENVIRONMENTS

MESSAGES

-residents/visitors -male/female -youth/adult/elderly victim, culprit

-mobile device -non-mobile device -street lamps, anything that casts light really -other people -on person, jewlery, clothes

-not restricted to night -alone -safe/unsafe --dark vs. light -familiar/unfamiliar --anywhere?

-groups (large/small) -criminals/terrorists -disabled/unable to dial -users without phones or limited capabilities -authorities/police/emergency services

-loudspeakers, sirens -megaphones landlines -life-alert systems -pacemakers -monitors -kiosks, billboards -walkietalkies, CB radio

-stadiums -train cars -highways -houses -high-rises -airports -banks -stadiums -hospitals -residences -sidewalk -transportation -streets, buildings, lake/river -Lonely street in the night/day -Snowing -Slippery Foot paths -Busy street -People continously moving -Low reception area -Parking lot -Shops

-victim -patient -People near by -Co-passengers -Paramedics

-Personal Mobile -Diary / Contacts -Public Telephone -Mobile of Co-passengers -Laptop -Medicine Kit -Patroling cars -Ambulance -cabs

UNDERSTANDING USERS AND CAPABILITIES

-neighbors exchanging info. after the fact, not in realtime -caps, neighborhood watch -personal attack alarm -- life alert, solution for no mobile device, even though it is a mobile device -onstar -bluetooth panic button -safety/evacuation instruc-refuge, preparation, escape tions -pay phones -warnings -safety, security, escape, -negotiations resolution -request for help, survival -alternate PSA channels (tv, instructions radio, web) -limited access to information -Public Transport -instructions, notification of --People near by violation, internal coordination

-Falling Ice -Emergency Number -List in the phone -Low Battery Indi-cation -Street indications -Details of the current location.

Nearly all

resident Phone Only

Text Enabled

Web Enabled

-Public Telephone -ATM Machine -Maps

Some

Text Enabled

victim

solo commuter

Cubs game attendee

Resident solo

group

solo

group

Olympic attendee

Tourist

train riders

no access

witness

EMERGENCIES REQUIRE DESIGN FOR

FOCUS ON THE VICTIM

THE LOWEST COMMON DENOMINATOR.

AND WITNESS

IT’S NOT ABOUT TECHNOLOGY, BUT INVOLVEMENT

USER TASK ANALYSIS - WITNESS

Unmet Areas

tourist Kiosk Style Phone Only

full access

SERVICES

-crime happens -some preventative measures, but no real options --message sent by menacing subject and defenseless victim -its hard to even move to a “safe” neighborhood

FOCUS ON INVOLVEMENT

Web Enabled

Crime

Scenario

Subtask

Influences

Pain Points

Functions

Several El riders witness mugging from platform and passing train

• Calling for help • Identifying perpetrator

• Tragedy of the commons • Fear of involvement

• Anxiety of deciding to call or not • possible lack of helpful information

• Encourage reporting • Assist caller in documenting incident

Kiosk Style

WITNESSES

Emergency

VICTIM

Health

WITNESSES

WHAT SHOULD WE FOCUS ON? ACCESS, SCENARIOS, VISITORS... Seth Kutnick Design Research

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PEOPLE ACT BASED ON PERCEIVED LEVEL OF INTENSITY

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spring 2007

Primary Research: Early Rapid Prototyping SIMULATING EMERGENCY SITUATIONS: WILL PEOPLE TEXT IN AN EMERGENCY?

Respond to all 3 scenarios by clicking on the phone. Click Scenario 1 to begin.

Address/Intersection:

Brief Description:

Additional Details:

Thank You for using M Chicago Safety. Help is on the way.

Exit

Seth Kutnick Design Research

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M Chicago: An Emergency Application For Mobile Devices Testing Results CLARITY- people will always call in a clear emergency FEAR- fear of possible retaliation or revenge

Participants were very adamant that if they perceived the event to be a clear emergency, they would call 911 every time. Even avid texters still preferred to call rather than text. Often participants expressed that they may be fearful of reporting either because of possible retaliation or because they do not want to tie up the lines in case there is a real clear emergency.

AMBIGUITY- not sure of situation CLOGS- do not want to tie up lines

don’t try to replace 911

FEEDBACK- users want immediate feedback

Project Reframe: From Emergencies to Ambiguous Situations WITNESS SEGMENTATION : FOCUS ON HESITATION clear emergency

fear of retaliation

confident callers

fearful

fearless

I’m not sure

in a real emergency, not text how do I know my message was received? i would hate to call for no reason

over reporters

ambiguous emergency

Seth Kutnick Design Research

I will always call

sometimes I don’t know if it’s a real emergency

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How Can We Encourage Fearful People to Report in Ambiguous Situations? 25


spring 2008

Revised Interface From Testing Results

M CHICAGO SHOULD........ NOT ADD MORE OPTIONS FOR 911 ADDRESS SITUATIONS THAT FALL BETWEEN 911 AND 311 CREATE WAYS FOR PEOPLE TO REPORT AMBIGUOUS SITUATIONS.

Seth Kutnick Design Research

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Product Design

Flying With Kids: Examining In Flight Entertainment For Boeing Problem As growing trends in technology offer new potential for in-flight entertainment, Boeing sought help from the Institute of Design to differentiate itself in this changing industry. Boeing’s Commercial Aircraft Division wanted information on the future of in-flight entertainment. Given the multiple restraints associated with in-flight entertainment and the competitive environment of the industry, Boeing is searching for it’s role in this emerging service.

Solution After identifying parents traveling with young kids as extreme users, we were able to research their behavior, motivations, and needs in the hopes of finding meaningful insights. We were quickly able to reframe the issue from focusing just on the in-flight experience to focusing more on the entire journey of the passenger experience; from packing, to getting to the airport, navigating through the airport, activities on the plane, and exiting the plane. Systematic concepts were than generated based on design principals uncovered during the research. By identifying needs of extreme users, these findings could eventually be scaled and refined to design for other passenger segments as well.

Seth Kutnick Design Research

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Flying With Kids: Examining In Flight Entertainment For Boeing Background and Secondary Research Users were assessed based on their frequency of travel. Focusing on extreme users, the flyers that truly put the system to the test would give us the richest data. We selected parents traveling with small children on mid-haul flights. By focusing on this audience we felt that we could get a clear picture of larger travel issues that we couldn’t have gleaned from the everyday traveler.

Identify the IFE needs for parents traveling with small children on flights taking 2 to 5 hours.

lead travelers: business travelers kids of separated parents

extreme travelers: elderly handicapped travelers parents traveling with small children

non travelers

Primary Research

Design Principals

User Interviews, Photo Journaling, and Expert Interviews

“THE DVD PLAYER IS A MUST, WE NEVER TRAVEL WITHOUT IT” “MY KIDS NEED MULTIPLE ACTIVITIES”

PICKING TIMES

KIDS NEED MULTIPLE ACTIVITIES PARENTS WOULD LIKE DOWN TIME

Seth Kutnick Design Research

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KIDS ARE THE PRIORITY

KIDS NEED TO MOVE AROUND

INTERACTION WITH OTHER KIDS IS IMPORTANT

PACKING IS A STRATEGY FOR PARENTS

TRYING NOT TO DISTURB OTHERS

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spring 2009

Structured Concept Generation

DESIGN PRINCIPALS

kid finder while picking seats

CONSTRAINTS DESIGN PRINCIPALS

airplane jungle gym at gate

USER JOURNEY

welcome/activity pack on plane tour of plane before flight

Systematic Concept Generation Based on the design principles we developed systematic concepts throughout the entire travel journey from planning to arrival addressing the entertainment needs of parents and small children.

Familiar Comforts - storage unit/play surface - adjustable lowering tray - preloaded kids IFE Seth Kutnick Design Research

Kid Social System - airplane jungle gym - kid-specific booking - Interactive pull down tray

+ Innovation Strategy

Parent Focused - activity pack - kids club in airport - kid-specific booking

Educational System - tour of plane before takeoff - kid-friendly booking - books about travel at gate 30


Product Design

Our Pets vs. Our Furniture: Must We Choose? Problem The pet care industry is one of the largest growing markets in the U.S. with approximately 69 million pets in homes. This market attracts many large and small businesses; from large corporations like PetSmart to small “puppy boutiques� in local neighborhoods. Pets are always an interesting topic as it conjures up feelings and emotions in people similar to that of only actual family members. The goal of this project was to apply user-centered methods to open opportunities in the pet care industry. An initial hypothesis was formed based on current trends in the industry. However, soon after the research began, the focus was switched away from the hypothesis to another more relevant trend we had witnessed.

Solution As pets have taken on a more dominant role in peoples lives, it is the pet owner’s furniture that has suffered as a result. Pet owners want to share their furniture with their pets, but do not want to have it ruined in the process by chewing, drool, hair, blood, and other messes. An Initial concept for a solution includes a partnership with existing furniture stores to sell pet friendly furniture.

Seth Kutnick Design Research

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Our Pets vs. Our Furniture: Must We Choose? Ethnographic Research: Observing Owners and Pets A mixed sample of participants were interviewed and observed in their homes and interacting with their pets. Different trends were witnessed, including the fact that many pet owners not only allowed, but encouraged their pets to come on their furniture. It also became apparent that the majority of participants took some temporary precautionary measures before allowing their pets on the furniture; usually in the form of a blanket or towel. However, there were some cases where the precautionary measures were much more permanent than temporary.

Real Life Situations Aileen and Bob have theater style chairs in their living room. The middle of the three seats has a couple of blankets strategically tucked in and around it. When Aileen was asked about this seat, she simply replied “Oh, that’s Dylan’s seat”. At the time, Aileen and Bob were not even using the living room. Maria loves to have Roger sleep on the bed with her at night, but she is not a fan of the hair and drool that he leaves behind on her nice bedding. Maria is forced to put an additional “doggy sheet” on top of her bed protecting her sheets and bedding. This “doggy sheet” is usually changed a few times a week. Justin does not let Arlo on the new furniture, but Arlo is rather sneaky and tries to get on the furniture anyway. There is not much Justin can do during the day while he is gone to discourage Arlo from getting on the furniture. Justin does not want to keep him a cage, but he is also concerned about his new couch and bed.

Seth Kutnick Design Research

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“NO, HE IS NOT ALLOWED ON THE FURNITURE, BUT I CAN’T WATCH HIM EVERY SECOND””

“I WANT HER TO SLEEP IN THE BED WITH ME, BUT I CAN’T DEAL WITH THE HAIR“ “OF COURSE I LET MAX ON THE COUCH......AFTER I PUT A SHEET DOWN “

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spring 2007

Analysis

Implications and Opportunities for Petsmart

observation

implication • owners want to share their furniture with their dogs

couch cushion covered with blankets and bungee cords

dog gets on couch despite owners disaproval

seperate sheet on bed to protect from dog

temporary measures are taken to protect furniture

opportunity • pet friendly furniture

• partnership with existing furniture stores

• there is a real need to protect furniture from pets

Our research has shown that there is indeed an opportunity for pet supply stores such as Petsmart to offer “pet friendly” furniture. While traditional “pet furniture” still exists, there is a demographic of pet owners who choose to share their furniture with their pets. These Pet owners will go to great lengths to protect their furniture to enable their pets to sit with them. Traditionally, consumers are not used to purchasing their furniture at a pet supplies store such as Petsmart. The best place to began to encourage people to buy pet-friendly furniture is the same place where they have previously bought furniture; a furniture store. A pet supplies store such as Petsmart could team with Ikea Furniture stores to provide customers with the first ever line of pet friendly furniture. In time, Petsmart may develop their own independent petfriendly furniture stores as well.

After clustering and finding themes within our observations, we than determined the implication of the observation (what does this mean?) and finally came up with a viable opportunity based on that implication.

APPRO

Case Study

Seth Kutnick Design Research

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option 1 - “Petsmart Approved” department within Ikea

$699.99

Zach is a 35 year old dog owner who recently decided to purchase a new couch. He heard from a co-worker that Ikea was having a sale, so he headed there over the weekend to see what they had. Now Zach had been to Ikea before, but when he walked in he saw something that had never seen before; a big sign which read “Petsmart Approved”. Intrigued, Zach inquired about the sign. It turns out that Petsmart had teamed up with Ikea to offer a line of highly durable yet stylish furniture, specifically for pet owners. As a dog owner, surely if he had to pick between pet friendly and unfriendly, he would pick the friendly. Zach never thought of purchasing a pet friendly couch until he saw the opportunity presented to him at an existing furniture store.

VED

APPROVED option 2 - “Petsmart Approved” Price/Info. tags

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Product Design

Immersive Bathrooms: A Smart Multi-Functional Bathtub Problem The theme of this project was to explore different means by which the bathroom could have more of an experiential existence as compared to our functional yet utilitarian bathrooms. After all, we spend a good majority of our time in the bathroom, yet it is constantly the smallest room in our homes.

Solution We focused our experiential design on the bathtub. Our initial inspiration were beanbag chairs and pit art - basically a pixilated surface that takes the shape of anything that applies pressure to it. We envisioned a situation in which the user could be virtually enveloped by the bathtub for a total immersive experience. This quickly spawned to other modes and eventually a seat, All of these modes combined proved to be very useful and elegant. After numerous renderings and scenario planning, we built a full size prototype of the bathtub. It included a real graphical touch interface and simulated the various modes of use.

Seth Kutnick Design Research

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The Immersive Bathroom: A Smart Multi-Functional Bathtub Inspiration

User Scenario Research SCENARIO MATRIX flat/ shower

sit

bath

massage waterfall personal

flat/shower sit bath massage waterfall personal SIT MODE TO BATH MODE

sitting

user presses recline button user presss recline again to confirm shape changes recline position

Seth Seth B. B. Kutnick Kutnick Design Design Research Research

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spring 2008

Preliminary Renderings

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Final Prototype

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Design Research Methodology

Rethinking Healthcare: Prototyping New Participatory Research Methods Problem As part of the Rethinking Healthcare Initiative at the Institute of Design, The goal of this project was to prototype different forms of data collection methods for the healthcare industry, which could also then be applied to other industries. While traditional user-centered design research has proven very effective for qualitative studies, newer methods are emerging which brings the user into the design process in a more casual yet richer form.

Solution Part of the problem with a traditional design research interview, is that the participant is usually somewhat guarded due to the formal nature of the method. This is especially true when dealing with a private subject matter such as health. Our initial thought was to engage the participants with research methods in a casual manner. If we could get the participants to let their guard down in a more casual environment, than we were more likely to get deeper more powerful responses. We prototyped our methods based on casual games and activities that participants could play and which they could interact. Due to the casual nature of the environment, participants began freely sharing personal experiences and insights which may have not been possible by traditional design research methods.

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Rethinking Healthcare: Prototyping New Participatory Research Methods Participatory Methods LANDSCAPE GAME

GIFT MAKING GAME

The Landscape game gives the participant an informal and comfortable outlet to share their thoughts and feelings on a personal subject.

The gift making game utilizes participants information and memories of a past health experience to educate or inform someone else.

1. Participants sat around the game board (target) where there were 50 photos for them to consider in response to directives about health and wellness. For example the first directive was “Choose an image that represents your experience of healthcare.”

1. Participants were asked to create a “gift” for someone who has been through a health situation similar to one they’ve been through.

2. Participants took three turns selecting an image and placing it strategically on the game board according to how strongly they felt about the image and what it represents. Images placed near the center of the board were most important. 3. They described why they selected each image and why they placed it where they did. After the third round of picture selection, participants had the opportunity to reconsider the position of their selected photos on the game board. Seth Kutnick Design Research

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2. Materials we provided to do this included photographs from magazines, construction paper, colored pens, small boxes, scissors, glue sticks, and ribbons. 3. Participants had approximately 40 minutes to construct their gifts, and then each had some time to describe their gift to the group. 4. The activity proved to be very useful by keeping the term “gift” open. As a result, gifts ranged from letters, poems, doctor recommendations, websites, and good health insurance.

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spring 2008

Participatory Methods PHOTO JOURNAL

HEALTH JOURNEY ACTIVITY

This is a self-documentation method that allows a view into the subjects’ life in the least invasive way. This method is useful when the researcher feels that their presence may have an impact on the results.

This hands on storytelling activity trys to understand how participants view health (short-term vs. long-term view) and to understand choices or decisions made at points in the health journey.

1. The research participants are provided with a disposable camera and instructed to take photos of all of the people, objects, environments, messages, media and services that they interact with while doing things that make them healthy.

1. Participants were asked to create a view of their health care journey using materials provided.

2. The research team will collect the cameras and place the photos in a standardized notebook, or album. This album will serve as the prompt and guide for a 2 hour in-home interview. 3. The interview will ask questions regarding the activities taking place in the photos. If possible, the interviewer will ask the interviewee to show the artifacts or spaces in the picture in for better clarification.

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2. They were asked to think about their current health status and past points in their life that have affected that current status. They were encouraged to think about specific events that altered their journey and show what and who affected decisions surrounding those events by using materials provided. 3. They could also create their “future journey” and represent a path to their ideal health status.

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Design Research Methodology

Smokers vs. Non-Smokers: Can’t We All Just Get Along? Problem Due to various restrictions on smoking, we could assume society would inevitably ban smoking altogether. This was my thinking until I started to look at smoking in a historical context. The truth is, the perception of smoking has constantly changed and fluctuated throughout time. To base my rational, that smoking would eventually be banned, on current negative perceptions, turned out to be a narrow way of thinking. Having witnessed much animosity between smokers and non-smokers, I wanted to examine their interactions and look into insights as to how they interact the way they do. I set out to observe the opinions, interactions, and overall perceptions between smokers and non-smokers.

Solution The goal of this research was not the end insights, recommendations or concepts, but more about applying appropriate types of research and analysis methods based on the topic. Some results were expected; non-smokers did not like being exposed to second hand smoke. Some results were surprising; the fact that many smokers were actually sympathetic to non-smokers was something I had not considered. They felt that instead of enjoying life, that non-smokers were more prone to constantly worrying about the ramifications of their life choices, instead of enjoying life. As a Design Researcher, this project really opened my eyes to the importance and necessity of picking the right method to answer a particular research question.

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Smokers vs. Non-Smokers: Can’t We All Just Get Along? Secondary Research: Era Analysis

Primary Research SELF-DOCUMENTATION

With current restrictions on smoking, we could assume that smoking will be further restricted or banned; however, because the perception of smoking has constantly changed over time, we cannot make such an assumption

repurposed object

S T L U S E R D MIXE

FIELD OBSERVATIONS ERA 1

ERA 2 When 18th amendment was passed, many tobacco restrictions and bans were also put into place. Like alcohol, tobacco was seen as a sinful, debaucherous act.

PERCEPTION Tobacco was originally used for medical purposes

MEDICAL

RESTRICTIONS

Native Americans used tobacco in curing wounds, swellings, coughs, tooth-ache, rheumatism, and stomach disorders

SMOKING WAS...

1909: 15 states have passed legislation banning the sale of cigarettes initially prompted by church

N/A Tobacco was often used as currency and gifts

INDUSTRY/ ECONOMY

1912: HEALTH: First strong link made between lung cancer and smoking. In a monograph, Dr. Isaac Adler is the first to strongly suggest that lung cancer is related to smoking.

ERA 3

PRESENT

WORKAROUND

”You ask me what we need to win this war. I answer tobacco as much as bullets.” “Tobacco is as indispensable as the daily ration; we must have thousands of tons without delay.”

1936: American Journal of Obstetrics and Bynecology publishes an article raising concerns about the effect of smoking on unborn children

Nixon Administration Surgeon General Dr. Jesse Steinfeld is fired after angering tobacco executives by urging restrictions on secondhand smoke.

1906: BUSINESS: Brown and Williamson Tobacco Company is formed

Smoking-related diseases cause an estimated 440,000 American deaths each year.

REPURPOSED OBJECT

Smoking costs the United States over $150 billion annually in health care costs. 1973 Arizona becomes the first state in the current wave of smoking bans to pass a comprehensive law restricting smoking in public places

USER TORTURE

Tobacco executives testifying before Congress in 1994

1908 Children Act prohibits the sales of tobacco to under 16.

GOOD

BAD

USER AND NON-USER INTERVIEWS GOOD AGAIN

BAD AGAIN

GOOD AGAIN? STILL BAD?

non smoker

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smoker

ex smoker

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fall 2008

Analysis: Unexpected Composite Narratives

I KIND OF FEEL BAD FOR NON-SMOKERS

I REALLY WANT TO QUIT AND CONSTANTLY STRUGGLE

I JUST FEEL BAD FOR SMOKERS...BEING ADDICTED TO SOMETHING LIKE THAT

I ACTUALLY DON’T MIND THE SMOKING BAN

MY MOM SMOKED FOR YEARS AND NOW SHE MUST SPEAK WITH A DEVICE HOW CAN DO THEY DO’ THAT TO THEIR BODIES

Insights and Opportunities

Top 5 Findings

Some results were surprising, the fact that many smokers were actually sympathetic to non-smokers was not something that we had considered. They felt that instead of enjoying life, that non-smokers were constantly worried about the ramifications of their life choices instead of just enjoying their life.

• Smokers are sympathetic to non-smokers

In further research, I would like to explore and observe more of the interactions within the two individual groups. I would also like to test the idea of an ex-smoker as a possible mediator role which may have the potential to bridge the gap. Seth Kutnick Design Research

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• Non-smokers view smoking as an act of negligence • Smokers view smoking as an act of indulgence • Most non-smokers have a passionate opposition to smoking • Both groups generally misunderstand each other

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Design Research Methodology

Trying To Wake Up Starbucks: Preparing For The Research Problem The goal of this week long project was to formulate a research plan relating to Starbucks. Starbucks was chosen as a topic due to project members familiarity with the company. This prevented the need for extensive secondary research. This research plan did not focus on the methods of research, but rather what we wanted to find out, what users we felt we needed to get this information from, and how we would go about finding these users. riate approp method

Solution

multiary disciplin

After performing some secondary research, we determined that our focus was going to be on revitalizing Starbucks as a novel experience. We set out to formulate our research questions and we picked the appropriate users who we felt would help us answer these questions. We drafted a screener for our recruiting process and an interview protocol. The Interview protocol questions were formulated based on our overall research questions which address novel and coffee experience.

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Trying To Wake Up Starbucks: Preparing For The Research Secondary User Research

Picking a Focus and User Segment

source: marketresearch.com

Key Demographic Characteristics of Starbucks Customers

Index

18 - 24 years old

146

25 - 34 years old

137

? T E G R A

T O T WHO

Live in the Pacific States College Student

PARTICIPANTS • 12 participants • 18 - 30 year olds

193

• 1/2 Starbucks and

171

1/2 non-starbucks

Graduate Degree

190

Manager/Financial Operations

163

Starbucks needs to differentiate itself in an ever growing coffee market. Our initial goal is to convert starbucks and non-starbucks, once in a while coffee drinkers, to regular starbucks drinkers extreme coffee drinkers

drinkers • once in a while coffee drinkers

Professional/Technical occupation 159 as: Starbucks customers are 45% more * Read likely to be between the ages of 18 and 24

Selected Attitudes/Behaviors Regarding Food of Frequent Starbucks Customers

Index

E R A E S L E T A WH ? O T N I THEY

Seek organic/natural food

131

Enjoy foreign food

190

Like healthy fast food trend

141

Usually first to try new foods

126

Like to try new Drinks

158

Eat several small meals in a day

119

*

non-starbucks drinkers

starbucks drinkers

Novelty as the focus Starbucks customers frequently exhibit novelty behaviors in and outside of Starbucks; however, the Starbucks experience is no longer novel.

once in a while coffee drinkers

extreme: 5 cups a week regular- 3-4 cups a week once in a while: 1-2 cups a week

Read as: Frequent Starbucks customers are 31% more likely to seek/organic than the average customer

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spring 2008

Research Questions 1. What is the coffee experience like? 2. What is a novel experience like?

How many times a week do you engage in the following activities ? Activity Eating out

Frequency

Drinking coffee

1 -2 times a week Starbucks, Dunkin, Note Preference, McDonalds etc CONTINUE

Sample Screener and Interview Questions

Watching movies

SCREENER

Working out

Activity Eating out

Frequency

Drinking coffee

1 -2 times a week Starbucks, Dunkin, Note Preference, McDonalds etc CONTINUE

Places

Action

Places

Action

Other

Watching movies

1. Choose the pictures that most resonates with you.

Working out Other

2. Previous studys have shown that people who work in a particular field may have different attitudes towards products than do others. For this reason, we need to know where each income earner in your household works and exactly what they do for that company 3. When research studies are conducted, it is sometimes important for us to talk to individuals who have already participated in a prior research study because they have experience talking about certain topics.. Sometimes it is important that we do not talk to the people.

INTERVIEW

4. Can you describe a fearful situation?

5. What makes it fearful? 1. Choose the pictures that most resonates with you. 6. When was the last time you participated in a study 7. Are you available for a home interview?

2. Why did you choose them ? (we will look out for words used ......exciting, novel, new, ....) 3. Tell me about something that’s __________________ which you did recently. What made it _____________________ for you. (use the same words as 3) 4. What do you like about this place 5. When was the last time you had a surprising experience? Can you tell me a little about it? 6. Are surprising experiences something you enjoy? 7. Can you describe a fearful situation? 8. What makes it fearful?

2. Why did you choose them ? (use this answer to fill in #3 ....)

novel experience

3. Tell me about something that’s __________________ which you did recently. What made it _____________________ for you. (use the same words as 3)

9. Would you consider yourself an exciting person 10. What about compared to your friends.

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NOW

NEXT


Design Research Methodology

Design Research and Innovation Strategy: The Way I See It Problem The challenge of having multiple great professors and experiences is that sometimes the theories you encounter, conflict with one another. I learned early in my psychology education the importance of having a point of view. As I do not see a future for myself without design research, ethnography, and innovation strategy, I thought I better get a point of view.

y

empath

y

empath minimize ence

riate es approp pr method

Solution

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tive

percep

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acture • manuf ting • marke te • innova

quant. ll as we e Effectiv

Design multirch ary disciplinResea

riate approp method

In order to better understand the process and to inform others, I have created a few frameworks compiled from my undergraduate psychology experience, my professional ethnographic research experience, and lastly, from my time at the Institute of Design.

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percept

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ENT

IMPLEM

G

TESTIN

quant. as well SEARCH

multi- RE y ar disciplin

ary • second ary • prim

y • usabilit ck • feedba ent • refinem

??

WHAT??

SIS

SYNTHE

types

IS

ANALYS

ts/proto • concep y • strateg

ts

ine insigh

determ

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Design Research and Ethnography: My Point of View “Ask someone to sketch appropriate clothes for a person to go to a concert. Do not specify season, sex, age, venue, or music type. This is the same as asking someone to design something without doing user research”

THE DESIGNER DOES NOT KNOW ALL...

Bill Buxton, Microsoft “If I’d asked people what they wanted, they would have asked for a better horse”

...BUT NEITHER DOES THE USER

Henry Ford

My EDR Framework

Ethnographic Checklist • express ignorance

quanitative

• be courteous yet confident perceptive

Effective Design Research empathy

appropriate method

Design Research Strategy research question?

• what’s not being said? • what’s missing?

appropriate user

multidisciplinary

• look for the Conifer 6 (confusion, barriers, repurposed objects, user-torture, wear patterns, and workarounds)

type of user?

• bring the client

research method?

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Design Planning and Innovation Strategy: Making Sense of It All

Design Planning and Innovation Strategy • manufacture • marketing • innovate

IMPLEMENT

TESTING

• usability • feedback

• secondary • primary

RESEARCH

• refinement

INTENT??

SYNTHESIS

• concepts/prototypes • strategy

• cluster insights

ANALYSIS

• generate design principals

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thank you


Seth Kutnick, portfolio