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serene wongsa 2010

a rc h i te c t u re p o r t fo l i o


Serene Wongsa

University of Texas at Austin

Austin, TX

wongsas@gmail.com (281) 8149886 1404 Indiana #4, Houston, Texas 77006

Bachelor of Architecture Bachelor of Science, Architectural Engineering Overall GPA: 3.8

May 2006 May 2006

EDUCATION

EXPERIENCE Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates Junior Architect/Engineer

Houston, TX June 2006 - May 2010

• Technical peer review of building exterior shell systems, including roofing, waterproofing, curtain wall and windows, and various other types of cladding, during all phases of design and construction • Drafted details and built 3-dimensional computer models of construction details as design tools to assist our clients, who consist of architects, contractors, and owner representatives • Per formed construction administration/construction obser vation ser vices as an agent of architects, owners, and general contractors • Researched materials and industr y standards; edited and formatted projecte specifications • Per formed code compliance research • Attend design and construction phase meetings with architects, owners’ representatives, and contractors • Investigations of construction related problems and evaluated design solutions • Created written reports, including graphical representations, and power point presentations of investigations, solutions, and recommendations • Coordination of documents between all parties of a construction project SKILLS • Proficient in Autodesk AutoCAD & Arhcitecture; formZ; SketchUp; Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, & InDesign; WUFI Pro; Microsoft Word, Excel, & Access • Fluent in Thai

Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects Architectural Intern

Seattle, WA Jan 2005 - June 2005

• Collaborated with project managers and designers on various architectural designs including residential and institutional buildings • Created presentation material such as plans, elevations, and perspective views through the use of hand sketching and computer software • Built physical scale models and 3-dimensional computer models as both design tools and as presentation material • Attended client meetings and site visits ACHIEVEMENTS • Nominated for UT Austin School of Architecture Sound Building Studio Distinction, which honors the most complete projects in terms of integration of building systems • Nominated for UT Austin School of Architecture Excellence in Design Award, Sound Building Studio categor y, a distinction for one architecture student per graduating class • Recipient of College of Engineering Friends of Alec Scholarship Award • LEED Accredited Professional • Currently working toward professional architectural registration in Texas


Charter School and Community Center UT Austin Sound Building Design Studio [Nominated for Excellence in Design Award] The purpose of this project was to create a building in which all aspects of architecture - structure, environment, interior spacemaking, and ser vice - are thoroughly interrelated in a good, meaningful design. The program includes a small charter school combined with a community center set in a public park. I felt the main challence was how to integrate the two main programs but maintain privacy and security for the school. In addition, the existing use of the public park space must remain. I decided to use the building and the existing railroad berm to create a sunken outdoor space for the children that is separate from the public area.

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Charter School and Community Center UT Austin Sound Building Design Studio The park has a big “bowl”-shaped area with a basketball court and a small blue stage. There is a playground at the west end of the park and an abandoned railroad berm at the southeast corner near the lakefront. A parking lot, situated between the berm and the water, is somewhat hidden from the rest of the park. I decided to turn the parking lot into the protected outdoor area for the schoolchildren. The space is further screened from the public by the building and the berm, which has been built up higher as a hillside. Only the top floor of the building is visible from the street. The entrance where students are dropped off is especially prominent, giving the “school” portion of the program the biggest public presence in the building. It was important to me to establish that this building is a school.

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SITE PLAN

03


1

Mini gathering

2

Small groups / classroom

3

Offices & lounge

1

4

2

Entrance to park

5

Outdoor play area

6

Park

4

6 5

1

3

SECTION B

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Charter School and Community Center UT Austin Sound Building Design Studio

The building diagram is clear in this section cut. The building is split lengthwise down the middle. Enclosed rooms and offices are one side of the building, the common school space, the hallway, where kids hang out are on the other half. The two-stor y assembly room abuts one end of the structure. The existing landscape is manipulated to create a more exaggerated hillside which protects the privacy and security of the children’s play area and the more transparent hallway. The other side of the hill remains a public park.

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1

Open to below

2 Walkway

3

Steps

4 Small groups / classroom

5

Hallway / gathering

8

Lockers

7

Street entrance

8

Park entrance

8

4 1

6

4

4

2

5

7

3 6

TOP FLOOR PLAN

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Charter School and Community Center UT Austin Sound Building Design Studio

The diagram of hallway and classrooms continue on the top floor. Students would be dropped off at by bus or car at this level and enter through the street entrance at the north end of the building. Each of the 3 classrooms also have their own door to the “bowl� area of the park. The classrooms are situated above the rest of the park to create a vantage point where teachers can overlook park activities, including when the children are playing in this public area. On the other side of the row of classrooms is the upper hallway, where kids can car ve out their own hang-out spaces. This area is visually protected from the public. But the school areas and the public areas are not completely shut off from each other. Views and limited access is available through a walkway that cuts through the building from the park side to the school side.

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1 7

Assembly Kitchen

2

Storage & Mechanical 8 Courtyard

3 Lower floor entrance 4 Offices & waiting 9 Tables 10 Mechanical ser vices 11

6

Small groups / classroom 12 Outdoor play area

8

6

4 2

5 Hallway / gathering Loading / ser vice entrance

1

9 5 7

3

10

11

12 BOTTOM FLOOR PLAN

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Charter School and Community Center UT Austin Sound Building Design Studio

The bottom floor consists of the assembly room, administrative areas, the hall, and one enclosed classroom. The assembly room, which would often be used as a community space, is easily accessed from the parking lot, which has now moved to abut a natural hillside between the park and neighboring houses. The main entrance opens into the assembly area but is also close to the school hallway. During school hours, teachers using this entrance from the parking lot have easy access to the administrative areas. After hours, the main entrance is used by the public when meeting in the assembly area or in the classrooms.

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Stucco Repair Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates This 3-building apartment complex suffered from constant water infiltration. WJE was retained the investigate the causes of the leaks and prepare a design solution. We found that lack of proper flashing tie-ins at windows, doors, and other penetrations was letting in the bulk of the water. The proposed solutions included reworking all flashings, stucco details, and adding a second layer of weather resistive barrier to the cladding section. After producing a report of the findings and recommendations, the client retained WJE to produce construction documents for the repair project.


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SUMMARY OF WUFI RUNS FOR EXTERIOR MASONRY WALL WJE Project No. 2007.1962

III IV

2w 2w

n 0.04P n 0.04P

V VI

2w 2w

VII VIII VIIII X XI XII

XIII XIIII XV XVI XVII XVIII

Inside Face Air Inter C/W Elev Spc VB Gyp Year NSEW Descriptions .04P C N PSG Recommendation .04P W S "London"

6" 6"

.04P .04P

2" 1.0P 2" 1.0P

n n

2w 2w 2w 2w 2w 2w

2" 2" 2" 2" 1" 1"

1.0P 1.0P 1.0P 1.0P 1.0P 1.0P

6" 6" 4", stud 4", stud 4", stud 4", stud

1w 1w 1w 1w 1w 1w

n n n n n n

1.0P 1.0P 1.0P 1.0P 0.04P 0.04P

n 25.5p n 25.5p

XVIIII 2w XX 2w

C W

N S

PSG Recommendation lower perm exter

n n

C W

N S

Original WJE Rec.

n n n n n n

C W C W C W

N S N S N S

Hybrid Hybrid Hybrid Hybrid Hybrid Hybrid

6" 6" 6" 6" 6" 6"

.04P .04P n n n n

C W C W C W

N S N S N S

Other Rice U Bldgs Other Rice U Bldgs Other Rice U Bldgs Other Rice U Bldgs Other Rice U Bldgs Other Rice U Bldgs

6" 6"

n n

C W

N S

Tyvek WUFI does not

n n n n n

C W C W C

N S N S N

foil foil kraft kraft n n

C W C W C C

N S N S N N

IIIa 2w n 0.04P 6" IIIb 2w n 0.04P 6" IIIc 2w n 1.0P 6" IIId 2w n 1.0P 6" IIIe 2w n 1.0P 6" Runs Requested by PSG on OCT 1, 2007 I.1 2w n 1.0P 6" I.1a 2w n 1.0P 6" V.1 2w RI 1.0P 6" V1a 2w RI 1.0P 6" V.2 2w RI 1.0P n V.2a 2w RI 1.0P 6" Legend: RI VB Dens Gyp y n C W N S I * Oct Jun ; 8 .49 / .38 Sep w

All Runs

I II

Brk 2w 2w

All Runs

Outside Face to Air Extr Batt Spc RI VB Dens Insul n 1.0P 6" n 1.0P 6"

0" 0" 0" 0"

model venting

Latest option being discussed IIIc with RH at 28 to 38%

Rigid Insulation Vapor Barrier Densglass Gold Interior Gypsum wallboard yes no cold year warm year North elevation exposure South elevation exposure Increasing moisture content Max. water content of air space since these models do not have batt insulation Condition occurs from October to June; number of months (If one month shown, maximum only occurs in that month) Starting maximum, leveled out maximum, month maximum occurs Wythe of brick

Revised:

Rice Dorms

Max Water Content lb/ft^3 Exter Densglass Batt Insul Inter Gyp 8.3 / I 0.94 / I 0.54 / .32 11.6 / I 1.5 / I 0.54 / .32

4-Oct-07

Relative Humidity Exter Densglass 80-97 Sep Mar 7 80-97 Oct Mar 6

Batt Insul 80-97 Sep Mar 7 80-97 Oct Mar 6

Inter Gyp 40-60 40-60

Temp/DewPoint overlap PERFORMANCE Exter Gyp Batt Insul Inter Gyp RANK y y n Don’t Use y y n

80-93 Oct Jun 8 80-92 Oct May 7

80-82 Apr Jan 9 80-85 Sep Jul 10

40-60 40-60

0.7 / I 0.65 / I

0.05 / I 0.06 / I

0.54 / .32 0.54 / .32

y y

y y

n n

Don’t Use

45-58 42-58

45-59 43-59

40-61 40-62

0.39 / .22 0.39

-

0.54 / .33 0.54 / .34

n n

n n

n n

1

45-80 40-62 45-75 42-60 80-85 Feb 40-65

45-57 40-60 45-60 41-60 80-84 Feb 40-61

37-62 37-63 40-63 40-39 37-64 37-65

0.39 0.39 0.39 / .34 0.39 / .23 0.43 0.39

0.03 / .01 0.03 / .01 0.03 / .01 0.03 / .01 0.03 / .01 0.03 / .01

0.54 / .34 0.54 / .35 0.54 / .35 0.54 / .35 0.48 / .35 0.48 / .35

n n y n y y

n n n n n n

n n n n n n

3

80-97 Oct Jun 8 80-97 Oct Jul 9 80-97 Dec Mar 3 80-91 Jan 80-96 Jan Mar 2 26-74

80-98 Mar Jun 3 80-94 all year 12 80-95 Dec Mar 3 45-65 80-95 Dec Mar 3 25-73

40-60 40-60 33-71 35-72 33-64 30-64

8.8 / I 12 / I 0.98 0.67 0.95 0.33

1/ I 1.5 / I 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.03 / .01

0.54 0.54 0.54 / .39 0.54 / .4 0.54 / .34 0.64/ .34

y y y y y y

y y y y y y

n n n n n n

Don’t Use

80-97 all yr 12 84-97 all yr 12

80-92 May Oct 5 80-94 Apr Nov 7

80-97 May Oct 5 80-98 Apr Dec 8

1.05 1.05

0.11 0.18

4.7 7.8

y y

y y

n y

7

80-96 Dec Mar 3 30-72 80-97- Dec Apr 4 41-76 81

80-95 Dec Mar 3 29-73 80-96 Dec Mar 4 39-77 78

34-61 Aug 33-61 Aug 33-70 Sep 36-72 Sep 25-50 Aug

.98 Feb .32 Feb 1.05 Mar .36 Feb .39 Feb

.03 Feb .03 / .01 .03 Mar 0.01 .01 Feb

.49 / .22 Aug .54 / .33 Aug .49/ .38 Sep .56 / .39 Sep .42 / .26 Aug

y n y y y

y n y y y

n n n n n

5

80-96 Sep May 8 80-97 Oct Jun 8 55-75 53-69 44-57 43-79

80-97 Oct Jul 9 80-95 Oct Sep 11 47-73 54-67 36-64

42-60 40-58 42-61 41-62 40-62 36-63

7.8 / I 11.2 / I .39 / .34 .38 / .3 .39 / .22 0.38

.9 / I 1.0 / I .03 / .02 .04 / .02 .03 / .01

.44 / .32 .43 / .32 .44 / .33 .47 / .33 .54 / .33 .54 / .34

y y (y) (y) n (y)

y y n n n

n n n n n n

2 4

Similar to III c & d

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Vapor Drive Analysis Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates WJE was hired as a consultant to evaluate proposed wall sections for a large brick-clad dormitor y building in Houston. WUFI Pro software was used to determine any increase or decrease of stored water in the wall sections over a 3-year period. Dewpoint calculations (Glaser Method) were also per formed as a check of the WUFI software. Several of the proposed wall sections were predicted to have an accumulation of water over the 3-year cycle. The modeled wall sections were ranked by per formance and the results summarized in the above table.

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Hybrid Building UT Austin Urban Design Studio Instructor: Dean Almy This hybrid building is situated in a mixed use urban area of Houston. Its programs include offices, a small movie theatre, SRO housing, a restaurant, and a public plaza. From the initial analysis, I found this area almost devoid of pedestrians and places for pedestrians to occupy. Therefore, I designed the spaces for these different programs to interlock in order to bring different kinds of occupants together and to create a pedestrian-based urban scene.

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1 4 7 10

Private entrance Public restrooms Entrance for offices Fire trucks driveway

2

SRO lobby / living rooms 5 Ser vice core 8 Existing fire station 11 Public plaza

3

Court for residences 6 Lobby for offices 9 Hose tower 12 Existing buildings

12

12

1

5

11

2

8

6

9 7 3

10 12

4

N


2

1

3

3

1

Movie / teaching theatre

2

Garden

3

Offices

4

SRO housing

5

Job training center

6

SRO lobby

7

Firemen lounge

8

Restaurant

9

Fire trucks driveway

10 Entrance for offices 4

3

7

8 5 6

10 9

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Hybrid Building UT Austin Urban Design Studio

N Pedestrian Access to Site The first half of the studio was devoted to mapping the areas around our building sites. This map shows existing and potential pedestrian traffic. This area is rich in variety of activities, but most people are not walking. This idea was used in developing my design.


The new building is well-integrated with the existing buildings on the block (shown shaded in white). The existing 1-stor y fire station is further incorporated into the design by providing a firemen’s lounge within the office tower and a hose storage space in return for building above and directly adjacent to the station.

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Hybrid Building UT Austin Urban Design Studio

3-dimensional models were extensively used to present site analysis graphics and building programs. The model to the left was created during the analysis phase to study the existing uses of the site and the surrounding blocks. The models below are final presentation graphics illustrating the programming and circulation of the building. The goal was to create an interlock of the spaces and circulation to encourage pedestrian acitivity within and around the building.

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Library and Theatre UT Austin Suburban Studio Instructor: Nestor Bottino The challenge of this project was an extra large site in a typical suburban neighborhood with little pedestrian activity and the combination of two complex programs - a theatre and a librar y. I felt that space planning (in this case, the integration and separation of the two main spaces) was the most important task of the project. The two spaces share lobby, circulation, and other public areas. The blandness of the surrounding area is mitigated by the interjection of a prominently asymmetrical form of the theatre popping out of a rectangular building. 20

N


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Library and Theatre UT Austin Suburban Studio The asymmetrical form of the theature is highly visible from the main street to the west of the site. The theatre’s position adjacent to the main entrance for both pedestrian and vehicular traffic adds to the prominence. The form and position were chosen because I believe one function of a theatre is to be a symbol for the arts. Theatre is not typical; a suburban theatre, especially, should have a statement to make up for the regularity of the site context. A librar y, on the other hand, is a normal occurance in suburbia. The regularity of the librar y portion of the building further accentuates the irregular form of the theatre.

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01 window support angle

04 window

02 double row of sealant under sill pan

05 vertical sheet metal flashing

03 sill pan and window anchor clips

06 membrane patch at corner


07 seal membrane patch

10 seal edges of sam

Methodist Hospital Wiss Janney Elstner We are currently working for the architect-of-record as exterior envelope consultants on a hospital campus. These 3d SketchUp models were created to aid the installation of window flashing and waterproofing. They were presented in a sequence of steps starting with the just the slab to the last sealant bead. In addition to these 08 self-adhesive membrane

09 shingle upper sam

sketches, we per form regular site visits to monitor construction progress and compliance with project documents.

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Methodist Hospital Wiss Janney Elstner

As the installation of this window sill started, our project team reported obser ved problems and created these sketches to

03 double row of sealant under sill pan

demonstrate how the detail could be made watertight.

01 curb and cast stone base

04 sill pan

02 seal between cast stone

05 window anchor clips


06 window

09 through-wall flashing

07 vertical sheet metal flashing

10 self-adhesive membrane

08 double sealant under flashing

11 seal edge of sam

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USSR Pavilion by Konstantin Melikov UT Austin Visual Communications Studio This class was my first introduction to 3d modeling software. Groups of two were assigned a building to model in formZ. Included in the task were section cuts and a model of the building’s structural system. We used photographs and available drawings to create this model. The asymmetr y of the building and the roof slope in two directions added to the challenge of this model.

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Wing Luke Asian Museum Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen [2009 AIA Seattle Honor Award]

I became a part of the project team during the design development phased. This model was used to work out the addition to the original building, particularly its integration with the exisiting structural components. The finished model was displayed at client meetings and its images were used in the owner’s fundraising efforts.

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Garden Shade UT Austin Community Design Studio This studio was a wholestudo collaborative project to design half of an East Austin city block. I designed and constructed these garden shades as one of 2

Shanghai Villa Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen

installations created by the studio. They are meant to be easily replicated by the

For this private residence in Shanghai, I got involved in the

people who would use this

middle of the schematic design phase. The 3-person design

community space.

team used this formZ model as a design tool. 32


Greene House by Office dA UT Austin Construction 5 Instructor: Juan Miro Teams of two were to create full set of construction drawings of an existing house of their choosing from a list approved by the instructor. The drawings are created from studying available photographs and and research of appropriate building systems, materials, and detailing which could be used to construct the building. My partner and I chose office dA’s Greene House because it contains several different types of wall and roof systems.

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Serene Wongsa's Architectural Portfolio