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doCUMENtiNG ChaNGE


sequence 04 EDITORS DESK DOCUMENTING CHANGE

06 TALES FROM ABROAD GEORGE WALTON AND ANDY COLLIN IN THE PROMISED LAND

08 THE BIGGER PICTURE GEORGE WALTON IN KRAKOW

10 IN FOCUS NATHAN CONNOLLY ZIN FRONT OF THE LENS

12 RIDER INSIGHT JOSH FAWCETT TAKES US BEHIND THE SCENES

14 GALLERY A FEW MORE OF OUR FAVOURITES

Editor

ROB EMBLING Photography

Harry Foskett PROOFING

LUKE DORKING Contributors

JOSH FAWCETT

Published by

Sequence MAgazine AN EXTENDED PUBLICATION FROM UNITY CONCEPTS The views and opinions expressed in this edition are not neccessarily those of SEquence magazine or its associates. This edition and everything contained within it remaiN the copyright of sequence magazine.

Printed by

The newspaper club, london

CONTENTS


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EDITORS DESK

doCUMENtiNG ChaNGE WhEthEr it’s thE ProGrEssioN FroM triCk to triCk or thE traNsitioN BEtWEEN styLEs, thE oNE thiNG that yoU CaN aLWays CoUNt oN iN FrEEskiiNG is ChaNGE. thE CaPtUriNG oF aN iMaGE aLLoWs Us to PrEsErvE iNdividUaL MoMENts iN tiME aNd iN thE ENdLEss sEarCh For that oNE PErFECt MoMENt, WE CoNtiNUE to drivE ChaNGE. as WE sEt oUr siGhts hiGhEr aNd PUsh thE LiMits FUrthEr WE LEt thEsE MoMENts Pass riGht By Us iN thE NEvEr ENdiNG qUEst to CrEatE soMEthiNG NEW. it is oNLy WhEN yoU Look BaCk oN it aNd thE iMaGEs havE BECoME MEMoriEs that yoU rEaLisE that it Was NEvEr aBoUt JUst oNE MoMENt BUt aBoUt thE JoUrNEy to GEt thErE. this is oUr story. this is oUr sEqUENCE.

thE Editor roB EMBLiNG

CovEr shot skiiNG By AnDY Collin PhotoGraPhy By HARRY FoSKeTT shot oN LoCatioN iN ZAKoPAne PolAnD oN a doWN day FroM shootiNG UrBaN dUriNG oUr triP to PoLaNd, With thE skiEs thiCk With sNoWFaLL WE dECidEd it Was tiME to hEad UP iNto thE MoUNtaiNs to sEE What WE CoULd disCovEr. UNdEr a hEavy BLaNkEt oF CLoUd thErE Was No ChaNCE oF sCoPiNG oUt aNy oF thE BiGGEr LiNEs aNd With oUr PassEs oNLy vaLid oN oNE LiFt, WE WErE ForCEd to JUst ski What Was ahEad oF Us. iN FaCt What Was ahEad oF Us Was MELLoW PoWdEr aNd ENdLEss trEEs. aFtEr tWo WEEks oF hikiNG stairs aNd takiNG a BEatiNG, No oNE sEEMEd to MiNd.


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TALES FROM ABROAD

Taking your tricks into the streets is the real test of any rail skier and it’s becoming a must for anyone trying to prove themselves, but can it really be that different from skiing in the park? Over the next ten days I was about to find out just how much blood and sweat goes into an urban trip. This was my fourth trip out to poland, but in the past either a lack of time or snow had always prevented us from spending too much time in the cities. What we had managed to hit in one or two spots and seen in endless others is what keeps us coming back year after year.

THE PROMISED LAND Rob embling talks about his trip with GEORGE WALTON AND ANDY COLLIN PROWLING THE STREETS OF POLAND IN SEARCH OF THE HOLY GRAIL. PHOTOGRAPHY BY HARRY FOSKETT

After weeks of watching webcams and praying for snow the day finally came to pack the car and hit the road. We were apprehensive to say least, as we set off in the knowledge that while the Alps were having their biggest snowfalls in years, there had not yet been so much as a single flake where we were headed. With our accomodation already booked and our crew carefully crafted for an all out urban assault, there was not much we could do but set off and hope for the best. After 32 hours on the road with veteran Andy Collin in the driving seat and rookie George Walton riding shotgun, we finally arrived in Krakow in the middle of a snowstorm. With the blizzard rapidly turning the city skyline into an urban playground, it seemed just too good to be true. Perhaps this year would be different after all. The following morning we were up early and greeted by a blanket of white, and in high spirits we headed out into the promised land in search of the holy grail. When the snow starts to fall in town here, it can be difficult to choose from all the rails that are on offer and nowhere is that more true than at our first spot. Known locally as ‘The Master Spot’ it is a kingdom of downrails with any length or pitch you could desire and the perfect place to get warmed up.


ONE STYLE. TWO SIZES.

EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

dragonalliance.com

Chris Benchetler


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SKIING BY GEORGE WALTON PHOTOGRAPHY BY HARRY FOSKETT SHOT ON LOCATION IN ZEKOPANE, POLAND


THE BIGGER PICTURE


sequence After a long first session dusting off the cobwebs and with our first couple of shots already in the bag, we finished the first day still knackered from our drive but excited about the rest of our trip. Over the next couple of days we scouted out a couple of new spots and it was George who showed just how much he deserved his place on the trip by banking a couple more bangers. But by day four our luck seemed to be running out: after some big falls, a few encounters with angry residents and a night spent enjoying the Polish tradition of vodka, it had all finally caught up with us. With the whole team feeling battered and bruised after just a few days, we could do nothing but spend the day recovering and watch as the snow started to melt. That night, with the snow supplies dwindling and our list of spots getting shorter, we decided it was time for some local knowledge. So we relocated from Krakow to Katowice and enlisted the services of Marcin Pospiech.

After hours of riding and hundreds of hits it was starting to dawn on us just how difficult this rail was. When we arrived at Marcin’s house we were all keen to take a look through his catalogue of rails he had been telling us about and as we started to browse, snow flakes started falling outside the window. Once again, the excitement started to build. The feeling however was somewhat shortlived. We had decided on a spot that Marcin had been eager to shoot for a few years but had never had the opportunity. After a long and treacherous drive through what was now an all out snowstorm, we found ourselves going over the Czech border only to find the snow turning to rain and our chances of being able to shoot anything being rapidly washed away.


TALES FROM ABROAD Turning our attentions back to Poland, we headed back into the eye of the storm and to our second choice spot, a banger quad kink. This time the session was on, but by the time we had set up we were already into the early hours and soaked through from the heavy snow that was quickly turning to rain. When the new day finally broke the snow had all but melted. After a long couple of days, we were all about ready to sack it in. After visiting a couple of spots with no luck we decided to try one more place before calling it a day. A small park surrounded by trees provided just about enough shelter to have kept some of the snow and right there in the middle, surrounding a small sledging hill was a long winding c-rail. With no need for a bungee and very low consequences everyone was soon stoked but after hours of riding and hundreds of hits it was starting to dawn on us just how difficult this rail was. The frustration was beginning to set in and it eventually resulted in the loss of a ski pole to a nearby tree, after some time we eventually manged to free the pole and return it to its rightful owner but by this time we were all exhausted and it was time for us to finish up. With the snow now totally gone in town, we headed into the mountains to see what we could find in the small resort of Zakopane. As we drove, the snow banks at the side of the road got steadily bigger and we arrived to more snow than I had ever seen here before. We all know this resort pretty well but have already shot on most of the features (and wanting to keep things as legit as possible) we were looking for something new. In the end we stumbled accross a big gas pipe which we have shot before, but under all this snow gave the spot a completly different feel to the last time and a very different feel to everything else we had hit during this trip. The boys even strapped on their powder skis to hit it and after another late night, and with our final shots in the bag, we put our lens caps on the cameras and packed up the car for the final time. Our trip may have been strikes and gutters but it was not just our hangovers and battle scars we were taking home with us, but the knowledge that we had scratched below the surface of this forgotten land and just about lived to tell the tale.


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IN FOCUS

I first met Nathan a couple of years ago, and over that time I have seen him gradually expand his bag of tricks and really discover his own style. this constant progression is the reason i enjoy working with Nathan and has started to bring him right to the forefront of British freeskiing. after good results at both the London Freeze and the Brits this year it looks like his time at the top may be just around the corner.

iN FoCUs nATHAn ConnollY is oNE oF thE British FrEEski sCENE’s risiNG stars. HARRY FoSKeTT tELLs Us What it’s LikE WorkiNG With thE yoUNG Lad FroM LaNCashirE.

at the beginning of March, i met up with Nathan in his winter home of Livigno, and once again found myself crammed in the back of a car, filled with ski bags and camera equipment and unable to move forour entire 12 hour drive. When we finally made it to our Deštné, at four in the morning, we were greeted by a massive 21 meter table, built specially for the Freeski Soldiers it is without a doubt the biggest jump in the Czech Republic. it was a couple of days later that we strapped up for the shoot and after some variable weather conditions we finally had a bluebird day and perfect light. The backdrop was not great and after a couple of missed opportunities trying to get the right angle, i found this spot. Right in the middle of the gap I was able to just about capture the edge of the landing and the huge seven metre wedge that shows the sheer scale of the jump. It was just then that Nathan threw this smooth 5 blunt and the shot was just a little bit different to everything else and one of the best shots of the session.

CAmeRA CaNoN Eos 7d lenS CaNoN 15MM F2.8 FishEyE SHUTTeR SPeeD 1/2500s APeRTURe F/7.1 iSo 400


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RIDERS INSIGHT

BEHIND THE SCENES AFTER LOSING HIS SPONSORS AND GOING BACK TO HIS ROOTS JOSH FAWCETT TALKS TO ROB EMBLING ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCES. PHOTOGRAPHY BY HARRY FOSKETT

We haven’t seen you around much over the last few years what you been up to? Yeah, I’ve been hiding away at my home in stoke for the last year but I’ve just recently finished my college education after having a few set backs with injuries so now I’m all freed up to ski. Apart from that I’ve been down at my local dry ski slope riding at least once a week, which has been sweet. Also managed to get in the car a few times this year and go to different locations around the UK to do some filming with the Unity crew, which is always super fun. Ski Stoke is relatively unknown as a dryslope, although it has always had one of the biggest scenes with loads of riders coming through, is there something in water? Haha. I’m not sure; I don’t drink as much of it as I should. I think a large part of it is to do with the very friendly scene. The atmosphere makes it an amazing place to ride whether your training for comps or just coming down for a casual jam on a Friday night. I can still remember the days of the ‘Stoke Massive’ as we used to call ourselves, always getting in a big convoy to travel to comps near and far in the UK. A big shout out to all the parents who would ferry us around, it was almost a full time job. Like you say, you have been in the scene for a long time and have grown up as a sponsored skier from a very young age. What exactly was it like? When you travelled to those competitions did you feel under pressure to perform and did the glamour of it always live up to expectations? That’s a tough question. Don’t get me wrong, getting sponsored was the best thing to ever happen to me and my skiing. I can still remember when I first got asked and my jaw dropped to the floor. Back then, it was the one thing every young skier wanted. Throughout the first few years it was amazing, seeing pictures of yourself in magazines next to all of my idols was unbelievable and being invited to competitions like the London Ride were lifetime experiences. At the age of 12 it can make you a little bit cocky, which I guess anyone who knew me at the time would agree with. After having several big injuries in a very small space of time, coming back to the competition scene was very nerve wracking and I would defiantly feel the pressure when the younger kids were throwing down. It’s at these times when you wonder if the pressure is actually worth the amount of fun that you get from it. Some people

probably thrive off the challenge but I don’t find it very fun. It’s probably another reason for one or two of my injuries, but who knows. There is a whole generation of young riders coming through at the moment and it seems like they are getting sponsored left, right and centre. If there was one piece of advice you wish you had been given when you were younger what might it be? My one piece of advice is to enjoy it, even though I know that sounds corny. Ski for yourself, take bad competition results with a pinch of salt and don’t rush into anything. Oh, and race training is the bomb. You no longer have any ties to all your old sponsors, can you tell us how that came about? Not really. I don’t even know myself. I guess far too much of a competition orientated scene in the UK, but I really don’t know how to answer that. Now that you are back skiing for yourself do you feel like your attitude towards the sport has changed? Incredibly, yeah. When I rock down for ski, whether it is at Stoke or anywhere else, I don’t feel the push to be one of the best there, I can just ride to the standard where I’m happy. I don’t find myself quizzing people after every ride with things like, “Did you just see my run? What do you think of it?” It’s become much more of a selfmotivated sport. Has this held you back from really pushing yourself to achieve your goals or has it just meant that your overall goals have changed? I would say my goals have changed slightly. Since day one my number one goal was to be able to ski on real snow, (not some crazy ass plastic) as much as I possibly could. In the end I still love skiing, maybe more now than ever. Every time I go skiing I aim to get that buzz that comes from having a really good ride, it is just a different path that’s taking me there. I guess the biggest thing that has changed is what I want to do with my skiing, I really want to spend a lot of time this coming season making a killer movie segment that I can be proud of. That way I hope will always have something to look back on to remind me of this period in my life.


sequence CLOCKWISE FROM TOP

LUKAS SCHAFER IN KRONPLATS SZCZEPAN KARPIEL IN ZAKOPANE ANDREW MATTHEW IN LONDON JURGEN NIGG IN INNSBRUCK

PHOTOGRAPHY BY HARRY FOSKETT

GALLERY



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