Page 1

Southeast RPDC Summer News

Southeast Regional Professional Development Center. 920 Broadway, Cape Girardeau, MO 63701 573-651-5161. Fax 573-651-2308. Email rpdc@semo.edu. Website http:www4.semo.edu/rpdc

Greetings from Southeast RPDC T

from Unleashing the Clickers (Classroom Performance Systems), to Instructional Strategies that Work in the Algebra I and Biology Classrooms, to the Technology Conference at the end of July – and a whole wealth of opportunities throughout the summer. Our continued focus at Southeast RPDC is “HOW” to effectively integrate the activities in school districts and provide Today, the most frequently asked question of modeling/coaching follow-ups without adding anothour consultants is . . . how will the legislative reduction er layer to a teacher’s day. That is our challenge; that in funding affect the RPDCs and the related program- is our goal. ming that has been established? In response, at this Included in the newsletter is a copy of the time the initial effect of the twenty-five (25%) percent Closing the Gap MSIP – Cycle 4 Classroom Observation Form. Please reduction will not be known for a few more weeks. with Tom Anderson and note the emphasis on the Instructional Processes – Once the revised budgets are approved by the State Arvilla Early and the use of Cooperative Learning Strategies. Once Board of Education and the Joint Committee of Legagain, Southeast RPDC is pleased to host the experts islators identifies the services to be approved, Southfrom Canada in July. Chris Ward and Jim Craigen will east RPDC will receive notice of grant funding. I will Lost in Transition be meeting with the Executive Board of the Southeast spend two days in July sharing the most current findwith Susan Hekmat ings on Brain Research and how students learn; then Superintendents’ Association as well as the Executive three days will be spent modeling the use of CooperaBoard of Southeast RPDC to determine how The Centive Learning Strategies in the classroom. As most ter might continue the work with consortium school STARRS participants will state: Cooperative districts. More detailed information New and Rising Learning is not just having a group will be shared with you at a later date. of students work together on a projSoutheast In the meantime, Southeast ect, but is a highly-focused process Technology Opportunities team members are RPDC will be continuing the trek forof learning. Curious? Check out this for the Classroom providing collaborative information on our website. ward. As summer approaches, there are numerous professional developactivities to assist Continually, our charge is to provide ment seminars and trainings planned D.O.K. and You! teachers in the rigor and relevance in our programthat might spark your interest and implementation process. ming through the establishment of efneeds. The studies and on-sight obfective relationships with consortium servations in our Reading First (both How much do you know educators. If we can be of assistance funded and non-funded) districts are about Positive Behavior to you or your district, please do not showing strong indicators of suchesitate contacting us. Consider this as an invitation Support? Take this quiz! cess in the Southeast region; student achievement in to visit our Center located at 920 Broadway in Cape participating school districts continues to increase. More districts are requesting services as a non-funded Girardeau, check out some of the learning resources IEP Changes from the library (or visit the Resource Library via the district. Several opportunities for teachers, adminisInternet), and visit with our many consultants -- all trators, paraprofessionals and even classroom subHave You DIBEL’d Lately? specialists in their fields of learning. stitutes will be provided training sessions in various locations. This is an exciting time for our four ReadFind out with Reading First ing First Instructional Specialists and their respective schools. Wishing you a relaxing and fun-filled summer! See Retinitis Pigmentosa you soon! Technology and its integration into the instructional and assessment process are key ingrediProfessional Learning ents for enhancing school improvement initiatives. Communities Southeast team members are providing collaborative Cheri Fuemmeler, Director activities to assist teachers in the implementation process. Professional development trainings range he MAP tests have been boxed and shipped; banquets and assemblies have been held to celebrate and recognize students’ successes and achievements; the final year-end countdown is at an end; summer school adventures are being planned. Hopefully, you experienced a highly rewarding year of learning.

In This Issue

Southeast Regional Professional Development Center 920 Broadway, MS 0120 Cape Girardeau, MO 63701 573-651-5161/Fax 573-651-2308 Email: rpdc@semo.edu Web: http://www4.semo.edu/rpdc

Outlearning the Wolves A book review by Rebecca Rider, Assistant Director


Closing the Gap with Tom Anderson and Arvilla Early

F

ifteen CLOSE THE GAP school districts completed the training on closing the achievement gap for their students. The importance of vocabulary and the use of various learning strategies is evident in the classrooms and hallways. Many classrooms are using vocabulary notebooks as a way of helping students learn the vocabulary words that are presented by the teacher. Marzano’s Six Step Vocabulary Plan, Frayer Models and other concept maps are included in instruction by the teacher.

Vocabulary Becomes

***Visual*** Word Walls are displayed around the classroom for for instruction and review.

Learn to use your classroom response systems!

Forr More Information Fo In on Close the Gap Cont Contact: Tom m Ande Anderson: derson: 573-651-2730 573-651-2 tanderson@semo.edu or Arvill Arvilla Early: 573- 651-2704 651 aearly@semo.edu


Have You DIBEL’d Lately?

W

hat if you could DIBEL for FREE! You can. Just go to http: //dibels.uoregon. edu You can download DIBELS tests for kindergarten through sixth grade as well as administration and scoring guides. Printed versions can also be purchased if you want to save time and have booklets that will last. Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) is an example of a curriculum based measurement (CBM) which corresponds to the five big ideas of reading (phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency and comprehension).

is brief, one to two minutes; and three to four measures are given at each grade level. DIBELS benchmark raw scores are norm referenced and percentiles are given on reports from the DIBELS data system. The benchmark results are an effective and efficient way to identify children who are not on track to be good readers. Results are used in conjunction with additional assessments to determine grouping so that appropriate intervention can be implemented.

Throughout the school year the progress monitoring DIBELS is an assessment portion of DIBELS is admintool that consists of seven istered every two weeks. measures (Initial Sound The progress monitoring Fluency, Phoneme Segmen- test takes only three to five tation Fluency, Nonsense minutes to administer and Word Fluency, Oral Readprovides ongoing informaing Fluency, Retell Fluency, tion on student progress. Word Use Fluency, Letter Results are used to inform Naming Fluency)that have instruction in whole group, been proven to be predicsmall group, and interventive of future reading suction lessons. cess. Data can be tracked and The benchmark portion of charted by hand or on DIBELS is a screening and line at various sources and outcome based tool that is costs. Administration of the administered at the begin- test can be expedited with ning, middle and end of the the use of a PDA. school year. Each measure

Presently at least thirty school districts in Southeast Missouri are using DIBELS. DIBELS The Practical Manual 2006 Sopris West Linda Farrell, Carrie Hancok, Susan Smartt

For More Information Call Betty McIntrye 573-986-4902 bmcintyre@semo.edu Anita Nall 573-986-6003 anall@semo.edu Carol Reimann 573-986-6056 creimann@semo.edu Melanie Whitener 573-651-5962 mwhitener@semo.edu

Featured Pictures: 2007-2008 Readng First Coaches


D.O.K. Depth of Knowledge A thorough tutorial on the concept of DOK appears at the following website: http://www.wcer.wisc.edu/wat/ Tutorial/LangArtsDOKDef.aspx

D

epth of Knowledge, DOK, yes another educational acronym. These three little letters are now appearing all over educational material including the MAP Test. Due to the fact that states have been required by NCLB to ensure that their assessments truly reflect the level of thinking required by their standards, Missouri has adopted Dr. Norman Webb’s DOK measurement tool to meet these guidelines. Dr. Norman Webb, of the University of Wisconsin, developed DOK as a way to ensure that one gets to the heart of a task or question in considering its complexity. What exactly is DOK and how does it affect teachers? What DOK is‌ • a common language for discussing complexity • a tool for alignment • a conversation starter • a way to “tuneâ€? common assessments • a part of reflective teaching • language used in 4th cycle MSIP curriculum reviews • a measurement tool Note: DOK measures the degree to which the knowledge elicited from students on assessments is as complex as what students are expected to know and do as stated in the curriculum/GLEs/Show-Me Standards. What DOK is not‌ • a state mandate • anything new • a silver bullet • based on verbs Affect on Classrooms and Teachers‌ Most importantly, DOK is not an attempt to cause teachers more stress—although I fear it has! For an effective teacher, this simply means “be mindful of the level on which you are teaching and concurrently what level you are assessing your students.â€? Allow your students to experience and practice higher order thinking activities and assessments. Produced By: SE RPDC MAP Consultants

$EPTHOF+NOWLEDGE$/+ ,EVELS $RAW $ElNE

)DENTIFY -EMORIZE

,IST ,ABEL

)LLUSTRATE 7HO 7HAT 7HEN 7HERE 7HY -EASURE !RRANGE .AME 3TATE 4ABULATE 2EPEAT 2EPORT )NFER 5SE 4ELL $ESIGN 2ECALL 1UOTE #ATEGORIZE 2ECOGNIZE #ALCULATE

2ECITE

#ONNECT

-ATCH

,EVEL /NE

3YNTHESIZE

#OLLECTAND$ISPLAY )DENTIFY0ATTERNS 'RAPH

2ECALL

,EVEL &OUR

!PPLY#ONCEPTS

%XTENDED 4HINKING

#RITIQUE

$ESCRIBE %XPLAIN )NTERPRET

#REATE 0ROVE

2EVISE !PPRISE

3KILL #ONCEPT

0REDICT

%STIMATE

)NTERPRET

#OMPARE

$ISTINGUISH

2ELATE

5SE#ONTEXT#UES

!SSESS $EVELOPA,OGICAL!RGUMENT #ONSTRUCT

-AKE/BSERVATIONS 3UMMARIZE 3HOW

5SE#ONCEPTSTO3OLVE.ON 2OUTINE0ROBLEMS #RITIQUE

-ODIFY

#AUSE%FFECT

3TRATEGIC4HINKING

For more information please contact the SE RPDC MAP consultants.

#ONSTRUCT

3EPARATE

,EVEL 4WO

,EVEL 4HREE

!NALYZE

/RGANIZE

#LASSIFY

#OMPARE

%XPLAIN0HENOMENAIN4ERMSOF#ONCEPTS &ORMULATE )NVESTIGATE $RAW#ONCLUSIONS (YPOTHESIZE $IFFERENTIATE #ITE%VIDENCE

Julie Antill jantill@semo.edu Tammy Brotherton tsbrotherton@semo.edu

,EVEL4WO!CTIVITIES 2ECALLELEMENTSANDDETAILSOFSTORY )DENTIFYANDSUMMARIZETHEMAJOR EVENTSINANARRATIVE STRUCTURE SUCHASSEQUENCEOF EVENTS CHARACTER PLOTANDSETTING 5SECONTEXTCUESTOIDENTIFYTHE MEANINGOFUNFAMILIARWORDS #ONDUCTBASICMATHEMATICAL CALCULATIONS 3OLVEROUTINEMULTIPLE STEPPROBLEMS ,ABELLOCATIONSONAMAP $ESCRIBETHECAUSEEFFECTOFA PARTICULAREVENT 2EPRESENTINWORDSORDIAGRAMSA SCIENTIlCCONCEPTORRELATIONSHIP )DENTIFYPATTERNSINEVENTSOR BEHAVIOR 0ERFORMROUTINEPROCEDURESLIKE MEASURINGLENGTHORUSING &ORMULATEAROUTINEPROBLEMGIVEN PUNCTUATIONMARKSCORRECTLY DATAANDCONDITIONS $ESCRIBETHEFEATURESOFAPLACEOR /RGANIZE REPRESENTANDINTERPRET PEOPLE DATA ,EVEL/NE!CTIVITIES

Joyce Penland jpenland@semo.edu 573-986-6794

,EVEL4HREE!CTIVITIES 3UPPORTIDEASWITHDETAILSAND EXAMPLES 5SEVOICEAPPROPRIATETOTHE PURPOSEANDAUDIENCE )DENTIFYRESEARCHQUESTIONSAND DESIGNINVESTIGATIONSFORA SCIENTIlCPROBLEM $EVELOPASCIENTIlCMODELFORA COMPLEXSITUATION $ETERMINETHEAUTHORSPURPOSE ANDDESCRIBEHOWITAFFECTSTHE INTERPRETATIONOFAREADING SELECTION !PPLYACONCEPTINOTHERCONTEXTS

,EVEL&OUR!CTIVITIES #ONDUCTAPROJECTTHATREQUIRES SPECIFYINGAPROBLEM DESIGNINGAND CONDUCTINGANEXPERIMENT ANALYZING ITSDATA ANDREPORTINGRESULTS SOLUTIONS !PPLYMATHEMATICALMODELTO ILLUMINATEAPROBLEMORSITUATION !NALYZEANDSYNTHESIZE INFORMATIONFROMMULTIPLESOURCES $ESCRIBEANDILLUSTRATEHOWCOMMON THEMESAREFOUNDACROSSTEXTSFROM DIFFERENTCULTURES $ESIGNAMATHEMATICALMODELTO INFORMANDSOLVEAPRACTICAL ORABSTRACTSITUATION

7EBB .ORMAN,ANDOTHERSh7EB!LIGNMENT4OOLv*ULY7ISCONSIN#ENTEROF%DUCATIONAL2ESEARCH5NIVERSITYOF7ISCONSIN -ADISON&EBHTTPWWWWCERWISCEDU7!4INDEXASPX


Instructional Strategies, D.O.K., and Technology Use are integral parts of your curriculum! MSIP 4th C Cycle l Cl Classroom Ob Observation ti FForm District ______________________ Building ____________ Room No. _______ Team Member _____________________________ Date ___________________ Time ____________ ‰ Beginning ‰ Middle ‰ End

Grade Level __________________________

Subject/Learning Objective _____________________________________________________________________________________ Was Instructional activity observed? _________ ‰ Large group ‰ Small group ‰ Independent work ‰ Co-teaching/Class within a class ‰ Special Education self- contained Instructional Delivery Method Observed

Instructional Strategies

(Mark “E” for extensive, “M” for moderate, or “S” for slight)

(Mark “E” for extensive, “M” for moderate, or “S” for slight)

Class discussion

Advance organizers

Cooperative learning (specify structure)

Graphic organizers

Distance learning

Nonlinguistic representation

Group work

Problem-based/project-based learning

Guided practice/modeling

Research - generating and testing hypotheses

Hands-on/experiments/laboratory work

Similarities and differences

Learning centers

Summarizing and note taking

Lecture

Other

Peer evaluation Question and answer Seat work (e.g., worksheets, textbook readings) Student presentations Other

DOK Level

DOK Description

Level 1

Recall

Level 2

Skill/Concept

Level 3

Strategic Thinking

Level 4

Extended Thinking

Student Engagement Level

Teacher Engagement ‰ No

Student Work on Display

Highest Reached

Classroom Learning Environment

‰ High (Above 90%) ‰ Moderate (75-89%) ‰ Low (50-74%) ‰ Disengaged (Below 50%) ‰ Yes

Prevailing

‰ Student work is displayed ‰ Work is displayed with scoring guide ‰ Work is displayed without a scoring guide ‰ Displayed work indicates a high level of learning is expected ‰ Displayed work does not indicate a high level of learning is expected ‰ Level of expectation is not distinguishable through the displayed work ‰ Student work is not displayed

The physical climate is: ‰ Conducive to learning ‰ Somewhat conducive to learning ‰ Not conducive to learning (Check all that apply) ‰ Classroom design ‰ Attractiveness ‰ External disruptions ‰ Cleanliness ‰ Temperature ‰ Other: ___________________ _________________________

________________________ ________________________

Technology Was technology used? ‰ Yes ‰ No If yes, please check the type(s) used and the use level. Type(s) of Technology In Use ‰ Student computer ‰ Digital camera/multimedia ‰ Graphing calculator ‰ Handheld computer ‰ Internet ‰ Lab equipment ‰ Projector ‰ Teacher workstation ‰ Interactive whiteboard ‰ Other ____________________ Technology Use Level ‰ Literacy - Centers on acquiring and practicing technical skills; technology is something to learn. ‰ Adaptive- Automates traditional teacher and student roles; technology is optional. ‰ Transforming - Expands role and/or products; technology is essential.

The instructional climate is: ‰ Conducive to learning ‰ Somewhat conducive to learning ‰ Not conducive to learning (Check all that apply) ‰ Disruptive behavior ‰ Off-task behavior ‰ Lack of organization ‰ Internal disruptions ‰ Other: ________________________ ________________________ ________________________ ________________________

‰ Differentiated instruction observed. Describe __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________ ‰ Teacher reinforced effort or provided feedback. Describe ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________ Comments (if necessary): _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ DESE 3341-52 Rev 8//07

Grade and Course Level Expectations Update!

D

test. Therefore, 8th grade students enrolled in Algebra I will be required to take two (2) exams. Visit the following websites that DESE discuss the new tests: http://www.dese.mo.gov/news/2007/tests. htm; DESE Road Show: Myths and Legends: http://www.dese.mo.gov/divimprove/asA question has been asked many times re- sess/documents/myths_legends_gle_cle_ garding the testing of 8th grade Algebra eoc.pdf students. Any student taking Algebra I or an The Course Level Expectations in Communi- equivalent course will need to take the Algecation Arts, Mathematics and Science will be bra I MAP End-of-Course Exam. Any student available in final version on November 29th enrolled in a school as an 8th grade student (approximate date), and will go into effect will take the 8th grade MAP Mathematics uring the summer of 2007 draft forms of the Grade Level Expectations Version 2.0 in Communication Arts and Mathematics (K-8) were posted on the DESE web site for feedback. Editing is being completed and the final versions will be made available on November 29th (approximate date). GLE Version 2.0 will go into effect for assessment of grades K-8 during the 20092010 school year.

for assessment of English II, Algebra I, and Biology beginning in the fall 2008. A second tier of End-of-Course tests for Algebra II, Geometry, Integrated Math II or III, English I, American History, and American Government will be implemented in the fall 2009.


Special Education News The second annual DESE Summer Institute on Transition will be held July 2125, 2008, in Springfield, MO. You may begin registering your school or teams on www.MyLearningPlan. com. Schools who attend will develop an action plan for their school’s transition needs. There will be several breakout sessions on the various aspects of transition planning.

Lost In Transition?

students with disabilities.

T

ransition Form C ? New IEP forms? TOPs training? Indicator 13? NSTTAC? …Sound familiar? One of education’s most important goals is to prepare students to be fully participating members of their communities. To ensure that this goal is met, schools must provide a comprehensive program-planning, assessment, curriculum, and job/career liaison-for the transition of all their students with disabilities into post-secondary life. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act states that schools must provide specific transition plans for

Transition plans for these students, which must be in place by age 16, are part of the student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP). An area of focus is on the concept of transition planning for students with disabilities to begin for students at all levels of their education- from elementary to middle school and from middle school to high school. Additional transition planning is also a focus for students to transition from high school to a college or other post-secondary learning environment.

Contact Susan to find out how your district may benefit from these and other trainings. You may reach Susan by phone 573-651-2718 or email srhekmat@semo.edu.

Understanding Disabilities ParaProfessional Training September 16, 2008

Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support (SW-PBS) implementation is in full swing across the region. Many of the sites who are involved in the initiative have reported a decrease in office discipline referrals and an increase in staff job satisfaction. To learn more about SW-PBS, please call Brandi Schumacher - 573-651-6895 or email bschumacher@semo.edu. For further information about SW-PBS, please visit the NEW Missouri SW-PBS website at www.pbismissouri.org.

How much do you know about PBS? SW-PBS stands for... 1. Some What a Pretty Big Salad 2. Several Ways to Punish Bad Students 3. Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support 4. Super Whooper Peanut Butter Sandwich

with problem behavior is... 1. Using duct tape where necessary 2. Exclusionary practices (ISS, OSS, time out of class, etc.) 3. Getting them on Dr. Phil’s TV show Increases in student detentions and suspensions (ISS & OSS) have proven effective as long term solutions? 1. True 2. False

According to research, the single most important factor affecting student achievement is... 1. Aligned Curriculum 2. Standards and Benchmarks 3. The Teacher 4. Common Assessments

The most effective response to student behavior is... 1. Social skills training 2. Academic restructuring 3. Behavior interventions 4. Build behavior skills through effective teaching 5. All of the above 6. None of the above

The common school response to students

Investing in prevention results in...

SE RPDC Special Education Consultants

Jennifer Coy Blindness Skills jcoy@semo.edu Susan Hekmat Regional Technical Assistance Coach srhekmat@semo.edu

1. Increased student and staff attendance 2. Decrease in discipline referrals 3. Increase in student perception of school safety 4. Improved academic performance 5. Decrease in referrals to special education 6. Improved faculty/staff retention 7. All of the above Schoolwide PBS is a prevention based approach to behavior? 1. True 2. False Thanks to Christine Combs for providing this quiz!

Denis Moore Compliance Resource Specialist dmmoore@semo.edu

Tiffiney Smith Regional Technical Assistance Coach rpdc@semo.edu

Brandi Schumacher Positive Behavior Support bschumacher@semo.edu

Kim Swedberg Compliance Resource Specialist kswedberg@semo.edu

Vist the Special Education Webpage at: http://www4.semo.edu/ rpdc/spec_ed_consultants.htm


IEP Changes What does it mean for you and your students?

I

n the area of Special Education Compliance several changes have been made to the state IEP forms as well as the Special Education Compliance Program Review Standards and Indicators. The following lists will highlight these changes.

RtI: Response to Interventions Join Susan Hekmat and Tiffiney Smith

Congress has made changes that will impact those given the responsibility to screen, conduct pre-referral intervention and determine special education eligibility. This workshop will focus on the practical aspects of the advantages of integrating RtI into your school-based team making decision under the newly reauthorized IDEA. This workshop will explain some of the key concepts and principles of response to intervention: * Introduction to and rationale for implementing Response to Intervention * Describe in plain language how to conduct RtI within the school * Describe how to know if individual student problems are related to the core curriculum or possible learning disabilities * Focus will include information concerning intervention that may be attempted in the classroom * How RtI benefits general education as well as special education.

IEP Forms *The term “amendment” will be used in place of the term “addendum” *The IEP amendment form now mirrors the order of the IEP form * Form I is now Form F (Modifications and Accommodations) *Form D now reflects MAP Science given in the July 9, 2008 10th grade 9AM - 3PM * The Present Level of Academic Achievement Innovation Center Room 202 and Functional Performance now reflects the $40 Member/$75 Non-Member importance of including transition planning (as Register Online www4.semo.edu/rpdc appropriate) in all areas of the IEP; including Southeast Regional Professional Development Center Innovation Center - Second Floor 920 Broadway, One University Plaza MS 0120 Cape Girardeau, MO 63701 the student’s performance on age-appropriate 573-651-5161/800-401-6680 fax: 573-651-2380 email: rpdc@semo.edu Pre-Registration and Cancellation Policy: Pre-registration for Southeast RPDC workshops is required. transition assessment has been added and the Cancellations will be honored with a full refund if received 2 business days prior to workshop. Registrations received after the registration deadline and walk-ins will be charged an additional fee of $10. No-shows and cancellations after requirement for including a summary of statethe registration deadline will be charged the full price of the workshop. School districts may substitute pre-registrations without penalty, however. and district-wide assessment results has been removed *The goals pages have an added check for students with Post Secondary Transition Plans * New Form C (Post Secondary Transition Plan) * The requirement to include the direction has been removed from IEP goals; Missouri requires S.M.A.R.T goals in which the goals must be specific to a particular skill/behavior, measurable, attainable (within the duration of the IEP), results oriented, and time bound (within one year) Special Education Compliance Program Review Standards and Indicators (updates made after September 14, 2007) * Procedures for in-state and out-of-state transfer students have been addressed separately in the standards * Additions/Deletions to indicators and sub-indicators, reference changes, and formatting changes have been made to the following sections: tudents with retinitis pigmentosa General Information: Cover, Table of Contents, General Use of Manual appreciate extra lighting. Those Section I: State Performance Plan Indicators with albinism may prefer less lightSection II: Program Review Standards [100 Administrative Checklist; ing. A child who is blind may find 200 Special Education Process; 300 Discipline; 550 Transfer Students: Outshadows and light projection helpful of-State; Eligibility Criteria: 1400 Learning Disability, 1500 Language Impairfor traveling. ment, 2000 Vision Impairment, 2100 Young Child with Developmental DeEach student who is blind or visulay]

Blindness Skills

S

ally impaired has unique needs. No student with a visual impairment is the same and even students with a similar visual diagnosis may function very differently. For this reason, assessment of a student’s visual functioning and orientation as well asmobility skills is essential in order to provide meaningful recommendations for educational programming.

The Southeast Blindness Skills Specialist is able to provide appropriate assessments of students with visual impairments in Region 1, in addition to offering professional development opportunities such as workshops or inservices. All BSS services are FREE to eligible districts. You may contact the Southeast BSS, Jennifer Coy, at 573-651-5077 or jcoy@semo.edu.

The revised IEP forms can be accessed at: http://dese.mo.gov/divspeced/Compliance/IEP/Index.html http://dese.mo.gov/divspeced/Compliance/MOSample_Forms/Index.html The revised Special Education Compliance Program Review Standards and Indicators can be accessed at: http://dese.mo.gov/divspeced/Compliance/ StandardsManual/index.html A listing of the corrections made can be found at: http://dese.mo.gov/divspeced/Compliance/StandardsManual/documents/ changesSImanual.pdf Contact Kim Swedberg or Denis Moore, Compliance Resource Officers, at 573-651-5161. Vist the Special Education Webpage at: http://www4.semo.edu/rpdc/spec_ed_consultants.htm


Top Ten Reasons for Using Virtual Manipulatives in Mathematics Class By Linda Null 1. Virtual manipulatives allow free access to teachers and students anytime, anywhere as long as they have on-line capabilities. As a result of their easy access and online availability, teachers may be more apt to use them than the physical manipulatives, which are costly and take more class preparation time. In addition, the learning curve on how to use them is very low. Most take only a few minutes to learn how to manipulate. 2. Virtual manipulatives provide the user multiple representations. For example, the computer can represent the results of a student’s actions of a virtual manipulative with both a visual and symbolic representation at the same time. Linking visual and symbolic representations can assist students in bridging the gap between concrete and abstract thinking and thus can help students have a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts. 3. When used in good, inquiry-driven lessons, virtual manipulatives allow students to experiment with ideas, make conjectures, test hypotheses, and form generalizations. Students have the freedom to test their ideas with little psychological risk of being incorrect. As a result, students feel less threatened to try out their ideas on a computer. 4. Virtual manipulatives save time, thus giving the teacher more time to instruct. For example, virtual tools that investigate topics such as data and probability, aid the teacher in decreasing time spent on actual data collection, leaving more time for analyzing the data and drawing conclusions. Students are able to perform many more experiments with virtual spinners or coins, thus producing more trials and outcomes. Also, the logistics of storing and getting them passed out and put away is not an issue with virtual manipulatives. Clean-up can be accomplished with the click of a mouse. 5. Many virtual manipulatives provide the user with constructive and immediate feedback. Research by Marzano and others claim that providing feedback is the most powerful single innovation for improving student achievement. Students who are given immediate, constructive feedback are also more motivated to learn. 6. Virtual manipulatives are effective in teaching all students, especially visual and tactile learners. However, research reveals that using virtual manipulatives is especially helpful to lower-achieving students or students with learning disabilities. Also, ESL (English as a Second Language) students can access many virtual manipulative sites that provide the instructions in Spanish. Virtual manipulatives give the nonlanguage student a visual way to demonstrate what he/she knows. 7. Virtual manipulatives are very flexible. Teachers can use them for students who need practice in applying various math skills, such as integer operations. They can also be used to challenge students to uses higher level thinking skills. For example, students can be given a probability word problem and then asked to design a test using virtual spinners to simulate the problem. 8. Teachers can use virtual manipulatives to differentiate instruction and assessment. As an example, students who are not yet fluent with a particular skill, such as multiplying polynomials, can obtain the correct solution using virtual algebra tiles. Without the tiles, the student might not otherwise be able to work out the answer using an algorithm only. Allowing students to use manipulatives to demonstrate their math skills is one way for teachers to differentiate process. 9. One advantage virtual manipulatives have over concrete manipulatives is that virtual manipulatives can be altered. This fact allows students to explore “What if� questions and gain a deeper understanding of mathematical principles. 10. The best incentive for using virtual manipulatives is that they make mathematics come alive and more enjoyable. By actively engaging their students with interactive virtual manipulatives, teachers can create a more student-centered learning environment in which students are excited to learn.

Join Linda Null, Martha Short, and Donna Shaver

Navigating Through Data and Probability Are you looking for ways to improve MAP scores in Data Analysis and Probability? This workshop is designed to give you a multitude of ideas and examples on how to incorporate these topics into your curriculum. Participants will receive a copy of NCTM's Navigating Through Data Analysis and Probability appropriate to their specific grade level.

July 30-31, 2008 Innovation Center Room 202 & 214A 9AM - 3PM Cost: Member $100/Non-Member $135 Register Online: www4.semo.edu/rpdc


This fall’s Teachers’ Academy is underway! Our focus areas will include Depth of Knowledge, Co-teaching, Student Engagement, Cooperative Learning, Assessment FOR Learning, and Differentiated Instruction. Wikis, Blogs, Clickers, Digital Storytelling and Clay Animation are a few of the instructional technologies that will be introduced.

For more information about Teachers’ Academy please call: 573-651-5161 or visit our website: http://www4.semo.edu/ rpdc

2007-2008 Teachers’ Academy


P L C ’s N o t J u s t Another Program by Peggy Hitt, Missouri Professional Learning Communities Coordinator Cyndi Morgan, Peggy Hitt , and Pat Baker

A

s the research behind learning trators to better utilize both just makes cation leads to a more positive culture in any building. communities continues to grow, sense. One of the strengths of a learna question we are often asked is “Is Change is not easy nor is it done this just another program?” and right- ing community is training a leadership fully so. With schools under the stress team to collaborate and build a posi- quickly. Building a strong school culof meeting the requirements of NCLB, tive culture in their building. Teaching ture and climate which focuses on stuand managing the fiscal and time costs professionals, who are used to working dent learning is the foundation for continuous school improvement. of professional development for Becoming a member of the staff, this is a legitimate question; The three “Big Ideas” of a learning community are project is not just adding anschools do not need one more “Ensuring Students Learn”, “A Culture of Collaboration”, other program to your school’s thing to do. The answer to the and “Focusing on Results”. professional development question “Is this just another proplan. The Missouri Profesgram?” is a resounding no. in isolation to work and excel as a team sional Learning Communities Project The purpose of the Missouri Pro- is one of the first steps. Teams working is a management system for all school fessional Learning Communities Project well together build a positive culture. improvement efforts. is to provide the framework through Team members and administrators, Contact Peggy Hitt, PLC which all school improvement efforts who have clearly outlined expectaflow. Time and money are school re- tions and well defined parameters for Coordinator at peggy.hitt@dese.mo.gov sources which are always in short sup- decision-making are paving the way for or Cyndi Morgan, PLC Coordinator at ply. So, training teachers and adminis- team collaboration. Better communi- cmorgan@semo.edu.

Join Jim Craigen a n d C h r i s Wa r d

Exerpt from MSIP Cycle 4 Classroom O b s e r v a t i o n Fo r m


Book Review:

Outlearning the Wolves Surviving and Thriving in a Learning Organization By David Hutchens Review by: Rebecca Rider

W

hen I first saw the cover of this book I thought of a picture book. An adult picture book. The sheep herd keeps dwindling in numbers and the sheep don’t know what to do. Although they know why the herd keeps

getting smaller they don’t have any idea how to keep it from happening. They lay victim to their own tunnel vision and stand by feeling helpless. The wolf on the other hand knows exactly what he is doing. As long as the sheep continue to stagnate in their approach to the problem, the wolf can continue to reek havoc on the herd. Sound familiar? Often we work with educators who are faced with a problem but don’t know how to move forward.

The sheep, like many teachers, found that by working together they were able to come up with a way to solve the problem. They looked over the situation, gathered data and made observations before outlining a plan to try. Enough sheep thought it couldn’t hurt to try. Doing something is better than doing nothing. There will always be a few sheep in every herd that only believe the worst --that nothing can be done to change the situation. It is easy for us to tell them what to do or do it The title of this book tells us that the for them, but then they would be no better off sheep finally had enough and decided to do than the sheep. something about their situation. Sometimes it As facilitators we can give schools the takes a real crisis for schools to move beyond “business as usual”. For some schools it could tools to work through problems. And if they be their MSIP findings, for others it could be have the tools, they might not be using them APR results, and for others it could be the ar- or using them effectively. We sometimes have rival of a new administrator who sees the need to help schools “outlearn” the wolves. for change. There are quite a few teachers who are not sheep. These educators are proactive and energetic and willing to think outside the box, if it is in the best interest of their students.

J

oin Becky Rider for a workday designed for members of professional development committees that want to provide powerful professional development to their schools and districts. New committee members will receive training on their responsibilities as PDC members, allowable expenditures for PD, what needs to be considered when planning and implementing staff development programs and effective evaluation. Time will be provided for professional development teams to work on and refine their district’s professional development plans. SE RPDC personnel will be on hand to answer any questions. September 3, 2008 9AM - 3PM Southeast Innovation Center No Cost!

2009 STARR Teachers Gail Burton - Hayti R-II Susan Floyd - Jackson, R-II Laura Green - Jackson R-II

Rising STARR Teachers 2009-2010 Carla Boulton - Bernie R-XIII Carole Henry - Charleston R-I Sandra Kelso - Sikeston R-VI Shana Kight- Jackson R-II


6RXWKHDVW53'&(YHQWV&DOHQGDU 7R5HJLVWHU 2QOLQHZZZVHPRHGXUSGF &OLFN:RUNVKRSV7DE 6FUROOGRZQWRFKRRVHZRUNVKRS )ROORZSURPSWVWRFRPSOHWHUHJLVWUDWLRQ )RUDGGLWLRQDOLQIRUPDWLRQFRQWDFWWKH53'&DWRU 6RPHZRUNVKRSVPD\QRW\HWEHDYDLODEOHRQ0/3

3URIHVVLRQDO'HYHORSPHQW

/RFDWLRQ

'DWH

7LPH

3RUWIROLR6XPPHU,QVWLWXWHZ9%HUQKDUGW ,QQRYDWLRQVLQ%XVLQHVVDQG0DUNHWLQJ(GXF ,QQRYDWLRQVLQ%XVLQHVVDQG0DUNHWLQJ(GXF 0DQDJHZ&ODVV,GHDVIRU6XFFHVVIXO &ODVVURRP0DQDJHPHQW 0DQDJHZ&ODVV ,GHDVIRU6XFFHVVIXO 0DQDJHZ&ODVV,GHDVIRU6XFFHVVIXO &ODVVURRP0DQDJHPHQW 5HDGHUV:RUNVKRS:KDWLVD%DODQFHG/LWHUDF\ $SSURDFK &RQFHSW$WWDLQPHQW 3RZHU:ULWLQJDQG6L[7UDLWV %UDLQ5HVHDUFKZ&UDLJHQ :DUG &RRSHUDWLYH/HDUQLQJZ&UDLJHQ :DUG

6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6W&KDUOHV&RPPXQLW\&ROOHJH 6W&KDUOHV&RPPXQLW\&ROOHJH

0D\ -XQH -XQH

DPSP DPSP DPSP

5HJLVWUDWLRQ 'HDGOLQH 0D\ -XQ -XQ

6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P

-XQH

DPSP

-XQ

6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P

-XQH

DPSP

-XQ

-XQH -XO\ -XO\ -XO -XO -XO -XO\ -XO -XO\ $XJ 6HSW 6HSWHPEHU 6HSW 6HSWHPEHU 6HSWHPEHU 2FWREHU 2FWREHU 2FWREHU

DPSP

1HZ7HDFKHU6XUYLYRU6HULHV.LFN2II WK$QQXDO7HFKQRORJ\&RQIHUHQFH 1DYLJDWLQJWKURXJK'DWD 3UREDELOLW\ *DWHZD\0LVVRXUL:ULWHUV$FDGHP\ 3URIHVVLRQDO'HYHORSPHQW:RUNGD\ -LOO-DFNVRQ$GROHVFHQFH/LWHUDF\ -LOO-DFNVRQ&RDFKLQJ $GPLQLVWUDWRU0HQWRU0HQWHH1HDO3HQEHUWK\ 3%7(-DQLFH5HKDN 7RP6FKOLPSHUW %HJLQQLQJ7HDFKHU:RUNVKRS )RUPDWLYH$VVPWIRU&RXQVHORUV%UDJJ6WDQOH\ 6XUYLYRU6HULHV)ROORZ8S

6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(028QLYHUVLW\&HQWHU0LVVRXULDQD 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02'HPSVWHU*OHQQ$XG 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P /RFDWLRQWREHVFKHGXOHG /RFDWLRQWREHVFKHGXOHG 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(028QLYHUVLW\&HQWHU%DOOURRP 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P

DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP

-XQ -XQ -XO -XO -XO -XO -XO -XO -XO $XJ $XJ 6HS 6HS 6HS 6HS

DPSP DPSP

2FW 2FW

$GYDQFHG6DIHW\7UDLQLQJ*OHQQ%HUU\ 1R0R%XOO\LQJ

6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P

2FWREHU 1RY

DPSP DPSP

2FW 1RY

5HDGLQJ)LUVW

/RFDWLRQ

'DWH

7LPH

5HDGLQJ)LUVW6XVWDLQDEOLW\ 1RQ)XQGHG'LVWULFWV 5HDGLQJ)LUVW1HZ&RDFKHV 7UDLQLQJ 5HDGLQJ)LUVW6XVWDLQDEOLW\ 5HDGLQJ)LUVW)UDPHZRUNIRU8SSHU(OHPHQWDU\ 5HDGLQJ)LUVW1HZ$GPLQLVWUDWRU V0HHWLQJ /(756',%(/6. 1HZSHUVRQQHOWUDLQLQJ

/(756',%(/6. 1HZSHUVRQQHOWUDLQLQJ

',%(/6DQG3DOP7UDLQLQJ /(756',%(/6. 1HZSHUVRQQHOWUJ

5HDGLQJ)LUVW&RDFKHV0HHWLQJ 5HDGLQJ)LUVW&RDFKHV0HHWLQJ -LOO -DFNVRQ 5HDGLQJ )LUVW -LOO-DFNVRQ5HDGLQJ)LUVW -LOO-DFNVRQ5HDGLQJ)LUVW 5HDGLQJ)LUVW$GPLQLVWUDWRUV0HHWLQJ 5HDGLQJ)LUVW&RDFKHV0HHWLQJ 5HDGLQJ)LUVW&RDFKHV0HHWLQJ 5HDGLQJ)LUVW&RDFKHV0HHWLQJ 5HDGLQJ)LUVW$GPLQLVWUDWRUV0HHWLQJ 5HDGLQJ)LUVW&RDFKHV0HHWLQJ 5HDGLQJ)LUVW&RDFKHV0HHWLQJ 5HDGLQJ)LUVW&RDFKHV0HHWLQJ 5HDGLQJ)LUVW&RDFKHV0HHWLQJ

8&,QGLDQ5RRP 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 3RSODU%OXII$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ%OGJ 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P &KDUOHVWRQ:DUUHQ(+HDUQHV(OHP 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02 *OHQQ $XGLWRULXP 6(02*OHQQ$XGLWRULXP 0LQHUDO$UHD&ROOHJH 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P

0D\ -XQH -XQH -XO\ -XO\ -XO\ -XO\ $XJ $XJ $XJXVW 6HSWHPEHU 6HSW   6HSW 6HSW 2FWREHU 2FWREHU 1RYHPEHU -DQXDU\ )HEUXDU\ )HEUXDU\ 0DUFK $SULO 0D\

DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP  DP  SP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP

0DWK

/RFDWLRQ

'DWH

7LPH

8VLQJ7HFKQRORJ\,QVWU6WUDWWKDW:RUN$OJHEUD%LRORJ\

6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P$

-XQH-XO\

1DYLJDWLQJ7KURXJK'DWD$QDO\VLV 3UREDELOLW\

-XO

DPSP DPSP

5HJLVWUDWLRQ 'HDGOLQH -XQ -XO

7HFKQRORJ\

/RFDWLRQ

'DWH

7LPH

5HJLVWUDWLRQ 'HDGOLQH

+RZWR&RDFK7HDFK:KR'RQ W7KLQN/LNH<RX%'DYLV

DPSPDPSP

DPSP DPSP DPSPDPSP

To Register For SE RPDC Workshops Go To: http:www4.semo.edu/rpdc For Questions Please Call: 573-651-5161 Email: rpdc@semo.edu

5HJLVWUDWLRQ 'HDGOLQH 0D\ -XQ -XQ -XQ -XO -XO -XO -XO $XJ $XJ 6HS  6HS 6HS 6HS 2FW 2FW 1RY 'HF )HE )HE 0DU $SU 0D\


8QOHDVKLQJWKH&OLFNHUV 8VLQJ7HFKQRORJ\,QVWU6WUDWWKDW:RUN$OJHEUD%LRORJ\

WK$QQXDO7HFKQRORJ\&RQIHUHQFH 1DYLJDWLQJ7KURXJK'DWD$QDO\VLV 3UREDELOLW\

6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02'HPSVWHU*OHQQ$XG 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P$

-XQH -XQH-XO\

-XO -XO

DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP

&ORVHWKH*DS

/RFDWLRQ

'DWH

&ORVH7KH*DS &ORVH7KH*DS &ORVH7KH*DS &ORVH7KH*DS

6(025LYHU&DPSXV&RQYRFDWLRQ&WU 6(025LYHU&DPSXV&RQYRFDWLRQ&WU 6(025LYHU&DPSXV&RQYRFDWLRQ&WU /RFDWLRQWREHVFKHGXOHG

$XJXVW 1RYHPEHU -DQXDU\ 0D\

7LPH

6SHFLDO(GXFDWLRQ

/RFDWLRQ

'DWH

7RSLFVLQ/RZYLVLRQ,,,Z'U5DQG\-RVH 5HVSRQVHWR,QWHUYHQWLRQ 5W,

6:3%6,QWHUQDO&RDFKHV 8QGHUVWDQGLQJ 'LVDELOLWLHV 8QGHUVWDQGLQJ'LVDELOLWLHV 6:3%60HHWLQJ &RPSOLDQFH:RUNVKRS &RPSOLDQFH:RUNVKRS 6HOI$VVHVVPHQW&RPSOLDQFH,37UDLQLQJ 6:3%60HHWLQJ *UDQW:ULWLQJ 6:3%60HHWLQJ *UDQW:ULWLQJ'URS,Q'D\

6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02 8QLYHUVLW\ &WU %DOOURRP 6(028QLYHUVLW\&WU%DOOURRP 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(028QLYHUVLW\&WU0LVVRXULDQD 6(028QLYHUVLW\&WU%DOOURRP 6(02 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P

0D\ DPSP -XO\ DPSP 6HSWHPEHU DPSP 6HSWHPEHU   DPSP 6HSWHPEHU  DP  SP 6HSWHPEHU DPSP 2FWREHU DPSP 2FWREHU DPSP 1RYHPEHUDPSP 'HFHPEHU DPSP )HEUXDU\ DPSP )HEUXDU\ DPSP )HEUXDU\ DPSP

7LPH

0$3$

/RFDWLRQ

'DWH

7LPH

0$3$7UDLQLQJ 0$3$7UDLQLQJ 0$3$7UDLQLQJ 0$3$7UDLQLQJ

6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 0LQHUDO$UHD&ROOHJH 6RXWK3HPLVFRW6SHFLDO'LVWULFW

6HSW 2FW 2FW 2FW

DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP

,QVWUXFWLRQ 6FKRRO,PSURYHPHQW

/RFDWLRQ

'DWH

7LPH

,QVWUXFWLRQDO3UDFWLFHV,QYHQWRU\,3,

6WH*HQHYLHYH+6/LEUDU\

-XQH

DPSP

-XQ -XQ -XO -XO 5HJLVWUDWLRQ 'HDGOLQH

5HJLVWUDWLRQ 'HDGOLQH 0D\ -XO 6HS  6HS 6HS 6HS 2FW 2FW 1RY 'HF -DQ )HE )HE 5HJLVWUDWLRQ 'HDGOLQH 6HS 2FW 2FW 2FW 5HJLVWUDWLRQ 'HDGOLQH -XQ 5HJLVWUDWLRQ 'HDGOLQH

0$3

/RFDWLRQ

'DWH

7LPH

'(+6+DQG6FRULQJ0DWK 9LVLWRU0HGLD'D\

'(+6+DQG6FRULQJ0DWK 9LVLWRU0HGLD'D\

0LVVRXUL:ULWLQJ3URMHFW$FDGHP\ 0LVVRXUL:ULWLQJ3URMHFW 0LVVRXUL:ULWLQJ3URMHFW 0LVVRXUL:ULWLQJ3URMHFW

6LNHVWRQ&DUHHUDQG7HFKQRORJ\ 6LNHVWRQ&DUHHUDQG7HFKQRORJ\ 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P

-XQH -XQH $XJXVW 2FWREHU 1RYHPEHU -DQXDU\

DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP

3URIHVVLRQDO/HDUQLQJ&RPPXQLWLHV

/RFDWLRQ

'DWH

7LPH

3/&<HDU7UDLQLQJ(OHPHQWDU\ 3/&<HDU7UDLQLQJ06-++6 WK*HQHUDWLRQ3/&QG<U6FKRROV 3/&<HDU7UDLQLQJ(OHPHQWDU\ 3/&<HDU7UDLQLQJ06-++6 3/& <HDU  7HDP 7UDLQLQJ 3/&<HDU7HDP7UDLQLQJ 3/&<HDU7UDLQLQJ(OHPHQWDU\ 3/&<HDU7UDLQLQJ06-++6 WK*HQHUDWLRQ3/&QG<U6FKRROV 3/&<HDU7UDLQLQJ(OHPHQWDU\ 3/&<HDU7UDLQLQJ06-++6 3/&<HDU7UDLQLQJ(OHPHQWDU\ 3/&<HDU7UDLQLQJ06-++6 3/&<HDU7HDP7UDLQLQJ WK*HQHUDWLRQ3/&QG<U6FKRROV 3/&<HDU7UDLQLQJ(OHPHQWDU\ 3/&<HDU7UDLQLQJ06-++6 WK*HQHUDWLRQ3/&QG<U6FKRROV WK*HQHUDWLRQ3/&QG<U6FKRROV 3/&<HDU7HDP7UDLQLQJ 3/&<HDU7UDLQLQJ(OHPHQWDU\ 3/&<HDU7UDLQLQJ06-++6

6(025LYHU&DPSXV&RQYRFDWLRQ&WU 6(025LYHU&DPSXV&RQYRFDWLRQ&WU

6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P$ 6(025LYHU&DPSXV&RQYRFDWLRQ&WU 6(025LYHU&DPSXV&RQYRFDWLRQ&WU

6HSWHPEHU 6HSWHPEHU 6HSWHPEHU 2FWREHU 2FWREHU 2FWREHU   2FWREHU 1RYHPEHU 1RYHPEHU 1RYHPEHU 'HFHPEHU 'HFHPEHU -DQXDU\ -DQXDU\ -DQXDU\ )HEUXDU\ 0DUFK 0DUFK 0DUFK $SULO $SULO 0D\ 0D\

DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP  DP  SP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP

5HJLVWUDWLRQ 'HDGOLQH 6HS 6HS 6HS 2FW 2FW  2FW 2FW 1RY 1RY 1RY 1RY 'HF -DQ -DQ -DQ )HE )HE 0DU 0DU $SU $SU 0D\ 0D\

7HDFKHU$FDGHP\

/RFDWLRQ

'DWH

7LPH

5HJLVWUDWLRQ 'HDGOLQH

7HDFKHUV$FDGHP\ 7HDFKHU V$FDGHP\0HHWLQJ 6\VWHPV7KLQNLQJ6\VWHPV&KDQJLQJ 7HDFKHU V$FDGHP\0HHWLQJ 7HDFKHU V$FDGHP\0HHWLQJ 7HDFKHU V$FDGHP\0HHWLQJ 7HDFKHU V$FDGHP\0HHWLQJ 7HDFKHU V$FDGHP\0HHWLQJ

6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P

6HSW 2FW 1RY 'HF -DQXDU\ )HEUXDU\ 0DUFK $SULO

DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP

/HDGHUVKLS$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ

/RFDWLRQ

'DWH

7LPH

6DWHOOLWH/HDGHUVKLS$FDGHP\*UDGXDWLRQ

5HVRUW3RUW$UURZKHDG 5HVRUW3RUW$UURZKHDG 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P

-XQ -XQ 6HSWHPEHU 1RYHPEHU 1RY 0DUFK

DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP DPSP

$GYDQFHG/HDGHUVKLS$FDGHP\ $GPLQLVWUDWRU0HQWRU0HQWHH $03

$GPLQLVWUDWRU0HQWRU0HQWHH $03

6\VWHPV7KLQNLQJ6\VWHPV&KDQJLQJ $GPLQLVWUDWRU0HQWRU0HQWHH $03

6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(025LYHU&DPSXV&RQYRFDWLRQ&WU 6(025LYHU&DPSXV&RQYRFDWLRQ&WU 6(02 , 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P$ WL &W 5 $ 6(025LYHU&DPSXV&RQYRFDWLRQ&WU 6(025LYHU&DPSXV&RQYRFDWLRQ&WU

6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(025LYHU&DPSXV&RQYRFDWLRQ&WU 6(025LYHU&DPSXV&RQYRFDWLRQ&WU 6(025LYHU&DPSXV&RQYRFDWLRQ&WU 6(025LYHU&DPSXV&RQYRFDWLRQ&WU 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P$

6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(025LYHU&DPSXV&RQYRFDWLRQ&WU 6(025LYHU&DPSXV&RQYRFDWLRQ&WU

6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P 6(02,QQRYDWLRQ&WU5P

$XJ 2FW 1RY -DQ

6HS 2FW 1RY 'HF -DQ )HE 0DU $SU 5HJLVWUDWLRQ 'HDGOLQH -XQ -XQ 6HS 1RY 1RY 0DU


Instructional Technology Coming Your Way

P

lans are underway for the 4th Annual Southeast RPDC Technology Conference coming July 28-29. Nationally-known speakers, Gail Lovely and Meg Ormiston, are teaming up to give a dynamic opening session on Web 2.0. Again this year during the breakout sessions, local educators and vendors will share ways technology is used in classrooms. Presenter applications are available on the Southeast RPDC web site (http://www4.semo.edu/rpdc/) – the conference registration charges will be waived for one presenter in each breakout session. Again this year, if four staff members pay for and attend the conference, a fifth person may attend at no cost. Linda Null and Martha Mangels have teamed up to give a 4-day workshop this summer (June 30-July 3) for area Algebra I teachers and

Biology I teachers. The workshop will focus on using technology with Marzano’s instructional strategies that work in the Algebra I and Biology I classrooms. The workshop will include two additional days of professional development during the school year. Martha Mangels is working with an eInstruction consultant to bring her to Cape Girardeau in early June for a 2-day workshop entitled “Unleashing the Clickers”. This workshop will include seven modules guaranteed to give teachers the tools, training, and time to master using the “Clickers” in the classroom. Check online for the specific information on this workshop. In addition to the workshops at the Innovation Center, Martha is available to travel to the school districts in Southeast Missouri to conduct PD day workshops and/or after-school workshops for staff members. If interested in providing your staff with instructional technology training, contact Martha Mangels at mlmangels@semo.edu or 573/986-6739.

Using Technology

Math and science teachers will experience using instructional technology resources to create a 21st century classroom.

Integrate Marzano’s nine instructional strategies, using technology resources, into existing Algebra I and Biology curriculum.

Participants will be given a copy of Marzano’s "Using Technology with Classroom Instruction that Works.”

y=x 3

June 30 - July 3, 2008 Plus 2 follow-up days during the 2008-2009 school year 9AM - 3PM PM Innovation Center Room 202 register online: www4.semo.edu/rpdc Cost: $250 Member/$425 Non-Member

Strategies that Work

Instructional Strategies that Work in the Algebra I and Biology Classrooms

Southeast Regional Professional Development Center Innovation Center - Second Floor 920 Broadway, One University Plaza MS 0120 Cape Girardeau, MO 63701 573-651-5161/800-401-6680 fax: 573-651-2380 email: rpdc@semo.edu Pre-Registration and Cancellation Policy: Pre-registration for Southeast RPDC workshops is required. Cancellations will be honored with a full refund if received 2 business days prior to workshop. Registrations received after the registration deadline and walk-ins will be charged an additional fee of $10. No-shows and cancellations after the registration deadline will be charged the full price of the workshop. School districts may substitute pre-registrations without penalty, however.

Have a workshop idea or request? Contact Robin Smith, SE RPDC Program Coordinator rlsmith@semo.edu


Register Online http:www4.semo.edu/rpdc


For More Information Visit Our Website http://www4.semo.edu/rpdc

Save the Date How to Coach Teachers Who Don’t Think Like You - July 21- 23, 2008 Survivor Series Kick-Off - July 24, 2008 4th Annual Southeast Technology Conference - July 28-29, 2008 Mentor-Protege - July 31, 2008 SE RPDC Advisory Council - September 5th, 2008 2009 Teachers’ Academy - September 10, 2008

Southeast Regional Professional Development Center 920 Broadway, MS 0120 Cape Girardeau, MO 63701 573-651-5161/Fax 573-651-2308

SE RPDC Summer News  

Southeast Regional Professional Develeopment Center News - Summer Edition

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you