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The Senior

OIC V E

Published Locally Since 1980

May 2013

They Knew

BUTCH CASSIDY BABY DOE TABOR's

Remarkable Life


1862

Stage Coach Station

By Marcie Wells

Restoration of the historic Virginia Dale Stage Station, the only remaining Overland Trail stagecoach station still standing in its original location, will be done by Bill Bailey of Historical Associates, Inc., and engineer Paul Matosky. The 1862 stage station north of Fort Collins is designated a National Historic Site. Due to volunteer labor, in-kind and monetary donations, and the generosity of the American Society of Civil Engineers (who chose the stage station as its community service project in 2012), the original $326,000 restoration estimate has dropped to $135,000. Each year the Virginia Dale Community Club has an open house to celebrate the stage sta-

2 •May 2013 • The Senior Voice

tion’s historical significance and raise funds for maintenance so many more generations can enjoy its unique heritage. This year’s free open house will be held June 7 and 8. The theme will be “Abe Lincoln and the Civil War.” The local popular band “Barely Gettin’ By” will kick off the weekend with a Western dance from 7-11 pm on June 7 at the stage station. An old-fashioned pie auction will be held at intermission.

Saturday June 8, from 9 am to 4 pm, will be the quilt raffle, craft show, bake sale, and lunch. Speakers include Bruce Spear as Abe Lincoln; Joan Day as Virginia Slade; Eva Sue Littleton as Lady Moon; and historian Wayne Sundberg.

The Virginia Dale Stagecoach Station. Bill Lambdin photo. Also Civil War expert Stephen Hyatt; cowboy poet Dick Hart; local historians Susan and Duane Kniebes; Rocky Mountain High School bivouac re-enactors; the American Tapestry Choir; and representatives of the Oregon California Trails Association and the National Freight Wagon and Stagecoach Association.

Also an exhibit by the Model A Ford Club, spinning demonstra-

tions, a silent auction, food, and games for all ages.

The stage station is located four miles south of the Wyoming border on US Highway 287. Turn right on County Road 43F and go one mile; stay left at the fork. Email marcie.wells@wildblue.net. See www.virginiadalecommunityclub.org. Call 970-495-1828 or 970-568-7646. ■


Published Locally Since 1980 Vol. 33, No. 6

Online at www.theseniorvoice.net

By Bill Lambdin

PUBLICATION INFORMATION The Senior Voice is locally owned and has been published the first of each month since 1980 for residents in Fort Collins, Greeley, Loveland and nearby towns.

Pioneers called them the Bassett women—two sisters who knew outlaw Butch Cassidy in the late 1800s. Ann and Josie Bassett grew up on a ranch in the Brown’s Park area of far northwestern Colorado, east of Cassidy’s birthplace of Beaver, Utah.

ADVERTISING Ad deadline is 20th of month. For rates, call 970-229-9204; email wolf@theseniorvoice.net or see www.theseniorvoice.net

As a young man before he became an outlaw, Cassidy was a ranch hand at the Bassetts’ place and another nearby ranch. Josie and Ann were young women— pretty, hot tempered and adventurous.

Wolfgang Lambdin Advertising Director Fort Collins, Colorado (970) 229-9204 wolf@theseniorvoice.net SALES OFFICES: Fort Collins & Loveland (970) 229-9204 Greeley (970) 223-9271

Josie was three years older than Ann and probably dated Cassidy. Some said the sisters fought each other for his affections, but no one is sure of that. Cassidy was an affable, good looking fellow, and there were few of his type available in the isolated backcountry of the Bassett’s ranch. In fact, there were so few settlers that Ann was the first white child born in the region in 1878.

Cassidy later used a nearby area as a hideout with the Bassetts’ knowledge. Eventually he took his untamed ways elsewhere. The sisters stayed, but they also remained untamed. Their mother died young, and the girls had to help their father run the ranch. They grew up quickly. They both had guns and knew how to use them against cattle rustlers. Josie went through five husbands. Some people suspected she killed one of them, but that was not proven. Ann hit one of her husbands in the head with a frying pan and nearly killed him. During Prohibition in the 1920s, Josie set up a still and

3 •May 2013 • The Senior Voice

Ann Bassett. Colorado Historical Society. sold moonshine. Later her reputation spread to the East Coast and prompted “Life” magazine to do a story about her.

In 1967 Hollywood did a movie based on her life titled “The

Ann died in 1956 at age 78. Josie continued to run her ranch until she was nearly 89—alone, without electricity, far from the conveniences of modern life. She died in 1964.

No man wanted to cross them. Ballad of Josie” starring Doris Day. It was a silly movie and did not depict the hard reality Josie and Ann faced on the frontier.

The Bassett women didn’t try to be wild; they simply lived in a wild country that demanded much to survive. And they were determined to be survivors because they loved ranch life. In her later years, Ann said of her ranch: “It was the only thing I ever selfishly loved.”

EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Announcements and stories must be received by the 10th of the month; ads by the 20th of the month. READER INFORMATION: Subscriptions $48 a year. The Senior Voice welcomes readers’ letters and contributions. The Senior Voice assumes no responsibility for damaged or lost material submitted by readers. © Copyright 2013 The Senior Voice EDITORIAL OFFICE: (970) 223-9271 email: thevoice@frii.com www.theseniorvoice.net

Josie and Ann lived their lives on their own terms—in a man’s world, and no man wanted to cross them. ■

Design Production by Ellen Bryant Design ellen@ellenbryantdesign.com.

COVER PICTURE: A cowgirl and cowboy taken by Colorado photographer Connie Dines. See the short story about her on page 4 and view her work at www.conniedines.com. Email cmdines@mac.com.

No material may be reproduced by any means without permission of the Senior Voice.

________________

A+ Rating

William and Peggy Lambdin Founders, 1980


Voice Cover Photo This month’s Voice cover photo of two horseback riders was taken at the Absoroka Ranch near Dubois, Wyoming, by Colorado photographer Connie Dines. She studied with Jay Dickman, a National Geographic photographer and Pulitzer Prize winner. Her photos have been exhibited in Spain, France, the National Western Stock Show in Denver, and elsewhere. The Photography Colorado Art-

ists Guild has honored her work, and she is a member of the American Society of Media Professionals. She is also the producer of FirstLight, a photography workshop specializing in the art of visual narrative. Born in Boulder, she said her mother was her artistic inspiration. “She is a painter and ceramics artist; so art is just in my genes.” See Connie’s work at www.conniedines.com.

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Rural Hospitals

By Jordan Rau - Kaiser Health News For 15 years, Congress has did worse than other small, rural bestowed special privileges to hospitals that were not in the prosome small remote hospitals, usugram. The paper said all these really in rural areas, to help them sults were statistically significant. stay afloat. Medicare pays them Joynt and her co-authors, John more than it pays most hospitals Orav and Dr. Ashish Jha, also of and exempts them from financial Harvard, suggested that the hospipressure to operate efficiently and tals’ care may suffer because they requirements to reveal how their don’t have the latest sophisticated patients fare. Nearly one in four technology or specialists to treat hospitals qualifies for the prothe increasingly elderly and frail gram. rural populations. A previous pa Despite these benefits, there’s per by the trio found that critical new evidence that the quality of access hospitals were less likely many of these hospitals may be to have the ability to perform cardeteriorating. A  study published diac catheterizations and to have recently found that during the past intensive care units. decade the death rates of patients “As we have more advanced at these critical access hospitals treatments, it’s harder for rural were growing while mortality hospital to keep up,” Joynt said. rates at other hospitals were drop“It’s hard to provide care for reping. ally, really sick patients in a re “This carved-out group of hossource-limited setting.” pitals seems to be falling further She also suggested that the hosand further behind,” said the papitals may have been victims of per’s lead author, Dr. Karen Joynt their lenient treatment by the govof the Harvard School of Public ernment. Since hospital officials Health.  are not required to evaluate their The study, published in the performances to make reports to Journal of the American Medical Medicare, the government may Association, found that in 2002, not realize that facilities could mortality rates at critical access need additional assistance in carhospitals for Medicare patients ing for sicker patients. with heart attacks, heart failure “This is 1,000 hospitals, a quarand pneumonia were about the ter of the hospitals in the country, same as at other hospitals. But that are invisible,” she said. they have diverged since then. ________________ While death rates at other hospiKaiser Health News is an editoritals dropped by 0.2 percent a year, ally independent program of the reaching 11.4 percent in 2010, Henry J. Kaiser Family Founmortality rates at critical access hospital death rates rose about 0.1 dation, a nonprofit, nonpartisan percent each year, reaching 13.3 health policy research and compercent in 2010. munication organization not affil Critical access hospitals also iated with Kaiser Permanente. ■

Nurses Distracted

So many hospital machines emit beeping sounds that nurses are becoming desensitized to the sounds and ignore them, resulting in patient deaths in some cases, said a report from the Joint Commission, the nation’s main hospital accrediting agency. The machines beep while monitoring blood pressure, heart rate, and other functions. In some cases, nurses hear so many beeps from so many patient rooms that the beeps become irritating noises and distractions that nurses’ minds have to shut out in order to function. Some machines beep when they are working; some when they are not working; some when there is an emergency. There is no standardization for what all the noises mean, said Dr. Ana McKee, executive vice president of the Joint Commission. ■


Greeley Stampede By Andy Segal

Initially a celebration for a successful potato harvest in 1922, the Greeley Stampede and Rodeo is now the world’s largest 4th of July rodeo and Western celebration, with more than 250,000 visitors annually. The 2013 Stampede runs from June 27 to July 7.

Since its inception 91 years ago, top-notch rodeo action has been a hallmark of the Greeley celebration. Carrying on that tradition, the 2013 rodeo kicks off with Xtreme Bulls featuring some of the top bulls in the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA). Listed as one of the top 25 pro rodeos by purse size, the Greeley Stampede PRCA Rodeo itself runs June 29 to July 4, with the final performance on Independence Day. In addition to the PRCA performances, the Stampede features

All American Bullfighting, Demolition Derby, and the concert line-up. The Stampede is also the host of the Miss Colorado Rodeo Pageant.

This year’s concert lineup includes entertainers Josh Turner (June 28); Lynyrd Skynyrd (June 29); Los Lonely Boys and Los Lobos (June 30); Jerrod Nemann (July 5); and Trace Adkins (July 6).

Spectators enjoy Western hospitality while experiencing free entertainment stages, a free petting zoo, Sheep Stampede, daily parades, Western art show, shopping, and festival food. The Stampede has awarded more than $220,000 in scholarships; and in 2012, it contributed more than $17,000 to Weld County students. To learn more or buy tickets,

The Greeley Stampede runs June 27 to July 7. see greeleystampede.org. Or call 970-356-7787, visit any Colorado King Soopers, or go to Ticketswest.com. ■ 

3 Announcements 4 League of Women Voters: May 9, “Health Care Reform” talk by Public Television’s Frontline journalist T.R. Reid. May 13, the League’s annual convention in Loveland. Call 416.5873. UNC Theatre: May 5, “Medea.” Music, May 4, UNC Choirs with Greeley Philharmonic. Call

351.2515. Weld County Gluten Free Society meets May 25. Call 356.3050. Cancer fundraiser “Relay for Life,” June 1-2 at the Fort Collins High School track. Cancer survivors receive a free dinner if they sign up in advance. Free public events and music. Call 223.7259.

Estes Park Jazz Fest, May 19. Antique Show, May 25-27. Call 577.9900. Northern Colorado Pioneer Association spring luncheon, May 18. Call 226.4984 for reservations. Timberlane Farm Museum, Loveland, June 1-2, living history events. Call 646.2875. ■

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By Tony COLORADO CROSSWORDS Donovan Estate Planning

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ACROSS 1. Northern Colorado county bounded by 5 other counties as well as another state 4. “The Angel of “ is a snow formation often visible on this 14’er of the same name near Salida 10. Cheer heard south of the border 11. Wynkoop or Rock Bottom offering 12. Jima 13. Black mark on a driver’s record 15. Mauna is a flowering vine of Hawaii used in making leis 16. Guy’s date 17. Name of a river, county and range of mountains in Colorado 18. Festive holiday this month 21. Flightless bird of Australia 22. Mills known for his dedication to conserv- ation & preservation of RMNP 23. Egyptian goddess of fertility 24. Last page of a book with “the” 26 Part of a serviceman’s address on a letter 28. Feathers partner 30. Danica Patrick’s mantra 36. Body of water in RMNP named for renowned artist commissioned by Lord Dunraven to paint scenes of the area 38. Highway was so named because it ran from Pikes Peak, just east of Mt. Evans to Longs Peak 39. Farm gal? 42. Coach Eustachy’s guys, briefly 43. Gardner of films 45. The of office 48. Memo abbreviation with a sense of urgency 51. The Sun Devils of the Pac 12 on a scoreboard 52. Some were Aleros and Cutlasses 57. Body of water in RMNP close to #36 across named for early resident: Lake 58. Matchless output? 59. Woodsman’s tool 60. Number associated with films’ Bo Derek 61. Letters on a gravestone 62. Bus overseer in the Denver area 63. Russian space orbiter

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Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, Certified Financial Planner™ which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements. Investment Centers of America, Inc. (ICA), member FINRA/SIPC, is not affiliated with Home State Bank. Securites and insurance products offered through ICA and affiliated insurance agencies are *not insured by the FDIC or an other Federal Government agency *not a deposit or other obliation of, or guaranteed by any bank or their affiliates

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–––––––––––––––– Email attorney Ron Rutz at rutz@ronaldrutz.com. Call 970.223.8388.■

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Although I have written on this topic often, the same questions come up in almost every estate review. On January 1st, the federal tax exemption dropped to $1 million. But then Congress permanently restored the exemption to $5.2 million for a single person and $10.4 million for a couple with the proper estate documents. The Colorado estate tax follows the federal exemptions. Thus, 98 percent of us do not have to worry about death tax. Just do Wills. For estates above that figure (for taxes) and/or with real property in a sister state (avoid probate there), other simple tools are available, such as using a Limited Liability Company to hold the real

estate. Probate has such a negative connotation, I use the term “Court Proceeding.” Unsupervised administration is an available Court Proceeding in Colorado. An attorney is not required, and the forms normally needed (Application, Acceptance, Order, Letters, Information, Notice to Creditors, and Verified Statement) are available on the internet. The forms are easy to complete, file, and then we do not have to file anything else such as inventories, accountings, hold hearings, etc., unless a problem arises. The cost without an attorney is around $450.    Do at least talk with your attorney. It may change your fear of death taxes and probate by learning about the Colorado law.

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By Ron Rutz, Attorney - Legal Correspondent

64. Chef’s tools used for pounding or grinding 65. Many are often found in ambulances DOWN 1. Town on the Eagle River between Avon and Eagle 2. “The Time Machine” people 3. What Jack Sprat’s wife could eat none of 4. Referred to by Mark Twain as the “most dangerous” man in the West, he helped estab lish the Pony Express and named “Virginia Dale” for his wife 5. Bonfils was married to the former owner of the Denver Post & is associated with blood drives and charitable works 6. Some credit cards 7. Not at home 8. Warning to Nanette 9. Title for a Hindu religious leader 11. In the past 13. HOA collections 14. Changeable sign on a bathroom door, perhaps 19. Where to tune in to catch Piers Morgan or Anderson Cooper 20. The Spanish word for “fly” lends itself to this locale’ at 9713 ft. near the Great Sand Dunes 23. Setting for “A Field of Dreams” 24. Large lake or Colorado town 25. Novitzky and Bogarde 26. Coach’s word before “boy” or “girl” 27. Lawrence Welk staple 29. Highest church official below the rank of Cardinal (abbr.) 31. Q – V connection 32. Greek fraternity letters 33. Dutch commune 34. Swedish retailer featuring huge blue build ings with yellow signage 35. Castle, between Rifle and Glen wood Springs 37. “To His Own” 40. Pencil ends, often 41. Texas or French follower 44. The oldest state supported military college in the US is located in Lexington, VA (abbr.) 46. White bark tree popular in Colorado landscapes 47. Don’t go straight, as a car 48. Skilled or proficient in 49. Dean Martin hit, “That’s “ 50. Some sweet wines 52. Monster 53. San Valley 54. Goldilocks thought Baby Bear’s was just right 55. Colorado governor who turned down the Olympics 56. Lighted sign in a theater

COLORADO CROSSWORDS are created exclusively for The Voice by Tony Donovan, who lives in Loveland.


Baby Doe Taborj Baby Doe Tabor’s life was perhaps the most remarkable rags-toriches story in early Colorado— and one of the saddest.

Born in 1854 as Elizabeth McCourt in Wisconsin, she was the fifth of 14 children. As a young woman, she became known as the Belle of Oshkosh for her striking figure, blue eyes and good looks.

When she married local man Harvey Doe in 1877, his parents gave them title to a silver mine near Central City, Colorado, as a wedding gift. Baby and Harvey went there, but she soon discovered he had no interest in mining or any kind of work. Harvey drifted from job to job, and Baby divorced him three years after their marriage. Then she went to Leadville and met Horace Tabor, whose silver mines had made him the wealthiest man in Colorado.

Horace was nearly 50, and Baby was 26. He was also married, but that didn’t stop him from courting the beautiful Baby Doe. He set her up in a luxury apartment in Denver’s most expensive hotel and got her everything she wanted—except a divorce from his wife. Horace had political ambitions, and divorce was frowned upon in that Victorian time. When he and Baby went out, she tried to hide behind a veil; but their affair was widely known and criticized. Finally she insisted on marriage, and Horace managed a divorce. He also managed to get a temporary appointment as a U.S. senator and threw one of the most elaborate weddings Washington, D.C., had ever seen.

Baby wore a $75,000 diamond necklace and a white satin gown that made men drool and women talk. President Chester A. Arthur

7 •May 2013 • The Senior Voice

By P.J. Hunt

attended the wedding.

Back in Denver, Baby and Horace moved into a mansion with statues of naked Greek gods scattered around the grounds. Proper neighbor ladies complained; so Baby had bizarre costumes made for the statues and enjoyed a laugh. Baby was never fully accepted

She wore a white satin gown that made men drool and women talk.

Her daughter Lillie left home and refused to answer her mother’s letters. Her daughter Rose Mary became a stripper and drug addict, dying in Chicago at age 36.

Baby moved into a shack at Horace’s only remaining property, the ramshackle Matchless Mine at Leadville, and lived there many years. In winter, she wrapped her feet in burlap and stuffed newspapers under her clothes to keep warm. She got stale bread at a grocery store, telling the owner to “put it on my tab.” Townspeople took up collections and paid her bills. She became eccentric and refused to acknowledge that the drug addict who died in Chicago was her daughter.

Baby Doe Tabor. Colorado Historical Society. After a winter storm on February 20, 1935, locals found her frozen to death on the floor of her shack. She was 81 years old. Her daughter Lillie refused to attend the funeral and told reporters she was not Baby Doe’s daughter. It was a hard ride down. ■

into Denver society, but she soon had two beautiful daughters she thought might someday be the social leaders of Denver.

Lillie was born in 1884, and Rose Mary in 1889. Baby dressed Lillie in a $15,000 lace gown for her christening. Newspapers nationwide covered the event, calling the child the “Little Silver Princess.”

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People thought she would marry another wealthy man, but she refused all suitors. In fact, she remained true to Horace’s memory for the remaining 35 years of her life.

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Horace lost his fortune in the 1893 Silver Panic when the federal government stopped using silver as the monetary standard. Creditors seized their home, Horace died, and Baby was left destitute.

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Family Health Guide Drug Prices They vary greatly at pharmacies, said Consumer Reports. A month’s supply of Lipitor at Costco is $17; at CVS it’s $150. Lexapro is $7 at Costco; $126 at CVS. Researchers found Costco to be consistently lower than most pharmacies.

Heart Defibrillators Doctors often fail to tell patients about serious side effects associated with these implants, like depression and the inability to do physical activities, said researchers at St. Louis University.

Early Baby Deliveries Some hospitals in five states (Texas, New York, Illinois, Florida, and California) have stopped delivering babies before 39 weeks gestation unless there is medical reason to do otherwise, said a report in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology. Why? Early deliveries lead to more baby deaths and serious problems.

Enlarged Prostate A new procedure called prostatic artery embolization (PAE) shrinks the prostate without surgery or the risks of impotence and incontinence associated with some other procedures, said researchers at Inova Alexandria Hospital in Virginia. It has been used in Europe and elsewhere with success.

C.difficile This deadly infection found in hospital rooms can be virtually eliminated by a three-step cleaning process: Using fluorescent markers that show cleaning thoroughness, using an ultraviolet radiation device that improves cleaning, and supervising a daily disinfection team. The report came from the Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Seasonal Affective Disorder One in five people (mostly women) feel depressed in win-

ter due to a lack of sunlight, said Mayo Clinic researchers. The answer: Walk outdoors so sunlight reaches the brain through the eyes and stimulates serotonin, which affects mood.

Prostate Cancer A treatment that lowers testosterone (called intermittent androgen deprivation therapy) does not work well, said a report in the New England Journal of Medicine by researchers at the University of Michigan.

Hip Replacement Do it early if you have osteoarthritis. You probably won’t need the revision surgery previously required because today’s improved technology makes the hip devices last much longer, said a report from the European Health Technology Institute.

Breast Cancer Risk It might be reduced in mature women who exercise, said

researchers at the U.S. National Cancer Institute. Even moderate exercise like walking lowers estrogen levels, which in turn lowers the risk. Risky Meats Ground beef and chicken cause the most hospitalizations from salmonella, E. coli, and other pathogens, said a report from the Center for Science in the Public Interest.

Pancreatitis Type 2 diabetes drugs Januvia and Byetta can cause this dangerous inflammation, said a report in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine by Johns Hopkins University researchers. Symptoms of pancreatitis include abdominal pain, nausea and persistent vomiting. ■

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HOW THE $UPER RICH HIDE MONEY Insurance By Bill Lambdin We’ve heard about offshore banks and foreign companies that let the mega-rich avoid taxes, launder money, and commit fraud. But the full extent of such offshore operations had not been known until the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) recently revealed findings that show up to $32 trillion is hidden in offshore operations. That’s the equivalent of the combined economies of the U.S. and Japan. Analysts say the offshore operations have become so large they could destabilize the global economy. Over 80 journalists from 46 countries formed the consortium and gathered information from various governments’ records and other sources. Cooperating media include the Washington Post, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the BBC in Britain, and others.

So far, they have determined that at least 4,000 Americans have offshore accounts, including people like Denise Rich, who used wealth and influence in a campaign that helped persuade President Bill Clinton to pardon her ex-husband, Marc Rich, who had been wanted for tax evasion and racketeering charges, according to the ICIJ investigations. Journalists determined there are at least 120,000 offshore companies in the British Virgin Isles, Cook Islands, and other places. Some people using them were directly linked to the recent Greek financial disaster and other countries’ fiscal problems. Former U.S. Senate investigator Jack Blum says the offshore operations are a “zone of impunity” for the super rich. “Periodically, the stench gets so bad somebody has to get out there and clap a lid on the garbage can and sit on it for a while. There’s been some progress, but there’s a bloody long way

to go,” said Blum. The Tax Justice Network says a third of the world’s wealth is in offshore operations. Many of the top banks, including UBS and Deutsche Bank, are “aiding and abetting tax fraud, money laundering, and similar crimes,” said Frank Wehrheim, a former tax investigator in Germany. Journalists with the ICIJ used the latest high-tech software from the Australian-based company NUIX, which allows them search large volumes of unstructured data. The journalists say they will continue to release information as their work on the project progresses. They added, “It’s a secrecy system on a gigantic scale that obscures ownership of billions of often-untraceable dollars that flow through these entities every year.” For more information see www. icij.org/offshore/secret-files-expose-offshores-global-impact. ■

Confusion Health insurance companies sometimes make patients pay for rectal cancer screenings even though the new healthcare laws say they should not, according to a study done at Georgetown University. For instance, an insurer might classify a colonoscopy involving polyp removal as a therapeutic procedure instead of a screening test and require the patient to pay several thousand dollars. Federal officials say they have issued clarifications on such procedures, but some insurers continue to insist there are confusions about what’s covered. And Medicare guidelines add to the confusion by saying, “If a screening test results in the biopsy or removal of a growth (polyp) during the same visit, the procedure is considered diagnostic, and you may have to pay coinsurance.” ■

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(Editor’s Note: Wyoming historian Margaret Laybourn wrote this story.) By Margaret Laybourn

Hiram “Hi” Kelly was one of the first pioneer ranchers who became successful in Wyoming. A native of Missouri, he came West as a 15-year-old boy with a wagon train of gold seekers in 1849. Disillusioned with gold prospecting, he worked as a freighter delivering supplies and mail between Santa Fe and Independence, Missouri. In 1861 he worked for Ben Holiday on the overland stage line between Julesburg, Colorado, and

South Pass, Wyoming. In 1863 he married a Sioux woman who bore him eight children. At that time, he was furnishing wood, hay and beef to Forts Laramie, Fetterman, Kearney, and Reno while avoiding skirmishes with Indian warriors on the trails. After 1865 he established a ranch near Chugwater north of Cheyenne. He and his family lived in a log and sod house until 1877 when Hi built a spacious brick house containing 14 rooms. After that, the Kelly children had tutors from the East, and his wife had household help. In 1870 Kelly shipped the first

cattle out of Wyoming and expanded his holdings to six ranches. He later sold the ranches and moved to Cheyenne where he built one of the finest homes in the city. When many pioneers sent their Indian wives to reservations after the Custer defeat at Little Big Horn, Hiram Kelly kept his wife and honored her Sioux heritage by using Indian symbols to enhance the beauty of their home. Kelly later lived in Fort Collins and died there in 1924 at age 89. He was buried next to his beloved wife.

An Indian woman in the 1800s (not Hi Kelly's wife). The Voice archive. Wyoming historian Margaret Laybourn lives in Cheyenne and has written for The Voice for over 20 years. You can email her at miggsbob@yahoo.com. ■

Avoiding Infection

For hospital patients, a daily swabbing with an inexpensive antiseptic (chlorhexidine) reduces the risk of life-threatening infections like MRSA, said a report in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The antiseptic is especially effective when used just before a patient has surgery, and it stays on the skin for a day or two. “When the surgeon cuts through the flesh, it’s less likely to impregnate the skin with organisms,” said researcher Dr. Philip Tierno at NYU Langone Medical Center.

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In one study, the antiseptic lowered the hospital-acquired infection rate by nearly 30 percent. Nationwide about 5 percent of hospital patients get such infections, often through surgical incisions or catheters. The infections cost about $40,000 per patient to treat, said researchers.

Risky Plastic Surgery Many of the doctors who perform plastic surgery are not qualified to do so and cause serious harm to patients, says Dr. Malcolm Z. Roth, president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. “We’ve had people go to the emergency room with deep vein thrombosis, heart attacks...and death,” said Roth.

Unqualified doctors performing such surgeries include dermatologists, gynecologists, dentists, and

radiologists. Plastic surgery should be done only by a board certified doctor who has had three to five yeas of residency in the field, said Roth. He said patients should ask these questions:

Are you board certified in both general surgery and plastic surgery? Do you have privileges to perform plastic surgery in the hospital? Do you practice another specialty or only plastic surgery?


WWII Remembrance

By John Kefalas - Colorado State Senator I attended the Governor’s An- cided to save three Jews. This simnual Holocaust Remembrance ple family man, who risked imProgram. The evening’s theme prisonment, torture and death for was to imagine a world without him and his family, hid Daniel’s hate, and the keynote speaker was parents and paternal grandmother my friend and colleague, Repre- for nine months in the foundry atsentative Daniel Kagan, whose tic. parents were Holocaust survivors. Such heroism and selflessness A short video with John Lennon’s song “Imagine” presented images of courageous people whose lives were cut short such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr, Anne Frank, Harvey Milk, Daniel Pearl, Mathew Shephard, James Byrd Jr., and Yitzhak Rabin. Imagine what they could have achieved to reduce prejudice and discrimination while expanding equality and community had they lived longer. The Governor spoke of justice, righteousness, integrity and the obligation of kindness to others. Daniel shared the story of his parents who survived the Holocaust due to the exceptional bravery of an iron foundry foreman who de-

reminds me of our common humanity and that we are all bound together in one extraordinary tapestry of life and death. It is imperative that we never forget how six million Jews, including 1.5 million children, were murdered in the Holocaust between 1933 and 1945. As the legislative session ends May 8, I look forward to coming home and reconnecting with you. Please join me for a May 4 town hall meeting at Council Tree Library. ________________ Email Sen. Kefalas falashd52@frii.com.■

at

jke-

Social Security

By Kyle McTighe - Greeley Social Security Office If you are a military service publication, Military Service and member who was wounded and Social Security. You can find it needs to apply for disability bene- online at www.socialsecurity.gov/ fits, it’s important to know that you pubs/10017.html, or email us at will receive expedited processing. OPI.Net.Post@ssa.gov; or call at Our wounded warriors initiative 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325is for military service members 0778) to ask for a free copy to be who become disabled while on mailed to you. active duty on or after October 1, Memorial Day also is a good 2001, regardless of where the dis- time to remind families of fallen ability occurs. Depending on the military heroes that we may be situation, some family members of able to pay Social Security surmilitary personnel, including de- vivors benefits. If the person you pendent children and, in some cas- depended on for income has died, es, spouses, may be able to receive you should apply for survivors benefits. Learn more at www.so- benefits. Learn more about those cialsecurity.gov/woundedwarriors. Social Security benefits at www. Did you know that May also socialsecurity.gov/pgm/survivors. is National Military Appreciation htm. Month? Even more reason to let The men and women of the members of our military know Armed Forces serve us every day. how much we value what they do At Social Security, we’re here to for us and our nation. serve them too. To learn about the Social Secu- ________________ rity benefits for those who have Email questions to kyle.mctighe@ served in the military, read our ssa.gov. ■

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Health Insurance Plans

Health plan deductibles keep getting higher. The proportion of workers with a deductible that topped $1,000 for single coverage nearly tripled in the past five years to 34 percent. Since high-deductible plans often mean you pay more out of pocket for medical care, it might seem like a no-brainer to sign up for a plan that links to a health savings account (HSA) so you can sock away money tax free to cover your medical expenses. But there are good reasons to think twice before making that choice. In order to get the tax advantages of a health savings account, the health plan it’s linked to has to meet certain criteria. In 2013, for instance, an HSA-qualified plan has to have a deductible of at least $1,250 for single coverage and $2,500 for family coverage, and the maximum out-of-pocket limits can be no higher than $6,250 and $12,500 respectively for sin-

gle and family coverage.

But HSA-qualified plans have other limitations that consumers often aren’t aware of. For one thing, even though the Affordable Care Act allows parents to keep their adult children on their policies until they reach age 26, they can’t use funds from their HSA to pay for the child’s care after age 24. That’s because “dependent” is defined differently  for HSA purposes than it is under the ACA provisions that extend dependent coverage to adult children. In addition, except for preventive care, which is generally covered at 100 percent and is not subject to the deductible, consumers in an HSA-qualified plan may be on the hook for the entire cost of medical care—including doctor visits, medications, tests and treatments—until they reach their deductible. (They will be charged the negotiated rate their insurer has agreed to pay providers for

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services, however, not the “rack” rate paid by the uninsured.) Regular high-deductible plans, on the other hand, offer many more options. In addition to covering preventive care at 100 percent, some function like traditional plans, requiring only a copayment for doctor visits and medicines even before the deductible is met. Or they may offer a limited number of doctor visits with a copayment before people meet their deductible, says Carrie McLean, senior manager of customer care at eHealthInsurance.com, an online vendor.

Consumers need to evaluate the full spectrum of costs and benefits for HSA plans, but the advantages may have nothing to do with medical expenses, she advises. “The true benefit you get from (HSA) accounts is because you’re putting money away and you get that tax (savings),” says McLean. ––––––––––––––––

Kaiser Health News is an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit, nonpartisan health policy research and communication organization not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente. ■

Going Strong at 101 in Estes Park By Carey Stevanus

Activities at the Good Samaritan Society Estes Park Village are important to the residents. However, 101-year-old Frances Steige enjoys them greatly. Stiege has lived at the Estes Park Village for seven years and has been involved in activities since she first moved in. She enjoys playing bingo every Monday afternoon. This past year, she not only had the best attendance at the games but also won the most. A tradition began years ago at the games that if you win four or more games you have to bring a treat the following week. Steige makes peanut brittle as her treat, and the other players joke that they let her win just so they can have the peanut brittle. Steige says, “Win or lose, I just enjoy going.” She has also been bowling every Friday on the Village’s Nintendo Wii game system since they bought it five years ago. This past summer, the residents held their own Olympic Games, and Stiege won the gold medal. Her high score is currently 226. She says, “I’m going to do this until I can’t do it anymore.” She then laughs and says that she

Francis Steige. says that about everything now. Steige says of her living at the Village: “I love it. I have never regretted one day of moving in.” The staff and residents of the Village agree; she is an inspiration to all. For more information about the Good Samaritan Society Estes Park Village, call 970577-7700. There are six Good Samaritan facilities located in northern Colorado: Estes Park, Loveland, Fort Collins, Windsor, and two in Greeley. The Society has provided services to mature people for over 85 years. ■


Volunteer Awards The Weld County Area Agency on Aging recently honored several volunteers for community service, according to AAA Community Services Coordinator Meredith Skoglund.

INDEPENDENT LIVING THE WEXFORD

Sandy Wilts of Kersey was honored for her work with the Kersey Senior Center and numerous projects, including quilted blankets she makes for children in hospitals in Greeley and Loveland. She also serves on the Planning and Zoning Board for the town of Kersey.

Don and Marjorie Robinson of Johnstown were honored for their work with senior nutrition, transportation, and exercise programs. Also the town’s BBQ Daze, Christmas Boutique, and other community programs.

Overworked Doctors That’s according to a survey conducted by Johns Hopkins University researchers and reported by the Journal of the American Medical Association.

“With an increased amount of patients into the health system, if

13 •May 2013 • The Senior Voice

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John Garcia of Erie was honored for his work with the Erie Historical Preservation Board, Erie Historical Society, and Meals on Wheels. He also volunteers with the Senior Center’s nutrition program.

Many doctors employed by hospitals say they are overworked and required to see too many patients—and it can be a threat to patient safety.

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there is an underlying issue with work load, we can expect it to get worse,��� said researcher Dr. Henry Michtalik.

More than 500 doctors responded to the survey. Over one-third said more than once a week their work loads exceeded levels they consider safe for patients. Over 20 percent said their workloads resulted in negative outcomes for patients, including serious complications. ■

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Laughter: Best Medicine A boss invited some employees to a picnic and told them to bring their children. One little girl seated across from the boss kept staring at him. He checked his face, hair and clothes. Everything was fine, but she kept staring. Finally he asked, “Sweetie, why are you staring at me?” “I want to see how you drink like a fish.” A reporter said to golfer Phil Mickelson, “You really know your way around the course. What’s your secret?” Phil said, “The holes are numbered.”

The police came to a house where a woman stood holding a golf club and a man lay badly beaten. “Did you hit him with the club?” they asked her. “Yes.” “How many times?”

“I’m not sure. Put me down for a five.”

Years ago when the Sears catalog first appeared in rural America, two rednecks looked at the beautiful models in it, and Bubba said to Earl, “I’m gonna’ order one.” Weeks later, Earl said, “Did ya’ get that order from the catalog?” “Not yet, but it won’t be long. Her clothes came yesterday.”

A little boy got separated from his grandfather in a mall and asked a guard to page him. The guard asked, “What’s his name?’ “Grandpa.” “What’s he like?” “Crown Royal whisky.” A husband was eating breakfast when his wife hit him in the head with a pan. “What was that for?” he asked “I found a piece of paper in

your pants pocket with the name Jenny on it.” “Oh, that was a horse I bet on at the track last week.” She apologized, but a few days later she hit him with a bigger pan. When he asked why, she said, “Your horse phoned.” A little boy told his mother, “When I was on the bus with daddy this morning, he told me to get up and give my seat to a lady.” “That was polite,” said his mother. “But I was sitting on daddy’s lap.” Newspaper headlines: Marijuana Issue Sent to a Joint Committee. Diana Was Still Alive Hours Before She Died. Missippi’s Literacy Program Shows Improvement. Homicide Victims Rarely Talk to Police.

Rally Against Apathy Draws Small Crowd. Total Lunar Eclipse Will Be Broadcast Live on Public Radio. The Bra Celebrates a Pair of Historic Milestones This Year. Newspaper classified ads:

Wedding dress for sale. Worn once by mistake. Washer and dryer for sale. Good condition. Don’t need, joining nudist colony. Encyclopedia Britannica set for sale. Got married. Wife knows everything. A woman told her friend, “My husband is so conservative he dislikes making left turns at intersections.” ■

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CHILDHOOD Memories

By Chuck Spray

Some years ago, I went to visit the Cripple Creek-Victor district where I was raised in the mountains above Colorado Springs. I went past the little lake called Eagle-Eye and the washed-out remains of Altmann Reservoir. It was in these small bodies of water that I learned to swim in the icecold water fresh out of the snowbanks of nearby Pikes Peak. I was young then and hadn’t been exposed to hot tubs and steam rooms. I thought everybody skinny-dipped in ice cold water that turned your body a vivid shade of pink and your lips a contrasting purple. After a few nostalgic moments, I took a left turn on the Gold Camp Road and stopped on the heights overlooking the Beaver Valley Ranch site where my friend Earl lived. As children, he and I had many an adventure. Sometimes we were rustlers hiding from the sheriff, or maybe cowboys rounding up the herd— all those exciting things boys

of 10 envision in the wonderful worlds of their imaginations. I remember the fantastic meals Earl’s mom used to put on the table: hotcakes with melted freshchurned butter and warm maple syrup, oatmeal with fresh milk loaded with cream, pork chops or bacon, sometimes venison steak if the season was right. A hearty breakfast was necessary for the adventures that lay ahead. We’d saddle up, Earl on his little mare Pardner and me on ole Brownie. Earl’s dad had bought Pardner at a state fair sale in Pueblo, a nice little buckskin. They forgot to tell him Pardner had been used for relay races. The minute a foot hit the stirrup, Pardner proceeded to do what she was trained for. That was to git! And git she did. Earl got to be real proficient at the flying mount. Sometimes he was left standing at the station though. Brownie was one of our small-

A stagecoach in early Cripple Creek. Colorado Historical Society. er work horses. While he didn’t neck rein too good, he would tolerate a saddle or a half-naked kid riding bareback and screaming like a Comanche.

The closest we could come to looking like an Indian was to take off our shirts. Anybody who has run around at 10,000 feet altitude in the mountains with only half of their clothes on knows how cool it gets when the sun ducks behind a cloud. In the best tradition of our painted heroes, we’d sit on our noble mounts atop a ridge, looking down on an unsuspecting settler’s cabin in the valley below. Actually it was Jim Cameron’s old line cabin.

We’d let out our best Comanche war cry, put the heels to our mounts and swoop down on the shack below.

With warrior senses keenly alert, we’d enter the cabin and hurriedly fill our pockets with the Hershey miniature candy bars left conveniently in the center of the table. We pillaged (candy only) but didn’t burn anything. Then running outside to our trusty steeds, we swung aboard and with a parting war cry dashed away.

It wasn’t until years later— when the boy had become a man—that it dawned on me that we woke up everybody in the valley with our blood-curdling war cries. So our presence was never a secret when we raided the line shack. With a smile, I remember those miniature candy bars and how they were always in plain sight.

Earl, do you think they were on to us? ■

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May 2013