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The Sentinel Konah

February 1, 2018 February 1, 2018

The Sentinel Konah

LIFESTYLE

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LIFESTYLE

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#Me Too #MeToo : A voice for those who never thought they had one

A crime by any name to anyone Jordan Cowan

I

n light of the recent “Me, Too” movement, which started to become big in Hollywood with many women

speaking out about famous producer Harthe nation have come forward with their own sexual assault experience. With all of the sexual assault allegations going around, it’s important to really define what sexual assault is and that it can happen between anyone, not just between

2017, singer Timothy Heller accused “The Voice” pop-star Melanie Martinez of sexually assaulting her. Heller tweeted the story of her friendship with Martinez, and how one night when they were staying together, Martinez had sex with Heller despite her allegedly saying no to any sexual advances. “Just so there is no confusion, I was molested by my best friend,” Heller claimed in her initial tweet and has since been re-

men and women.

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YOU WERE ASKING FOR IT I T ’ S A LL MY FAU Y P M I SK LT

RAPE

YOU CAN’T PROVE THAT

Opinion: Athletes and sexual assault: society must raise awareness early In the age of ‘locker room talk,’ to bla-

Andrea Porch

of the Sentinel Konah

T R A M P

vey Weinstein, countless women across

As printed in Newsweek, on Dec.4,

WHORE

of the Sentinel Konah

SLUT

YOU KNOW YOU WANTED IT

YOU’RE DOING IT FOR ATTENTION

S

tantly disrespecting and berating women

exual Assault has been labeled

in a sexual manner in the presence of their

as a “women’s issue.” Women

colleagues in the locker room setting is in-

try to raise awareness, create

excusable and has no justification.

organizations educating indi-

Dr. Pamela Paresky speaks on the in-

viduals on preventing assault, and are the

appropriateness of this problem, “From a

majority of the victims of sexual assault.

psychological perspective, the answer is

Rather than giving them this respon-

unambiguous. There is a problem with it,

sibility and burden of putting themselves

and it isn’t about being politically correct.

out there to raise awareness, shouldn’t

It is important to understand the damage

we make the majority of the perpetrator’s

this kind of talk does, not only to women,

peers take responsibility for this?

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PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY ASTON KINSELLA

#Me Too movement gains ground around country

Spartans Speak: Should high schoolers be educated on sexual assault?

by Danika Firth

of the Sentinel Konah Victims of sexual assault are speaking out. In 2006, civil rights activist Tarana Burke first coined the phrase ‘Me Too’ to raise awareness of the pervasiveness of sexual abuse and assault in society in hopes of helping survivors of sexual violence find “pathways to healing.” Last December, the New York Times named ‘The Silence Breakers,’ women who came forward about sexual assault, as the “Person of the Year” for 2017. Being claimed as one of the “fastest-moving social changes” they’d seen in decades. Since 1998, 17.7 million women have reported being a victim of sexual assault. By building this community of survivors from “all walks of life” Burke hopes to bring vital conversations of sexual violence into the mainstream. Media around the world has unfortunately stigmatized survivors and those who have reported these assaults. Burke hopes to break these stigmas and shine a light on those living with the weight of what happened every day. Burke has taken on the job of giving millions of women the hope they want, as well as the chance of showing people the importance of these discussions. It’s a fight to end sexual violence and heal communities. “For too long, survivors of sexual assault and harassment have been in the shadows. We have been afraid to speak up, to say ‘Me Too’ and seek accountability,” Burke said. Last year, the #Me Too movement gained ground, beginning in October 2017 as allegations against Hollywood producer and director Harvey Weinstein exploded. Some other major #MeToo movements of 2017 include allegations of sexual misconduct against big names such as actor Jeremy Piven, former NFL quarterback Warren Moon, actor Casey Affleck, actor James Franco, chef Mario Batali, actor Kevin Spacey, former senate candidate Roy Moore, comedian Louis C.K., reporter Matt Lauer, actor Dustin Hoffman, President Donald Trump, former President George H.W. Bush, actor George Takei, singer Nick Carter, actor Ben Affleck, and Larry Nassar.

“It shouldn’t go unrecognized.”

“Most people just look over it.”

“If we knew more about it and why it was happening, we could help people.”

“They need to know how to cope with it.”

Blake Jolma, Freshman

Collin Baker, Sophomore

Skylar Babcock, Junior

Hannah Schoonmaker, Senior

ILLUSTRATION BY RILEY NIELSEN

Women’s march takes on the world by Aston Kinsella

Editor-in-Chief On Jan. 20, 2018 women and their communities came together and marched in all corners of the world for the second year in a row, to represent and stand for Women’s Rights and equality. Coming off last year’s focus of protesting the inauguration of President Trump, this year women came together to speak out against sexual assault, to voice the inequalities they face, and to CONTINUED ON C4 At right: Thousands of men and women gathered in Downtown Missoula on Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018 from noon to 2:30 p.m., to march for equality, justice, and human rights. PHOTO BY ARIANNA SILVA

INFOGRAPHIC BY RILEY NIELSEN

Konah #MeToo Spread  
Konah #MeToo Spread  
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