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The Senior

OIC V E

Published Locally Since 1980

June 2013

HIDDEN TREASURES North Colorado

SCENIC DRIVE

to History


Estate Planning Q:

By Ron Rutz, Attorney - Legal Correspondent

  In his Will, my uncle named me as the sole recipient of his estate because he was estranged from his children. However, I ended up with nothing.

A:

The Will has no author ity over assets held in joint tenancy or with beneficiary designations. Your uncle’s personal banker set up your uncle’s bank accounts, CDs, and money market accounts with his children as the beneficiaries, not you.

The banker claims that your uncle wanted it that way and that she always does beneficiaries naming the children, thus avoiding probate, ensuring that funds were immediately available to pay bills, which is the fastest and easiest way to settle things. She is wrong, but I don’t think she even asked about his Will. A financial advisor arranged to

2 • June 2013 • The Senior Voice

put all the real property owned by a mutual client into joint tenancy even though the Will specifically left the property to only one child. But to his credit, your uncle said no to his financial advisor’s insistence on redoing his legal documents by replacing the Will with a Living Trust. The failure to listen to what the client wants, the failure to coordinate the beneficiary designations and property ownership with the estate plan, and the insistence on only using living trusts instead of Wills, are three of the major problems in holding together an estate plan when financial advisors, bankers, and insurance agents insist on doing things their way. In your case, the beneficiary designations made the Will meaningless.  ________________ Email questions to rutz@ronaldrutz.com.

STATE LEGISLATURE By Randy Fischer - Colorado State Representative As a life-long resident of Fort Coltraveled to Fort Collins to sign my lins, I can’t recall a more abrupt bill, HB-1044, to authorize the use turn-around in a water year than of graywater in Colorado. 2013. The drought predictions The deployment of graywathat dominated this winter’s snowter reuse as a water conservation pack reports finally gave way to strategy has the potential to reduce abundant mountain snows and residential water consumption prairie rains. substantially and will help Colora This verdant spring offers tredo meet its future water demands. mendous relief to agricultural pro Two of my other water bills ducers and municipal water prosigned into law will enable agviders alike. Yet concerns about ricultural water owners to share the long-term future sustainability their water on a temporary basis of Colorado’s water supplies perwith municipalities while still sist. maintaining ownership of the wa As chairman of the House Agter in the hands of agricultural proriculture and Natural Resources ducers. Committee, I have a responsibility I was pleased to work with a to put water issues at the top of my group of forward-thinking water priority list. experts to write and pass HB-1130 I am pleased to report that and HB-1248. I feel privileged to substantial progress was made in be at the forefront of Colorado’s strengthening water conservation future water supply policies. policies and promoting innovative ________________ water-sharing strategies during Email Representative Fischer at this legislative session. I am honrandyfischer@frii.com. ■ ored that Governor Hickenlooper


Hidden Treasures

Published Locally Since 1980 Vol. 33, No. 7

Online at www.theseniorvoice.net

By Bill Lambdin

Pioneers often talked of lost gold mines and hidden treasures.

PUBLICATION INFORMATION The Senior Voice is locally owned and has been published the first of each month since 1980 for residents in Fort Collins, Greeley, Loveland and nearby towns.

In Poudre Canyon, some said there was a mine found in the late 1800s by two prospectors who died suddenly without revealing the mine’s location. A young boy supposedly found it once by accident but was scared away by a bear and couldn’t remember the location.

ADVERTISING Ad deadline is 20th of month. For rates, call 970-229-9204; email wolf@theseniorvoice.net or see www.theseniorvoice.net

Also in Poudre Canyon, some said a man named Sam Steel buried $10,000 that was never found near his cabin along the Little South Fork of the Poudre River.

Wolfgang Lambdin Advertising Director Fort Collins, Colorado (970) 229-9204 wolf@theseniorvoice.net

On the banks of the Poudre River between Fort Collins and Greeley, two men headed for the gold fields supposedly found a cave containing Spanish gold pieces. Indians attacked and killed one man. The other returned years later but could not remember where the cave was.

In 1891, a dam broke at Chambers Lake in Poudre Canyon and washed away old Poudre City located where Poudre Chapel now stands. The settlers escaped death, but all of their possessions were swept down river, perhaps including gold pieces some settlers may have had.

SALES OFFICES: Fort Collins & Loveland (970) 229-9204 Greeley (970) 223-9271 EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Announcements and stories must be received by the 10th of the month; ads by the 20th of the month.

Part of the old gold processing mill in Poudre Canyon still stands. The Voice photo by Bill Lambdin. named a hill there Robbers Roost, and historians know that outlaws hid out there.

Most lost treasure stories can-

Between Fort Collins and Greeley, two trappers supposedly found a cave containing Spanish gold pieces. Before that flood, pioneer John Zimmerman built a gold-processing mill at Poudre City. The chimney of that old mill still stands about 75 yards west of Poudre Chapel, a few feet from the river.

North of Fort Collins near the old Virginia Dale stagecoach station, robbers may have buried loot that has never been found. Settlers

3 • June 2013 • The Senior Voice

not be verified, but occasionally someone does find something.

In 1883 north of Gunnison, a man found a stash of stolen money in what’s now called the Cement Creek Caves.

Northeast of Alamosa near the old town of Crestone, a man found a human skull and gold. The location is now called Deadman Creek.

One of the most famous stories concerns the Reynolds Gang Treasure. In the 1860s, John Reynolds led a gang of Southern rebels who robbed stagecoaches in Colorado. Legend says the gang buried some of their loot in Handcart Gulch south of Georgetown and that it has never been found.

If you’re lucky, you might stumble onto some old miner’s treasure someday. But I’m inclined to believe that Mark Twain was right when he said a gold mine was a hole in the ground owned by a liar.

READER INFORMATION: Subscriptions $48 a year. The Senior Voice welcomes readers’ letters and contributions. The Senior Voice assumes no responsibility for damaged or lost material submitted by readers. © Copyright 2013 The Senior Voice EDITORIAL OFFICE: (970) 223-9271 email: thevoice@frii.com www.theseniorvoice.net Design Production by Ellen Bryant Design ellen@ellenbryantdesign.com. A+ Rating

________________ COVER PICTURE: Young wolf pups taken by Fort Collins professional photographer Ray Rafiti. See his greeting cards and pictures at www.rayrafiti.com. ■

No material may be reproduced by any means without permission of the Senior Voice. William and Peggy Lambdin Founders, 1980


M E A D O W V I E W

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G R E E L E Y

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Scenic Drive to History By P.J. Hunt

A scenic drive west of Laramie takes you to the beautiful Snowy Range Mountains and two fine museums in the little towns of Encampment and Saratoga.

The Grand Encampment Museum contains many historical buildings, a covered wagon, buggies, indoor exhibits of wedding dresses, Indian artifacts, and many things from early settlers.

Originally called Grand Encampment for a fur trappers’ rendezvous in 1851, the town name was shortened to Encampment in 1896 when copper was discovered. You’ll see ore buckets from a 16-mile tramway that brought ore from the famous FerrisHaggerty Mine to a smelter in Encampment. Buffalo Bill Cody invested in a mine there. Events include a Woodchoppers’ Jamboree, June 15-16; Cowboy Gathering, July 19-21; Muzzle guns competition, July 26-28; and Living History Day, July 27. The museum is open late May to mid October; call 307.327.5308.

The Saratoga Museum is open late May to Labor Day. It has per-

haps the largest gem and mineral exhibit in Wyoming plus displays of a pioneer home interior, fossils, blacksmithing, and other things. The museum’s Annual Celebration with special exhibits and events is held July 6. For information, call 307.326.5511 or email saratogamuseum@gmail.com. Saratoga’s Wolf Hotel is on the National Register of Historic Places and is a good place for lunch or dinner. It was built in 1893 as an unusual, upscale stage stop that had a parlor for ladies’ teas and other amenities. The Saratoga Inn has lodging and meals; and there are motels in town. Comedian Bob Hope was a member of The Old Baldy golf resort here. To reach the area, drive west of Laramie on Highway 130 (Snowy Range Road) to Highway 230, then south to Encampment or north to Saratoga. Or you can take I-80 west of Laramie, then Highway 130 south. You can make the trip in one day, but it’s best to allow two. ■


GREELEY SETTLERS By Lois Hall

Early farming and ranching around Greeley were boom-andbust operations subject to the whims of nature.

In the late 1800s, one observer said, “Greenhorn settlers have pushed out into the arid plains... messed up the place, gone broke and vacated it to lie idle again until a new crop of suckers is ripe.” Dry-land farming was new to Eastern settlers accustomed to plenty of rainfall for crops. On the plains, they had to learn how to build irrigation ditches, measure flowing water and decide which crops were suited to desert conditions. After 1870, the Greeley settlers were the first to be successful. They built the first irrigation canal in the state that was long enough to

lift water out of the Poudre River to farms some distance away.

But early dry-land farmers didn’t know about the extended dry weather cycles that occur on the plains. After several wet years, they stood by helplessly and watched their plowed fields blow away during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s.

Ranchers were also surprised by nature. They enjoyed a beef bonanza for several years after Charles Goodnight brought the first herd of Texas cattle to Colorado and Wyoming in 1864. Profits were huge with free range land and good grass.

sons here to learn ranching. Others hired managers who found it easy to cheat owners far away in England or Scotland.

Bad management and overgrazing the land caught up with them in the late 1880s when a cycle of droughts and winter blizzards hit the plains. Dead cattle lay everywhere.

It took some pioneers a long time to learn that things were different in the West. ■

Early hunter with an antelope. J.H. Grabill Collection.

APPROACHED A CROSSING

This was the time when the big cattle empires were started, often by British investors who knew nothing about ranching in the West. Some sent their playboy

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Changes in Healthcare By Bill Lambdin What major healthcare changes can we expect as a result of the new healthcare laws now becoming effective?

Northern Colorado healthcare executives recently discussed that at a Healthcare Summit sponsored

by the Fort Collins Chamber of Commerce.

Yvonne Myers, director of Columbine Health Systems, said changes mandated by the government and providers will force people to become more involved in their own health decisions and be more active as healthcare con-

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sumers, not passive patients.

She said we need to help mature people stay socially active, not isolated, which in turn will keep them healthier. And all of us will have to be better informed about healthcare costs because we will have to be more involved than in the past.

“Over 10,000 baby boomers are turning age 65 every day, and more Americans now turn age 100 than are born every year,” said Myers. “Such things mean we have to keep people healthier longer.” Kevin Unger, CEO of Poudre Valley Hospital, said our current healthcare system is about to bankrupt the nation. “We have to find ways to control costs without rationing care,” he said.

One way to do that is to keep people out of hospitals as much as possible because hospital care is very expensive. Patients will also be seeing fewer doctors and instead seeing nurses, physician assistants, and other less expensive providers, said Unger.

Dr. James Sprowell, Executive Director of Associates in Family Medicine, said doctors will have to be more cost conscious about treatments and tests they recommend. He also said, “The government cannot solve our healthcare problems; consumers will have to do it.”

Yvonne Myers, Director of Columbine Health Systems. Photo by Bill Lambdin. unsure of the law’s status.

Paul Roberts with Colorado Choice Health Plans said people don’t realize how much “costs are going to be tied to behavior.” People who cause their own health problems by smoking or other behaviors will have to pay more. Dr. William Wright with Colorado Permanente said, “Obamacare is a good attempt to provide healthcare coverage for more people,” but it might prove to be too expensive for consumers and the government. ■

Jim Sampson, Benefits Executive with Flood & Peterson insurance company, said most people are uninformed about what’s happening with healthcare, and there is a great deal of confusion. That was confirmed by a recent Kaiser Family Foundation poll that showed 42% of Americans do not know the 2010 Affordable Care Act is now law; 12% believe the law was repealed by Congress; 7% think the Supreme Court overturned it; and 23% are

Kevin Unger, CEO of Poudre Valley Hospital. Photo by Bill Lambdin.


By P.J. Hunt

Early Estes Park resident Joe Mills built the once famous Crags Lodge on the south end of town (on Prospect Mountain where the tramway was later built). The Crags Lodge was a dream he pursued much of his life. But just when he achieved it, tragedy struck. Joe was not as well known as his brother, Enos Mills; but he was an important resident of early northern Colorado. Born in 1880 at Fort Scott, Kansas, Joe spent his early childhood listening to his mother and father talk about their time in Colorado during the gold rush. Their stories captured his imagination.

At age 16, he came to Estes Park and worked for an uncle who owned a tourist lodge below Longs Peak. Joe felt he was in paradise, and his dream from then on was to own a lodge in this place. He built a small cabin before attending Colorado Agricultural College (now CSU) in Fort Collins where he lettered in football, baseball and track. His athletic ability later got him a job as football coach at Fort Worth University in Texas. It was there he met Ethel Steere, a beautiful young woman whom he married in 1909. Joe later became coach and athletic director at Baylor University in Texas. He and Ethel were happy, but he longed to return to the mountains of Estes Park.

In 1913 Joe and Ethel began building the Crags Lodge in Estes, and soon thereafter Joe took a coaching job at the University

7 • June 2013 • The Senior Voice

of Colorado. Now he was close to his place of dreams.

He was a strong advocate of healthful, outdoor activities and published numerous articles extolling the virtues of living close to nature. He had a private reason for his beliefs—he had diabetes. Outdoor activities were special to him because he knew the time might come when he could not pursue them.

Coaching jobs did not pay much in those days. Joe and Ethel scraped by for years, doing much of the work at the Crags themselves. They had two children to raise, plus hundreds of lodge guests to please every summer.

Ethel helped every step of the way. Strong and loyal, she did much to make the Crags one of

the finest lodges in Estes Park.

In the mid-1920s, Joe wrote “A Mountain Boyhood,” a book that became quite popular. He dedicated it to Ethel. In 1924 he left the University of Colorado because the Crags was starting to be profitable. For several years, he and Ethel could afford to spend their winters at the luxurious Shirley-Savoy Hotel in Denver and summers in the sunny mountains of Estes.

Joe had finally achieved his dream. But it didn’t last. At age 55, he fell into a diabetic coma while driving his car in Denver. He crashed into a streetcar and died a few weeks later. That was 1935. Ethel continued to run the Crags for several years, but it was not the same without Joe. The heart had gone out of it for her. She sold the Crags in 1946 and was living in Denver at her death in 1969 at age 85. She lived for more than 30 years remembering the youthful dream she shared with a man who loved the mountains. ■

Joe at a cabin he built in Estes. Estes Park History Museum.


Tony COLORADO CROSSWORDS ByDonovan 1

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ACROSS 1. CSU athlete 3. Old North Church alert: “One if by sea” land, 8. Letter afterthoughts (abbr.) 11. Directions to get to downtown Denver from the north: from I 25 take Larimer or Lawrence 13. Off road vehicle often 14. Rube or Whoopi 16. Prefix with slavery or war 17. Not exactly intrepid 19. Worked out 21. Fauna partner 22. Banned apple spray 24. Descriptive of one adhering to a tight budget 25. Cleveland hoopsters on a scoreboard 27. Séance sound, maybe 28. North Park community southwest of Gould 30. Major U.S. migration route which took pioneers to the Northwest in the 19th century 33. One of three iconic characters on a Rice Krispies box 34. Corporal or sergeant 35. Estes Park bugler 38. Upscale hotel brand 40. Athletes often have them following an injury 41. Interested onlookers while a will is being read 42. Starbucks worker 45. Greenstreet and Pollack 50. 007 51. Upscale community near Aspen 53. Dies . 54. George Burns’ wife, et. Al.

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55. Cable channel 56. “ grass” 57. Emergency responder, often (abbr.) DOWN 1. Broncos’ of Fame 2. Next to the highest ranking for a # 34 across 3. Prefix used with “graph” or “scope” 4. Gets married 5. Eyes or planets to a poet 6. Mineral suffix 7. Locale’ which grew up around Ft. Lan caster on the South Platte 8. Actor Sean of Mystic River 9. Rose or Seeger 10. Little Miss Muffet threat 12. Bear type 13. Fast-paced South American sport which involves wooden “catchers” called “cestas” 15. Pirates drink 18. USC arch rival 20. Possible mountain resting spot of the ark 21. He pitched the home opener for the Rockies in 2013 22. One fifth of a “dead man’s” hand 23. English river or a Colorado mountain town 24. Population corridor of Colorado 26. Indian dwellings 29. Cardinal or Rockie 31. TV series which introduced Clint East wood 32. Nods of approval 36. Tomlin or Pons 37. Hit film of 2012 with ”THE” 39. Watches kids 40. Parson’s dwelling 43. One or the other, on a test 44. Some singled stranded molecules 45. Lake 46. Village People hit 47. The presidential seal adorns one when the president speaks 48. Latin: existence 49. Western slope town on I 70 east of Rifle 52. What went into smelters

COLORADO CROSSWORDS are created exclusively for The Voice by Tony Donovan, who lives in Loveland.


Family Health Guide Risks After Hospital Stay Heart attack and heart failure patients are at high risk of serious problems and even death for several weeks after hospitalization and should get medical attention immediately if they feel bad, said researchers at Columbia University Medical Center. Testosterone Supplements They’re “snake oil,” said researcher Dr. Kevin McVary at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine. They can cause male breast growth, problems for the prostate, liver, and heart. Wrong Diagnosis That’s the mistake doctors make most and the one they are sued for most often, said a report in the online journal BMJ Quality and Safety. Diagnostic errors account for 34% of disabilities and 40% of deaths, far more than other mistakes. “You can’t get the

treatment right if you don’t get the diagnosis right,” said Dr. David Newman-Toker at Johns Hopkins University. Indoor Tanning Beds They should be banned for children under age 18 because they cause skin cancer, said the FDA’s advisory panel. But FDA administrators decided on a warning instead of a ban, ignoring its experts’ recommendations. Hospital Infections About 1 in 20 patients get them, causing about 100,000 deaths a year, said an Associated Press report. Hospitals are trying numerous things to deal with this, including anti-microbial linens, machines that emit ultraviolet light, and other things. Statins Those used to lower cholesterol are often prescribed unnecessarily for people who are unlikely to have a heart attack, said a re-

port in JAMA Internal Medicine. Birth Control Pills Those with low estrogen cause chronic pelvic pain and pain during orgasm for many women, said researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. Pregnant Women They should avoid migraine headache drugs Depacon, Depakote and others containing valproate, which can lower a child’s IQ, said the FDA. Pregnant women should also avoid hair dyes, acrylic nails, cosmetics containing oils, and cutting cuticles during manicures, said researcher Dr. Mary Rosser at Yeshiva University in New York City. Vitamin D Mothers who are breast feeding should probably take a daily vitamin D supplement of 400 international units, said a report in the Journal of the American Medical Association—to support

Dangerous Drugs Ranbaxy in India is one of the biggest suppliers of generic drugs in the U.S.; and the company recently pleaded guilty to numerous criminal counts of selling tainted drugs, fraud, falsifying test results, and other charges, according to Forbes magazine and other sources. Its drugs include the generic Lisinopril (brand name Prinivil); Fluoxetine (Prozac); Atorvastatin (Lipitor); and many others. Investigators call the case one of the most devastating exposes ever made about the conduct of a drug company. Ranbaxy has agreed to pay $500 million in fines, the most ever paid by a generic drug company. But some investigators note that the case shows how dangerous drugs made by foreign companies can be and how ineffective U.S. agencies are at protecting Americans against bad drugs. “The real story is how poorly

9 • June 2013 • The Senior Voice

(the) government has responded to all of this,” said Vincent Fabiano, a former Ranbaxy vice president. Even after the scandal, Ranbaxy is still allowed to sell drugs in the U.S. “The reality is that we simply don’t know what we’re dealing with,” said Dr. Roger Bate, a pharmaceutical researcher. “No one has actually gone into these sites to expose what’s going on.” The Government Accountability Office says only 11 percent of foreign drug manufacturing plants are inspected by U.S. officials— even though over 80 percent of the pharmaceutical ingredients for all U.S. drugs comes from overseas. Officials inspect U.S. drug plants unannounced, but they give foreign manufacturers weeks of advance notice. Such policies raise serious questions about public safety, say researchers. ■

infant bone growth. Stroke Victims If they arrive at the hospital in an ambulance, they will get quicker treatment with life-saving drugs that also greatly reduce disabilities later, said a report in the journal Circulation. Thyroid Disease Women with type 1 diabetes are more likely to get thyroid disease than others, said researchers at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. “People who have one autoimmune disease (like diabetes) are at risk for another” (like thyroid disease) said Dr. Lowell Schmeltz.■

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Prostate Cancer Most men don’t need PSA tests for prostate cancer, says the American College of Physicians in a report in the Annals of Internal Medicine. “The data doesn’t support routine screening because the outcomes aren’t better,” said Cleveland Clinic researcher Dr. David Bronson, who is president of the American College of Physicians. “For the significant majority of men who have a relatively benign form of prostate cancer, that cancer isn’t likely to give them problems.” Less than 3 percent of men die from prostate cancer, though as many as 1 in 6 are diagnosed with it, he added. The diagnosis too often leads to unnecessary prostate surgery that can cause erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence and other problems. The PSA test cannot determine if cancer is present or if it

is aggressive enough for treatment. The test sometimes leads to a prostate biopsy, which can result in infection, said Bronson. Dr. Durado Brooks agrees. He is the director of prostate and colon cancers for the American Cancer Society. “If men want to be screened, that’s certainly within their right. But they need to know we don’t have studies that clearly demonstrate that (PSA) screening can alter the course of prostate cancer, and we don’t have evidence that screening provides better outcomes,” he said. But cancer is a frightening word. When men hear they have it, they often choose treatment. Doctors should tell them that, unless the cancer is aggressive, they should take a wait-and-see approach, say researchers. “The treatment comes with significant risks,” said Bronson. ■

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Who's in charge of YOUR care?

By Roni Caryn Rabin - Kaiser Health News Betsy Gabay saw a rotating cast of at least 14 doctors when she was hospitalized at New York Hospital Queens for almost four weeks last year for a flare-up of ulcerative colitis. But the person she credits with saving her life is a spry, persistent 75-year-old with a vested interest—her mother. Alarmed by her daughter’s rapid deterioration and then by her abrupt discharge from the hospital, Gabay’s mother contacted a physician friend who got her daughter admitted to Mount Sinai Medical Center in Manhattan.  By then, Gabay, 50, had a blood clot in her lung and a serious bacterial infection (C. difficile). She also needed to have her diseased colon removed, according to the doctors at Mount Sinai. Had the problems been left unaddressed, any one of them might have killed her. Coordinated care is touted as the key to better and more costeffective care, and it is being encouraged with financial rewards and penalties under the 2010 federal health care overhaul, as well as by private insurers. But experts say the communication failures that landed Gabay in a rehab center, rather than in surgery, remain disturbingly common. “Nobody is responsible for coordinating care,” said Dr. Lucian Leape, a Harvard health policy

analyst and a nationally recognized patient safety leader. “That’s the dirty little secret about health care.” Advocates for hospital patients and their families say confusion about who is managing a patient’s care—and lack of coordination among those caregivers—are endemic, contributing to the estimated 44,000 to 98,000 deaths from medical errors each year.  A landmark report by the Institute of Medicine in 1999 cited the fragmented health-care system and patients’ reliance on multiple providers as a leading cause of medical mistakes. Leape, who helped author that report, says there have been improvements since, but “we have not done enough.” Subsequent studies suggest the toll may be even higher than the Institute of Medicine estimated. A 2010 federal report projected that 15,000 Medicare patients every month suffered such serious harm in a hospital that it contributed to their deaths.  ­­———————————— Kaiser Health News is an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit, nonpartisan health policy research and communication organization not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente. ■

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A Different Kind of Travel Guide By Lois Hall

If you want to get yourself or friend a good travel guide about Mesa Verde, the Grand Canyon, Monument Valley, and other attractions of the American Southwest, you might consider Susan Neider’s “Color Country: Touring the Colorado Plateau.” It covers national parks, state parks, and major recreation areas in Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, and Arizona—with maps, information and beautiful photographs. I have been to many of the places the author includes and find her information to be accurate and interesting. For instance, she quotes Willa Cather’s comments about an ancient cliff dwelling at Mesa Verde: “Such silence and stillness and repose—immortal repose. That

village sat looking down into the canyon with the calmness of eternity...I knew at once that I had come upon the city of some extinct civilization.” And Abraham Fellows’ comments about his 1901 raft trip down the Gunnison River in the dangerous Black Canyon near Montrose, Colorado:

“Our surroundings were of the wildest possible description...the walls of the canyon, towering half a mile above us, were seemingly vertical. Occasionally a rock would fall...exploding like a ton of dynamite when it struck the bottom, making us think our last day had come.” The book’s author is also a good writer who says of the Southwest: “I love this place. I love its

Scene in Arches National Park. Photo National Park Service. unearthly beauty, its fantastic shapes and intense colors of every imaginable hue...its overwhelming immensity where sound is swallowed up by impenetrable silence...Here is release into unbound enormity.” You don’t find that kind of history and writing in most travel books. You also don’t find such

detailed maps that direct you to the best locations for scenic views and photographs. The author is the photographer, and her pictures alone make this a good coffee table book. It is 185 pages ($24.95) available from Mountain Press, 800.234.5308, www.mountainpress.com. ■

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A Medicare Change? To reduce the federal deficit, President Obama said he will consider combining Medicare Part A and Part B coverage (hospital and doctor). But some analysts say that would be a bad idea and result in higher costs for Medicare participants. “There is a feeling that beneficiaries should be paying more for Medicare, but they already pay a lot out of pocket,” said Diane Lifsey with

the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare. Researcher Tricia Neuman with the non-partisan Kaiser Family Foundation agrees. “Benefit re-design proposals would provide real help to a small share of the Medicare population but raise costs for the majority,” she said. Analysts say such a change might result in a single deductible of $550. ■

Health Law Undermined?

An important part of the new healthcare law “is being undermined,” say officials with the American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, and other groups. Patients’ out-of-pocket costs could be two or three times what they should be because federal officials plan to make exceptions to the new law for the benefit of some insurance companies and certain employers—to give them time to adjust to the new law. Effective January 1, 2014, a patient’s insurance deductible, co-payment, and co-insurance are supposed to be capped at $6,250. But the government’s exceptions will allow caps to be $12,500 or possibly higher. “This is a very important consumer protection that is being undermined,” said Stephen Finan with the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network. ■ pride ff takes ing a t s r u o Where ring and ser v in prepa t food available the fines sonable cost.” at a rea

“ Thank for choo you sing us!

Giving By Michael Fitzsimmons - Good Samaritan Society Fred Rogers said in his book “The World According to Mister Rogers”: “The real issue in life is not how many blessings we have but what we do with our blessings. Some people have many blessings and hoard them. Some have few and give everything away.” That is the benefit of giving. You are important to those you meet, and to the people you may never dream of. Scripture has told us that to give is to receive. Medical researchers confirm the benefits of giving. Helping others improves our physical and emotional well being. As you think about your life and the future, you may be thinking about a legacy you would like to leave. For our residents at Good Samaritan Society-Greeley Communities, the most important mission is to give them the very best in care and love. We have done that for the past 75 years through donations we have received from people who have experienced the love and compassion we provide our residents. Donors who have remembered the Good Samaritan Society through charitable gifts in their estate plans have given joy in knowing that they are making a difference in the lives of others. ■

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Laughter: Best Medicine On a busy street, a reporter was trying to push his way through a crowd to reach a car accident.

top of her blouse, reached inside and pulled out a $20 bill as her husband watched with interest.

He devised a plan and shouted, “Let me through, I’m the son of the victim!”

Then she said, “Have you ever seen $50,000 all crumpled up?”

The crowd parted, and many of them began laughing. Lying in front of the car was a donkey.

“Look in the garage.”

A woman told her friend, “My boyfriend and I were hiking when a big bear charged us. All I had was my little .22 pistol, which I knew wouldn’t stop the bear. But a single shot to my boyfriend’s knee worked, and I was able to get away.” A wife said to her husband, “Have you ever seen a really crumpled $20 bill?” “No,” he said. She slowly

unbuttoned the

Letters

Baby Doe Tabor Story

I enjoyed the May issue, but I want to make a couple of comments about Baby Doe. When she moved to the Matchless Mine, it was owned by J. K. Mullen, who let her live in the shanty.   In his book “Amole Again,” Gene Amole included a column from the Rocky Mountain News  of March 8, 1984. Back when Amole was age 8 or 9, he was taken by his grandfather and father to visit Baby Doe at the Matchless Mine. As a boy, the grandfather had delivered flowers to Baby Doe in her good years and spoke with her about the old times in Denver. She visited but never allowed them to come up to the cabin, keeping her rifle at hand. Two neighbors found her frozen body five years after the Amole visit.

13 • June 2013 • The Senior Voice

“No.”

A dyslexic man told his friend that he walked into a bra. A woman told her friend, “Every time I hear the dirty word ‘exercise,’ I wash my mouth out with chocolate.” “I spent half of my money on booze, women, and gambling. The other half I wasted.” W.C. Fields A woman told her friend, “I can’t make it to the gym today. And that’s five years in a row.” A doctor called a woman and said, “Mrs. Smith, the test we did

  Baby Doe’s wedding dress was once on display at the State Historical Museum in Denver. Today very few artifacts of Colorado history are on display. The first time I visited the shanty at the Matchless it was very much the same as when she died except for the fact that some people had torn parts up looking for valuables.   The Tabors, including Augusta, were an important aspect of Colorado history. Ray Jenkins , Fort Collins

on your husband last week got confused with another man’s test, and we’re unsure which belongs to your husband. Either way, the results are not good.” She said, “What do you mean not good?” “One test is positive for Alzheimer’s, and the other is positive for AIDS.” “Can’t you re-test?” she said. “Normally yes, but these are very expensive tests, and the insurance company will pay for only one a year.” “What am I supposed to do?” “The insurer suggests you drop your husband off somewhere downtown. If he finds his way home, don’t sleep with him.” On St. Patrick’s Day, a young Irishman gave his girlfriend a synthetic diamond and asked her

Outreach Award.  The award recognizes the Chorale’s “important leadership in the choral field” and praises the Singing for Seniors outreach program for its “strong commitment to outreach and education to an under-served population, while still providing a model that can be successfully adapted by all kinds of choruses.”   We will accept the award in Seattle, Washington, June 13, during Chorus America’s annual conference. Wendy White, Executive Director

Larimer Chorale Award Chorus America, a national organization that provides advocacy, research, and leadership development for choirs across the country, has honored the Larimer Chorale’s Singing for Seniors program with the 2013 Education

The Larimer Chorale ________________ Readers can email The Voice at thevoice@frii.com. You can read current and past issues free online each month at www.theseniorvoice.net. ■

to marry him. She showed the ring to her father, who was a jeweler. He told her it wasn’t a real diamond. When she confronted her boyfriend, he said, “I know. That’s why I gave it to you on St. Partick’s Day. It’s a sham rock.” ■


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The high cost of cancer drugs in the U.S.—but not in some other countries—keeps many American cancer patients from getting them, said a report in the journal “Blood” by researchers at the University of Texas. A drug for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) costs over $100,000 a year. The survival rate for CML in the U.S. is a little over 50 percent. In Sweden the survival rate is 80 percent; the drug is much cheaper in Sweden. Eleven of 12 cancer drugs approved by the FDA in 2012 also cost over $100,000 a year in the U.S., said researchers.

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“In many cases, it makes sense to let the market govern the price; however when a product is directly related to a patient’s survival over a period of years, it is critical to set a price that allows companies to profit and ensures that pa-

tients can afford their treatment,” said Dr. Hagop Kantarjian at the university.” Cancer care in much of Europe is nearly half the cost of what it is in the U.S. We spend about 18 percent of our Gross Domestic Product on it. Many European countries spend less than 10 percent. For the study, 120 specialists in over 15 countries joined together to point out what high drug prices are doing. “Patients with CML have a much better outlook today than ever before thanks to advances that have greatly improved survival rates,” said Kantarjian. “But these patients now face dire financial struggles as they try to maintain their treatment regimen with the drastically inflating cost of care.” ■

Why do advertisers choose The Senior Voice? “We have advertised with The Senior Voice since it began in 1980, and we’ve had excellent results.” - Sylvia Mucklow, Rocky Mountain Travel King

“50-somethings spend more on products and services than any other age group.” - USA Today News

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Cutting Medicare Costs What Privacy Rights? Raising the eligibility age to 67, which has been considered for years. Means testing Part A (hospital coverage) by making wealthy participants pay higher premiums. Each of these strategies would reduce Medicare spending. Premium support would reduce it the most. But it is also the most likely to cause financial hardships for participants, said researchers. The other strategies would discourage Medicare enrollment. ■

Three of the main strategies Congress is considering to reduce Medicare spending could leave millions of Medicare participants with no coverage, said researchers at the non-profit Rand Corporation. The strategies include:

The “premium support” plan supported by Rep. Paul Ryan. It would give Medicare participants money to buy their own private insurance plans instead of using the present Medicare system.

Hospital Bills

for it. The American Hospital Association says hospitals are supposed to publicize such programs, but many do not. Patients usually have to ask, be persistent, and keep good notes on services they receive. You can also contact an independent medical cost advocate. That’s someone who understands hospital billing codes and, for a fee, can often find errors that reduce your bill. ■

Many people do not know they can reduce high hospital bills by asking about patient assistance programs that most non-profit hospitals are required to provide, according to ABC News. The savings can be large, as Las Vegas resident Joyce Huston discovered. Her hospital reduced her $25,000 bill to $7,000 after she learned about the hospital’s financial assistance program and applied

How much do data collectors know about you? A lot. What do they do with the information? Sell it. They know if you’re pregnant, divorced, trying to lose weight, rich or poor, what car you drive, occupation, if you’re buying a home, — the list goes on. And it’s pretty scary, said University of California researchers. The state department of motor vehicles sells information about you. So does the voter registration office and numerous other government agencies you might think are supposed to protect your privacy. Credit agencies are especially notorious for collecting and selling information, said researchers. Experian, for instance, knows the names of expectant parents, when their babies are born, your pay stub information—whatever a marketing company wants to pay for. “I can tell you with confidence that I can predict who you are without you telling me anything at all, just from your Facebook ‘likes,’” said researcher Michal Kosinski at Psychometrics Center at the University of Cambridge in England. He says clicking “like” on Facebook can leave a highly personal record for data collectors, including your medical history, sexual preferences, drug use, religion, and much more. “The biggest problem for consumers is that they don’t know when they click to think three or four steps ahead about how that information could potentially be used,” said Lillie Coney with Electronic Privacy Information, a public interest research group in Washington, D.C. “Somebody will pay to use this data,” she added. “And unfortunately nobody is sending you notice that somebody is using the information.” ■

Macular Degeneration

or other vision limiting condition? Just because you have macular degeneration or other eye diseases like diabetic retinopathy doesn’t mean you must give up life’s pleasures like reading, watching your grandchildren across the room, or seeing signs at a distance.“People don’t know that there are doctors who are very experienced in low vision care,” says Dr. Robert Stamm, a low vision optometrist.“Our job is to figure out everything and anything possible to keep a person functioning visually,” says Dr. Stamm. Carl Muller, a low vision patient (pictured above), says “I am so excited with these new glasses - I can’t wait to use them on an upcoming Alaska Trip.

“Thank you Dr. Stamm so much for helping me see again. Without you and these glasses I wouldn’t be able to keep driving!”

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June 2013