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“The Universe is change, our life is what our thoughts make it.� -Marcus Aurelius


Work Selected ACADEMIC

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Dip Haus a Fresh New Cap ‘Stuck in the Middle with You’ Social [me]dia the Overlook Hotel Slick Storage

PROFESSIONAL Yang Pu Lobby Interior SOM, Chicago TOWER C 塔楼C

07 08 09

LOBBY

大堂

Plaza San Pedro Habitan Arquitectos, Barcelona Church of Our Lady Guadalupe 上海杨浦区平凉街道40街坊项目 SHANGHAI YANGPU DISTRICT BLOCK 40 SKIDMORE, OWINGS & MERRILL LLP

JGMA, Chicago

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01 Dip Haus a new Detroit housing strategy

studio | SYSTEMS University of Michigan Fall 2017 Team: Seth Kopka | Matt Weinberg | Chenhao Cao | Irene Yang

Dip Haus is a proposal for a new midrise housing project located on two sites at the corners of E. Jefferson Avenue and Joseph Campau in the Lafayette Park neighborhood of Detroit. The project is sighted along one of the new “green fingers” put forward in SOM’s 2015 master pan for the city. The plan proposes a number of green fingers moving inland from the Detroit riverfront as a series of parks and bio swales that would filter run off from the city as it makes its way towards the river front and act as new anchor points for communities in east Detroit. The primary focus of the project was to activate the green finger as a locus of both residential and community activity, as well as providing new and exciting residential projects for the increasing number of new arrivals to the city of Detroit. Dip Haus includes 247 units ranging from studio apartments targeted at young professionals, one, two, and three-bedroom units for families and empty nesters, as well as townhouse apartments for single families. Dip Haus is aligned to be parallel to Joseph Campau rather than E Jefferson causing the building to pull away from the street creating more public space at the street level along Jefferson. This in combination with a 60-foot setback on the northside of the site as well as by kinking the building in towards its center along Jos. Campau give the intersection of the two streets more of a character of a public space and pedestrian thoroughfare rather than the intersection that exists there today.

The project which is intended to be a pilot makes use of a nontraditional building form and new materials in an effort to explore the new types of housing that could help to make Detroit the next city to move to. The two buildings roof lines slope towards one another in an effort to make the entirety of the site read and feel like one cohesive space. On the far end the project is anchored by a 12-story tower providing views downtown, towards the river, Belle Isle, and inland towards Mies’ iconic Lafayette park towers. The building is assembled using load bearing CLT construction which allows for quicker and cheaper construction. Additionally, the cellular nature of the structural system lends itself well to housing, creates homey interior spaces, as well as lending itself well to panelized façade systems. The southern building which situates itself around a central semi-public courtyard makes use of two separate façade systems. The exterior is clad in Zinc metal panels which fit into the industrial character of the area while the facades facing the central courtyard are made with a wooden louvre system which not only shows off the structure of the building but also create a more intimate and private feeling within the project. Finally, the building is broken up into for separate structures within one with each part gaining its own address making the project feel more like a community rather than simply a building.


100’

60’

sites oriented to ‘green finger’

‘green finger’ connection to housing

hierarchy of spacial design

287 Jos. Campau

100º

297 Jos. Campau

125º 100º

100º

125º 2730 E. Jefferson

sloped roof highlights new urban axis

parking (cocealed half underground) covered by courtyard

building max height denotes address

tower captures site views

‘green finger’ introduces levels of private + sem-private gardens

two means of egress achieved on every level with horizontal stair

sloped roof directs rainwater towards ‘green finger’

sloped roof brings natural sunlight to courtyard

final massing to engage site

Riverfront

Belle Isle

Downtown Detroit

Green Finger

289 Jos. Campau


southern plot along ‘green-finger’ | headings south towards river


FIGURE GROUND PLAN 1” = 400’


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Ground Floor Plan

ound Floor Plan 10’

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As a hierarchy of private space, the central courtyard acts as a semi-public green space which, although hidden, is still accessible. However, as we move up through the building, semi-private garden spaces are provided between buildings for residents to meet and socialize with their neighbors. Finally, as we move higher up in the building balconies begin to act as private gardens for individual residents.

Level 5 Floor Plan scale: ¹/₃₂” = 1’-0” 0

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Due to the extreme slope of the roof, as a way to provide two means of egress per floor a horizontal run fire stair connects the two vertical fire stairs. Access to this horizontal stair can be found at the end of each hallway which directs occupants down to the clossest vertical egress stair and then out of the building.

Horizontal Egress Diagram

Level 2 Floor Plan scale: ¹/₃₂” = 1’-0” 0

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Larned St

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Woodbridge st

pile foundation to bedrock


Section Detail Key: 01: Velux QPF fixed pan flashed skylight 02: Rheinzink interlocking tile roof panel 03: Sheathing - to wrap perimeter 04: 2” Aluminum gutter 05: Vapor barrior - to wrap around parapet 06: Rheinzink zink parapet cap - to match facade 07: 4” Rigid insulation 08: 5-ply CLT panel - 7.5”

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09: 3-ply CLT panel - 4.5” 10: Vapor barrier 11: Rheinzink reveal zink facade panel 12: Rheinzink zink flashing - to match facade 13: 2” Air gap 14: Exterior microshade 15: Operable double-glaze window - wood frame inset 01 02 03 04 05

16: Wood baseboard 17: 4” Screed 18: 1/2” Radiant pipe 19: 2” Rigid insulation 20: 4” Steel angle mounting plate

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ROOF 100’-0”

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LEVEL 7 93’-0”

21: Rainwater gutter 22: 6” Poured concrete slab 23: 6” Screed 24: 2” Rigid insulation 25: 3” French drain 26: Concrete pile foundation - to bedrock

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81’-0”

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27: 1” Aluminum gutter 28: 3” Poured concrete slab 29: Sliding track system - according to Powerwood 30: 8” deep Wood louver 31: Louvre track tie back 32: 1/2” Tempered glass 33: 1.5” Steel tube 34: 2” Steel pipe 35: Aluminum Double-glazed sliding door 36: Wood cladding 37: Wood block tie in 38: Aluminum frame double glazed window

LEVEL 5

69’-0”

LEVEL 4

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45’-0”

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LEVEL 1 21’-0”

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GROUND FLOOR 0’-0”

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Exterior Facade Elevation + Section SCALE: 1/2” = 1’-0”

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Jos. Campau

Cross Section

scale: ¹/₃₂” = 1’-0” 0

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Section Detail Key: 01: Velux QPF fixed pan flashed skylight 02: Rheinzink interlocking tile roof panel 03: Sheathing - to wrap perimeter 04: 2” Aluminum gutter

38

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05: Vapor barrior - to wrap around parapet 06: Rheinzink zink parapet cap - to match facade 07: 4” Rigid insulation 08: 5-ply CLT panel - 7.5”

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09: 3-ply CLT panel - 4.5” 10: Vapor barrier 11: Rheinzink reveal zink facade panel 12: Rheinzink zink flashing - to match facade 13: 2” Air gap 14: Exterior microshade 15: Operable double-glaze window - wood frame inset

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02 03 04 05 06 ROOF 112’-0”

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16: Wood baseboard 17: 4” Screed 18: 1/2” Radiant pipe 19: 2” Rigid insulation 20: 4” Steel angle mounting plate

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LEVEL 7 93’-0”

21: Rainwater gutter 22: 6” Poured concrete slab 23: 6” Screed 24: 2” Rigid insulation 25: 3” French drain 26: Concrete pile foundation - to bedrock

LEVEL 6

81’-0”

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27: 1” Aluminum gutter 28: 3” Poured concrete slab 29: Sliding track system - according to Powerwood 30: 8” deep Wood louver 31: Louvre track tie back 32: 1/2” Tempered glass 33: 1.5” Steel tube 34: 2” Steel pipe 35: Aluminum Double-glazed sliding door 36: Wood cladding 37: Wood block tie in 38: Aluminum frame double glazed window

34 32 33

LEVEL 5 69’-0”

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57’-0”

LEVEL 3

45’-0”

LEVEL 2

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LEVEL 1 21’-0”

GROUND FLOOR 5’-0”

Courtyard Facade Elevation + Section SCALE: 1/2” = 1’-0”

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THREE BEDROOM PLAN 1/4”=1’

STUDIO PLAN 1/4”=1’

DUPLEX UNIT FIRST FLOOR 1/4”=1’

ONE BEDROOM PLAN 1/4”=1’

DUPLEX UNIT SECOND FLOOR 1/4”=1’

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02 Fresh New Cap a proposition for a new Arroyo capping strategy

studio | PROPOSITIONS University of Michigan Spring 2016 A Fresh New Cap is an Architectural proposal aimed to rethink current capping strategies for large water channels— commonly known as Arroyos—that run throughout the Colombian city of Barranquilla. Barranquilla is the fourth largest city in Colombia (following Medallín, Bogatá, and Cali) and annually hosts the second largest Carnivál celebration in the world. Due to the city’s adjacency to the Caribbean Sea and the Magdalena River—which runs deep into Colombian inlands—the city is vital for commercial trade. The city of Barranquilla, established in 1813, was built along a steep topography that sloped towards the Magdalena River. As the city developed through Modernity it—like many other cities of the time— deployed a concrete paving strategy based around the automobile. During the wet seasons, roughly from May to October, the overabundance of concrete surfaces, coupled with the steep slope of the natural topography, leads to sever and in some cases deadly flash flooding. In recent years a new Mayor, Alejandro Char, has been developing plans and allocating resources to rebuild the city’s infrastructure—especially in regards

to dangerous Arroyos. The city of Barranquilla has already begun investing millions of dollars in the burying of massive culverts and industrial drainage pipes which are then (as they historically do) paved over with concrete. The largest and most dangerous Arroyo in Barranquilla is the Rebolo Arroyo which spans a distance of 5,758m in length, 386ha in area, and (during the wet season) has a flow rate of 105m3. Under the current plan of the Barranquillan municipality, only 50% of the Rebolo Arroyo will receive aid; while, the poorer neighborhoods closer to the river (and therefore in more danger of flash flooding) are left with the current concrete water channel that physically and socially divides neighborhoods. What a Fresh New Cap aims to do is draw attention to current methods and trends used to ‘cap’ an Arroyo, and make claim that by spending a small portion of infrastructural money in areas that suffer from blight, crime, and poverty, the city can begin to celebrate the Arroyo and infill the ‘dead space’ above the water channel with architecture that connects citizens and creates community.


HISTORY OF THE ARROYO The Arroyo is a naturally formed water channel that evolved in the terrain over time. It was a naturally formed artery that carried storm water down to the Magdalena river. As the city of Barranquilla began to grow in the early 1800s clusters of towns began to naturally form around Arroyos due to the protection they provided from dangerous flash flooding. As the city continued to grow, many of the Arroyos were paved over to meet automotive demands, which in turn lead to further issues regarding urban flooding. The city met this issue with various installations of water channels that ultimately divided the city more than protected it. Currently, the city of Barranquilla has begun investing millions of dollars in an attempt to bury these water channels.

EVOLUTION EVOLUTION OF OF THETHE ARROYOS: ARROYOS:

Research Team: Seth Kopka | Daniel Smith | Jared Monce | Daniel Clunis

FLASH FLOODING IS

i. NATURALLY i. NATURALLY FORMED FORMED WATER WATER CHANNELS CHANNELS

ii. NEIGHBORHOODS ii. NEIGHBORHOODS DEVELO DE PROTECTION PROTECTION

iv. PAVING iv. PAVING INCREASES INCREASES CITY FLOODING CITY FLOODING

v. CHANNEL INSERTION TO A v. CHANNEL INSERTION


COMMON IN URBAN CENTER

ODS EVELOP DEVELOP ALONG ALONG FOR FOR

TERRAIN ANALYSIS

DANIEL SMITH, DANIEL CLUNIS, JARED MONCE

iii. PAVED iii. PAVED TO MEET TO MEET AUTOMOTIVE AUTOMOTIVE DEMAND DEMAND

NRTION TO ALLEVIATE TO ALLEVIATE FLOODING FLOODING vi. BURY vi. BURY PIPINGPIPING TO RECLAIM TO RECLAIM SPACESPACE

ARROYO ARROYO ANALYSIS ANALYSIS

DANIELDANIEL SMITH, SMITH, DANIELDANIEL CLUNIS,CLUNIS, JARED MONCE JARED MONCE


Currently open Arroyos divide communities and strongly limit circulation

Phase 2: Insert the culturally resilient ‘corner stores’ / local business at new roadway intersections to draw communities

Phase 1: Physically bridge aligned roadways across neighborhoods

Phase 3: Infill the space between corner stores with new forms of architecture (i.e.: housing)

Housing provides a better opportunity for new symbiotic relationships to occur within communities


GROUND FLOOR PLAN


SECOND FLOOR PLAN


CORNER STORE

LONGITUDINAL SECTION


CORNER STORE


03 ‘Stuck in the Middle with You’ an Ann Arbor middle-school

studio | INSTITUTIONS University of Michigan Fall 2016 Middle School is a time of adolescent growth and social transition. From an academic perspective, students must officially adhere to the strict cadence of the American education system; however, at the same time, deal with a constant battle between social metamorphosis and adolescent puberty. The question begins to surface as to how one could approach a middle school that gears students academically while simultaneously promoting the development of a social self-identity. Programmatically the middle school evolved from a study of segregated masses/linear-bands that intersected to generate moments of activity and freedom. Where students are sorted and separated by grade during the routine academic hours, there are special, denoted moments of break-out space and a large open, free zone for all students to Meet in the Middle. As Ashley steps off the noisy bus on the gloomy Monday morning her anxiety builds. Today is her first day of sixth grade. The downpour of the September rain seems to exemplify the

flutter in her belly. At least, she thinks to herself, I can avoid soggy shoes for the day. The bus sat parked, beneath the hovering mass that was the student’s media center; a shelter for the mass of students that exit the bus and rush towards the front entrance. Ashley is overcome by the large student cliques sitting and forming across the steps of the middle’s public space. She rushes swiftly, head down, past the seventh and eighth graders—who seemed tentimes her size. They all seemed to either be playing foosball, talking loudly, or lounging in beanbag-chairs before the first period bell rang. Ashley scurries up the steps and heads to the sixth-grade wing where she is relieved to find some students her own size. Looking down the sixth-grade hallway she can see rows of classrooms and rows of lockers to one side. To her left she notices with relief the haphazard arrangement of sofas, love seats, and tables—all occupied by her peers. Through the mass of sixth graders Ashley spots Ellie, their eyes meet and a smile breaks across both of their faces. Perhaps the day wont be so bad.


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04 Social [ME] dia a Chicago public library

studio | Architecture design in the City University of Illinois | Urbana-Champaign Spring 2014 Located in Old Town, Chicago, this public library reflects a young and vibrant culture while catering to a tech-savvy new market. With advancements in technology and widespread use of social media, communication and education are more accessible than ever before. Libraries, once a sanctuary of delicate knowledge, are being overshadowed by companies like Google and Yelp. Advancements in smart-phone and tablet technologies are challenging the very definition of a book. The architecture of the New Library must reflect the culture and the time it is built for. Therefore, this Library embraces and encourages new technologies as a medium of spreading knowledge. All texts in the Library are digital. Laptops and tablets can be rented directly from the librarians at any of the marked “Help Desks”. Where the laptops and tablets mustn’t leave the library, the texts can be accessed anytime from anywhere via an online account. A bar-code can be

scanned for a direct download or a serial number will be presented and downloaded through the Library’s website. This notion of the serial number and bar-scanning as a new way of cataloging information was profoundly interesting and was further articulated in the linear steel members of the facade. The facade itself was meant to read conceptually as a bar code; however, not only was it an homage to the work done by Mies Van der Rohe in Chicago but by implementing a vertical louver system on the exterior the library reduced solar heat gain and on-screen glare. Inspired by the inherent open-source technology of the library, the overall layout of the library was meant to remain semi open, becoming more private as one circulates higher in the building. A large void in the center of the structure provides natural light as well as promotes passive learning strategies from surrounding lectures, conversations, and friendly debates.


skeletal structure

interior structure

egress

restroom core elevator core

central circulation


05 the OVERLOOK a Champaign hotel

studio | CAPSTONE Edward C. Earl Prize Winner University of Illinois | Urbana-Champaign Fall 2014 The Overlook hotel. Located at the North-West corner of Champaign’s up-and-coming downtown district, the structure stands a tall frame for residents to look at and guests to viewout from. The rise of shopping districts in the early stages of Champaign’s downtown development resulted in an extreme amount of real estate devoted to public parking. Only recently has the city of Champaign begun to renovate un-used parking lots for public parks and displays of local-art. The Overlook provides a unique vantage for overlooking the largest downtown Champaign public-arts displays— located directly across the street. Set-back and raised high off the ground floor, a series of ADA accessible rooms, varying in size and occupancy, create a rectangular stack hovering over Champaign’s urban-scape. A large double-skinned facade is utilized on the Southern-face to both reinforce the bold framed displays of the local works

of art as well as to maintain a level of interior comfort for each resident. A personal louver-system accompanies each hotel-room; whether for privacy or ambiance the louver-system could be manually operated from within the room. Upon entering underneath the hovering mass of rooms; one enters a large, spacious, double-heighted lobby. Through the lobby entrance, one can visually take in the location of reception, the elevators, a bar above, and even a backdoor entrance to the adjacent restaurant around the corner. The travelers that are hungry after a long flight have the option for an easily accessible meal; the travelers that aren’t so hungry after a long flight have direct access to the bar on the second level—to which you enter mainly via a grand staircase within the hotel lobby. The bar itself overhangs the lobby on one side and has direct access to an outdoor patio/deck on the other.


site extrusion

street activation | restaurant + lobby

hotel activation | patio + garden

lobby entrance setback

build vertical circulation

capture views


rainwater collection + rainwater collection + storage storage - supplies hotel WC’s with recycled water a

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skylight +

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- natural light pen

- reduces electric

- supplies hotel WC’s withsystem recycled water - grey water used in combination - grey water system used in combination - collection located below patio subfloor

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- collection- located patio subfloor storage below located in basement

- sky-wells build ci

- storage located in basement

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- wind protection

skylight + sky-well

- trapped air heat

- natural light penetrates deep into structure

- shading devices

- reduces electrical costs in hotel - sky-wells build circulation in hallways

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double skin facade

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- wind protection - trapped air heated to meet thermal loads

sustainable technology sustainable technology diagramdiagram

- shading devices on exterior of first facade provide shading

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Downtown Champaign


Typical Floor Plan

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RESAURANT BACK OF HOUSE OFFICE SPACE

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Parapit Cap Parapit Cap

Water-Proof Membrane

Water-Proof Membrane

Insulated / Operable Louvers

Insulated / Operable Louvers

Air Flow

Rigid Insulation

Air Flow

Rigid Insulation Concrete Slab

Concrete Slab

Batt Insulation Batt Insulation 5/8” Gyp. Board

5/8” Gyp. Board Room Operable Shading Device

Room Operable Shading Device

Single-Pane Glass Single-Pane Glass

Triple-Pane (Low-E) Insulated Glass

Triple-Pane (Low-E) Insulated Glass

Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete Block 1/2” thick

Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete Block 1/2” thick

Face Fastener Insulated Louvers Concrete Beam: 12” X 36” Perfarated Panel

Face Fastener Insulated Louvers Concrete Beam: 12” X 36” Perfarated Panel

(Air Flow Entrance)

(Air Flow Entrance)

Rigid Insulation

Rigid Insulation

Double-Pane Insulate Glass

Double-Pane Insulate Glass

Concrete Beam: 12” X 30”

Concrete Beam: 12” X 30”

Rigid Insulation

Rigid Insulation

Wood-Finish Panel

3” thick

3” thick 8” thick

Wood-Finish Panel

8” thick

Revolving Door Revolving Door Deck: 4” thick

Deck: 4” thick


06 Slick Storage a partition addition for studio

Independent Study Faculty Advisor: David Emmons University of Illinois | Urbana-Champaign Sprint 2015 Team: Seth Kopka | Gideon Schwartzman | Mary Kate Cassidy

In this independent study, we looked at how partitions can be (re)defined in today’s environments. Typically used as divisions among spaces, could partitions become objects that bring people together rather than split apart? By looking at subjects of adaptability and usage, we identified certain functions that were missing from our current, most mundane spaces. The first of these functions was “displaying,” or “pin-up” as we refer to in school. Too often, spaces are left empty, unused, and non-conversational. This sparked an idea or motive to advocate displaying and transparency among students and their work, ideally creating conversation and dialogue among the school. Both projects explored in this study, feature a “display” wall that could continuously change – lecture posters, student work, school announcements, etc. In addition to displaying work, we also noticed a general lack of storage and organization within our spaces. Architecture students, not typically known for being organized in the first place, could benefit from

a shared storage space(s). Over the years, we have come to collect an enormous amount of materials that we use on a daily basis, but can never find the item or object which we desire. We stuff things behind our desks and stack things on the floor. So it became clear that perhaps we could at least create a more habitable space by allowing for a more organized storage system. Our studies, which began as discussions and sketches, eventually evolved into exploring current fabrication methods of a single material (plywood) combined with CNC milling technology. Throughout the semester, we studied a variety of construction techniques through digital and physical modeling, primarily analyzing the joinery and lateral forces. The proposals for both projects, hybridize display walls and storage cubbies – seeking a utilitarian function and optimized fabrication process.


塔楼C LOBBY

大堂

07 Yang Pu Lobby corporate lobby proposals MATERIAL PALETTE 材料样品

THEME 1: TECH HUB 主题1 科技中心

上海杨浦区平凉街道40街坊项目 SHANGHAI YANGPU DISTRICT BLOCK 40 SKIDMORE, OWINGS & MERRILL LLP

上海杨浦区平凉街道40街坊项目 SHANGHAI YANGPU DISTRICT BLOCK 40 SKIDMORE, OWINGS & MERRILL LLP

Location: Shanghai | Yang Pu Skidmore Owings & Merrill | Chicago Summer 2016 Project Lead: Patrick Clay Team: Seth Kopka | Mark Wiley | Esau Ramirez | Stephanie Choi

I was brought on to the SOM team in May of 2016 where I worked primarily in the interiors department developing finishing packages for a series of SOM towers being developed in Yang Pu, China. I worked closely with the architects and the internal interiors team to develop contextual concepts that could carry through to the finishing of material surfaces. The flow of the Huangpu River, which connects the district to neighboring cities began to articulate itself through the rough linearity of the ceiling and vertical core circulation. I worked closely with the team researching both the city of Yang Pu, as well as modern office trends. We were primarily interested in ways innovative technology and interior ‘green’ and low carbon solutions could enhance the quality of contemporary office spaces. Taking into account a program

that could be flexible for branding opportunities and retail space, we were also interested in providing a variety of work surfaces and wellness spaces for employees to remain flexible and casually circulate across the site. The project holistically consisted of four towers (titled respectively Tower A, Tower B, Tower C, and Tower D), where Tower C was meant to be the new HQ for the development firm: Alibaba, whereas Towers A, B, and D would be leased to future tenants. What is presented in this scheme is an interior representation of Tower C, which was a primary driver for the interior finishing and planning of the remaining towers. The package shows two options for interior finishing. One option uses cooltones as a nod to the contextual technology industry; and the other option consists of warm-tones as an atmospheric way of drawing the landscape into the lobby.


ATION

The four towers are situated along the Huangpu Riverfront, which is apart of the new riverfront development plan in China. The Towers formally went through a series of iterations, developing ways of maintaining views to the River and downtown Shanghai as well as optimize sunlight and provide a landscape that can engage its context.

RAM

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项目 RICT BLOCK 40 RRILL LLP /主要内容

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The ground floor consists of four separate lobbies that would be open to one another as a way of promoting healthy circulation across the site. The landscaping on the ground floor also played an important role in analyzing ways for office tenants to find moments of relaxation and escape from their busy day-to-day lives.

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site plan produced by SOM

TOWER D

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上海杨浦区平凉街道40街坊项目 SHANGHAI YANGPU DISTRICT BLOCK 40 SKIDMORE, OWINGS & MERRILL LLP

site axon produced by SOM


TOWER C 塔楼C PLANNING STRATEGY LEVEL 1

规划策略1层 LEGEND / KEY 图例/主要内容 VERTICAL ACCESS 通往停车场及塔楼的垂直交通

SECONDARY DROP OFF 次落客区

MAIN DROP OFF 主落客区

望向下沉花园 VIEW INTO SUNKEN GARDEN 上海杨浦区平凉街道40街坊项目 SHANGHAI YANGPU DISTRICT BLOCK 40 SKIDMORE, OWINGS & MERRILL LLP

TOWER C 塔楼C BASE PLAN

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上海杨浦区平凉街道40街坊项目 SHANGHAI YANGPU DISTRICT BLOCK 40 SKIDMORE, OWINGS & MERRILL LLP

望向下沉花园 VIEW INTO SUNKEN GARDEN


cool tone option

平凉街道40街坊项目 ER C YANGPU DISTRICT BLOCK 40 C, OWINGS & MERRILL LLP

BY

OPTION 1

方案 1 INTERIOR ELEVATION

室内立面

浦区平凉街道40街坊项目 HAI YANGPU DISTRICT BLOCK 40 ORE, OWINGS & MERRILL LLP


warm tone option

平凉街道40街坊项目 ER C DISTRICT BLOCK 40 YANGPU COWINGS & MERRILL LLP

BY

OPTION 2 方案 2 INTERIOR ELEVATION

室内立面

浦区平凉街道40街坊项目 HAI YANGPU DISTRICT BLOCK 40 ORE, OWINGS & MERRILL LLP


上海杨浦区平凉街道40街坊项目 SHANGHAI YANGPU DISTRICT BLOCK 40 SKIDMORE, OWINGS & MERRILL LLP

OPTION 1

方案 1

街道40街坊项目 INTERIOR ELEVATION NGPU DISTRICT室内立面 BLOCK 40 WINGS & MERRILL LLP

上海杨浦区平凉街道40街坊项目 SHANGHAI YANGPU DISTRICT BLOCK 40 SKIDMORE, OWINGS & MERRILL LLP


C

R

上海杨浦区平凉街道40街坊项目 SHANGHAI YANGPU DISTRICT BLOCK 40 SKIDMORE, OWINGS & MERRILL LLP

OPTION 2 方案 2

INTERIOR ELEVATION 凉街道40街坊项目 室内立面 ANGPU DISTRICT BLOCK 40 OWINGS & MERRILL LLP

上海杨浦区平凉街道40街坊项目 SHANGHAI YANGPU DISTRICT BLOCK 40 SKIDMORE, OWINGS & MERRILL LLP


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1. extrude pavilion geometry to cover plaza

aluminum crossheads

2. pitch roof to expel rain

08 Plaza San Pedro

polycarbonate plastic rain-covering

3. utilize grid system to invoke illusion of transparency

plaza installation competition lightweight aluminum bars

aluminum crossheads connect horizontal and vertical elements using traditional construction screws

form diagram

29

Location: Sestao Bilbao, Spain Habitan Arquitectos

construction diagram

Barcelona, Spain

July 2016

Team: Seth Kopka | Juan Simonet | Elena Hachuel | Yoel Karas

This design competition was equally collaborated between a team of four individuals including myself. We each shared an equal amount of responsibility working through the early conceptual design processes to the later production and development of a working model. My main responsibilities revolved around the production of the 3D model as well as the day, night, and interior renderings. The municipality of Sestao called for architects and designers alike to participate in a two-week long design competition. Sestao, much like the rest of Spain, cherishes their plazas and open spaces. However, Plaza San Pedro was

far too large of an uncovered-open space. Frequent rainstorms limited the activity of the plaza. The new installation should cover the plaza from rain as well as create a new iconic image within the community. We planned to leave one-third of the plaza uncovered; therefore, maintaining the existence of an exterior space and not loosing the plaza. The exterior form was generated to invoke the feeling of a building. The interior was generated by voiding the mass of the classic “Bilbao-Shed”. By using a large scale modular construction system, our pavilion could be easily installed and taken apart with the most basic of construction tools.

*all representation was produced by this author

section detail


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Sestao, Bilbao Spain Sestao, Bilbao Spain The form of the “box” visually communicates place of shelter The form of thea “box” visually from the harsh rains of of shelter Sestao. communicates a place The the interior form of of theSestao. familiar from harsh rains and iconic “BilbaoThe interior form Spanish of the familiar shed”iconic expresses a sence and Spanish “Bilbao-of internalization andamezmerization shed” expresses sence of brought on by the repetition of a internalization and mezmerization common geometry. brought on by the repetition of a common geometry.

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form diagram form diagram

29

construction diagram construction diagram

section detail section detail


09 Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe Church Church renovation + revitalization

Location: Des Plains, Illinois Firm: JGMA August 2017 Supervisor: Dori del Rio

As a competition entry for the Chicago Architecture Foundation ‘non-built’ work, I aided in the reproduction of the ground floor plan, second floor plan, section, and conceptual diagrams for OLG. As an addition and renovation to an existing church, it was important to

represent conceptually how a new entry/lobby space could act as a beacon for Des Plains, formally directing pilgrims to the Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe. Simultaneously, internally, the existing gymnasium is carved out to allow in natural light and ample seating for congregates.

From the Architect: The Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe has hired JGMA to transform an existing gymnasium into a 1,300 seat worship space to serve the growing needs of the church. Currently, the church holds a crowded service inside an old gymnasium but prefers to gather outdoors whenever possible for the availability of extra space. The design of the plan utilizes the entire existing gymnasium floor area for guest seating, altar space, choir area and a sacristy while the addition of a mezzanine level was necessary in order to meet the desired capacity of at least 1,300 guests. The mezzanine has fixed bench seating while the main level has non-fixed seating for flexibility of layout and function.

The ground floor and mezzanine levels are seamlessly connected through the altar and adjoining stepped choir area as the concept of connectedness was paramount for the church. A newly constructed, double-height vestibule will run parallel to the entire length of the worship space and provide ample area for guests to gather before and after service and a landscaped plaza space has been incorporated that allows outdoor gathering and events to occur during the warmer seasons. The final major addition is the seventy-five foot tall steeple that extends upwards from the vestibule and is clad with reflective metal that will serve as a beacon and landmark for the surrounding Catholic community.


renderings produced by JGMA


the existing OLG church congregates in local gymnasium

a puncture in the roof structure provides natural light to penetrate into the performance space. a build-out of a lobby space provides a buffer space / threshold for congregates to collect prior to entering the church.

The lobby buildout provides an opportunity for the church to engage in its surroundings; the form of the structure points to the Shrine of Our Lady Guadalupe, forever connecting the shrine to its congregation.

The new church is iconic in its form, reflective in its materiality, and spiritual in its interior affect.


Second Floor Plan

Ground Floor Plan


Cross Section


Seth Kopka: Selected Works  
Seth Kopka: Selected Works  
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