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SERGIO CARRILLO

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO


SERGIO CARRILLO EDUCATION BS / Landscape Architecture Cal Poly Pomona May 2019 AA / Engineering and Technology Pasadena City College June 2018 AA / Humanities Pasadena City College June 2017 SKILLS Rhino 3D AutoCAD T-Splines Vray Photoshop Illustrator InDesign Lumion AWARDS Bobby Brooks Memorial Interdisciplinary Design Studio Cal Poly Pomona December 2018 California Landscape Architecture Student Scholarship - CLASS Cal Poly Pomona March 2018 Chapman Forestry Foundation Scholarship Cal Poly Pomona March 2018 Dean’s List Pasadena City College 2014-2015 GPA 3.6 Design Tech Scholarship PCC Pathway Program Summer 2011

626 391 1137

sacarrillo@cpp.edu

3108 Hammond st Baldwin Park CA 91706

OBJECTIVE

To obtain a full-time position in a design firm where I can use my graphic and technical skills to develop, explain, and sell a project. I am interested in projects with big/simple moves and fine details.

EXPERIENCE College of Environmental Design / Cal Poly Pomona Creative Director - ENV Student Council

06/2017 - Present

• Generate graphics and flyers for club events • Create and manage club website • Produce software tutorials through video and future workshops

Cal Poly Pomona Foundation General Maintenance

05/2017 - Present

• Service all housing units at the University Village by addressing all work orders submitted by residents • Replacing damaged pavement caused by weathering or vegetation. • Fix any maintenance issues throughout all of the Foundation buildings both on and off campus

OCDC / Little Tokyo 3D Modeler (Intern)

05/2012 - 08/2013

• Developed 3D representations of projects and concepts in computer models • Generated 2D images and drawing representations of projects • Produced a video for the USC Architecture Solar Decathlon competition entry • Rescheduled and prioritized projects in order to meet sensitive deadlines.

Pasadena City College / Architecture Teacher’s Assistant / Arch Visual Communications

Fall Semester 2011

• Assisted Professor in teaching students computer software and graphic representation • Gave critiques for progress work • Created and presented lectures when the professor was unable to do so.

Pasadena City College / Design Tech Pathways Student Mentor

• Lead groups of incoming Pathways students during in-class design competitions • Advised students on campus resources and academic strategies • Motivated students on their field of study in order to help improve thier overall success

Summer 2011


CATALYST CAMPUS MASTER PLAN STREETSIDE STADIUM TONGVA VILLAGE CHILDREN’S GARDEN RED HEAVEN GEORGETOWN WATERFRONT CONSUMING LANDSCAPES WORLD CUP STRUCTURE COMPETITION SOME CUT FLEX BENCH MARYVALE CHILDREN’S GARDEN RED ROCK CANYON VISITOR’S CENTER


[Los Angeles] Catalyst Campus Master Plan Cal Poly Pomona Bobby Brooks Interdisciplinary Studio Fall 2018 Andy Wilcox Sergio Carrillo Ella Altaji Daniella Moncayo Nadeen Nasridin The Catalyst Campus is a creative campus for aspiring entrepreneurs that carry a form of the city’s street styles. It celebrates the individual’s lifestyle and helps them turn their passion into a career. Whether it’s designing or manufacturing, the campus houses both classrooms and warehouses. Its openness to Spring street welcomes the community’s interactions by sharing spaces for local events such as music festivals from the Los Angeles State Historic Park and fundraising marathons hosted by Homeboy Industries. The campus is divided into four districts that represent a different form of street style. These districts include the following: Sports, Fashion, Music, and Arts. Two bridges physically connect the campus to the community by allowing pedestrian access over Spring St and into the Metro Gold Line Chinatown Station and the Los Angeles State Historic Park.


A Creative Campus For Los Angeles Street Styles

Street Sports: Soocer/Futsal Skating Basketball

Campus Production Green (Tree) Backdrop Production Corridor District Runways

Street Fashion: Fashinon District Melrose Hollywood

Street Music: Jazz Acoustic Drum Circles

Concept Diagram - Fashion Runway Street Art: Graffiti Murals Art Walk

Since our campus is focused on street styles, we decided to base our concept on the celebration of fashion. The styles would be celebrated out toward Spring street to welcome the community and to draw in new students with their own unique street style. Fashion catwalks typically have a backdrop, so for our site we created a backdrop of trees that run along the main circulation corridor. This divides the runways from the production area where classrooms and facilities are located. Essentially, our students develop their skills and products in the production area and pass on through to the backdrop and into their style’s runways to be showcased. Simultaneously prospective students can witness the showcasing of products and be drawn in from the street into our campus to develop their street style into a profession.


Site Analysis Intercepting Street Grids

Urban Grid 2

Urban Grid 1

While investigation the site, we noticed two urban grids in the area. These grids meet up where our site pivots on Main street. We used both grids to orientate our projects based on the directions of their respectful grid system.

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Zoning of Districts Campus Entrance

Music District

Sports District

The site was divided up into 4 districts for each of the street styles represented in our campus. The biggest area was given to the sports district based on the necessary size for its athletic programs. This is located at the northernmost part of the site. The Campus’s main entrance is located where both grids separate. The remaining area was divided between the Fashion, Music, and Arts districts.

Fashion District N

Art District

Concept on Site Sports Runways Fashion Runways Music Runways Art Runways

Tree Backdrop

Our Fashion Runway concept was implemented into our districts by creating linear zones that projected out into Spring Street. These areas would be our “Runways” that would celebrate the campus products out toward the city. The Campus “Backdrop” is created through a corridor of 100’ tall American Sycamores. Behind the Backdrop is our Campus “Production” where all the classrooms and warehouses are located.

Campus Production N

Bridge to Los Angeles State Historic Park Bridge to Chinatown Metro Station

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Connections to the Contextual Community Los Angeles State Historic Park

Chinatown Metro Station


Campus Site Plan and District Designs Los Angeles State Historic Park Connection

Streetside Stadium

Campus Entrance Metro Gold Line Station Connection

Chinatown

Homeboy Industries

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The Node Building

Sparks Music Building

Rhythm Melodic Parallels


Team Members Individual Designs Streetside Stadium Sergio Carrillo - Landscape Architecture

The Node Building Ella Altaji - Architecture

Sparks Music Building Nadeen Nasridin - Architecture

Rhythm Melodic Parallels Daniella Moncayo - Landscape Architecture


[Los Angeles] Streetside Stadium - Catalyst Campus Cal Poly Pomona Bobby Brooks Interdisciplinary Studio Fall 2018 Andy Wilcox Individual Project

As the ending anchoring point along our campus production corridor, the Streetside Stadium elevates visitors to a series of overhanging platforms that reveal grand views of our campus, the park, and of all the sports talent nested within our city’s streets. By being open to the street, the stadium welcomes everyone to watch or to play at any time of day. It faces and bridges over to the Los Angeles State Historic Park to connect the campus with the community. This results in a space where our campus’s discipline meets local skill and celebrates the performances of their interactions. To expand the use of the stadium outside of our campus, it was important to connect over to the park. This gives access to the crowds and the events from the park into our stadium. Events such as concerts can take place by using the elevated end of the skatepark as a stage. The stage looks out towards the seating area and uses Spring street and the Metro Gold Line as a backdrop. Visitors and athletes from outside of town can drive to the stadium and park within the parking structure that is imbedded within the terraced earth. Lockers and the administration buildings are also imbedded underneath the topography.


Big Moves and Strategies

Typical Stadium

Stadium Facilities

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4 1

1. Administration 2. Production 3. Lockers 4. Parking Entrance

3

Cut Front End

Ramps and Access 1. Parking Access 2. Bleacher Access 3. Terraced Park Access 3

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Street and Stadium Interlock

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3

2

Program and Grading

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1. Bridge to Park 2. Skate Park and Stage 3. Basketball 4. Street Soccer 5. Observation Deck

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Section A-A


ng Str

eet

Site Plan W Elmyra St

W Elmyra St

Green Backrop

N Spri

Parking Structure Entrance

Adminsitration

Lvl 3 Parking Access

Pa

rk

Stage

Street Soccer #2

Lvl 3 Seating

Basketball

Lvl 2 Seating

ate

#1

26’

A` B`

N Spring Stree

t

A B

Sk

Lvl 1 Seating

#3

Green Backrop

Production

Lvl 2 Parking Access

36’

16’ Level 2 Observation Deck

Level 3 Observation Deck

6’

16’

Passive Field

26’

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eck

tion D

serva

Ob vel 2

6’

16’

6’

Campus Entrance

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Fountain

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de

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Green Backrop

Los Angeles State Historic Park

36’


Streetside Stadium Athletic Programs

Backstage Production

Sports Technologies

Backdrop

Parking Structure


Basketball Court

Street Soccer Court

Stadium Entrance and Skate Park Runways

Street Soccer

Basketball

Stage

Skate Park Section B-B Typical Day


View From the Top Level into the Street


[Rancho Santa Ana] Tongva Village Cal Poly Pomona LA 202 Spring 2017 Keigi Uesugi Sergio Carrillo Saul Navarro Mark Escobar

The Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden houses a small set of Tongva housing structures. The Garden’s administration would like to define this area as the Tongva Village. This area will educate children about the Tongva people and their way of living during the undeveloped ages of California. Native plants that were crucial to the survival of the Tongva are showcased in mounds that define different sets of gathering spaces. Old maintenance buildings are turned into learning facilities for the children visiting from local elementary schools.


Site Plan and Concepts

ty

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Sacred Sundail

Main

tenan

Sacred Oak Trees

ce B

uildin

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Enchanted Forest

Dry Creek

Restroom Confe

rence

Room

Seating

Dance Circle

Tongva Village Tongva Kich Basket Top Seating

Tongva Kich

The Great Basin

N Plants used by the Tongva

Muhlenbergia rigens Deer Grass

Quercus kelloggii California Black Oak

Artemisia tridentata Great Basin Sagebrush

Salvia columbariae Chia Sage


Social to Intimate Our design focuses on the social life of the Tongva and transitions users from the group settings of everyday life, to intimate spaces where users are taken into the individual aspects of the native Californians.

Circulation The existing circulation is kept to minimize the flow of the entire garden. We moved access away from the Sacred Oak trees to preserve their health.

Planting Zones Native plants used by the Tongva are planted on mounds that surround the activity spaces.

Activity Spaces Native plants used by the Tongva are planted on mounds that surround the activity spaces. We created four new areas that allow for different sized classes to enjoy. The largest spaces are the Tongva Village and The Great Basin. Smaller areas include Basket Top and the Sacred Sundial Space.

Prunus Ilicifolia Holly Leaf Cherry

Hesperoyucca whipplei Our Lord’s Candle

Salvia apiana White Sage

Prosopis glandulosa Honey Mesquite


Spaces for Education The Great Basin

Physical to Spritual Our concept for the site approaches the physical and spiritual ways of life of the Tongva. The physical aspect deals with the social gatherings and working environments for the Tongva. These areas of gathering are the bigger classroom sized spaces in the southern part of the garden. Towards the North lies the Mystical Forest that filters rays of sunlight as users travel through a curved path. This is the transitional space between the physical and spiritual areas. Once through the Mystical Forest, one crosses a dry stream to enter the Sacred Sundial space. This smaller area provides intimate moments with where plants with different heights gradually create a full

enclosure. Surrounded by trees and protected by the higher elevation gives children and their teachers a chance to take a break from the busy day.We were asked to respect and protect the three existing oak trees. Our path through the Mystical Forest steers away from this area while still providing shade.


Section A-A

Section B-B

Section C-C


Mystical Forest


[PCC Shatford Library] Red Heaven Library Installation Pasadena City College Architecture 14 Materials and Methods Jian Huang Spring Semester 2011 Cost $1280

Red Heaven is the result of a semester long exploration of form structure and materials for the Architecture Materials and Methods course at Pasadena City College. The first phase of this course is to create a series of modules that can perform under forces. Our module is made of foam sheets which give it the ability to stretch and fold when pushed or pulled. Its form is created by folding 6�x6� sheet and cutting a square out of the center. Once folded over, another sheet is mirrored behind it and a rubber band holds the two pieces together. A gridded organization of nuts, bolts, washers, and rubber bands hold modules together. The tension from the rubber bands pull the modules into themselves and into each other simultaneously.


Material Study and Construction Process

Gridded System

Module Assembly Rubber Bands Nuts and Bolts

Orange Foam Sheet Red Foam Sheet

The overall structure is made of three different sized modules ranging from 6”, 9”, and 12”. The form we created is a set of two surfaces connected by a void. A second void hangs down from the lower surface for students to interact with as they enter the library. The tension from the rubber bands pulls the modules together in four directions. As the modules get pulled into themselves, the foam sheets reaact by expanding out.

Close up of Module

Study Model

Upper Surface Assembly


Surfaces and Voids

Upper Surface-Orange

Connecting Void

Lower Surface-Red Library Entrance Hanging Void

Lower Surface Assembly

Installation

Library Entrance


[Washington DC] Georgetown Waterfront Cal Poly Pomona LA 4116 Spring Semester 2019 Ray Senes Georgtown Business Improvement District SWA Group Laguna Beach Sergio Carrillo Saul Navarro The Washington Harbour on Georgetown’s waterfront has been battling flood conditions since its construction. The Georgetown BID is asking for resilient design strategies to help mitigate the flooding. This complex is the BID’s highest paying source of income. It is equipped with floodgates to protect itself and its users from the Potomac River. However, once the walls are raised, the business and livelihood of the complex is turned into an cold and isolated fortress. Business is hurt, especially when the walls are raised at an average of 60 days a year. The gates must be manually raised one by one with a crane. The failure to respond quickly to the raising water levels has cost millions of dollars in damage.


Site Analysis Perfect Conditions for Flooding

Riverine Flooding This type of flooding occurs when rainstorms or snowmelt increase water volume from up the Potomac River.

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Coastal Flooding Hurricanes bring in high tides into Georgetown. Coastal flooding happens throughout the Potamc River from where it meets the Atlantic Ocean and stops at Key Bridge, which is adajcent to the site.

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Interior Flooding Storm water from rain events travel down to Georgetown’s lowest point which is located at Mile Marker 0. This is about 300 feet away from the Washington Harbour.

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Flood Basin and Building Footprints 7

M. Street

2

3

4 5

1

C & O Canal

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Georgetown Waterfront Park

1. Potomac Boat Club 2. Forrest-Marbury House 3. Georgetown Market. 4. City Tavern 5. Vigilant Fire House 6. Grace Protestant Episcopal Church 7. Old Stone House

Pot oma

c Ri

ver

The Washington Harbour

Historic landmarks 1859 to 1927 Building Footprints

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Flood Lines

Georgetown Topography Scale - 1” = 200’

0-8% SLOPE

BUILDING FOOTPRINTS

POTOMAC RIVER

9-15% SLOPE 16-40% SLOPE HIGH POINT LOW POINT WATER FLOW

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Big Moves: Georgetown Breakwater Island Strategies: Cut and Fill

Topography Using cut and fill to excevate the land south of K street and elevate the area by the waterfront. This Island will now protect Georgetown from the rising tides.

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Water Catchment The excavation allows water to temporarirly enter the area during heavy storms and rising river crests.

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Flood Park The absence of water allows for a floodable park that can respond to the temporary flooding. Terraced programs create unique experiences with water flowing into the park.

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Urban Extension into Waterfront To minimize the flooding in the Washington Harbour area, storm water capture systems will be implemented on M St. This is the highest point of our site from where the average change in elevation is around 30 feet. Green infrastructure will be installed on Wisconsin Ave, Thomas Jefferson Dr, and on 29th-31st street as well. This will help capture some storm water as it moves downhill toward K St. Thomas Jefferson Dr will be converted into a pedestrian friendly corridor that

Proposed Urban Plan

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will align down to K St. and through the flood park where it will enter the newly designed Entertainment District and finish off as a pier on the waterfront. Wisconsin Ave will also extend itself to the waterfront in the same manner. 30th and 31st street will be extended into the island for service and drop off vehicles.


[Rural Australia] Consuming Landscapes Cal Poly Pomona LA 301 Fall Semester 2017 Kevin Finch Individual Project

This project dealt with giving meaning to foreign objects and creating the landscape around them to tell a story of what they might be and why they are there. This story

is about the owner of the world’s most successful weapons manufacturing company and his trip to the government protected land of the natives. Hated by the tribe but allowed access by the chief, this man enters the unexplored land with nothing more than a backpack full of supplies and a machete. He gets lost one night and is attacked by the purest feeling of evil. Unable to see trough the thick grass, he frantically runs blind and stumbles upon a dark structure where he takes shelter. He is surprised at the shape and look of this object when he sees it the next morning. This ugly object is masked with the finest materials. Although sleek and comfortable, the shelter does not feel right. He hears his attacker through the grass and decides to cut away the fast-growing vegetation to give him a buffered zone. Eventually his actions from the past run through his mind and he decides that his hauntings are far more dangerous than this hidden attacker. Once he can no longer live with his guilt, he willingly walks into the grass and disappears.


A Deadly Conscious

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April 29th I’m not sure what exactly attacked me last night as I moved through the grass in my search for water. I don’t see any marks or wounds on my body, but I am feeling uneasy about the whole incident. The shelter where I hid last night has me just as puzzled. This object has no place in its context. The environment is all natural while this thing has no logical form. It is crafted carefully with a fine attention to detail. Every component perfectly placed and cut for a seamless edge. It is somewhat beautiful yet hideous all at once. It has no reason to be here or any evidence of how it came to be. None of the materials from this object can be found anywhere near here. They are all synthetic. Regardless of its appearance and history, I will continue to stay here until I figure out what attacked me and how to start my journey back to the natives’ village.

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Topography: A Far As I Can See


Danger Lurks in the Tall Grass


Analyzing the Unknown Detailed Image of Foreign Object


Structural Components and Sectional Drawing 1/2” Tube Steel Frosted Glass Lens

PTDF 1x4

1/4” Carbon Fiber Panels

Scale: 1/4” = 1’-0” 0

2

4

8

Final Observations It’s been 6 months and I still have no idea what lurks inside the grass. I have grown tired of trimming down the area only to see it grow back to its initial height within days. I can feel the creature haunt me. Its waiting for me to give in. I don’t know what haunts me more, my unforeseen predator or the nightmares that come to me every night. I am tired of hearing the screams of every family caught in the crossfire of my products. Afterall, I am not the one

shooting them. Nor am I the one responsible for the social issues of their country. They must be laughing now at my situation. But you know what? I’m not going to give them that. I’m not going to give this creature this joy either. What’s really going to happen if I charge inside the grass?


[RIO DE JANEIRO] Symbolic World Cup Structure Competition Organized Crime Design Collective 2013 Andy Ku - Principal Kam Ku- Principal Sergio Carrillo - Intern Steven Garcia - Intern This project was submitted as a competition during the 2013 World Cup in Brazil. The competition called for a temporary structure in Rio De Janeiro’s aqueduct plaza, Arco Da Lapa. Its purpose was a gathering space where people can get information about the scheduled soccer games. Our strategy was to include an oversized screen that would be large enough for the plaza. The screen also acts as a platform where users can walk to a higher level for views into the plaza and around the aqueduct. The screen uses the aqueduct as a supporting structure by interlocking itself through the existing infrastructure. The plaza’s ground level houses an information office, a restaurant, restrooms, outdoor seating, and first aid. The top level of the structure has a space designated for musicians and DJs.


A Game to Watch A Space to Be Site Plan

Concept Diagram

We started by exploring the idea of dividing up a stadium by a linear form such as that of an aquduct.


Plan and Section

Programs The space is centered around a giant but light structure and grasps on to the existing infrastructure. It serves a screen that shows the ongoing games. It gives users access into the second floor of the aqueduct and transforms each pillar into a small hallway for art galleries. Stairs give vertical access to the top of the aqueduct to connect people to the existing rail line.

Components


[London] 2012 Olympic Pavillion Organized Crime Design Collective 2012 Andy Ku - Principal Kam Ku- Principal Sergio Carrillo - Intern Steven Garcia - Intern This design was for the Olympics’ information booth and gathering hub. The idea the drove this project was the creation of a centralized space that dipped down into the ground with pools surrounding the edges. The structure would welcome spectators and display the ongoing games. At night, the HUB would transform into social celebratory space with intricate lighting. Shell like ceilings expand over the seating areas for shade and provide a surface for games to be projected on. The spaces that dip out of the structure’s lower level create an area that is outside the structure itself but is still nested within the project and away from the outer levels.

Floor Plan


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Access Points from Every Side

South Elevation

North Elevation


East Elevation

West Elevation


[Pomona] Some Cut Flex Bench Cal Poly Pomona LA 332 Winter 2018 Keiji Uesugi Sergio Carrillo Gabe Choi Mario Valdez The Some Cut Flex Bench is a Design-Build project that was made for one of our Landscape Construction assignments. We were asked to design a bench that had some sort of added performance. Our group was interested in making the seating area flexible. We were able to do so by dividing the seating area into blocks. We made 5 different types of blocks ranging from 5-7 inches in length. Two different sets of block configurations grouped the blocks so that a 2-footlong seat with an offset pattern was constructed. Each block configuration had 12 holes drilled to allow a bungee cord to loop through. The bungee holds the configurations together while allowing the blocks to move down when someone sits on the bench. Our design was modeled in 3D before any wood was cut. This helped us build our bench with accuracy since we had a total of 160 blocks to cut and 516 holes to drill. Each hole had to align perfectly with its neighbor so that the bungee cord could slide through.

x 65’ BUNGEE x 65’ BUNGEE

Block Types

Configurations

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1

x20 x20 7” Blocks 7” Blocks

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x20 x20 6” Type 6” AType Blocks A Blocks

A

3

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X80 X80 6” Type 6” B Type Blocks B Blocks

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x20 x20 6” Type 6” C Type Blocks C Blocks

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x20 x20 5” Blocks 5” Blocks

BB

BB

BB

BB

BB

BB

BB

BB

BB

x20 x20

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B

2 3

3 3

3 4

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B

x20 x20

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C B

A

1 3

3 3

3 5

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C

x3

C BB

BB

BB

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B

x3


x 65’ BUNGEE

Bungee Path

1

x20

7” Blocks

2

x20

6” Type A Blocks

A

3

X80

6” Type B Blocks

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x20

6” Type C Blocks

5

x20

5” Blocks

x20

2

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4

B

x20

1

3

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C

x3

x 65’ BUNGEE

Configuration Layout

1

x20 B B

B7” Blocks B B

x20

6” Type A Blocks

3

X80

6” Type B Blocks

4

x20

6” Type C Blocks

5

x20

5” Blocks

2

C

C

B

B

B

B

AB

B

B

B

B

2

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B

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3

B

B

x20

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x20

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x3

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C AB AB AB AB AB AB AB AB AB AB

C

A B A B A B A B A B AB A B A B A B A B

C


Construction Documents

Sheet 1

Sheet 2


Sheet 3

Mario Valdez

THE ASSEMBLY

Sheet 4

To achieve the flexibility we envisioned, we cut 2x4 boards to three different sizes, then staggered them to create an overlap. Two boards at each end and one at the center, provide support for the staggering blocks and


[Rosemead] Maryvale Children’s Garden Cal Poly Pomona LA 342 Spring 2018 Ray Senes Individual Project LA 342 is a Planting Design class where we focused on creating a planting plan for Maryvale. The site is a center for women and children who have suffered abuse in the past. We were asked to design a children’s area that included an edible garden and a shaded space for outdoor classes. Due to the sensitive nature of the center’s program, key considerations for the design included soft enclosures and the staff’s visibility.


[Red Rock Canyon] Visitor’s Center Cal Poly Pomona LA 332 Fall 2017 Keiji Uesugi Individual Project LA 331 is the department’s first construction course. The Red Rock Canyon Visitor’s Center assignment carried over to the spring quarter as a yearlong project (LA 331-LA 333). During the Fall quarter, we started the project by changing some of the site’s grade to accommodate an amphitheater and a catch basin. During the Winter quarter (LA 332), we added an observation deck in the catch basin. Details for the deck had to be included. Plant design, paving, irrigation, water features, and lighting were added in Spring quarter. I have only included the grading and observation deck drawings to keep this project concise. GENERAL NOTES

95 95 W CHARLESTON BLVD

SITE

LAS VEGAS FREEWAY

RED N NYO

K CA

ROC D ROA RED ROCK AD N RO

CANYO

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ROC

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ENIC

DRIV

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CHA

1.CONTRACTOR TO EXERCISE CAUTION WHEN WORKING IN AREA OF EXISTING UTILITY AS SHOWN. 2.CONTRACTOR TO ESTABLISH FLOW LINE ELEVATIONS AND SLOPE OF DRAIN LINE TO PROVIDE POSITIVE DRAINAGE. 3.CONTRACTOR TO VERIFY EXACT LOCATION O EXISTING UTILITIES (HORIZONTAL &VERTICAL) PRIOR TO COMMENCEMENT OF WORK CAUTION - NOTICE TO CONTRACTOR 4.THE CONTRACTOR IS SPECIFICALLY CAUTION THAT THE LOCATION AND/OR ELEVATION OF EXISTING UTILITIES AS SHOWN ON THESE PLANS IS BASED ON RECORDS OF THE VARIOUS UTILIT COMPANIES AND, WHERE POSSIBLE,MEASUREMENTS TAKEN IN T FIELD. THE INFORMATION IS NOT TO BE RELIED ON AS BEING EXACT OR COMPLETE. THE CONTRACTOR MUST CALL THE APPROPRIATE UTILITY COMPANY AT LEAST48 HOURS BEFORE ANY EXCAVATION TO REQUEST EXACT FIELD LOCATION OF UTILITIES. IT SHALL THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE CONTRACTOR TO RELOCATE ALL EXISTING UTILITIES WHICH CONFLICT WITH PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS SHOWN ON THE PLANS. 5.THE CONTRACTOR SHALL EXPOSE EXISTING UTILITIES AT LOCATIONS OF POSSIBLE CONFLICTS PRIOR TO ANY CONSTRUCTION. SAFETY NOTICE TO CONTRACTOR IN ACCORDANCE WITH GENERALLY ACCEPTED CONSTRUCTION PRACTICES, THE CONTRACTOR WILL BE SOLELY AND COMPLETELY RESPONSIBLE FOR CONDITIONS O THE JOB SITE, INCLUDING SAFETY OF ALL PERSONS AND PROPERTY DURING PERFORMANCE OF THE WORK. THIS REQUIREM WILL APPLY CONTINUOUSLY


Observation Deck


Observation Deck Details


Profile for Sergio Carrillo

Landscape Architecture Portfolio  

Projects from Cal Poly Pomona, Pasadena City College, and internship work at Organized Crime Design Collective.

Landscape Architecture Portfolio  

Projects from Cal Poly Pomona, Pasadena City College, and internship work at Organized Crime Design Collective.

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