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The Senior

OIC V E

Published Locally Since 1980

November 2013

FAMOUS PIONEER The Ladies Wore Calico


Famous Pioneer

Published Locally Since 1980 Vol. 33, No. 12

Online at www.theseniorvoice.net PUBLICATION INFORMATION The Senior Voice news is locally owned and has been published the first of each month since 1980 for residents in Fort Collins, Greeley, Loveland and nearby towns. ADVERTISING Ad deadline is 20th of month. For rates, call 970-229-9204; email wolf@theseniorvoice.net or see www.theseniorvoice.net Wolfgang Lambdin Advertising Director Fort Collins, Colorado (970) 229-9204 wolf@theseniorvoice.net SALES OFFICES: Fort Collins & Loveland (970) 229-9204 Greeley (970) 223-9271 EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Announcements and stories must be received by the 10th of the month; ads by the 20th of the month. READER INFORMATION: Subscriptions $48 a year. The Senior Voice welcomes readers’ letters and contributions. The Senior Voice assumes no responsibility for damaged or lost material submitted by readers. © Copyright 2013 The Senior Voice EDITORIAL OFFICE: (970) 223-9271 email: thevoice@frii.com www.theseniorvoice.net Design Production by Ellen Bryant Design ellen@ellenbryantdesign.com. A+ Rating

No material may be reproduced by any means without permission of the Senior Voice. William and Peggy Lambdin Founders, 1980

By Bill Lambdin It is mainly through the photographs of William Henry Jackson that we know what the frontier towns in Colorado and Wyoming looked like in the 1800s. He also captured the majestic scenery of the Rocky Mountains. Historian Marshall Sprague said of Jackson: “What gets me is how he survived it all—scrambling around those thousand foot precipices, those 14,000-foot Colorado peaks...and getting caught in those sudden violent hail-andwind storms above timberline that can kill a hiker in a matter of minutes.” Jackson’s photographs show our part of the West before civili-

draw and became a reasonably accomplished artist. At age 23, he and two friends set out for the West, taking whatever jobs they could find along the way. He worked as a bullwacker with a wagon train headed for mining camps on the Oregon Trail. In 1867, he helped drive a herd of horses from Salt Lake City to southern California. Women found Jackson attractive, though he admitted that as a young man he sometimes had more drinks at the bar than he could handle. After serving in the Civil War, he joined a U.S. Geological Survey crew headed by Ferdinand Hayden. That was his big break. In 1870 they went west to photo-

“What gets me is how he survived it all – scrambling around those thousand foot precipices, those 14,000-foot Colorado peaks." zation changed it. In 1874, he took the first pictures of the ancient Indian ruins at Mesa Verde. It was his pictures of northwestern Wyoming that prompted Congress to create Yellowstone National Park. He knew he was seeing the West as it would never be again and that he was leaving a valuable record of America. He pursued that destiny for much of the 99 years of his life. Jackson was born in 1843 in the small town of Keeseville, New York. He learned his photographic skills early as a boy working for a local studio. He also learned to

2 • November 2013 • The Senior Voice

graph and map uncharted areas of the Rockies. Photography at that time required lugging around nearly 300 pounds of equipment—camera, chemical plates, a developing tent, etc. It took an hour to expose and develop just one negative on a glass plate. It often took many hours, sometimes days, for Jackson and his pack mule to climb to a vantage point where he could get the best photos. The 1870 trip was the first time Jackson saw Colorado, and he fell in love with the place. During his lifetime, when he wasn’t living in Colorado, he returned often. At

Jackson often took risks to get his photos. National Park Service. Denver in 1874, he married Emilie Painter, a cousin of William Gilpin, the first Territorial Governor of Colorado. Jackson’s pictures grew popular with Easterners, who were curious about the West. He made other expeditions with government survey teams and did photographic work for the railroads. Later he became managing director of the Detroit Publishing Company but continued to return to the West often. On one of his later trips, he fell and fractured several vertebrae in his back while in Cheyenne. He was 94 years old at the time but recovered and continued to take pictures. In 1942 he died at age 99. His life’s work consisted of over 80,000 photographs, a legacy of immeasurable value. ________________ COVER PICTURE: Garden of the Gods near Colorado Springs. Taken by Fort Collins professional photographer Gregory Mayse, who has published two coffee-table books of photos: “Colorado: Rocky Mountain Magic” and “Rocky Mountain Wild.” His photos have been featured on television, in magazines such as BBC Wildlife, and other publications. See his gallery at www. gregorymayse.com. n


The

wore

CALICO

The Forks Hotel in the 1800s. Fort Collins Public Library. By Bill Lambdin Years ago, the ranch women in the Livermore area north of Fort Collins collected stories from pioneer families. Here is an excerpt from one of the stories describing the first dance at the Forks Hotel in 1875, written by pioneer Charlie Roberts: “They came in all kinds of conveyances. John Williams and Maggie came on horseback. There was Pat Mullins and all the crowd from the Elkhorn house… Bill Calloway and his little darkhaired wife… “They danced the Virginia Reel and Money Musk. They right and left, six forward and back, swing on the corners and alamen left, promenade all… “There was the red-headed girl from Greeley…Several had a bottle but no one was real drunk. The boys danced in their high-heeled boots. Some had brand new overalls. The ladies wore calico and gingham… “We danced until the golden

sun warned us that another day was born…There were no society buds that smelled like a tropical flower garden, but pure fresh young womanhood from mountain homes. They were the wives and mothers of empire builders, but they did not know it…” The Livermore Women’s Club later published a book titled “Among These Hills: A History of Livermore Colorado.” It contained valuable first-hand accounts of pioneer life. The women who compiled it said it was “affectionately dedicated to those rugged pioneers of the livestock industry in Larimer County and to the wives and mothers who made the homes and maintained the culture in this range community.” Thanks to those women, a valuable part of northern Colorado’s history was preserved. A recent edition of “Among These Hills” is available at some local bookstores and museums. It is one of the best books you will find on the early West in our area. n

3 • November 2013 • The Senior Voice

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Art About Our High Plains By P.J. Hunt The Northeastern Colorado Heritage League recently presented an art and photography exhibit featuring the plains east of Greeley titled “Grasslands Inspiration.”

Pawnee Buttes photo by Uli Limpitlaw.

The League is a nonprofit corporation dedicated to preserving the historical and cultural roots of northeastern Colorado, according to League president Mike Peters. The group produces special events, a website, newsletters, and other information. At the exhibit, 25 artists presented 81 pieces of art and photography at the Showcase Art Center in Greeley. It was a juried show with the first place award for art going to Mark Christensen. The first place photography award went Uli Limpitlaw. Other awards for art went to Michele Graham and Russ Anson. Additional awards for photography went to Sally Davisson and Gail Rowe. Peters said, “The League’s meetings are open to the public and feature programs of interest to local historians, genealogists, and cultural groups.” For meetings, events, and more information, see www.necoheritage.org. Or email Mike Peters at mpeters26@comcast.net. n

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STATE LEGISLATURE By John Kefalas - Colorado State Senator will also scrutinize the effective Recently I spoke with a young implementation of the Affordable friend who said her 27- year-old Care Act in Colorado. husband was diagnosed with brain The Colorado Health Benefit cancer and their insurance carrier Exchange, www.connectforhealthdenied covering procedures to deco.com allows people and small termine the most effective treatbusinesses to make informed dement because the insurer decided cisions about their private health this was a pre-existing condition. care coverage. Now this young couple is pay A family of four earning up to ing out of pocket for MRIs and $94,200 can share insurance preother expensive tests. Most reamium costs with federal subsidies sonable people would agree that to make coverage more affordable. the healthcare status quo is unacSmall businesses can receive tax ceptable and that bankruptcy due credits to insure their employees. to unsustainable medical costs is Medicaid expansion up to not right. $31,322 for a family of four pro Despite the controversy revides public insurance options for garding the Affordable Care Act low-income families; 50 percent (Obamacare) a key provision is of newly eligible individuals under that insurance companies will not Medicaid expansion are working. be allowed to deny healthcare cov In Larimer County, you can go erage to people with pre-existing to www.larimerhealthconnect.org conditions starting in 2014. for guidance. In the upcoming legislative ses________________ sion, we will address many critiYou can write Senator Kefalas at cal issues, including job creation, jkefalashd52@frii.com. n flood and wildfire recovery. We

Estate Planning

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A:

By Ron Rutz, Attorney

What is wrong with putting everything in joint tenancy with my kids?

First, if one of the added children dies before you do, the deceased’s children will not inherit the deceased’s share. Why? The right of survivorship takes priority over the Will. The surviving joint tenant owners now hold the entire property. Thus to ensure that the deceased’s family would share, it would be necessary to put the property back in the giver’s name. However, all of the joint tenants would have to agree. What if the you die before the transfer back occurs, or you do not have legal capacity to sign, or if Medicaid eligibility is then an issue? At some future point, a child on title as a joint tenant may force a sale of the property, may go through a divorce, or may

have financial problems or tax liens, etc. Any of the foregoing would have negative impacts on the property. Another problem involves borrowing money and putting a lien on the house, such as through a reverse mortgage. Everyone would have to sign the documentation, including most likely the promissory note. Also, the amount of available equity (based upon your retained share) might then be too small to qualify. Talk to your attorney and your CPA first before setting things up in joint tenancy. ________________ Attorney Ron Rutz will answer questions sent to rutz@ronaldrutz.com; phone 970.223.8388. 

REASON #41: EMERGENCY CARE WHILE TRAVELING. ROCKY MOUNTAIN HEALTH PLANS PUTS YOU IN CONTROL OF YOUR MEDICARE PLAN. If your current Medicare plan has too many restrictions, switch to one of Colorado’s most experienced Medicare plans. We’re nationally recognized, and have over 35 years of experience. So, no matter how you like to travel, you can stay in control of your health with Rocky Mountain Health Plans. To speak to a licensed salesperson call: 888-251-1330 TTY: 711 To request more information: www.rmhpMedicare.org/Travel RMHP is a Medicare-approved Cost plan. Enrollment in RMHP depends on contract renewal. This information is available for free in other languages. Please call Customer Service at 888-282-1420 (TTY dial 711). Hours are 8am - 8pm, 7 days/week, Oct. 1–Feb.14, and 8am - 8pm, M-F, Feb.15–Sept.30. Esta información está disponible gratuitamente en otros idiomas. Por favor llame a la línea de Atención a Clientes, al 888-282-1420(TTY marque 711). Horario de 8am - 8pm, 7 días a la semana, del 1 de octubre al 14 de febrero; y de 8am - 8pm, de lunes a viernes, del 15 de febrero al 30 de septiembre. ©2013 H0602_MS_MCAd253_S_08282013 Accepted 5 • November 2013 • The Senior Voice


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Insurance Issue

Anna Gorman & Julie Appleby - Kaiser Health News Health plans are sending hunexisting medical conditions when dreds of thousands of cancellation they signed up. Policyholders who letters to people who buy their own have regular policies because they coverage, frustrating some consumdid not have health problems will be ers who want to keep what they have given an option to extend their covand forcing others to buy more costerage through next year. ly policies. Consumer advocates say such The main reason insurers are docancellations raise concerns that ing this is that the policies fall short companies may be targeting their of what the Affordable Care Act remost costly enrollees. They may be quires starting January 1. By all ac“doing this as an opportunity to push counts, the new policies will offer their populations into the exchange consumers better coverage, in some and purge their systems” of policycases, for comparable cost—espeholders they no longer want, said cially after the inclusion of federal Jerry Flanagan, an attorney with the subsidies for those who qualify. advocacy group Consumer Watchdog in California. The law requires policies sold in the individual market to cover 10 Insurers deny that, saying they “essential” benefits, such as preare encouraging existing customers scription drugs, mental health treatto re-enroll in their new plans. ment, and maternity care. In addi________________ tion, insurers cannot reject people Kaiser Health News is an editorially with medical problems or charge independent program of the Henry them higher prices. The policies J. Kaiser Family Foundation, a must also cap consumers’ annual nonprofit, nonpartisan health policy expenses at levels lower than many research and communication orgaplans sold before the new rules. nization not affiliated with Kaiser But the cancellation notices have Permanente. n shocked many consumers in light of President Barack Obama’s promise that people could keep their plans if they liked them.  “I don’t feel like I need to change, but I have to,” said Jeff Learned, a television editor in Los Angeles, who must find a new plan for his teenage daughter, who has a health condition that has required multiple surgeries. An estimated 14 million people purchase their own coverage because they don’t get it through their jobs. Calls to insurers in several states showed that many have sent notices. Florida Blue, for example, is terminating about 300,000 policies, about 80 percent of its individual policies in the state. Kaiser Permanente in California has sent notices to 160,000 people, about half of its individual business in the state.  Insurer Highmark in Pittsburgh is dropping about 20 percent of its individual market customers, while Independence Blue Cross, the major insurer in Philadelphia, is dropping about 45 percent. Both Independence and Highmark are canceling so-called “guaranteed issue” policies, which had been sold to customers who had pre-


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ACROSS 1. Mt. Wilderness Area is in northern Colorado 4. The British “Bobbies” (police) were named for this 19th century prime minister: Sir Robert 8. Great expanse 11. Springs, near Boulder 12. Bake sale gp., often 14. Square is a historic district of shops and restaurants in downtown Denver named for a founding father. 16. Symbol of wisdom 17. Northeast Colorado town named for a Massachusetts community 19. Means justifier 20. Country across the Red Sea from Ethiopia 21. Camera letters 23. Cup holder? 25. Hot tub, maybe 26. Lumber yard items 27. Frying River 29. Shaker ingredient 31. World Cup chant, often 33. Where Colorado meets three other states 36. Go into motion 38. Four-legged pal of a lab worker? 39. Electrician’s unit of resistance 40. Mineral County mining town known for its wild reputation in the 19th century 41. “ the season…” 43. Lung filler 44. Anthem preposition 45. Muskrat’s larger playful cousin 48. Stringed instrument 50. Words confirming a suspicion 52. Person who is good with numbers, briefly 54. What you might put out to find out about a job opening O

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7 • November 2013 • The Senior Voice

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The 115-member Larimer Chorale is in its 37th season.

Larimer Chorale By P.J. Hunt The Larimer Chorale was recently honored by Colorado Creative Industries with a $6,500 grant for the Chorale’s artistic programs and community services, especially its “Singing for Seniors” program. The 115-member chorus is composed of business people, teachers, and other professionals who contribute 20,000 hours in rehearsals and performances, said executive director Wendy White. During its 37th season this year, the Chorale will perform works by Beethoven, Bernstein, Benjamin Britten, and introduce a new performing group,

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the Biermeister Chorus. Conductor is Dr. Michael Krueger. “The Larimer Chorale is one of the largest and most accomplished classical choral groups in Colorado,” said White. Its annual budget of $180,000 is unusual for local groups of its kind. This holiday season, the Chorale will perform Benjamin Britten’s “A Ceremony of Carols” at the Candlelight Christmas concerts. For information on performances, see www.larimerchorale.org. Or email wwhite-larimerchorale@comcast.org. n


on the

The Grover Museum and former railroad station. Hazel Johnson Collection.

(Editor’s Note: Grover is a historic town on the plains northeast of Greeley that James Michener visited while writing his book “Centennial.” For information on the area, see the Northeastern Colorado Heritage League at www.necoheritage.org.) By Louanne Timm The town of Grover had its beginnings in the 1880’s. In 1887 a mercantile store was built by Mayfield Jennings and was called The Jennings Store. In 1888 Jennings sold the store to George M. Morris, who called the building Cora M. Morris and Company after his wife, Cora. It was the only general mercantile store between Cheyenne, Wyoming and Sterling, Colorado. In 1894 George died and Cora remarried George W. Parker, who managed the store. In the mid to late 1930’s the store closed, and the Grover Chamber of Commerce purchased the building. The building was used for social events. Movies were held and chairs pushed back after the movies for dances. Soon cars made it easier to go to other entertainment venues, and the movies were discontinued. In 1975 the newly formed Lions Club purchased the building from the Community Club. In 2005 the Lions club dissolved because of lack of members, and the Pawnee Historical Society bought the building. In 2011 the Cora M. Morris building was on the State Historical Society list. The Morris store, a hotel run by Judge Barker, the Burlington hotel, the depot and stock yards, a school, and the post office were in Grover in 1905. In April of 1909 The Grover

State Bank was organized with a capital stock of $10,000. It folded in 1920 with very few deposits recovered. Old timers reported there had been a bank in 1889, and it had been robbed of $35 by cowboys from Wyoming. No one was ever caught and punished. In 1909 the Grover Telephone Company was formed and then sold in 1977 to Wiggins Telephone Company, which still has the service. Two doctors were among the homesteaders coming to Grover. Dr. J.G. Stewart set up an office and drug store. Dr. David M. Mitchell was a homesteader. In 1929 the town of Grover elected a woman mayor and allwoman town council. This was the first all-women town board in Colorado. The story goes that the men of the town looked the other way as bootleggers and gamblers operated from a local pool hall. The men didn’t take the woman seriously until after the votes were counted. The new board gave the pool hall owner an ultimatum— abide by the law or leave town. He left town. In 1932, Grover voted three to one to return the women to office for another term. Altogether 13 women served in the “petticoat government.” Throughout the years, women have continued to serve on the Grover Town Board. ________________ Email Louanne Timm at wprbb@juno.com. n

9 • November 2013 • The Senior Voice

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SELECTED EVENTS GREELEY CIVIC CENTER: November 7, UNC Orchestra. November 9, Western States Honor Orchestra Festival. November 10, The 101st Army Band. November 11, Youth Choir Concert. November 16, Greeley Philharmonic Orchestra. November 23, Michael Martin Murphey’s Cowboy Christmas Ball. November 24, Addams Family Musical Comedy. November 30, George Gray as Elvis with band, showgirls, and gospel singers. December 7, Greeley Philharmonic Poinsettia Pops. For information, email pilar.dejesus@greeleygov.com. FT. COLLINS LINCOLN CENTER: November 14, Sybarites string quartet plays everything from Mozart to Led Zeppelin. November 15, “Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus,” comedy theatre. November 25, Momix dance-illusionists. November 30, A Leahy Family Christmas. December 1, Cranberry Pops Concert. December 4, CSU Holiday Gala. December 13-15, “The Nutcracker.” Email verickson@fcgov.com. LOVELAND HISTORICAL SOCIETY: November 9, Wings Over the Rockies Museum in Denver. December 9, “The Cartographic Roots of Colorado: Discovery and Exploration of What Became Colorado,” program by Wesley Brown. December 14, a visit to Colorado’s most Victorian town, Georgetown west of Denver, and the historic Hotel de Paris. Email sadanhau@gmail.com. JOHNSTOWN BOUTIQUE: December 7, the Senior Center holds its annual Christmas crafts sale, silent auction, and bake sale to benefit children, 9 am to 3 pm, at 101 West Charlotte Street. Email njacobson34@hotmail. com. PIONEER ASSOCIATION: Luncheon November 16, 11 am, at the Elks Lodge, 1424 East Mulberry. Barbara Fleming will discuss her new book “Legendary Locals.” Call Bonnie Crane at 226.4984 or email pnjstroh@comcast.net.

Social Security By Lauren Eitel - Greeley Social Security Office These days it is more common than ever for a person to travel across the globe—either for a vacation or to live in another country permanently.  If you are one of these people, Social Security offers a special website: “Social Security Payments Outside the United States.” The website features all you need to know about Social Security while living abroad. You can find it at www.socialsecurity.gov/international/payments.html. If you’re in the planning stages of moving to another country, you may want to check out our “Payments Abroad Screening Tool.” It will ask you a few short questions and will let you know whether your payments can continue. It may make a difference in your decision to live abroad. The page also offers links to

publications such as “Your Payments While You Are Outside The United States,” which explains how your benefits may be affected and other important information you need to know about receiving Social Security benefits while outside the country. In the top, right corner of the page, you’ll find important information on how to contact Social Security when you are abroad to ask questions, make requests, or report events and changes that may affect payments. Whether you’re stateside or abroad, you’ll want to pay a visit to www.socialsecurity.gov/international/payments.html.  ________________ Lauren Eitel is the Assistant District Manager of the Greeley Social Security Office.  


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The Good Samaritan-Bonell Community in Greeley was a vision created by the Rev. August “Dad” Hoeger over 75 years ago when he saw a need for care for senior adults. It was named after Dr. Benjamin Bonell, who negotiated with Rev. Hoeger and the Rev. Erwin Fritchel, pastor of Our Savior’s Lutheran Church of Greeley, for the sale of the property. One of the primary reasons the Society is able to provide outstanding care for our residents is the generosity of many supporters over the years. We have a strong commitment of giving in the Greeley community. The Society currently seeks to increase gift commitments to our general endowment funds to $3 million over the next five years.

An endowment is a perpetual fund where only the earnings are spent annually to enhance the quality of life for those entrusted to our care. The endowment uses unrestricted funds that can be used anywhere there is a need. Estate gifts, bequests, and trusts are often preferred as a meaningful way to leave a legacy to ensure the Society’s success. Our deepest appreciation goes to all Good Samaritan Society supporters. Thank you to those who supported us in the past and those who will support our programs in the future. If you would like information on contributing to our endowment fund or if you would like to make a lasting legacy gift, please contact Michael Fitzsimmons at (970) 352-6082. n

Health Law Issues Some doctors and hospitals say the new healthcare law could cause them to lose money because some patients might not pay their health insurance premiums. The new law requires insurance companies to give patients a 90-day grace period for paying their monthly premiums. That means patients can get up to 90 days behind on their premiums. If they receive doctor or hospi-

tal services within that time and later fail to pay the premiums, insurance companies will retroactively revoke payments to physicians and hospitals, according to the Texas Medical Association and other groups.

Some doctors and hospitals also say they are not being told if they are included as approved providers in various insurance companies’ networks of providers. 

11 • November 2013 • The Senior Voice

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HISTORY NEAR

Laramie (Editor’s Note: Wyoming historian Margaret Laybourn wrote the following story.)

Denver Corporation then sold $l million in stock in copper speculation.

West of Laramie, Wyoming, in the valley of the Laramie River and in the shadow of Jelm Mountain near Woods Landing, a small church stands, steeple pointing to the sky.

Cummins was a flim-flam man who fled to Texas with the $10,000 after it was discovered that he had “salted� the area.

The bell is gone from the steeple, but the church is easily recognizable as a relic of a former community called Cummins. The church was built in the early 1870s when the mining boom was beginning in the area. A man called Cummins, who planned the town, was an opportunist who sold the mining rights to a Colorado company for $10,000. The

The Cummins community is called Old Jelm now, after a local miner, because settlers wanted to get rid of the original name. Old Jelm was owned by the Holland family of Laramie and is listed on the National Historic Register. The church can be seen from Wyoming Highway 10 about four miles south of Woods Landing, where the Jelm Post Office was located.

The pioneer church at Jelm. The Voice photo by Bill Lambdin. Woods Landing was once a shipping point where logs cut in the Medicine Bow forests were floated down the Laramie River and used to build the transcontinental railroad across southern Wyoming. Named after Sam Woods, a pioneer operator of a saw-mill nearby, Woods Landing survived

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Woods Landing and Old Jelm can be reached by Wyoming state highway 230 west of Laramie, or by Colorado Road 103 going north of Chambers Lake northwest of Fort Collins. n

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as a supply station for ranchers. A cafe and dance hall later catered to tourists, hunters and winter sports enthusiasts.

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Family Health Guide Breast Cancer Drug

Osteoporosis

The FDA has approved a new pre-surgical drug (Perjeta) that appears to shrink early-stage tumors, which could mean less invasive surgeries and better survival rates. “By making effective therapies available to high-risk patients in the earliest disease setting, we may delay or prevent cancer recurrences,” said FDA researcher Dr. Richard Pazdur.

Women over age 45 spend more time in the hospital for this than for breast cancer, heart attack, or any other chronic disease, said the International Osteoporosis Foundation. That’s because osteoporosis leads to broken bones, immobility, diminished quality of life, and early death.

Prostate Radiation Treatment

For infants, it appears to increase the risk of pyloric stenosis, a stomach obstruction that causes vomiting, said a report in the journal JAMA Pediatrics by researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle. The risk increases considerably for babies of mothers over age 35.

Most men get much more radiation therapy than they need to relieve pain from prostate cancer, said a report in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Just one therapy session is enough, but many men get up to 10 sessions, said researcher Dr. Justin Bekelman at the University of Pennsylvania.

Bottle Feeding

Cancer Over-treatment? Most patients are not told that

Medical Issues By Lois Hall The public’s view of cancer needs to change, and so do the treatments many doctors recommend, said a report from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Breast lesions and other things that are not really dangerous cancer can cause unnecessary fear, unnecessary treatment, and sometimes harmful treatment. “We’re still having trouble convincing people that the things that get found as a consequence of mammography and PSA testing and other screening devices are not always malignancies in the classical sense that will kill you,” said NCI director Dr. Harold Varmus. Some precancerous lesions grow so slowly that they are unlikely to ever cause harm and should not be classed as carcinoma or receive the medical treatments they often do, said the NCI’s leading researchers.

Elsewhere, Mayo Clinic researchers say many of the new drugs and medical treatments work no better than older ones, and some are worse. In a report in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, researchers said people and doctors often ask the wrong questions of new practices and products and say, “What does it do, how does it work?” They should be asking “Does it work at all?” Experts at the National Cancer Institute say nearly half of new medical practices have been found to be ineffective or harmful, including high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplants for breast cancer, which is no better than conventional chemotherapy. Also the routine use of hormone therapy in postmenopausal women, intensive glucose lowering in Type 2 diabetes patients, and numerous other treatments. n

13 • November 2013 • The Senior Voice

routine cancer screenings often lead to over-diagnosis and overtreatment of slow growing cancers that would never be a problem, said a report in the JAMA Internal Medicine. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute in Berlin said ten patients are overtreated for every one whose life is saved. Kidney Tests Routine screening is not recommended unless patients have symptoms or risk factors like diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease, says the American College of Physicians. That’s because screening leads to too many false positives, unnecessary treatments, and adverse effects. Food Labels Misleading “Sell By” and “Best If Used

By” dates are meaningless in most cases, prompting millions of people to discard perfectly good food, said Harvard researchers. The dates have little to do with safety. Pain Patches Those called fentanyl can be deadly to young children, said the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. They’re sold under the brand name Duragesic or as a generic. Laser Treatments Those used for hair removal, wrinkle removal and other treatments can be dangerous, and lawsuits involving them are increasing, said a report in the journal JAMA Dermatology. Treatments should be done by a doctor, not just someone licensed to use a laser. 

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EarlyDays in By P.J. Hunt Estes Park historian Henry F. Pedersen, Jr., said he was a man who was born too late. He would like to have seen the unspoiled beauty of Colorado 100 years ago: “I long to experience the real America that caught the gaze of those early visionaries who wended their way along dusty trails in search of their dream… (who) stood mesmerized by the glorious mountains and sparkling brooks.…”

Pedersen, a retired attorney and former Nebraska legislator, came to Estes Park in 1973 and began writing books on the area. His most popular was “Those Castles of Wood,” a history of pioneer days in Estes. For some people, the book will bring back memories of early

lodges and guest ranches of the Estes valley— Elkhorn Lodge, Long’s Peak Inn, Moraine Lodge, Sprague’s Ranch. Pedersen’s

description

of

Mills came to Estes in 1885 at age 15 and built a cabin with a view of Long’s Peak.

Controlling Pain Many of the painful, uncomfortable things patients are subjected to are unnecessary, said a report in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology by researchers at the Mayo Clinic.

The Longs Peak Inn. Courtesy Estes Park History Museum.

more pleased with treatment, and on average cost the healthcare system $7,600 less.

That includes things like having to drink large amounts of medicine to clean the intestinal tract, getting intravenous opioids, extensive fasting, and other “punishments” patients endure.

The quicker recovery is especially important for patients like women headed for chemotherapy after ovarian cancer surgery. “They have to recover to the extent that they’re healthy enough for chemotherapy,” said Dr. Sean Dowdy.

Patients not subjected to such things recovered sooner, were

Most doctors have not adopted such practices, he said.

Long’s Peak Inn is especially good. It was operated by Enos Mills, the famous naturalist who helped establish Rocky Mountain National Park.

Among those who stayed at Long’s Peak Inn were John D. Rockefeller and Frank Lloyd Wright. Mills used such contacts to help get Rocky Mountain National Park established in 1915. Pedersen told this and many more stories in “Those Castles of Wood.” The book should be available at MacDonald Bookstore in Estes Park. n

Mills came to Estes in 1885 at age 15 and built a small cabin with a magnificent view of Long’s Peak. He loved the mountains and within a few years had climbed most of the peaks in the area. He vowed he would become an expert nature guide, which he did. In winter months, he worked as a snow observer for the state, snowshoeing in the mountains with little more than one coat, a camera and boxes of raisins. Making extensive use of libraries, he educated himself in mathematics, science and government—things he thought he needed to become a first-rate naturalist. Within a few years, he was writing and lecturing on nature. The U.S. Forest Service made him an official lecturer, and President Theodore Roosevelt was familiar with his work. Mills operated the Longs Peak Inn for guests who wanted to climb the mountains and experi-

14 • November 2013 • The Senior Voice

ence the beauty of Estes Park. One early guest wrote, “The tone of this place is distinctly high brow…There are poets, novelists and artists.”

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Laughter: Best Medicine Winston Churchill attended a dinner party and drank his usual amount of booze. Noticing his condition, Mrs. Bessie Braddock, a member of Parliment and a Churchill foe, said, “Mr. Churchill, you are drunk!” He replied, “And you, Bessie, are ugly. But tomorrow morning I’ll be sober, and you’ll still be ugly.” On his 75th birthday, Churchill was asked if he had any fear of death. He replied: “I am ready to meet my Maker. Whether my Maker is prepared for the great ordeal of meeting me is another matter.” At a social engagement, Churchill’s bitter foe, the American-born Lady Astor, was offended by one of his remarks and said: “Mr. Churchill, if you were my husband, I would put poison in your coffee!”

He replied, “Madam, if I were your husband, I would drink it!” A wife came home one night, went to her bedroom, and saw four legs in the bed instead of two. She grabbed a baseball bat and pounded the blanket until the bodies screamed. Then in a rage, she went to the kitchen to have a stiff drink. Her husband sat there, looked up an said, “Your parents showed up, and I put them in our bedroom.” You can say any foolish thing to a dog, and he will give you a look that says, “My God, you’re right. I never would have thought of that.” —Dave Barry Instead of getting married again, I’m going to find a woman I don’t like and just give her a house. —Steven Seagal

Why does Sea World have a seafood restaurant? I’m halfway through my fish dinner and I realize, oh my goodness, I could be eating a slow learner. —Lynda Montgomer “I think I’ll change doctors. Mine told me not to buy any more forever stamps.” —Bill Lambdin Texas talk translated: “She looks like the dogs have been keeping her under the porch.” (Ugly.) “They ate supper before they said grace.” (Unmarried and living together.) “Big hat, no cattle.” (All talk, no action.) “She’s got tongue enough for 10 rows of teeth.” (That woman can talk.) “You can put your boots in the oven, but that won’t make ‘em biscuits.” (You can’t change reality.)

Things that are difficult to say when you’re drunk: Indubitably. Preliminary. Things that are very difficult to say when you’re drunk: Specificity. Transubstantiate. Things that are impossible to say when you’re drunk: Nope, no more booze for me... Good evening officer, isn’t it lovely out tonight? 

Who are the most influential consumers in Northern Colorado? People over age 50.

• They have twice the spendable income of other consumers. (U.S. Consumer Research Center) • They account for 51% of all consumer demand. • High-income adults read newspapers and magazines. (Scarborough Research)

They read the Senior Voice every month. Published Locally Since 1980. • www.theseniorvoice.net

Fort Collins/Loveland 970-229-9204 • Greeley 970-223-9271 15 • November 2013 • The Senior Voice


I n times like these, it pays to know what your options are. Maybe you had plans to sell your house, move to a senior community and start getting more out of life. What now? Do you have to put your life on hold? Not an easy decision. Perhaps it’s time to give the Good Samaritan Society – Communities of Northern Colorado a call. We’ve helped seniors weather storms like this for more than 85 years. We’ll be happy to help you understand your options, at no cost or obligation. Getting good advice can make all the difference. For more information or to find a community near you, call 1-888-877-1058. Estes Park | Fort Collins | Greeley | Longmont | Loveland | Simla | Water Valley

The Evangelical Lutheran Good Samaritan Society provides housing and services to qualified individuals without regard to race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status, national origin or other protected statuses according to federal, state and local laws. All faiths or beliefs are welcome. Copyright © 2009 The Evangelical Lutheran Good Samaritan Society. All rights reserved. 09-G0683

16 • November 2013 • The Senior Voice


November 2013