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The Senior

OIC V E

Published Locally Since 1980

Wild West RIDE When

BUFFALO ROAMED

September 2013


horse ride

Published Locally Since 1980 Vol. 33, No. 10

Online at www.theseniorvoice.net PUBLICATION INFORMATION The Senior Voice news is locally owned and has been published the first of each month since 1980 for residents in Fort Collins, Greeley, Loveland and nearby towns. ADVERTISING Ad deadline is 20th of month. For rates, call 970-229-9204; email wolf@theseniorvoice.net or see www.theseniorvoice.net Wolfgang Lambdin Advertising Director Fort Collins, Colorado (970) 229-9204 wolf@theseniorvoice.net SALES OFFICES: Fort Collins & Loveland (970) 229-9204 Greeley (970) 223-9271 EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Announcements and stories must be received by the 10th of the month; ads by the 20th of the month. READER INFORMATION: Subscriptions $48 a year. The Senior Voice welcomes readers’ letters and contributions. The Senior Voice assumes no responsibility for damaged or lost material submitted by readers. © Copyright 2013 The Senior Voice EDITORIAL OFFICE: (970) 223-9271 email: thevoice@frii.com www.theseniorvoice.net Design Production by Ellen Bryant Design ellen@ellenbryantdesign.com. A+ Rating

No material may be reproduced by any means without permission of the Senior Voice. William and Peggy Lambdin Founders, 1980

By Bill Lambdin

In 1848, a young man named Francis Aubry made one of the most amazing horseback rides in the early West. He covered the 800 miles of the Santa Fe Trail in five days and 16 hours—crossing parts of Kansas, southeastern Colorado, and northern New Mexico. It nearly cost him his life, and he rode down several horses in an attempt to win a $1,000 bet and show how fast a rider could make the journey that usually took wagon trains over two months. On September 12, he saddled a fast horse in Santa Fe and hit the trail. Aubry was only five feettwo inches tall, lean and an excellent horseman. He had fresh horses stationed at several relay points. But he wasn’t sure how fast the horses were or how much stamina they had since he had not ridden them before. He also didn’t know what the weather or Indians might do. The first horse got him to Las Vegas, New Mexico, northeast of Santa Fe. There he jumped on a fresh mount and galloped off leading two more horses. He rode all night, switching mounts when one wore down. By the end of the second day, he strapped himself in the saddle so he wouldn’t fall off when he dozed. For mile after mile across the plains, he heard only the galloping beat of the horses’ hooves. He listened carefully to his mount’s breathing and felt the changes in its movement to determine when it was tiring too much. At one relay point, he was able to get only one fresh mount, a yellow mare named Dolly. She became his favorite because of what

2 • September 2013 • The Senior Voice

she was able to do.

When he was supposed to leave Dolly for another mount at the next relay point, Indians had attacked the camp, killed the man there and stolen the horses. Aubry had to spur Dolly on, even though he had already ridden her hard. How much more could she stand? Aubry knew the next relay was many miles away, but the mare seemed strong of wind and spirit. He didn’t let up on her. She carried him over 100 miles and did it in 26 hours—an amazing feat and probably a record. Luckily, Aubry met a wagon train and was able to borrow a fresh horse. He told the wagon master to be sure Dolly was returned to Santa Fe and cared for. Aubry rode off but was not so lucky with the horses he picked up at the next relay point. He mounted one and led two. After just a few miles, the first horse gave out. Another ten miles, the second was done. He had ridden the third only about ten miles when it began to tire, stepped in a hole and fell dead. Aubry knew he had pushed them too hard. They were not like Dolly. He was afoot in the middle of nowhere. He hid his saddle in some brush and headed up the trail. After walking several miles, he reached a military post where a friend was supposed to be waiting with fresh mounts. But the friend was not there. Aubry was told the man should arrive soon; so he lay down for a nap. After just two hours, he was up and on the trail again. On the last leg of the ride, it

Francis Aubry made his ride in 1848. Photo Colorado Historical Society. began to rain and it was dark. Aubry strapped himself in the saddle again, but staying on the horse was difficult. His mount slipped in the mud several times and nearly fell. Aubry was groggy and could hardly hang on or see what dangers lay ahead. He was barely conscious when he finally reached Independence late that night. Some men lifted him from the saddle and carried him to a hotel where he collapsed. He was bleeding, and some thought he might die; but he recovered. He had made perhaps the most torturous ride in the West. Few other men would have attempted it. He won the bet, but that was not the only reason he made the ride. He was a young man full of spirit and eager to become part of the great adventure on the Frontier. And he did. ________________ COVER PICTURE: Bent's Fort on the Santa Fe Trail. The Voice archive. 


New Health Law Changes By Julie Appleby - Kaiser Health News If you buy your own health insurance, you’ve no doubt heard that subsidies will be available next year to help pay the premiums. But will you get a subsidy and how much? Researchers at the Kaiser Family Foundation have a report out that provides some insight. Based on their analysis, about 48 percent of adults currently purchasing coverage for themselves will be eligible for subsidies next year, and those subsidies will average $5,548 per family. Because that figure is an average, some families will get more and some will receive less when they enroll through new online marketplaces, which open October 1 (see www.cohealthop.org). “Generally, younger people will get less because the amounts tend to follow the age curve,” said Gary Claxton, a vice president at the foundation. “Single buyers will get a smaller credit, in general, than families.” Under the health law, people earning more than 400 percent of the federal poverty level—about $46,000 for a single person or $94,000 for a family of four— won’t be eligible for a subsidy at all.  Those offered affordable and comprehensive coverage through their employers, or those on government health programs like Medicaid, are also not eligible for a subsidy. The researchers did not include those groups—people eli-

gible for Medicaid or job coverage—in their analysis. How far will the subsidy go toward buying coverage? That depends on a number of factors, including age, where one lives and what type of policy one selects. Still, the analysis provides some clues. Using Congressional Budget Office information, the foundation researchers estimated the annual premium for an individual 40-year-old will average $3,857 nationally. Based on that estimate, the analysis pegged the average cost of family coverage for those who have coverage now and are expected to buy next year at $8,250. So, the estimated average subsidy of $5,548 would cover 67 percent of the cost of the average family plan. Individuals and families could choose lower premium plans, but in no case will the subsidy be greater than the amount of the premium. Subsidies, provided as tax credits, will be given on a sliding scale based on household income and are less generous as income rises. –––––––––––––––– Kaiser Health News is an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit, nonpartisan health policy research and communication organization not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente. 

Putting it all on the table.

Free Pie Wednesdays! Delays in Health Law Seniors 50¢ always receive:

The new healthcare law is supposed to limit your out-of-pocket expenses in 2014 to $6,350 for an individual and $12,700 for a family. But federal officials have delayed that until at least 2015 in some cases.

This means some insurance companies can still require high co-pays and other payments of patients in 2014. “The government’s unexpected interpretation of the law will disproportionately harm people with complex chronic conditions,” said Myrl Weinberg with the consumer group National Health Council. This delay is in addition to another delay that allows some large companies to put off providing health coverage to full-time workers. In both cases, companies complained they needed more time to implement the changes, and government officials agreed. 

3 • September 2013 • The Senior Voice

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Early Stage By P.J. Hunt

The Fort Collins Museum has an authentic stagecoach built in 1874. Historians say it was used on the stage line between Cheyenne, Wyoming, and Deadwood, South Dakota, in the late 1800s. Some said Buffalo Bill Cody used it for a while in his Wild West show. In 1913 Frank C. Miller, Jr., of Fort Collins reportedly bought the stagecoach from Cody. Miller had performed in some of Cody’s shows and was the son of a Fort Collins pioneer family. He learned sharp shooting from cowboys when he was a boy. In 1921 Miller organized Fort Collins Pioneer Days with Indian

dances, roping and shooting. He and his wife, Peggy, had a guest ranch called Trail’s End near Cherokee Park north of Fort Collins. Famous people, including Will Rogers, visited the ranch. People enjoyed rides on the old stagecoach at Miller’s ranch, which also had a zoo with bears, bobcats and other animals. The stagecoach at the museum is a “mudwagon” model made in Concord, New Hampshire, by the Abbott-Downing Company. That company made the popular Concord stagecoach, but the mudwagon was more durable for the rough roads of mountain country. 

Stage at the museum.

New Insurance Plans

New health insurance premiums under Obamacare will mainly affect people who buy their own insurance or work for a small business. In Colorado, Deputy Insurance Commissioner Peg Brown said a 40-yearold can expect to pay from $177 a month for a low-end policy to $970 for the best coverage. A 27-year-old will pay from $135 to $567. Colorado HealthOP (www.cohealthop.org) provides information on plans. The insurance company offering the most plans is the nonprofit Rocky Mountain HMO headquartered in Grand Junction. Numerous other insurers offering plans include Cigna, Anthem and Humana. About 15% of Colorado’s population is currently uninsured, said Brown. 

Dedication Ceremony honoring National Pet Memorial Day

Saturday September 7, 2013 at 10am Pets are important family members, and when we lose them, it is important to have a place where they will rest and be memorialized – a place to visit and remember treasured memories. Join us for a touching and respectful service honoring National Pet Memorial Day as we dedicate our new Precious Pals Cemetery at Resthaven Cemetery.

Resthaven Memory Gardens is a proud member of the Pet Loss Professional Alliance.

(970) 667-0202 • www.resthavencolorado.com 8426 S. Hwy. 287 Fort Collins, CO 80525 Photography courtesy: Santella Productions

4 • September 2013 • The Senior Voice


When Buffalo

Roamed

pressed into action with shovels, which were carried for this purpose. “A shallow trench was dug around the train so that a back-fire could be started. The smoke and heat were agonizing. Children coughed and cried. Eyes were watery and reddened from the

smoke. “After long hours of digging and smothering the fire with wet burlap bags, the flames subsided...” Those pioneers probably never forgot that trip across the plains. 

Rocky Mountain Travel King Book with experience 46 years, 1966-2012

Shooting buffalo, from an 1871 painting. Colorado Historical Society.

(Editor’s Note: Early Greeley historian Hazel Johnson wrote this story.)

In 1870, the Rogerson brothers (Horatio and Robert) were among the first settlers in Greeley and built the first hotel here, the Greeley House. A grandson, Robert B. Rogerson, later wrote about their journey west: “In 1869 the two Rogerson brothers, along with a few others, were sent as scouts to inspect the proposed site for (the Greeley) colony of emigrants in the great unsettled West. “After selecting a site, they returned to New York and, with their families, relocated in 1870. Traveling in a new conveyance called a train, which had been in

herd had been grazing along the track, and as the train approached they surrounded it with angry, stomping, snorting violence. “The crew shouted and waved their arms, which seemed to enrage the animals more. In fear of an onslaught by the herd, passengers were restrained from using their guns. “During the long wait, every passenger was horror stricken. Mothers clutched their children and tried to quiet them. Visions were in every mind of the enraged beasts charging the coaches and pushing them from the tracks and trampling the occupants into the dust. “After several hours, the buffalo wandered off onto the prairie. “But disaster seemed bent on

They were in the midst of a great buffalo herd. use only a few years, was a tiresome, hard journey... “The long stretches of prairie seemed endless...One day the train chugged along and without warning they found themselves in the midst of a great herd of buffalo. “The humped, hairy beasts milled on the track and up and down beside the coaches. The

following this train. “Shortly after the buffalo encounter, a bright dancing flame (prairie fire) appeared on the horizon in the deep of the night. It seemed to be racing directly toward the train. “Grass fires were a menace to the railroads...The wind was high and the grass thick and dry. The train stopped and every man was

5 • September 2013 • The Senior Voice

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M E A D O W V I E W

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Thousands of faulty PSA tests have been shipped by Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics since February 2012, said ABC News. The tests show higher PSA levels than are actually present and can prompt unnecessary biopsies. Autism Inducing labor at birth might increase the risk for it, said a report in JAMA Pediatrics by Duke University researchers. About one in 88 children are born with autism in the U.S. Many of them have superior math skills, said researchers. Medicare Patients

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The number of doctors who decided not to accept them nearly tripled in the past four years, said Medicare officials. The reason: Low reimbursement rates and too much paperwork. Laser Toys Dangerous Some emit beams that can damage the eyes in an instant, even cause blindness, said the FDA. That includes some on toy guns, spinning tops that project beams, light sabers, and toys that create optical effects. Buy toys with the label “21 CFR” for safety, said the FDA. MRIs

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They appear to prompt many unnecessary mastectomies in mature women, said a report in the journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. Prostate Cancer Drug The drug finasteride reduces the chance of getting prostate cancer, said a report in the New England Journal of Medicine. Finas-

teride is already used successfully to treat an enlarged prostrate. Gluten Free Foods As of 2014 they must adhere to FDA definitions of what glutenfree actually is, e.g., contain less than 20 parts per million of gluten. Cat Feces It can contain an infectious parasite (T. gondii) that can cause nerve damage, eye diseases, and other serious problems if the cat goes outdoors and eats birds, mice, etc, said a report in the journal Trends in Parasitology. This “may be a much bigger problem than we realize,” said researcher E. Fuller Torry at Stanley Medical Research Institute. Breast Feeding It appears to increase a child’s IQ if done for at least 6 months, preferably a year, said researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital. “It’s time to start making it easier and more acceptable for women to breast-feed for longer,” said Dr. Dimitri Christakis. Tattoos They should not be placed over moles because that could make cancerous moles hard to detect and treat, said a report in the journal JAMA Dermatology. Bedbug Bites Sometimes recognizable as small red, itchy bites when you first wake up, especially if the bites are lined up in a row. But some people show no reactions, said researcher Jorge Parada at Loyola University in Illinois. You need professional help to get rid of them. 


Editor’s Note: Historian Maria Rogers collected the following account years ago of Estes Park resident Enos Mills, the father of Rocky Mountain National Park. It was from an interview with Mills’ daughter, Enda (not Edna).

It was a very bitter battle… He gave a six full years to this endeavor. One of the best things he did was to use nature guiding. Nature guiding was a way to go with people, stimulate their interest in the out of doors, arouse their curiosity, sharpen their ob-

By Enda Mills Kiley (Enos Mills) started building his log cabin by himself in the fall of 1885 when he was 15 years old...He left home to see the world (and) before he was 33 he said he had a campfire in every state but Rhode Island… 1909 was a tremendously important year for Enos Mills because this was the year he began campaigning for Rocky Mountain National Park. He had been thinking and planning and setting it up, working on the boundaries and stimulating local people’s interest. But the real campaign started in 1909 and went until the park was finally ratified in January of 1915. It was a really bitter struggle because the mine union (was) against a national park and kept it from being a park until it was discovered that there was no mineral in (the proposed) Rocky Mountain National Park… The other people who did not think the national park was a good idea were the cattlemen. There

servation (skills) so that every person would be aware of the outdoors wherever they lived and take advantage of it, to enjoy it… He trained my mother and her sister as nature guides, and they were the first women to be licensed by the National Park. 

Need a Dentist? Enos Mills. Estes Park Museum. were many hundreds of cattle driven up to this area for summer grazing, and since it is high altitude, they devastated all the (fragile) vegetation, tramped the trails and brought a lot of flies. So they were not an asset, to say the least. It was cheap grazing, and they sure did make use of it. There was a tremendous amount of logging also. So the people who were making use of the resources were not in favor of “locking it all up” as they called it…They were people who didn’t have the perspective, to quote my father: “Scenery is a valuable resource, but it’s fragile.”

Conflict of Interest The safety of food additives is supposed to be determined by unbiased experts who are not influenced by the companies that make the additives. But the opposite is true, said a report in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. Conflicts of interest are obvious, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does nothing about it. Most of the experts are directly associated with the food additive companies. “It really dramatizes the extent to which the people who are evaluating many new food ingredients have severe conflicts of interest,” said Michael Jacobson with the Center for Science in the public interest.” New York University researcher Marion Nestle added, “The lack of independent review...raises serious questions about the public health implications of unregulated additives in the food supply.” 

7 • September 2013 • The Senior Voice

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Estate Planning

Q: A:

By Ron Rutz, Attorney

Besides a Will, what other document do I need? Do comprehensive Durable Powers of Attorney (DPOAs). Without that, a court conservatorship/guardianship would be needed. Since it is not known how a DPOA might come into play, the general scope of the DPOAs would permit anything to be handled whether it is medical, personal, business, financial, etc. Thus, in an emergency, a single three-page document can be picked up without the necessity of sorting through a number of individual DPOAs written for specific areas. Remember, if the DPOA does not provide authority, a court appointed guardianship/conservatorship could be necessary. I would recommend signing four original DPOAs. Often possession of an original is given up

when an agent uses it. If the maker later becomes incapacitated and if the maker’s agent has no originals left, then it would be necessary to go to Court, even though the maker had signed DPOAs. Name back-up agents. Chances are that at least one designee would be available. Also, as between a couple, each spouse can name different backups.   To remain in control, the maker should keep possession of all four DOAs and only give an original to an agent when a matter needs to be handled. Afterwards, the original DPOA should be returned to the maker.   Although DPOAs are good forever in Colorado, consider “rebooting” them every five years or so, even if no changes are needed. ________________ Attorney Ron Rutz will answer questions sent to rutz@ronaldrutz.com. Phone 223.8388 in Ft. Collins. 

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8 • September 2013 • The Senior Voice

I am chairing the Economic Opportunity Poverty Reduction Task Force that is committed to a dialogue that embraces varied perspectives on issues related to child and family poverty and the nexus between economic opportunity and poverty reduction. We understand that there is a proper role for the public sector to provide an effective safety net in collaboration with our communitybased non-profits and faith-based partners. And there is the moral component of supporting our most vulnerable neighbors such as children who are hungry, elders who survive on fixed incomes, persons with disabilities who are marginalized, or families who live paycheck to paycheck. We understand that there is a strong connection between public services and infrastructure, the business community, and sustainable economic development. A skilled workforce is our human

capital infrastructure, which is essential for a vibrant economy and for creating jobs that help lift people out of poverty. Colorado businesses can be greatly enhanced from potential employees seeking to overcome poverty. The best way out of poverty is a quality education and a quality job, and personal responsibility and shared responsibility go hand in hand. In addition to these shared principles, we have also formed four work groups to research and analyze the issues and promising practices that will move us towards the goal of cutting poverty in half by 2019. We are looking at workforce readiness and development, early childhood development and education, the housing continuum and the effective use of public/private resources and collaboration. ________________ Email Senator Kefalas at jkefalashd52@frii.com. 


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ACROSS 1. County home to Wolf Creek Pass and Creede 6. Japanese internment camp established in southeast CO named for this daughter of a Cheyenne chief killed at Sand Creek 10. “American “ 11. Sniggler’s targets 14. Web service provider, briefly 15. Speech problem for some 16. Apples and pears are two 17. Scott Decision 18. The “Duke of Flatbush” 19. Bill Cosby and Robert Culp TV series 21. Vegas beginning 22. “ is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.” (Franklin) 24. Jittery, on edge 26. Utah ski area 27. It might be natural 28. Ruffians 30. Syrian dictator 31. The Denver and Railroad 33. Type of protest 36. Eliminated rust and squeaks 37. “The Big Easy” of PGA fame 38. Artist community of northern New Mexico 40. You can’t buy a gun if one of these 42. Med students’ course (abbr.) 43. Zebra on a court? 45. Center to quarterback connection 46. Cat usually of 3 colors: black, orange (yellow) and white 48. Florida or Italy, e.g. (abbr.) 50. Be on a committee 51. If you’re twenty, you can’t be one S

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COLORADO CROSSWORDS are created exclusively for The Voice by Tony Donovan, who lives in Loveland.


By Kim McCloud

OF SERVICE

After extensive research, they liked what they found at Bonell Good Samaritan in Greeley and approached executives at the Good Samaritan Society’s headquarters in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. It didn’t take long for either party to realize that Good Samaritan and Loveland were a perfect fit.

The staff and residents of Good Samaritan Loveland Village invite the public to an Open House celebrating our 40th year on September 20 from 2 to 5 pm. Loveland Village is located at 2101 South Garfield Avenue, phone 970-624-5465. It’s hard to believe that it’s been 40 years since Good Samaritan Loveland Village became home to its first residents. A couple of Loveland retired teachers, Miss Eliese Kammeyer and Miss Lillian Akers, had a vision to create a place for people to live and be cared for as their needs arose.

Once the compatibility of Loveland and Good Samaritan was determined, land was purchased in south Loveland in a pastoral setting with magnificent mountain views. Ground breaking of phase one was in 1971, with both Eliese and Lillian turning the first shovels of dirt. The

first resident moved into the Village in 1973. It didn’t take much time for the leaders of Loveland Village to discover that the needs were growing, and more building was necessary. Growth at the Village has been ongoing ever since. Three more apartment buildings, twin homes, a secured memory wing, and the Gardner Therapy Center now provide housing and care to almost 400 people. For the next couple of years, the staff and residents are celebrating

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10 • September 2013 • The Senior Voice

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the theme “Live Happy”—realizing that we can find happiness through many different avenues. Residents can discover happiness through the arts and participate in various classes offered throughout the Village. Many find happiness through fitness and exercise, while some find it through music.

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 BUY a Home The 1862 stage station on the right still stands above the barn that is gone. The Voice archive.

Local HISTORY The Virginia Dale Community Club will host a Western History Day and Chili Cookoff on September 14, 9 am to 4 pm, at the Virginia Dale Stagecoach Station north of Fort Collins. Purpose of the event is to introduce children and families to local history and the stagecoach station, built in 1862, that still stands. The event will include food, demonstrations of quilting, square dancing, cowboy cooking, and other activities, said Marcie

Wells. There will be speakers on several topics, and the winner of a fifth grade essay contest on Abraham Lincoln will read the essay. The stage station is located four miles south of the Wyoming border on Highway 287. Turn east on County Road 43 and go one mile (left at the fork).

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Hospitals Penalized By Jordan Rau - Kaiser Health News Medicare will levy $227 million in fines against hospitals in every state but one for the second round of the government’s campaign to reduce the number of patients readmitted within a month, according to federal records. Medicare identified 2,225 hospitals that will have Medicare payments reduced for a year starting on October 1. Eighteen hospitals will lose 2 percent, the maximum possible and double the current top penalty. Another 154 will lose 1 percent or more of every payment for a patient stay, the records show. Hospitals that treated large numbers of low-income patients were more likely to be penalized than those treating the fewest impoverished people. The penalty program, which began in October 2012, is among the toughest of Medicare’s efforts to pay hospitals for the quality of their performances rather than merely the number of patients they treat. Unlike other new programs created by the new health law, the readmissions program offers hospitals no rewards for improvements or the opportunity to opt out. While the overall number of penalized hospitals stayed about the same—with Medicare penalizing two-thirds of eligible hospitals— there have been considerable shifts among facilities. A Kaiser Health News analysis found that 1,371

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hospitals are receiving a lower fine. Alegent Creighton Health Midlands Hospital in Papillion, Neb., will see the biggest penalty decrease, going from the maximum 1 percent fine in the current year to no fine for the second year. Nationwide, the average hospital fine will be slightly smaller, and the national total will be $53 million less than this year’s fines. Medicare is increasing penalties for 1,074 hospitals. A total of 283 hospitals not fined in the current year, including Stanford Hospital in California and Johns Hopkins’ Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C., will be penalized in the new round. The October penalties will be applied on at least four out of five hospitals in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, Illinois, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Tennessee, West Virginia and the District of Columbia. Maryland, which Medicare exempted from the program because it has a unique reimbursement system designed under a federal waiver, is the only state whose hospitals had no fines. ________________ Kaiser Health News is an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit, nonpartisan health policy research and communication organization not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente. ■

3 Local Events 4

FT. COLLINS HISTORIC HOMES: Tour, luncheon, silent auction, September 14. See poudrelandmarks@gmail.com.

Trappers, Indians, miners, loggers, ranchers and the longest tramway of its day - the echo of history preserved at the Grand Encampment Museum. Open Daily from 8am - 6pm. Admission by donation. Just a short drive away! 807 Barnett Ave Encampment, WY • (307) 327-5308 www.GEMuseum.com

12 • September 2013 • The Senior Voice

GREELEY POTATO DAY September 14, music, history demonstrations, food, kids' activities. Also Fall History Festival, September 17. Meeker Home Tours, October 5. See emily.lance@greeleygov.com. LOVELAND HISTORICAL SOCIETY: Sharon Danhauer's memories of growing up on Pike's Peak, September 9. Mapping the U.S.-Mexico Border, October 14. See contact@lovelandhistorical.org. LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS: Climate Change Forum by CSU scientist and others, September 30. See larimercountylwv@yahoo.com.

FORT COLLINS READS: Big band concert, September 13. Discussion of the book "In the Garden of Beasts," September 26. Former CIA agent Francine Mathews discusses her book on Kennedy, "Jack 1939," October 3. "Dirty 30s" history panel, October 15. Franklin Roosevelt portrayed by Richard Marold, October 18. See fortcollinsreads@gmail.com. ■


Remember Her? Her mother was the reason Shirley became a movie star, and she was always present to make sure her hair was right, her costumes fit, and that she knew her lines.

Shirley Temple Black. By Lois Hall Shirley Temple, America’s most famous child actor, said, “I stopped believing in Santa Claus when my mother took me to see him in a department store and he asked for my autograph.� She was a bright child; she had to be to learn dance steps and memorize lines by the time she was four. She was born in 1928 at Santa Monica, California. Her father, George F. Temple, was a banker. Her mother, Gertrude, liked dancing and had Shirley taking lessons very early.

Hollywood producers cast Shirley in “Bright Eyes� in 1934 and a series of other films in which she starred with the famous black dancer Bill “Bojangles� Robinson, who taught her a great deal. In 1936 she was paid $15,000 a week while working on “Poor Little Rich Girl.� That was an unprecedented amount for an actor at the time, but Shirley was Hollywood’s biggest star. It was the Depression, and her movies appealed to millions of Americans seeking a little optimism during hard times. President Franklin Roosevelt reportedly said, “As long as our country has Shirley Temple, we’ll be all right.�

But by 1945, she was tired of acting. She also had a daughter to take care of from a marriage to actor John Agar, whom she later divorced. In 1949, she retired at age 21 and later married businessman Charles A. Black. She ran for

Congress and lost, but in 1969 President Richard Nixon made her a delegate to the United Nations. She later became U.S. Ambassador to Czechoslovakia. She was the first woman brave enough to say on television, “I have breast cancer,â€? which began public recognition of that disease. Though she is mainly remembered as a child star, she did much more as an adult than most people knew. â–

Bugs In Your Food? What does “artificial colorâ€? mean in the ingredients of food we buy? In the case of Dannon Yogurt, it meant a dye made from the bodies of insects, said a report by the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI). The insect is a cochineal, a tiny parasitic scale from Mexico. Its dye is also used in ice creams, candies and other products. It is generally considered harmless, but it can cause allergic reactions in some people. CSPI executive Michael Jacobson said, “I have nothing against people who eat insects, but when I buy strawberry yogurt I’m expecting yogurt and strawberries, and not red dye made from bugs.â€? The FDA calls it “carmineâ€? and requires some products to use that instead of “artificial color.â€? â–

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Social Security By Lauren Eitel - Greeley Social Security Office

If you’re in your sixties, you probably know that the age to receive full Social Security benefits has changed. But it’s important to remember that the age to begin receiving Medicare has not—it is still 65. Even if you have decided to wait until after you are age 65 to apply for retirement benefits, most people should start getting Medicare coverage at age 65. If you would like to begin your Medicare coverage when you first become eligible, we suggest that you apply within three months of reaching age 65. You can do it online in as little as 10 minutes at www.socialsecurity.gov/medicareonly. At the website, you’ll find more than just the online Medicare application. You’ll also find information about Medicare. Why go online to apply for Medicare? Because it’s fast, easy, and secure. You don’t need an appointment and you can avoid waiting in traffic or in line. As long as you have ten minutes to spare, you have time to complete and submit your online Medicare application. People who started receiving Social Security retirement or disability benefits before age 65 do not need to apply; they will be automatically enrolled in Medicare.  ________________ Lauren Eitel is the Assistant District Manager of the Greeley Social Security Office. 

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The territorial prison in Laramie. Wyoming Historical Society.

History in

Laramie By P.J. Hunt

The Old West Park and Wyoming Territorial Prison in Laramie is a 180-acre state historic site that includes the old Prison Museum, U.S. Marshals’ Museum, gift shop, and other attractions. The prison was built in 1868 and housed several famous out-

Over the years, more than 300 marshals were killed in the line of duty, many of them after the Civil War when the West opened and marshals had to pursue outlaws on the unsettled frontier. One of the former attractions at Laramie’s Old West Park was the portrayal of Calamity Jane by her

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laws, including Butch Cassidy, who was jailed there from 1894 to 1896. It was the only time Cassidy was jailed. He was pardoned by Governor William Richards after he promised he would not rob banks in Wyoming. But soon after his release, he and his gang robbed a train at Kaycee, Wyoming. Some said Cassidy kept his promise— he robbed a train, not a bank. The National U.S. Marshals’ Museum here is the only one of its kind and contains some interesting exhibits. The marshals were the nation’s first federal law enforcement officers; their organization was established in 1789.

great, great niece Norma Cathey. The author of several books on Calamity Jane, Cathey did extensive research on the famous frontier woman. Events at the Park include a mountain man rendezvous, marshals’ rendezvous, cowboy poetry gathering, western music talent competition, and Native American performances. The Park and Prison are located on the west side of Laramie just off of Interstate-80. Take the Snowy Range Road exit and then turn right. For events, call 307745-6161, email chamberofcommerce@laramie.org. ■


Laughter: Best Medicine A little girl told her mother, “My stomach hurts.” Her mother said, “That’s because it’s empty. You need something in it.” Later the little girl’s grandmother visited and said, “I have a headache. The child said, “That’s because it’s empty.” Bob sat down in a bar next to

a blonde who was watching a TV news story about a man standing on a ledge threatening to jump. She turned to Bob and said, “Do you think he’ll jump?” “Yeah, I’ll bet ten dollars he jumps,” said Bob. “Okay, I’ll bet he doesn’t,” she said. The man did jump, and she handed Bob the money.

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He said, “I can’t take your money. I saw this earlier and knew he would jump.” “So did I, but I didn’t think he’d do it again.” A baby boomer told his friend, “We criticized Lance Armstrong for using drugs while winning all those bike races. I wonder about that. When I was on drugs, I couldn’t even find my bike.” Being popular on Facebook is like sitting at the cool table in a cafeteria at a mental hospital. Remember when girls were cooking like their mothers instead of drinking like their fathers? The probability of being watched is directly proportional to the stupidity of your act. What will the wealthy do when the middle class can no longer afford to support them? A man in a hot air balloon in Iowa yelled down to a farmer, “Where am I?” The farmer looked up and yelled, “You’re in a basket.”

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An old farmer in the backwoods went to town for the first time in his life and saw a mirror. He looked into it and said, “Well, I’ll be darned. It’s a picture of my old dad.” He took it home, hung it in a shed, and went out to look at it nearly every evening. His wife noticed his many trips to the shed and decided to investigate. She went to the shed, looked

in the mirror and said, “So that’s the ugly hag he’s been running around with!” When your wife says, “What?” it’s not because she didn’t hear you. She’s giving you a chance to change what you said. A college professor told his class, “I know when you’re texting. People don’t just look down at their crotch and smile.” Reportedly from an actual court transcript: Lawyer: “Doctor, before you performed the autopsy, did you check for a pulse?” Witness: “No.” Lawyer: “Did you check for breathing?” Witness: “No.” Lawyer: “So then, it is possible the patient was alive when you began the autopsy?” Witness: “No.” Lawyer: “How can you be sure?” Witness: “Because his brain was sitting in a jar on my desk.” Lawyer: “But could the patient have still been alive?” Witness: “I suppose it’s possible he could be practicing law.”

Protect Yourself “Safe and Sound in the Hospital: Must-Have Checklists and Tools for Your Loved One’s Care” is a recent book about how to protect yourself and others from infections and other problems during a hospital stay. Author Karen Curtiss says the most important thing to do is ask staff and doctors if they washed their hands when they come to

your bed. That’s not always easy because about 30% of doctors and nurses are offended if you ask. But Curtiss says do it—in a kind way that doesn’t bruise egos. Maybe say, “Do I need to ask...” Example hints: alcohol wipes kill staph bugs, but bleach wipes kill C.diff germs. Keeping the bed at a 30-degree angle helps avoid hospital acquired pneumonia. 


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September 2013  

Famous horse ride in the West. Rocky Mountain National Park. Health law changes.

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