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S E R EGIONAL P ROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CENTER

News and Events for Educators in Southeast Missouri January 2009 Inside this Issue: Missouri English Language Proficiency Standards SE RPDC 2009 Needs Assessment News from Southeast Missouri College of Education What’s New with Reading Recovery Using Children’s Literature to Explore Mathematics End-of-Course Q & A

Message from the Director Dear School Patrons and Colleagues: Welcome to 2009! As we begin the New Year, I want to personally thank each of you for your continued support of Southeast RPDC as we venture into some challenging times. Your ideas and suggestions have enabled us to serve you more effectively. We are committed to providing scientifically research-based professional development opportunities to the educators in Southeast Missouri. Enclosed in this newsletter are varied articles targeting research-based school improvement initiatives sponsored by Southeast RPDC and the numerous consultants housed in The Center. Planning is underway for the development of learning endeavors for summer trainings. Extended sessions will focus on the Annual Technology Conference, an Institute for Autism Training, Math and Science Integration in the classroom setting, and Show Me Success Conference which will enable all of us to celebrate the effective activities in our region – in your buildings and classrooms. Links to more information on each of these and the numerous other learning opportunities can be found on the RPDC website. Graduate credit will also be available through the Southeast Partnership Program coordinated by Rick McClard. Response to Intervention (RtI) is a “hot” topic which will be addressed through a professional development series. RtI encompasses methods for improving achievement for all students; it is a General Education not Special Education initiative. The focus is not only on academics, but on behavior as well. Be watching our website for additional trainings in the future. As districts strive to enhance student achievement, many have identified the IPI (Instructional Practices Inventory) as a highly-effective method for monitoring the instructional climate of a building – the level of student engagement. Several training sessions presented by Dr. Jerry Valentine are scheduled during the months of January and February. Should you need more

information on IPI, please contact Arvilla Early-Reinwald as she coordinates this program for our region. As we venture into the coming months, one of the challenges faced is the postponing and/or cancellation of workshops scheduled regionally. Should questions arise, please do not hesitate contacting our office. Typically, cancellations will be dependent upon the location of the session. Should the University or the host school district be closed, the session will be cancelled. Announcements of program changes will be posted to the website and also on the telephone system. Television and radio stations will not accept our notices.

to you soon regarding the Literacy Initiative. Hopefully, you will find the information in this newsletter informative and serve as a beneficial reference as professional development plans for FY 2010 are developed and implemented. The Annual Needs Assessment for FY 2010 will be mailed to PD chairpersons in January. We encourage you to complete these as soon as possible so results can be compiled and dispersed to each district on a timely basis. Once again, PD planning sessions will be held to assist in the interpretation of results.

Best Wishes are extended to each Due to changes at the federal level of you for a happy and engaging and possible revisions in the Read- year of learning! ing First project, Southeast RPDC will provide support for scientifiCheri Fuemmeler, Director cally research-based literacy initiatives that will extend from grades kindergarten through twelve, not just grades kindergarten to three. More information will be coming

CONTENTS MISSOURI ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY STANDARDS AND THE GLE .2

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES: THE CRITICAL QUESTIONS!......8

GRADUATE CREDIT OFFERINGS .................................................................11

2009 NEEDS ASSESSMENT ..........................................................................2

2009 POWERFUL LEARNING CONFERENCE REGISTRATION ........................9

SE RPDC EVENTS CALENDAR .....................................................................12

THREE TIER MODEL OF INSTRUCTION .........................................................3

INTERACTIVE WHITEBOARS ARE A HIT! .......................................................9

SE RPDC EVENTS CALENDAR .....................................................................13

POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT ....................................................................3

2008 DISTINCTION IN PERFORMANCE AWARDS..........................................9

TEACH TO REACH .......................................................................................13

LEADING CAUSE OF BLINDNESS IN SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN ......................3

SOUTHEAST MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF EDUCATION NEWS 10

INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES INVENTORY WITH DR. JERRY VALENTINE ....14

SPECIAL EDUCATION COMPLIANCE QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ................4 IN FOCUS: RTI ..............................................................................................5 WORKING WITH AUTISTIC CHILDREN WORKSHOP ......................................5

AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS................................................................10

IMPROVEMENT GRANT PLANNING ...........................................................14

READING RECOVERY NEWS .......................................................................10

DATA COLLECTION, CURRICULUM BASED ASSESSMENTS AND THE STANDARDS BASED IEP WITH SUZETTE SOUTHWICK................................14

SOUTHEAST STUDENTS PRESENT AT NATIONAL CONFERENCE..................10

CAREER CLUSTERS, PERSONAL PLANS, AND RESOURCES .........................14

USING CHILDREN’S LITERATURE AS A MOTIVATING CONTEXT TO EXPLORE MATHEMATICS..............................................................................6

REQUEST FOR USED TEXTBOOKS ...............................................................10

THE ART OF SCIENCE AND TEACHING WITH SALLE QUACKENBOSS ...........15

NAVIGATING THROUGH ALGEBRA IN GRADES K-9 WORKSHOP...................6

LOOK OUT VILLAGE HERE THEY COME .......................................................11

HOW TO REGISTER FOR TRAINING USING MY LEARNING PLAN ................15

END-OF-COURSE EXAMS: QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ....................................7

MEET THE DEAN!........................................................................................11

SE REGIONAL PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CENTER DIRECTORY ..........16

Southeast Regional Professional Development Center 1 University Plaza, MS 0120 920 Broadway, Suite 201 Cape Girardeau, MO 63701 Phone: 573.651.5161 800.401-6680 Fax: 573.651.2380 rpdc@semo.edu http:www4.semo.edu/rpdc Director Cheri Fuemmeler Assistant Director Rebecca Rider


MISSOURI ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY STANDARDS AND GRADE LEVEL EXPECTATIONS Jesse Deleon, Migrant English Language Consultant Missouri has recently revised the Missouri English Language Proficiency Standards and Grade Level Expectations. It is both the product of national TESOL Standards and Missouri ESL teachers. The English Language Proficiency GLEs, progress indicators and activities are derived from the experiences of the state’s fine ESL teachers. It is the intent that educators who use the document suggest additions as well as changes and substitutions for the progress indicators, activities, and linguistic elements. The Missouri English Language Proficiency Standards and Grade Level Expectations serve two basic functions: first, they give the practitioner progress indicators with which district, school, and classroom curriculum and instruction can be integrated; second, they align ESL classroom activities with the Missouri “Show Me Standards”. The English Language Proficiency GLEs have been isolated for language instruction attention while the Performance Indicators themselves have been

written in the form of assessable or measurable content-based tasks, rather than theoretical “learning levels,” so that teachers could see a practical sequencing of language instruction unfold. Generally, the English Language Proficiency Standards are designed for thoughtful educators to read and understand the design and science that they represent—a design which provides foundations and progressions of English language learning levels. Specifically, Missouri educators must: • Understand that all classrooms are multi-leveled, and the grade designations used within this document are merely there to show a logical progression for a student who progresses smoothly through all phases of the ESL curriculum at the appropriate age; • Consider carefully how to sequence activities for students, who have had no previous schooling, interrupted schooling, or ineffective formal instruction; • Supplement the activities within this

SOUTHEAST RPDC 2009 NEEDS ASSESSMENT responses), overall and comments. Often time there is a strong correlas the school year progresses tion of needs between buildings. districts are already beginOnce the Needs Assessment Survey ning to plan for the next year. reports have been completed, each Although this seems too early, district will receive an electronic within the next month, the RPDC copy as well as a copy in the mail. will send a copy of the 2009 Needs They will also receive an invitation Assessment Survey to each disto participate in a Professional Detrict. Survey questions will align velopment Workday at the RPDC. with the Missouri School Improve- This workday provides districts the ment Program Standards making opportunity to review their it easy for districts to data and begin planning identify the most imtheir professional developportant professional ment for the next school development needs year with assistance from within the district. available consultants in the This survey will RPDC. be administered to each teacher and administraDuring the 2008 Needs 05 04 03 02 01 tor in the district. From Assessment Survey period that information a report 51 school districts comwill be generated and sent to the pleted and returned their surveys. school district. Needs Assessment This valuable information allowed survey data is unique to each school them to begin professional develdistrict and gives the professional opment planning with ample time development planning committee to schedule presenters and create the “top ten” needs of the district. a schedule. The RPDC continues to These needs can then be used to get requests for copies of district’s create a professional development Needs Assessment results well into plan for the upcoming school year. the fall. From the data collected, multiple reports can be generated. Contact Rebecca at: 573-986-6887 These reports include elementary, if you have questions. junior high, high school, administrators (if there are three or more Rebecca Rider

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document to intensify and to solidify academic English language growth; • Consider and evaluate learning on an individual basis, given a student’ language, cultural and educational background. The English Language Proficiency Standards document is not unique to Missouri. It is both the product of national TESOL Standards and Missouri ESL teachers. The English Language Proficiency GLEs, progress indicators and activities are derived from the experiences of the state’s fine ESL teachers. Contact Jesse Deleon at: Phone: 573-986-6734 Fax: 573-651-2380 Email: jdeleon@semo.edu

TIPS to Successfully Complete the 2009 Survey Use high quality, white paper (scanner will not scan colored paper, including ivory). The copies made will need to be distributed throughout the district (the scanner will not accept faxes). Discourage participants from “doodling” on the form. Altering the form in any way will invalidate it. Copy the original form at 100%. Make sure the copy is front to back, (use one piece of paper per survey). Do no staple forms.


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THREE TIER MODEL OF INSTRUCTION News from Reading First An explanation of the Three Tier Model of Instruction Carol Reimann, Reading First Consultant

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issouri Reading First utilizes a Three Tier Model of Instruction for implementing reading cores which were chosen individually by funded and non-funded districts. This threetier model of instruction is a general framework for explaining how any research-based reading program is implemented. It describes a general process but is not designed as a prescription for what is to be done in a specific situation.

the students. Scientifically Based Reading Instruction (SBRI) provides the foundation for all activities. Students are challenged as well as progress accelerated for those who are not achieving at grade level.

The comprehensive core program, based on scientific reading research, is the basis for explicit, systematic, and differentiated instruction focusing on the five Reading First components of phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. The model includes Tier I, Tier II, and Tier III instruction. TIER I: Tier I instruction is designed for all K-3 students to receive at least 90 minutes of uninterrupted reading instruction daily. During this Tier, instruction is differentiated and a variety of grouping formats used including some whole group, small flexible groups, reading workstations, and partnering opportunities. DIBELS and other data (core assessments, classroom work, classroom performance, and teacher observation) are used to determine the targeted strategic instruction necessary to meet the assessed needs of

cally for a group of 3-5 students with 30 minutes of instruction daily. Tier III instruction is 60 additional minutes daily outside of Tier I. A group size of 1-3 is ideal, utilizing more explicit and systematic instruction. Differentiated instruction is based on diagnostic assessment and utilizing frequent DIBELS progress monitoring. Most schools have chosen a structured program to use for Tier III instruction. Please direct any questions concerning the Three Tier model of instruction to the Reading First office.

TIER II and TIER III Students who are identified as at risk of reading failure are provided additional reading intervention outside of the 90 minutes of Tier I instruction. Tier II and Tier III instruction is designed around specific student needs as determined by data. Some schools have selected a structured program for Tier II and Tier III instruction while others use activities from the core as extensions or additional practice aligned with the core. Planned intervention is explicitly and systematically taught with fidelity. Tier II intervention is planned specifi-

Carol Reimann: creimann@semo.edu 573-986-6056 Anita Nall: anall@semo.edu 573-986-6003 Betty McIntyre: bmcintrye@semo.edu 573-986-4902 Melanie Whitener: mwhitener@s 573-651-5962

Leading Cause of Blindness in School Age Children Blindness Skills

most effective when they are the result of comprehensive assessment of functional vision. These strategies should be based on each child’s unique visual and behavioral characteristics, such as color preference, visual field preference, difficulties with visual novelty, attracChildren with the tion to movement, leading cause of visual“Educational interventions difficulties with impairment in the visual complexity, United States may have for students with CVI non-purposeful a normal eye exam but gaze, attraction to present with a history of are critical for student light, visual latenneurological problems cy, difficulties with success.” and unique visual chardistance viewing, acteristics. This type and the inability of visual impairment is to coordinate the called Cortical Visual Impairment visual motor action of looking while (CVI). Cortical visual impairment is reaching(Jan & Groenveld, 1993; a neurological visual dysfunction Roman, 2004). caused by damage or injury to the brain. For children with cortical visual impairment, services from trained Educational interventions for stuand experienced teachers are very dents with CVI are critical for student important for the child’s developsuccess. Instructional strategies are ment.

Debora Lintner

Poor attendance? Tardies? Disruptions by students in the classroom? Office referrals? If these are problems for you and your school district, you might be interested in School Wide Positive Behavior Support. The number of schools in Missouri currently implementing SW-PBS reflects the rapid growth of the initiative across the state and the diversity in the locations and demographics of the schools. Regardless of whether we are supporting a small, rural district or one in a metropolitan area, we are finding SW-PBS to be effective in helping schools to create the kind of proactive social and behavioral environment that supports learning. Although most students experience some level of academic and social success in school, many do not. Students displaying antisocial behavior have difficulty achieving success unless schools, families, and communities organize proactive, specialized, and individualized supports. SW-PBS focuses on enhancing schools’ capacity to adopt and sustain effective practices for all students through (a) team-based problem solving and planning, (b) administrator and staff commitment and support, (c) systematic assessment of disciplinary practices and processes, (d) careful action planning, (e) ongoing staff development, and (f ) data-based decision making. Four interacting and dependent school systems— school wide, classroom, non-classroom, and individual student—are considered. Contact Deborah Lintner Phone: 573-986-6193 Email: dlintner@semo.edu

Jennifer Coy

Did you know that a child can have a normal or near normal eye examination and still be diagnosed with a visual impairment? Did you know that a child’s visual impairment may not be caused by an eye disease or condition?

School Wide Positive Behavior Support

BLIND SKILLS SPECIALIST Position Available Southeast Regional Professional Development Center Part Time/Term/Grant Funded The Southeast Regional Professional Development Center (RPDC) has been housed on the campus of Southeast Missouri State University since 1996. The grant under which the center operates has been renewed annually over the past 12 years. The Center serves more than 80 school districts in the Southeast region. RPDC personnel provide training programs for the teachers and administrators throughout the area on a continuous basis. Primary Responsibilities • Acts as a resource for school districts that serve students who are blind or visually impaired • Makes programming and placement recommendations to schools using assessment informa tion developed within the IEP process • Provides functional vision assessments and/or orientation and mobility evaluations as necessary for decision making/planning during the IEP process • Provides in-service training in alternative techniques of blindness to classroom teachers and teacher assistants engaged in the education of eligible students • Supports the application of appropriate technology in the education of eligible students Provides parents of eligible students with referrals and information regarding services available within the state • Collaborates with RPDC/DESE personnel and other regional personnel associated with the RPDC/DESE • Contributes ideas for future educational reform initiatives For More Information: Contact Dana Seabaugh, Employment Specialist, Human Resources, Southeast Missouri State University, One University Plaza, Cape Girardeau, MO 63701.


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SPECIAL EDUATION COMPLIANCE QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS Denis Moore, Special Education Compliance Consultant Several “Hot Topics” in Special Education have been addressed by the Compliance Consultants throughout the state. Margaret Strecker, the Director of Compliance, has shared the following information from our May thru June meeting notes. Question: When Head Start makes a referral is this considered a parent referral? Answer: Yes. Head Start may facilitate a parent referral. They should make it clear in their referral that the parent wishes to make the referral or understands that Head Start is assisting with making the referral. Informal observations of the entire classroom does not require parental consent however, if the observation focuses on one child then parental consent is required. Question: A homeschooled student was receiving speech therapy and occupational therapy on a service plan. The student no longer qualifies for speech therapy. Can the district provide only occupational therapy? Answer: Yes. Students who are homeschooled fall within the category of private/parentally placed. Please be aware that there is no individual right to services for private/parentally placed students, so the district determines the level of special education and related services that will be provided. Therefore, it would be possible that the district could determine that they would provide only that level of service. For example, a district might determine based on their proportionate share calculation that they were only going to provide speech services for parentally placed private school students. In some cases that speech therapy would be the sole service a student needs and would be considered special education, but for other students, speech would be considered a related service. So, some children that receive speech under a service plan would really be getting related services only. Question: When a district employees a speech implementer and puts them under contract, they do not have an obligation to hire a SLP who applies later on just because they came along and have appropriate certification, correct? It is still the district’s decision as to whether they want to hire the SLP, correct? Answer: Correct, we can’t expect them to breach the contract. Question: Is a public school district in the state of MO responsible for providing transportation to a child that has an IEP? I have a 3 year old son who receives speech services through the school district. Since that is the only service that he receives I have to bring him to and from speech twice a week for a half hour lesson. My husband and I work full time and have no way of getting him to the school for his speech lessons. The school district tells me that they can’t help me with my transportation issue. Do you know what other parents in our position do? Answer: The decision about whether transportation is needed as a related service is an IEP team decision; the transportation, if needed as a related service, is transportation between home and the place of special education services. Transportation to and from other locations (e.g. daycare center, babysitter) is at the discretion of the school district. Many school districts will transport to and from day care/babysitter, if the day care provider is located on an already established transportation route of the district; however, with early childhood special education, this rarely is the case. A school district is required to provide transportation to a student with a disability under an IEP, if the IEP team determines that such transportation is needed as a related service. The definition of a related service, is a service that is required in order to enable a child to benefit from special education. Additional Information: There is a reminder about compensatory services—IDEA makes no provision for compensatory services. It really is a question of providing FAPE and is an individualized issue. To address this issue, the provider may either provide full make up services OR the IEP team may convene to make a decision regarding the extent, if any, of making up the services. Below is the link to the SELS message on this topic: http://www.dese.mo.gov/divspeced/ LS05.23.08.htm The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, Division of School Improvement, has posted a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) document about the end of course exams. This document provides general information about the exam process and covers all students. You can review the FAQ at: http://www.dese.mo.gov/divimprove/assess/documents/EOCFAQ.pdf The U. S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) has posted a Question and Answer document addressing services for homeless children with disabilities on their website. The document can be viewed at http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/osers/osep/policy.html. Examples of topics addressed in the document include: a definition of homelessness and rights a homeless child receives under the McKinney-Vento Act; Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requirements relating to child find, evaluations, and individualized education programs (IEPs); surrogate parents for unaccompanied homeless youth; and, information about schools of origin and educational placements for homeless children with disabilities under IDEA.

Debora Lintner PBS Susan Hekmat Improvement

Tiffiney Smith Improvement

SE RPDC SPECIAL EDUCATION CONSULTANTS

Denis Moore Compliance Resource


IN FOCUS: RTI

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Susan R. Hekmat and Tiffiney Smith, Special Education Consultants

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s fall draws to an end and our thoughts turn to a new school year, one concept that comes to the forethought of our minds is how we can attain academic achievement for ALL students. Over the past few years, how we have addressed the various needs of students has changed dramatically. New best practices have come to light based upon the most current educational research. One of the most successful programs for attaining high student achievement is RtI-Response to Intervention. Response to Intervention (RtI) is the practice of matching high quality instruction and interventions matched to diverse student needs. Nebraska’s Department of Education (July 2007) stated, “The main objective of RtI is not to identify students for Special Education, but rather to help all students achieve at a proficient level and ultimately [schools] make adequately yearly progress.” RtI has several core principles all based on the belief that ALL students can learn. RtI uses data from universal data screenings and progress monitoring to make evidence based decisions regarding interventions and instruction for all students. While RtI is proactively based, it contains a multi-tiered system of interventions. Each intervention tier is progressively more intense thereby providing support for students with varying needs. More school districts are recognizing the benefit in using RtI as a means of increasing student achievement. The RPDC offers RtI training workshops. If you are interested in attending an RtI training please contact Susan Hekmat or Tiffiney Smith. Susan R. Hemat: Phone: 573-651-2718 Email: srhekmat@semo.edu Tiffiney Smith: Phone: 573-651-2621 Email: tdsmith@semo.edu


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USING CHILDREN’S LITERATURE AS A MOTIVATING CONTEXT TO EXPLORE MATHEMATICS Linda Null, Math Consultant tudents love a good story. Why not use this fact as a way to engage students in mathematics that is meaningful and motivating to them? Making connections between literature and mathematics might be the “spark” that ignites a student’s love for mathematics. Here are some additional reasons to integrate the two subjects:

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• In addition to math and reading, one can build connections to other subjects such as art, music, social studies, writing, communication arts, and science. Building such connections

for our students helps them see the relevance of mathematics to the real world. • Incorporates many state grade-level expectations and national standards • Incorporates and supports character education programs • Offers opportunities to use technology • Inspires students to do further research on their own • Stimulates students’ thinking and imagination • Incorporates problem-solving and higher order thinking skills • Gives students an “emotional hook” through which to learn mathematics. Research has shown that students are more

motivated to learn when they are emotionally attached. A variety of children’s literature can be used as a springboard for mathematical concepts: books, poems, and short stories. The possibilities are endless. Below are just a few ideas for elementary, middle, and high school. For more ideas and lessons, please feel free to contact Linda Null, RPDC’s Math Consultant. Contact Linda Null: Phone: 573-986-6736 Fax: 573-651-2380 Email: lnull@semo.edu

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Visit Linda Null’s Web page at: http://www6.semo.edu/rpdcmath If you are interested in having Linda to your school for professional development training or have a suggestion for a math workshop, please email her at: lnull@semo.edu


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END OF COURSE EXAMS Q & A Missouri Assessment Program Consultants

End-of-Course Exams Frequently Asked Questions Q: What is the purpose of end-of-course exams? A: The Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education has identified xxx the following purposes for end-of-course testing: • Measuring student achievement and progress toward postsecondary readiness • Identifying students’ strengths and weaknesses • Communicating expectations for all students • Meeting state and national accountability requirements • Evaluating programs End-of-course exams will provide a valid and reliable method for assessing students’ knowledge of Missouri’s Course-Level Expectations (CLEs). They will also allow classroom teachers to incorporate statewide assessment results into students’ course grades. Q: Which courses will be included in end-of-course testing? A: Beginning in 2008-09, end-of-course assessments will be available for three subjects: Algebra I, English II and Biology. End-of-course exams for Geometry, Algebra II, Integrated Mathematics II and III, English I, Government, and American History are being developed for use in 2009-10 and beyond. Additional science assessments also will be developed, but the specific courses to be covered have not been determined. Q: What is the timeline for implementing end-of-course testing? A: Algebra I, English II and Biology exams will be available for administration beginning in fall 2008. One complete form of each of these tests was released to the public in August 2008. Geometry, Algebra II, Integrated Mathematics II and Integrated Mathematics III, English I, Government, and American History will be administered in 2009-10. Q: What is the format for end-of-course tests? A: The Algebra I, English II and Biology assessments will include one session consisting of multiple-choice items and one session with a performance event (Algebra I and Biology) or a writing prompt (English II). Tests in these content areas will be designed to be administered in two 55-minute class periods; however, they will not be timed. Additional end-of-course assessments (available in 2009-2010) will consist entirely of multiple-choice items and will be designed to be administered in one 55-minute class period. All assessments will be available in both paper/pencil and online formats. Q: Who will take end-of-course exams? A: A student who completes a course or sequence of courses incorporating the content of the Course-Level Expectations will be expected to take the corresponding end-of-course exam. Students will be expected to take the end-of-course exam upon completion of the content of the CLEs, regardless of grade level. If CLEs are included in courses that are organized in a two-year format (Algebra IA and Algebra IB, for example), students will take the exam at the end of the second year. Q: If a student is failing a course, is he/she required to take the EOC exam? A: No. If a student is failing a course and/or the district is not going to award credit, the district may opt to administer the end-of-course exam to the student at a later time when he/she has successfully completed the content of the CLEs being assessed.

exam score account for a minimum of 10 percent, but no more than 25 percent, of the course grade. When all end-of-course assessments for the year have been completed statewide, Riverside Publishing Company, with the assistance of Missouri teachers, will also score students’ responses to performance events/writing prompts (much the same way that MAP constructed-response items and performance events are scored). Students’ scores on those items will be combined with their raw scores on selected response items to determine their achievement levels (similar to MAP achievement levels). Districts will receive a score report that will include building and district-level data, as well as individual students’ achievement levels. Q: How will teachers obtain copies of performance events and writing prompts for local scoring? A: Within five business days after end-of-course assessments are completed and returned to Riverside Publishing Company, the contractor will provide scanned electronic copies of performance events/writing prompts and student responses to districts for local scoring. Q: How will teachers be trained to score performance events and writing prompts locally? A: When Riverside Publishing Company receives a building’s completed end-of-course assessments, teachers in the building will receive access to online training, including training and anchor papers and qualifying procedures, to score performance events/writing prompts locally. Online training will parallel the training provided to the contractor’s scorers and to Missouri teachers participating in in-state scoring events. Q: Will 8th grade students who take a course that requires an end-of-course exam also take the 8th grade MAP test in the same content area? A: Yes. Q: How will end-of-course tests be field-tested and who will be involved? A: The Algebra I, English II and Biology tests were field-tested in spring 2008. With the exception of a sample of online tests administered in selected districts, these field tests were paper-pencil and were administered separately from all other statewide testing. All students enrolled in these courses participated in some portion of the field test. Initial field tests for Phase II end-of-course exams will be conducted in spring 2009. After the initial field tests, all field testing will be embedded, meaning that every student completing an end-of-course exam will also complete a small number of field-test items as part of the operational test. Q: Will MAP-A students have to take end-of-course exams? A: No. If a student meets the criteria for MAP-A eligibility, he/she will continue to participate in the MAP-A throughout high school. Q: How will districts identify which students should take an end-of-course test, particularly if course names do not correspond to end-of-course tests? A: End-of-course exams should be administered when the content outlined in the CLEs is completed, regardless of the name of the course. However, districts should be mindful that the CLEs have been developed by Missouri teachers to most accurately reflect the content that should be included in those courses. Q: Will students in grades 3-8 ever be required to take end-of-course tests? A: Students in grades 3-8 will continue to take the MAP test in its current format.

Q: Will students be required to pass end-of-course exams prior to graduation? A: No. While students will be required to take end-of-course exams upon completion of CLE content, DESE will not establish a “passing” score. Q: When will districts administer end-of-course tests? Can different buildings within a district administer the tests at different times of the year? A: Districts will administer end-of-course tests when students complete the applicable CLEs. Flexible administration schedules will allow districts to order and administer tests during summer school, at the end of the fall semester and at the end of the spring semester. Schools will be expected to identify a one-week window for test administration. Ordering windows will be flexible to allow for varying school calendars and schedules: • • •

Fall window: November 3, 2008 –January 31, 2009 Spring window: April 15, 2009-May 22, 2009 Summer window: June 16, 2009-August 31, 2009

If school buildings within a district have different schedules, the district will be able to place multiple orders to accommodate those needs. Results for students assessed during the summer window (June 16-August 31) will be included in the following year’s accountability calculations. Q: How will end-of-course exams be scored? When will students receive their scores? Will the scores impact their grades? A: Districts will send completed end-of-course exams to Riverside Publishing Company for scoring or submit exams electronically if they are completed online. Schools will receive raw score results from selected-response items within 24 hours for online exams or within five business days after Riverside Publishing receives paper answer sheets. For example, if an end-of-course exam included 45 selected-response items, and the student answered 40 items correctly, that student’s raw score would be 40. Teachers will score students’ responses to performance events and writing prompts locally. A student’s raw score on selected-response items combined with his/her score on open-ended items (determined by the classroom teacher), will contribute to that student’s course grade. DESE strongly recommends that a student’s end-of-course

Missouri Assessment Program Consultants 573-986-6794 Math Julie Antill: jantill@semo.edu Communication Arts Tammy Brotherton: tsbrotherton@semo.edu Science Joyce Penland: jpenland@semo.edu


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PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES

The Critical Questions!

Peggy Hitt and Cyndi Morgan, Professional Learning Community Consultants IF . . . the definition of a Professional Learning Community is “A group of Educators committed to working collaboratively in ongoing processes of collective inquiry and action research in order to achieve better results for the students they serve. PLCs operate under the assumption that the key to improved learning for students is continuous, job-embedded learning for educators.” DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, Many, 2006 THEN . . . the four Corollary Questions that schools must ask are: 1. What is it we want our students to learn? 2. How do we know they have learned it? 3. How will we respond when they don’t learn? 4. How will we respond when they already know it? SO . . . schools in the Professional Learning Communities process have their focus on learning – learning for the teaching staff and learning for their students. This is the fundamental purpose that unifies and guides the work of all PLCs. ******************************************** New schools in the PLC Project for the 2008-2009 school year include: Jackson Middle, Jr. High and High School, Caruthersville District, and Kennett District. We are looking forward to working with all of them and our continuing schools this year!


INTERACTIVE WHITEBOARDS ARE A HIT!

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Martha Mangels, Technology Consultant

A

cross the entire nation teachers are asking “How do I get one of those interactive whiteboards in my classroom!” The interactive whiteboard seems to be re-energizing both the teacher and the students in K-12 classrooms. Why?

cussing the activity. Everyone can get in on the action!

help you to locate local retailers and information about each of the brands.

In addition, most interactive whiteboards make it possible for teachers to record their instruction (using audio clips, written material, video clips, as well as manipulating objects) and post the material for review by students and even parents at a later time. This can be a very effective instructional strategy for students who benefit from repetition, who need to see the material presented again, for students who are absent from school, for struggling learners, and for review for tests.

Want to put the interactive whiteboard technology in every classroom, but short on funding? When considering the possibility of adding interactive whiteboard technology to classrooms, don’t overlook the possibility of simply putting a projector with an interactive pad in the classroom. In most cases three to four pads can be purchased for the price of one board. The same powerful software comes with the pads as with the boards. On the market today is the InterWrite Pad, the Airliner by Smartboard, the Chalkboard by eInstruction, and the Activslate by Parmetheon. In some cases teachers prefer using the pads as they allow the teacher to be more mobile – teachers and students carry the pen and pad around the classroom manipulating objects on the screen, writing on the screen, and moving in and out of programs on their computer screens. Demonstrations, collaboration, recording lessons, and catering to the various learning styles can still take place using the interactive pad as with the boards.

The interactive whiteboard is great for demonstrations. Whether it is the technology teacher demonstrating how to use a software package, a coach demonstrating to the players how to run a sports play, a language arts teacher demonstrating how to set up a paragraph, or a science teacher demonstrating the effects of force and motion, this technology captures the fascination Teachers using the interactive whiteboard can of all involved. Most whiteboard brands come accommodate different learning styles. Tacwith built in video players that allow tile learners can benthe instructor to pause and using a “ In most cases three to four efit from touching and pen make written notes and/or point marking at the board, out specific ideas presented in the audio learners can have video clip. One of the greatest funcpads can be purchased for the class discussion, tions in using the interactive whitevisual learners can see board when giving a demonstration/ what is taking place presentation, is the capability to save the price of one board. The as it develops at the and print all the notes made during board. the demonstration. These saved files The interactive whiteand printouts can be used for the same powerful software comes board is made and sold students absent on the day of the by several different demonstration and later for review companies. Although of the material presented. with the pads as with the each may be slightly different, they all work Collaborative learning takes place on the same premise in the classrooms with an interactive and come with their boards.” whiteboard. In the one-computer own software – some classroom using technology in stusoftware packages have dent collaboration can occur with more bells and whistles only 2-3 students at a time. On the other hand, than others. Interactive whiteboard brands on with the interactive whiteboard connected to the market today include: eBeam, InterWrite, that computer students can work together with Mimio, Parmetheon, Polyvision, Smartboard, and individuals contributing at the board, others at Starboard. A quick search on the Internet will the computer, and the group as a whole dis-

Want to learn more about using the interactive whiteboard in your classroom, check out this web site put together by the U.S. Department of Education: http://www.fsdb.k12.fl.us/rmc/ tutorials/whiteboards.html#resources It includes company names, tutorials, interactive sites, ideas for using the interactive board in your classroom, and software downloads. Contact Martha Mangels: Phone: 573-986-6739 Fax: 573-651-2380 Email: mlmangels@semo.edu

Congratulations! 2008 Distinction in Performance Awards Advance Altenburg Arcadia Valley Bell City Bernie Central R-III Chaffee Delta R-V Dexter Farmington Fredericktown Jackson R-II Kelso

Leopold Nell Holcomb Oak Ridge Oran Puxico Richland R-I Ripley Co. R-III Scott Co. R-IV Ste. Genevieve Co. R-II Van Buren West St. Francois Co. R-IV

Woodland Zalma


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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

Reading Recovery News By Gala Kolb

New Certificate Program Dr. Nancy Aguinaga

The College of Education at Southeast is developing a Certificate Program in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). This program will enable students to attain knowledge and skills essential in making a positive impact on individuals with ASD. The increasing prevalence and large research-to-practice gap in educational programs drives this critical need. The 15 credit hour certificate program will be available as an add-on to an undergraduate or graduate degree, or to non-degree seeking students. The program requirements will include the following five 3 credit courses: EX 555: Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorders (Register NowOffered in Spring ’09) EX 556: Speech & Communication Strategies EX 557: Behavior Management & Interventions EX 558: Seminar: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders EX 559: Clinical Practicum For more information please contact Dr. Nancy Aguinaga at naguinaga.semo.edu

Request for Used Textbooks from the Advising Center The Advising Center is collecting elementary social studies texts for inclusion in the CBASE preparatory library in Scully. Please give your donations to SE RPDC Counsultants when they are in your district or you may drop them off at the College of Education on the Southeast Campus, attention Dr. Joe Huskey.

T

he Reading Recovery® University Training Center (UTC) at Southeast Missouri State is in its third year of operation and currently accepting applications for Reading Recovery (RR) teacher leader training in 2009-2010. The Southeast UTC is one of twenty five centers nationwide that offers school systems and teacher leader candidates initial yearlong training (21 graduate hours) and ongoing professional development required to implement and operate a RR teacher training site. Upon successful completion of training, candidates receive university endorsement as a certified RR teacher leader. Endorsement enables teacher leaders to return to their home districts to provide RR teacher training to area schools. At present, Missouri’s 20 training sites and 20 teacher leaders provide RR teacher training, ongoing professional development, and implementation support for 144 school systems and 542 teachers statewide. Since 1997-1998 with funding support through the Missouri Statewide Early Literacy Intervention Program (MSELIP), over 50,000 first grade students have benefitted from RR. Through intervention services, highly qualified literacy teachers design and

deliver a short-term series (1220 weeks) of individualized literacy lessons to the lowest performing students with the goal of bringing them to the average band of literacy achievement in the classroom. RR is a half-time teaching assignment with the remainder of the school day devoted to other teaching responsibilities such as providing small groups of K-6 students with supplemental literacy instruction. On average, RR teachers serve 30 students daily. Teacher leaders also provide training in best literacy K-6 classroom practices including instructional strategies for classroom and small group interventions. In 2009-2010, teacher leaders will expand course offerings to include a companion training model to Reading Recovery entitled Literacy Lessons™. This series of specialized coursework and model of continuous professional development is specifically designed for the training of special educators in instructional techniques that will assist them in meeting the diverse needs of the students they serve. Together, training opportunities in RR, in the classroom and in special education will enable schools to effectively implement a Response to Intervention (RtI) approach. RR is grounded in scientifically based reading research (SBRR) in areas of phonemic awareness, phonics instruction, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. In March 2007 the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC), a research branch of the United States Department of Education, released an independent review of RR research and re-

ported that all evidence standards for SBRR were met without conflicting evidence. Specifically, the WWC gave its highest ratings to RR as an effective evidence-based program with reported positive effects on students’ skills in alphabetics and general reading achievement, as well as potentially positive effects on skills in comprehension and fluency. In July 2007, a WWC followup report revealed that RR is the only program to show positive and potentially positive effects across all four domains For more information about how RR can be implemented in tandem with various state initiatives and literacy frameworks including but not limited to Reading First, the Missouri Reading Initiative, the Missouri Integrated Model (MIM) and the Four-Blocks® Literacy Model, please contact Gayla Kolb at Southeast Missouri State University at (573) 986-6765 or gkolb@semo.edu. Mrs. Kolb serves as the Southeast UTC Director and Reading Recovery trainer. General program information about RR can also be found at www.readingrecovery.org. RR is recognized by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) as an evidenced-based program. RR teacher training is also recognized by DESE as meeting criteria for highly qualified teacher endorsement in the area of reading.

Southeast Students Present at National Conference

S

ix education majors from Southeast Missouri State University recently did presentations at the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) conference in Dallas, TX. The NAEYC Annual Conference is the largest early childhood education conference in the world, where tens of thousands of educators choose from hundreds of presentations and exhibits. With faculty support from the Elementary, Early and Special Education department, these senior education majors prepared and presented three different hour-long sessions at the national conference. Hayley Buchheit (Perryville, MO), Piccola Humphrey (Jackson, MO), and Natasha Bennett (Xenia, IL ) presented on the topic “Oh, the Places You’ll Go! Planning

and Implementing Enriching Field Trips for Kindergartners.” Malissa Beecham (St. Louis, MO) and early childhood faculty member, Dr. Julie Ray presented the topic “Families in Transition: Standing Beside Children and Families Going Through Difficult Changes.” Kathryn Ebers (Walsh, IL), Amy Kavanaugh (Manchester, MO), and early childhood / elementary faculty member, Ms. Sharon Dees, presented the topic “From Scribbles to Script: Evaluating What Children Want to Say.” Students received funding for their travel from the Provost’s Student Professional Development Funds. These students are currently student teaching and will be graduating from Southeast MO State University in December, 2008.

Piccola Humphrey, Hayley Buchheit, and Natasha Bennett


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Look Out Village Here They Come Mary Harriet Talbut Instructor, Southeast Missouri State University Department of Middle and Secondary Education At the beginning of every semester there is excitement and expectations at all levels in the education profession. Just like there is a new crop of students found in the classroom, there is a new crop of pre-service or student teachers as well. To paraphrase an old saying, “It takes a village to make a teacher.” The village of higher education has presented the best prepared pre-service teachers to the profession. These individuals have been taught lesson preparation based upon the latest research on learning

Meet the Dean Southeast Newswire The dean of the College of Education is Dr. Margaret Noe. Dr. Noe was formerly associate chancellor for access and equal opportunity and associate professor of educational leadership at the University of Illinois at Springfield. “Dr. Noe brings years of educational experience as well as a legal background to the College,” said Dr. Jane Stephens, Southeast provost. Noe said she became interested in the dean’s position at Southeast because of the reputation for excellence and the depth of the quality of programs for which the College of Education and the University are well-known. Dr. Noe has an extensive background in education. Earlier in her career, Noe served as the superintendent of the Bourbonnais Elementary Schools District No. 53 and Elmwood Community Unit School District N. 322. Prior to that, she taught math and served as dean of students, division head and director of curriculum and personnel at Limestone Community High School. She also has served as extension coordinator for Illinois Central College, a seventh and eighth grade math and language arts teacher at St. Philomena’s Catholic School and a group home parent for The Children’s Home, both in Peoria, Ill. As the Access and Equal Opportunity officer at the University of Illinois at Springfield, Noe was responsible for educating, informing and enforcing university policies and procedures and federal and state law related to human rights, sexual harassment, discrimination, disability services, and access and equal opportunity. She made recommendations

and success in the classroom. They have been taught on and with the latest technology available to educators and they know how best to apply it in the classroom. Ask them to show it to you. It may seem like the students are dropped off at the schools and field supervisors are sent to evaluate their soon to be graduates but there is a connection to the university. Some of the pre-service teachers will be brought back to the university for additional professional development between their two eight week assignments to give them additional tools to be successful in the profession. Pre-service teachers go out to the classrooms across the state as part of the final stages of their educational program. Many of them are required to do a capstone project and in the case of our university, a Teacher Work Sample or reflective unit plan. This just may seem like a very extensive assignment, but as any educator knows, it is what good teachers do all the time; look at the context in which they teach, pre-assess what do their students already know, assess what do they learned and reflect upon the deci-

sions they made as teachers which allowed learning to take place. Don’t be afraid to discuss this project with any pre-service teacher, as reflection is an important part of this project and teaching in general. What responsibilities does the village of the PK-12 educational village have? We have all heard stories of the cooperating teacher who on the second day handed the classroom over to the pre-service teacher, said teach Chapter X and were never seen again until it was time for the student teacher to go on to their next assignment. This may happen, but the real scenario is many good and masterful teachers giving advice and counsel all through the preservice teacher time in the classroom to help ease the transition to the profession of teaching. They provide advice and counsel to these individuals which impacts how they teach in their own classroom for years to come. The pre-service teachers have heard the terms internal and external curriculum alignment and may even know what they mean, but it is up to the master teacher to provide the depth of understanding. This can be done by showing them examples

for policy, performed education and training seminars and conducted compliance reviews and investigations of complaints. She reviewed and approved all student recruitment and admission practices and supervised and approved all employment search plans, interviews and hiring of faculty, administration and academic professionals. Noe reported to the chancellor and represented the chancellor’s administration on the Senate Committee on Rights, Opportunity, Access and Diversity, and to the campus

to become a teacher.”I teach because I love teaching. I teach because I can make a difference,” she said. “That driving force has led me to a career which including becoming a classroom teacher, a building administrator, a district superintendent, a school law professor, a college administrator and an advocate. In each of these responsibilities, I make a difference in the lives of the people and the communities I served.” “Education is a critical part of

Diversity Task Force. She also served on the University of Illinois Council of Equal Opportunity Officers, who reported to the president of the University of Illinois. In addition, Noe taught graduate and doctoral level courses in law, public policy, leadership and the superintendency. She recruited and advised graduate students in the educational administration program, assisted with the Administrator’s Roundtable, and served on master’s project committees, and on a number of departmental, college, campus and university committees. Noe said she discovered at a very early age that she was destined

American society,”she continued.“We need a well-educated workforce, and the College of Education has an important role to play in preparing teachers, administrators and counselors. Additionally, the college serves an important role in the professional development of area educators and maintains successful partnerships with area schools and public service agencies.” Noe is serving on the Publications Review Board and the Exemplary Schools Review Board of the American Association of School Administrators, and on the Human Rights Section Council of the Illinois State Bar Association. In 2004, she was honored with the “Dare to Be Great!”

of how they align their own curriculum and make sure the pre-service teacher aligns their lessons to the district curriculum as well. Pre-service teachers have been taught to make sure their objectives match their assessments, but the cooperating teacher can illustrate the importance as they do it every day. Principals and other administrators should check in on the pre-service teacher to show their support and encourage professional communication between administration and teacher. Both villages of PK-12 and Higher Education are needed to create the best and most prepared teachers. We all know the first year of teaching is difficult at best and overwhelming at worst. With all of us taking our professional responsibilities to heart, the ones who benefit the most are the students sitting in the classrooms for years to come. Comments? mhtalbut@semo.edu

award granted by the Illinois Women Administrators for outstanding leadership in education by Illinois women educators and leaders at the annual conference of the Illinois Women Administrators. Also in 2004, she was nominated and inducted into the Horace Mann Society, and honorary society to promote leadership for American Public Education. Noe holds a law degree from Southern Illinois University; a doctoral degree and a master’s of education degree, both in educational administration from Illinois State University; and a bachelor of arts degree in education with emphasis in history and mathematics from Eureka College. She is a member of the American Association of School Administrators, the Illinois Association of School Administrators, the National Council of Professors of Educational Administration, the Illinois Council of Professors of Educational Administration, the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Illinois Principals Association, Illinois Women Administrators, the University of Illinois at Springfield’s Administrator’s Roundtable, Phi Delta Kappa, Kappa Delta Pi and Alpha Chi. Noe is a member of the American Bar Association, the Illinois State Bar Association, the Education Law Association, Phi Alpha Delta, and the past chair of the Education Law Section Council. Prior to joining the University of Illinois at Springfield, she taught for two years in the Department of Educational Administration and Higher Education at Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, while attending law school. You may contact Dr. Margaret Noe at 573-651-2408 or by email at: mnoe@ semo.edu. For more information about the Southeast Missouri State University College of Education visit the web page at: http://www.semo.edu/education/

Graduate Credit Offerings Rick McClard Southeast Missouri State University working with the Southeast Regional Professional Development Center and the partnership school districts will be offering the possibility of graduate credit for many of the workshops offered through the RPDC. Theses graduate courses are from the variable topics course list targeting practices that can be implemented in a classroom, building or district wide setting. The basic requirements and fees are: ONE CREDIT HOUR Fee for partner school district employee is $50.00 15 hours of documented time (including workshop hours) learning, implementing, and assessing workshop strategies. Documentation of implementation (varies with each course offering). Reflection/rationale about the implementation process. TWO CREDIT HOURS Fee for a partner school district employee is $75.00 30 hours of documented time (including workshop hours) learning, implementing, and assessing workshop strategies. Documentation of implementation (varies with each course offering). Reflection/rationale about the implementation process. THREE CREDIT HOURS Fee for a partnership school district employee is $100.0 45 hours of documented time (including workshop hours) learning, implementing, and assessing workshop strategies. Documentation of implementation (varies with each course offering). Reflection/rationale about the implementation process.


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Teach to Reach ALL Students $50 Member $100 Non Member Per Workshop Tiers of Intervention- January 22, 2009 This workshop will address the third critical corollary question of a Professional Learning Community, "What do we do if students didn't learn it?â&#x20AC;? The focus for this meeting will be on developing tiers of intervention to use in your buildings. Please bring a copy of the interventions currently in place. Gain new innovative ideas to help develop your tiers.

Differentiated Instruction - March 19, 2009

Pre-Register Online www4.semo.edu/rpdc Call 573-651-5161

This workshop will address the fourth critical corollary question of a Professional Learning Community, "What do we do if students already know it?" The focus for this meeting will be on differentiating your instruction to meet the needs of the higher achieving students in your building. If applicable, please bring a copy of your current practices. Gain new innovative ideas to help you differentiate

Southeast Regional Professional Development Center Innovation Center - Second Floor 920 Broadway, One University Plaza MS 0120 Cape Girardeau, MO 63701 573-651-5161/800-401-6680 fax: 573-651-2380 email: rpdc@semo.edu Pre-Registration and Cancellation Policy: Pre-registration for Southeast RPDC workshops is required. Cancellations will be honored with a full refund if received 2 business days prior to workshop. Registrations received after the registration deadline and walk-ins will be charged an additional fee of $10. No-shows and cancellations after the registration deadline will be charged the full price of the workshop. School districts may substitute pre-registrations without penalty, however.


Page 14

Improvement Grant Planning with Susan Hekmat, Denis Moore, and Tiffiney Smith This training is designed to assist the public agencies in developing an Improvement Grant. Improvement Grant Planning is a process by which districts can evaluate the strengths and needs of their special education academic program to meet the learning requirements of their students. It is useful as part of a continual process to assess the district’s ability to meet the State Performance Plan (SPP) Indicator goals. This is a work session for districts that are applying for an improvement grant. Those districts are highly encouraged to send a team to this training as the presentation has been enhanced to include more in depth examples, more detailed improvement planning information, an updated scoring guide and information about entering improvement plans into the DESE's Electronic Planning and Electronic Grants System (ePeGS). Participants will be provided with answers to specific questions about the process of writing the grant and assistance in developing their grant. At least one of the attendees should be the district team person who will be responsible for completing the district’s Special Education Improvement Plan.

February 3, 2009 9:00AM - 3:00PM SE Innovation Center Room 202 $50 Member / $100 Non-Member Register: www4.semo.edu/rpdc

Watch for these Upcoming Events! Show Me Success Conference Autism Institute 5th Annual Southeast Technology Conference

Join Suzette Southwick for Data Collection, Curriculum Based Assessments and the Standards Based IEP

Career Clusters 9:00-11:30 Clusters, Personal Plans, Resources Join Camille MacDonald and Tanya DeGonia Career Education Coordinators for MCCE

Schools not only teach crucial academic, social, and behavioral skills, they are also required to measure individual children's acquisition and mastery of those school related skills. Measurement of a child’s abilities is as important as the teaching of those skills. Participants will learn how to: • Consider Grade Level Expectations • Identify and define the target skill or behavior • Select an appropriate data collection method • Collect baseline data • Collect intervention data • Determine data collection for generalization • Summarize progress and data • Make on-going instructional decisions based upon the data.

January 27, 2009 9:00 AM to 3:30 PM SE RPDC Innovation Center Room 202 Pre-Registration Required Please go to: http://www4.semo.edu/rpdc Cost: $60 Member / $110 Non-Member

This "hands on" workshop provides an overview of the Career Clusters framework and how it can be used to link what students learn in school with the knowledge and skills they will need for college, career development and work, along with how the clusters bring relevance into the classroom. The clusters benefit students, staff and employers. Numerous cluster resources/activities along with career gender resources/activities will be given.

12:30-2:30 Curriculum Manager Training Join Renee Bales-Missouri Field Trainer for Missouri Connections This workshop is a follow-up of the Clusters Workshop. Learn how to build a master database of your district courses and align them with clusters.Create a custom curriculum template where students can develop their Personal Plans of Study. You will need to bring a list of your school course offerings.

February 17, 2009 No Cost Workshops SE Innovation Center Room 202 Register: http://www4.semo.edu/rpdc


Page 15

How To Register For A Workshop Using My Learning Plan Start at the SE RPDC webpage http://www4.semo.edu/rpdc Choose “View All Upcoming Workshops” Click on the title of the workshop you would like to attend Click the “Enroll” button Choose “I’m a New User” or “I’m a Registered User” Follow the instructions. Questions? Please call Robin Smith at 573-651-2228


Southeast Regional Professional Development Center 1University Plaza, MS 0120 Cape Girardeau, MO 63701 573-651-5161



















 

   

 



        



   

 

  









   

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2009 SE RPDC Winter News  

Professional development news for educators in Southeast Missouri. This newsletter highlights upcoming professional development training, o...