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The Senior

OIC V E

Published Locally Since 1980

BABY DOE TABOR's Inglorious End

FIRST EXPLORERS North Colorado

July 2013


FIRST EXPLORERS 2013 Weld County Fair

Celebrating Seniors Day July 26, 2013 from 10 AM to 3 PM Island Grove Park Pavilion sion at FREE Admis seum Village Mu l ia n n e t n e C

The Pawnee Buttes northeast of Greeley. Photo by Bill Lambdin. By Lois HalL

Visit the Young Guns Wild West Fun Park

ithVic Anderson, Songs & poetry w boy the Yodeling Cow

Plus Play in the giant sand pile  Visit exhibits and shop with vendors Learn about oilfield equipment at  Noble Energy’s training trailer Swing along to Square Dance  demonstrations Play NOBLE bingo for gift card prizes

Join us for a fun-filled day! Lunch provided by Noble Energy and our partners in the oil field

2 • July 2013 • The Senior Voice

“In the sight of such a mass of life, the traveler feels a strange emotion of grandeur.” That’s how explorer John Fremont described the great buffalo herds he saw when he crossed the plains near Greeley in 1843. The herds here were among the largest life forces on earth at that time, numbering in the millions.

Pawnee Buttes and elsewhere near Greeley. Over millions of years, the plains evolved from a huge inland sea, jungle and pine forest. An evolutionary journey through eastern Colorado is grander than Fremont imagined. You can sense that if you look at the vast expanse of land that seems to roll forever in all directions. At the Pawnee Buttes, archaeologists have found evidence that many different prehistoric people crisscrossed this area. Those people were followed by Indian tribes such as the Cheyenne and Arapaho who hunted the plains for centuries—until white men wiped out the buffalo herds in the late 1800s. Today the plains appear dull and lifeless to some travelers. But they are enchanting to those who know their history. 

Pioneers did not exaggerate when they said the prairie was sometimes black with buffalo as far as the eye could see. In fact, pioneers said they felt the earth shake when the great herds stampeded and thundered across the plains. Before the buffalo, dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures had lumbered across these plains. Their fossils from 65 million years ago have been found at

BROTHER SPEEDERS

LET’S REHEARSE ALL TOGETHER

“GOOD MORNING NURSE”


STATE LEGISLATURE By Senator John Kefalas - Colorado State Senate The 69th Colorado General Assembly passed many substantive policies that strengthen our economy and make Colorado a better place to live. We advanced the shared values of opportunity, fairness and responsibility.   I sponsored legislation that creates jobs by supporting working families and small businesses, provides consumer protections for homeowners, improves our health care systems and our child death review systems, makes life easier for retirees, and promotes good governance through greater efficiencies. SB-001 (Working Families Economic Opportunity Act) will provide state refundable tax credits to about 500,000 low and moderate-income working families. The Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit are effective tools for reducing child poverty while supporting small businesses and local economies. SB-004 helps about 156,000 retirees who will not have to visit a driver’s license office to renew

their state IDs every five years and thus be afforded a well-deserved convenience. SB-255 further improves our child welfare systems to prevent abuse and neglect and child deaths. HB-1225 (Homeowners Insurance Reform Act) addresses problems faced by homeowners who suffered total losses of their homes due to wildfires. Problems being addressed concern under-insurance, personal property inventory lists, additional living expenses, re-building timeframes and replacement costs. HB-1138 (Public Benefit Corporations) will attract socially responsible investors to who want to invest in businesses that pursue the triple bottom line—profit, social good and sustainability. This bill allows for-profit businesses to establish themselves as “public benefit corporations.” ________________ Contact Sen. John Kefalas at jkefalashd52@frii.com, call 970.221.1135. 

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Estate Planning By Ron Rutz, Attorney Would you review the some states, an inheritance tax can current estate planbe imposed on as little as $30,000. ning tax rules? The federal tax exposure is the same in both inheritance tax states The estate of the deand estate tax states. ceased is taxed, not the The receiver inherits an asset inheritors. Currently the tax exfor tax purposes valued at the date emption for the deceased’s estate is of death and is entitled to that valu$5,250,000. If the proper election ation for future income tax puris made at the first death, the surposes. Why? Since the government viving spouse has $5,200,000 plus had an opportunity to tax an asset the unused portion of the deceased for estate/inheritance purposes, spouse’s $5,200,000. the beneficiary should not have to For a couple with a taxable net pay further tax on the appreciation worth over $10,400,000, planning of the inherited asset between the can eliminate any additional tax time that the deceased acquired the exposure. The federal government asset until the deceased’s date of and Colorado impose estate taxdeath. es. The tax is determined by who   Next month’s column will reinherits, not the size of the estate. view gift taxes, estate taxes, and The available exemption and “tax booby traps.” the tax rate varies depending on the ________________ amount inherited and how closely Attorney Ron Rutz will answer related the receiver is to the dequestions sent to rutz@ronaldrutz. ceased. Nebraska is an example of com. Phone 223.8388 in Ft. Colan inheritance tax jurisdiction. In lins. 

Q: A:

3 • July 2013 • The Senior Voice

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Published Locally Since 1980 Vol. 33, No. 8

Online at www.theseniorvoice.net PUBLICATION INFORMATION The Senior Voice news is locally owned and has been published the first of each month since 1980 for residents in Fort Collins, Greeley, Loveland and nearby towns. ADVERTISING Ad deadline is 20th of month. For rates, call 970-229-9204; email wolf@theseniorvoice.net or see www.theseniorvoice.net Wolfgang Lambdin Advertising Director Fort Collins, Colorado (970) 229-9204 wolf@theseniorvoice.net SALES OFFICES: Fort Collins & Loveland (970) 229-9204 Greeley (970) 223-9271 EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Announcements and stories must be received by the 10th of the month; ads by the 20th of the month. READER INFORMATION: Subscriptions $48 a year. The Senior Voice welcomes readers’ letters and contributions. The Senior Voice assumes no responsibility for damaged or lost material submitted by readers. © Copyright 2013 The Senior Voice EDITORIAL OFFICE: (970) 223-9271 email: thevoice@frii.com www.theseniorvoice.net Design Production by Ellen Bryant Design ellen@ellenbryantdesign.com. A+ Rating

No material may be reproduced by any means without permission of the Senior Voice. William and Peggy Lambdin Founders, 1980

4 • July 2013 • The Senior Voice

to (Editor’s Note: The story of Baby Doe Tabor is known to many Coloradoans. A beautiful but poor young woman in the gold rush days, she married the richest man in the state, Horace Tabor. They lived the life of kings until the Silver Crash of 1893 left them destitute. Historian Caroline Bancroft said Tabor’s dying words to Baby Doe were, “Hang onto the Matchless,” an abandoned Leadville mine he thought might yield wealth. It never did. Baby Doe lived there in poverty and was found frozen to death there in 1935. The following remembrance of her was provided by the Colorado Historical Society.)

By Caroline Bancroft Her story had been a drama of contrasts, from rags to riches and from riches back to rags again, the whole play enacted against the backdrop of Colorado’s magnificent and munificent mountains. But what those snow-capped peaks give, they also take away; and almost as if they are gods, they single out certain characters in history to destroy by first making them mad. Mrs. Tabor went to her death with a delusion about the Matchless Mine. She had lived the last years of her life largely through the charity of the citizens of Leadville and the bank that held the mortgage on the Matchless. The mine had produced no ore in years and was not really equipped to work, although she could not find it in her soul to admit this. She dressed in mining clothes and, off and on, during the last 20 years made a pretense of getting

RAGS

out ore with a series of men she inveigled to work on shares. But she either quarreled with these partners when she became suspicious of their honesty or the men became disillusioned about the supposed fortune hidden in the Matchless and drifted off. I met her once in the summer of 1927 when I called on her with my father, a mining engineer who was making a swing around the state to report on the mining situation. Mrs. Tabor, who had known my father for many years, showed us over the premises. She was polite to me but largely ignored me since she was concentrating on

Baby Doe Tabor. Colorado Historical Society. I could not have been more startled. The smile, the manner, the voice and the flowery speech were anomalous in that strange figure. Her smile was positively, although very briefly, gay and flashing; the teeth even and white, and the voice clear and bell-like while the manner I can only describe as queenly despite her diminutive size. While Father went back to the car, she and I strolled on ahead. I complimented her on the spectacular view of Mt. Massive and Mt. Elbert, Colorado’s highest peaks

Her eyes were very far apart and a gorgeous blue, their unusual color preserved through all the violence and drama. my father with the hope he might get her new backing. She was a little woman, very withered, and dressed in men’s corduroy trousers, mining boots and a soiled, torn blouse. She had a blue bandana tied around her head. When we first drove up to the Matchless and started to walk to her cabin, she met us halfway, a very belligerent expression on her face. My father and she had not met in several years, and it was not until after he gave his name that her manner changed. She smiled then and said, “Why, of course, pray do forgive me. And what a beautiful daughter you have! It is my lasting sorrow that the Lord’s work has taken my own daughter.”

off to the west beyond the town of Leadville. She did not say anything, but she turned her eyes full upon me, the only time I think she looked directly at me. Again I was startled. Her eyes were very far apart and a gorgeous blue—their unusual color preserved through all the violence and drama and bitterness of her then nearly 70 years. (Baby Doe froze to death in the mine shack 8 years later.) ________________ COVER PICTURE: The Maroon Bells west of Leadville taken by Colorado photographer Andy Cook. See his photos, books, cards and videos at www.RockyMountainReflections.com. 


2013 Larimer County Paved Road Maintenance Program The Chipseal portion of this year’s program starts July 8th and should be complete by the end of August but our Seal Coat program may continue through the first week of September. By Peggy Hunt

The 2013 Larimer County paved road maintenance program extends from the Larimer/Weld county line on the east to Larimer County Road (LCR) 27E on the west. The northern boundary is LCR 64 and the southern boundary is LCR 48. Traffic will be limited to one lane in these areas, expect delays of 10-15 minutes. Motorists, bike riders and pedestrians may wish to choose alternate routes until the work is completed, usually no later than 72 hours after product application. We encourage all traffic to drive slowly through the work zones and obey the posted speed limit to prevent materials that are being applied to the road from getting on vehicles.

Pioneer Elizabeth Stone was a cheerful, pleasant woman who often gave parties to brighten the lives of the early settlers in Fort Collins. Born in 1801 in Connecticut, she was married in 1824 and widowed 28 years and eight children later. In 1864, with a new husband, she crossed the plains to Colorado. “Their team was composed of two cows yoked together like oxen, which they drove to Denver, milking the cows regularly and making butter on the way,” said Fort Collins historian An-

Every church bell tolled for the woman known as one of Fort Collins’ founders. sel Watrous. “In making the butter, no churn was employed. It was produced by the motion of the wagon.” Elizabeth and her husband built the first permanent residence in what became Fort Collins. It was enlarged and became a boarding house for army officers. Later it became the town’s first school and eventually the town’s first hotel.

Elizabeth Stone. Peggy Hess painting.

2013 Larimer County Chipseal Map

Three years later, she helped start a brick yard that produced the first bricks made in northern Colorado. According to Watrous, the presence of the kindly, Christian Auntie tamed the “wild, sometimes reckless natures of the soldiers stationed there.” She later contributed to every church built in town and opened her hotel’s doors to all of the new ministers. As a temperance advocate, she was among the original organizers of a Woman’s Christian Temperance Union. When Colorado became the second state in the nation to give women the right to vote in 1894, she cast her first vote for the Prohibition Ticket. In 1895 Elizabeth Stone died at age 94. The town’s businesses closed, and every church bell tolled for the woman known as one of the founders of Fort Collins.

In 1868 Elizabeth teamed Her cabin still stands near with another pioneer, H.C. Peterson, to construct a flour mill. the downtown library.  5 • July 2013 • The Senior Voice

LEGEND: Green and Yellow are roads for chipseal, black is for roads being overlaid, brown and purple/pink are seal coat roads (no chips).

Informational signs will be posted on affected roads detailing exact locations and time frames. Please call our Seal Coat project line at (970) 498-5666 or visit our web page at: http://larimer.org/roads/road_ closures.cfm for schedule updates.


Family Health Guide Unclean Deadly Infection MRSA (methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureaus) can be controlled in hospital intensive care units by providing antibacterial soap and ointment to patients, said a report in the New England Journal of Medicine by researchers at the University of California, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, and other groups. Patient Safety Hospitals are still trying to get doctors and nurses to wash their hands often to avoid spreading infections like MRSA, but they’re having trouble convincing them, said Columbia University researcher Dr. Elaine Larson and others. “There are still staff out there who say, ‘How dare they!’” question doctors. About 100,000 patients die needlessly every year from such infections. Statin Drugs Those like Lipitor taken to

lower cholesterol could cause serious kidney damage if taken with two common antibiotics, erythromycin and clarithromycin, said a report in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Patients should substitute the antibiotic azithromycin or not take the statins while on those two antibiotics, said researchers. Sunblock It can help skin look younger if used daily (SPF 15), said a report in the Annals of Internal Medicine. It works better for dry skin and wrinkles than other lotions. Delaying Generic Drugs Brand name drug makers violate anti-trust laws and can be sued if they pay generic drug makers to delay putting generics on the market, said the U.S. Supreme Court. This should result in more generics and lower drug prices for consumers in the future, said the Federal Trade Commission.

Exercise Getting your heart rate up for just four minutes or so by sprinting, running up stairs, etc., provides considerable benefit, even if you take short breaks in between, said a report in the journal PLos One by researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Arthritis Drugs The old treatments are just as effective as the new drug Enbrel and cost thousands of dollars less, said a report in the New England Journal of Medicine. Scopes Three out of every 20 flexible colonoscopes used to examine the colon, gastroscopes for the stomach, and duodenoscopes for the small intestine are improperly cleaned and could pose serious risks for patients, said researchers at 3M Infection Prevention Division.

Medicare Its funding will remain solvent until 2026, two years longer than previously predicted, said the program’s trustees. Birth Control Pills Women who use them are less likely to have ovarian cancer later in life, said a report in Obstetrics & Gynecology. Whooping Cough The risk is 14 times higher for children who don’t get standard school vaccinations, said researchers at SUNY Medical University in New York. This also increases risk for their classmates because it is so contageous. 

Dedication Ceremony honoring National Pet Memorial Day

Saturday September 7, 2013 at 10am Pets are important family members, and when we lose them, it is important to have a place where they will rest and be memorialized – a place to visit and remember treasured memories. Join us for a touching and respectful service honoring National Pet Memorial Day as we dedicate our new Precious Pals Cemetery at Resthaven Cemetery.

Resthaven Memory Gardens is a proud member of the Pet Loss Professional Alliance.

(970) 667-0202 • www.resthavencolorado.com 8426 S. Hwy. 287 Fort Collins, CO 80525 Photography courtesy: Santella Productions

6 • July 2013 • The Senior Voice


Tony COLORADO CROSSWORDS ByDonovan 1

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ACROSS 1. A good place for some R & R 5. New executive vice president of hockey operations for the Avalanche 10. Honored name during Independence Day celebrations or a Colorado county 12. Word preceding Lyon or Laramie 13. Big name in “chips” 14. Sinatra/Reynolds film of 1955: “The Trap.” 16. Some whiskeys 17. Hebrew name meaning “the great de stroyer” or a name on a Bible 19. Name of a roadside camping facility 22. Scheduled activities 24. Surrounds, as an army or posse might 29. Nearly abandoned now, this once thriving mining camp in Chaffee County lies between Cottonwood and Monarch Pass 30. Synthetic clothing material 33. Southeastern Colorado town near junction of the Purgatoirie and Arkansas rivers 35. The road over this pass began as a toll road to enable wagons and livestock safe access to New Mexico 37. Town near Aspen named for the dark volcanic rock in the area 38. Town which is host to Northeastern Jr. College as well as Overland Trail Museum 40. Indians who originally settled in northern Indiana and southern Michigan 44. Snake-like fish 45. Afternoon snooze for Jose’ 47. CSU opponent in Mountain West Con ference whose nickname is “The Rebels” 49. Bronco receiver in the Hall of Fame 52. Instrument not found in a marching band 55. County you’d be in if you visited the Battle of Beecher Island site

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56. What everyone does on his birthday 57. James or Jackson 58. “Shock and !” DOWN 1. Town named for pioneer melon farmer who was the first mayor of Rocky Ford 2. Frying River 3. Pertaining to the stars 4. Longfellow work of 1858: “The Courtship of “ 5. Rank for York or Joe Friday 6. Consumed 7. Fay Wray’s captor 8. Setting for Gunga Din 9. Word before “Junction” or “Lake” 11. Attention getting yell 12. “… the land of the “ 15. Somber 19th century American writer fascinated by beauty and death; author of “The Gold Bug” and “The Black Cat” 18. Mere 20. City in central Florida 21. Neighbor of Ft. Collins 23. Rand who wrote Atlas Shrugged 25. Nordic capital and host to the Nobel Prize ceremonies 26. Some MIT grads 27. Houses without basements are usually . built on concrete 28. Complaint from sleepy neighbors, say 31. Wine region of Italy 32. Missouri river or Indian tribe of that area 34. Do damage to a car’s finish 35. CSU athlete or fan 36. Spicy Asian cuisine 39. Where # 47 across is located is Sports Illustrated’s 41. The swimsuit most popular publication 42. Verde 43. 19th Century transport on the Overland Trail 46. Some DIA postings was a 1928 play written 48. Diamond by and starring Mae West 50. Abbreviation found on a car battery 51. Farm female 53. Homophone of “knew” 54. Smelter input

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The Senior

VOICE congratulates historian

Margaret Laybourn on her 75th year of participating in the

Cheyenne Frontier Days Parade.


M E A D O W V I E W

O F

G R E E L E Y

FrontierDays (Editor’s Note: Wyoming historian Margaret Laybourn (miggsbob@yahoo.com) wrote this story and has written for The Voice for over 25 years.) By Margaret Laybourn

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My family—Royal and Kathleen Reed, my sister Mary June and I—moved to Cheyenne in 1936. I was a rather precocious young lady and read in the newspaper that preparations were being made for a new section in the famous Frontier Days parade. Margaret Boise was in charge and asked the socialites of the city to go through their closets and attics and find historic clothes to wear in a new section of the parade. The city fathers were asked to check old barns for antique horse-pulled carriages. The original parade was exciting and boisterous with all of the rowdy cowboy contestants whooping and hollering and shooting off their Winchesters in the air. But later it threatened to become too risque as the cowboys brought “ladies of the night” from Denver to ride with them. This was the reason for a new emphasis on the social significance of riding in the parade. I determined, after reading the article, to get a place in the parade; and I wanted to get on some sort of horse-drawn conveyance. I visited Mrs. Boise at her mansion on Carey Avenue. Being the true lady she was, she invited me in, served me lemonade, and put me on her per-

Margaret and Bob Laybourn in the 100th Frontier Days Parade. manent parade list. Since then, I have participated in 75 Frontier Days parades. That first time was on the children’s hay wagon, which was followed by stints on the top of the Yellowstone coach. After my marriage, my husband and I were in the Bride and Groom float followed by the stork. Then, with every new baby, we pushed an ornate wicker carriage; and as the children grew older, we rode bicycles, tandems, and unicycles. This year in the last week of July, a cannon shot blasts off the parade’s cavalcade of history. Ms. Frontier and her Lady in Waiting lead the parade, followed by hundreds of horses and riders, floats, and carriages displaying 116 years of history for the biggest outdoor rodeo in the world—Cheyenne Frontier Days. 


Outpatients Beware By Bill Lambdin The next time you have a hospital stay, be sure to ask if you are classed as an inpatient or outpatient, say healthcare analysts. You will pay a lot more out of your pocket if you are an outpatient because insurance companies require you to make larger co-pays plus pay for some tests, scans, and drugs. Hospitals are increasingly keeping patients in “observation” for a day or more after they enter an emergency room. Observation means they are outpatients. “We’re going to see an explosion in observation status,” said Rand researcher Arthur Kellermann. Hospitals usually don’t tell patients that’s what is happening, and patients get a big surprise when the bills come—especially if mature patients are sent from a hospital to a nursing home for

recovery. They will have to pay the full nursing home bill because Medicare law requires they be a hospital inpatient for at least three days before nursing home admission. Some hospitals use outpatient classifications to lower their readmission rates. Medicare penalizes them financially for high re-admission rates. So hospitals don’t want to send patients home from the emergency room and have them return in a few days. Outpatients also cost hospitals less in services. Insurance companies like outpatient classifications because they pay the hospital less and pass more costs on to the patient. “This fragmented, loophole-ridden payment system has taken one of the best ideas in medicine and made it confusing to patients and doctors,” said Kellerman. 

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A Day in the Life of a Cowboy another man after them, and he stayed too. There were only three of us left trying to hold those 700 head of cattle. The storm increased, but we stayed in the lead for 12 long hours without a change of mounts or a bite to eat. The boss at the ranch, knowing that many thousands of dollars was at stake in that blizzard, started out to overtake us on the trail. He hitched up a light buggy and drove without stopping to feed or water his horses, pushing through that blinding storm.

(Editor’s Note: Tom Richardson from Elk Mountain west of Laramie wrote about a cattle drive in the late 1800s when he was a young cowboy. It shows something of what life was like for cowboys.) By Tom Richardson We drove 700 head of cattle from the big pasture and set out on the long trek. We had traveled about 60 miles towards Orin Junction when a terrible, driving storm came up. The rain developed into a blizzard and struck about 2 in the night. About four in the afternoon, four of the boys went to the wagon and stayed there. They claimed they did not have clothes enough and that they were freezing to death. They stayed so long we sent

On reaching our mess wagon, he found out about the state of affairs and kicked those five quitters out, ordering them to our relief. After riding 12 hours in the blizzard, our horses were

played out, and we had stood more than ordinary men. We still had to ride four miles back to the wagon on our exhausted horses, but when we got to camp did we ever fill up on beefsteak and coffee! We only got to sleep about three hours, and then we had to get up and help the cook move the outfit. The average cowhand of that time was a happy-go-lucky fellow. He lived from day to day with no thought of the future or no ambition. When he drew his time in the fall, he usually hit for the nearest town and gambled away his money in one night. I have heard many tell what a tough time he had to get through the winter, often living

A cowboy. The Voice archive. on one meal a day or less and picking up a few odd chores to eke out an existence. 

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Saturday, August 3rd 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The Marriott Hotel Conference Center 350 E. Horsetooth Road, Fort Collins, CO (Wheelchair assistance available) For more information and to register: www.eldercarenet.org or call 970-495-3442

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Improving on Healthcare By Bill Lambdin Dr. Marty Makary is a cancer surgeon and researcher at Johns Hopkins University, and he has written a new book titled “Unaccountable: What Hospitals Won’t Tell You and How Transparency Can Revolutionize Health Care.” He contends that the government won’t solve our health care problems; patients will have to by demanding honesty and transparency from hospitals and doctors. “Unless we can be open and honest that up to 30 percent of health care is unnecessary and that 1 in 4 hospital patients is harmed by a mistake, then we’re just going to be continuing to beat our heads against a wall trying to pay for a broken health care system instead of fixing it,” he said.

pressure doctors to do things not in the best interest of patients. There are some good things happening, however. Some hospitals are working very hard to avoid errors and improve patient safety. Many new, young doctors dislike secrecy and demand transparency, and they are making improvements. But more honesty is needed, said Makary. “Patients should know about a mistake as soon as it happens. I can look back almost every year and think of a CT ordered on the wrong patient or a lab test misinterpreted.” Makary warns that patients should not have “blind trust” in health care providers. 

Our current system prompts some hospitals to fire doctors and nurses who expose problems, said Makary. The system wastes millions of dollars on unnecessary treatments and tests; it hides information from patients; it’s often dominated by a corporate mentality favoring profits over patient safety. The question of a doctor’s loyalty to patients is serious enough that the American Medical Association (AMA) recently told its members that a doctor “owes a duty of loyalty to his or her employer” but “this divided loyalty can create conflicts of interest such as financial incentives to over or under treat patients.” The AMA knows most doctors are now employees of hospitals or group practices that are owned in some cases by outside companies such as Wall Street firms. Such owners need to provide high profits to investors and might well

11 • July 2013 • The Senior Voice

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They Were Here First Fe along the South Platte River east of what would become Greeley 150 years later. On the plains, Pawnee Indians attacked them, killing Villasur and most of his men. By Bill Lambdin The first explorers in northern Colorado were not Zebulon Pike or Stephen Long. Spanish soldiers and French fur trappers were here long before Pike and Long’s government expeditions arrived. The Spanish passed through briefly. The French stayed to trap beaver and trade with Indians Northern Colorado was a dangerous wilderness then. The men had no maps to tell them what lay ahead and sometimes no guides to warn them of dangers. In 1720, Pedro de Villasur led 45 Spanish soldiers from Santa

The Pawnees were probably encouraged by French trappers who didn’t want the Spanish in their hunting grounds. At that time, the United States had not yet made the Louisiana Purchase, and several nations wanted to claim the region.

Being an explorer in early Colorado was a dangerous business. In 1739, the French Mallet brothers traveled with six other men across the eastern Colorado plains. That small group was the

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forerunner of the fur trading expeditions that led to the famous rendezvous and fur trading posts like Fort Vasquez south of Greeley. When Zebulon Pike came in 1806, he didn’t cross northern Colorado but came up the Arkansas River from the southeastern plains. His small party became lost in the mountains west of present-day Pueblo and nearly froze to death. Spanish soldiers captured them but eventually released them so they could return East. Stephen Long’s expedition in 1820 followed the South Platte River and passed near the later location of Greeley and other northern Colorado towns. Long then turned south along the front range, found the “great mountain” Pike had described and named it Pike’s Peak. Some of Long’s men named Long’s Peak for their leader.

Longs Peak was named for Stephen Long. The Voice archive. West, and his reports were widely read—thanks in part to the good writing of his wife, Jessie Benton Fremont.

The explorer who spent the most time in northern Colorado was John Charles Fremont, whose guide here was Kit Carson.

Fremont was looking for railroad routes across the mountains, as was John Gunnison in 1853. Neither found a route, but their maps of Colorado’s mountains proved valuable.

All five of Fremont’s expeditions from 1842 from 1853 came through Colorado, and two of them passed near what became Loveland, Fort Collins, and Greeley.

John Gunnison was killed by Indians. Fremont narrowly escaped several Indian encounters and nearly died in a blizzard. Pike was nearly shot by his Spanish captors.

By Fremont’s time, Easterners were very curious about the

Being an explorer in early Colorado was a dangerous business. 


Annual Senior Law Day The Elder Care Network of and other subjects of interest to Northern Colorado will present the ninth annual Larimer County Senior Law Day, August 3, at the Fort Collins Marriott Hotel, 350 East Horsetooth Road (just east of College Avenue). Events from 8 am to 3 pm include classes on estate planning, probate administration, fiduciary duties, Medicaid, legal issues for medical decisions, how the new health law will affect retirees,

people over age 50. Attorneys and other experts will be available to answer individual questions. Participants will receive the Senior Law Handbook, information from the Colorado Bar Association, and other publications. A $10 contribution includes four classes, lunch, and all publications. To register, call 970.495.3442 in Fort Collins. ď Ž

Reducing Drug Costs One tablet of the diabetes drug Januvia sells for $8.20 in the United States; it sells for $1.52 in Europe. A month’s supply of the cancer drug Avastin sells for $8,800 here; $3,978 in England. For many years, the U.S. has been the biggest source of high profits for drug companies, but that should change over the next few years, say researchers like Silvia Ondategui-Parra with Ernst &

Young. One of the good things about Obama’s Affordable Care Act is that it will require healthcare providers and insurance companies— and consumers—to pay a lot more attention to what drugs cost. “We will be facing enormous healthcare cost containment pressure in this country,â€? said researcher Joel Hay at the University of Southern California. ď Ž

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If interested, please email cvlab@cahs.colostate.edu or call (970) 491-6702.

13 • July 2013 • The Senior Voice

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Remembering Fred Astaire er, Ann, helped Fred and his sister, Adele, become child stars on the vaudeville circuit when they were very young, partly because their father lost his job as a brewer in Omaha.

By Lois Hall Singer Bing Crosby said of Fred Astaire: “There never was, and never will be, a better dancer; and I never knew anybody more kind, more considerate, or more completely a gentleman.” That was the opinion of many people who knew Fred Astaire, the popular dancer and actor during Hollywood’s golden age of musicals from the late 1930s to the 1950s. He was born in 1899 at Omaha, Nebraska, to Austrian immigrant Frederic Austerlitz. Fred’s moth-

The family moved to New York City where the youngsters took dancing lessons and became one of the most popular child acts in vaudeville. They took the stage name of Astaire. His sister got married in 1932, and Fred went to Hollywood where he failed one screen test because a producer said he “can’t act, slightly bald.” But Fred’s dancing talent was too obvious for Hollywood to ignore. He soon played in his first movie, “Dancing Lady,” with Joan Crawford. (Many people don’t remember that Joan Crawford was a dancer before she became a dramatic actress.)

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Fred’s first film with Ginger Rogers was “Flying Down to Rio” in 1933. He didn’t want to be paired with another female dancer, but he and Ginger worked so well together that they ended up making ten movies.

Katharine Hepburn explained why they were successful: “He gives her class, and she gives him sex.” Hepburn meant Ginger added sex appeal to the dances. At least people thought that’s what she meant. Maybe she knew that Ginger and Fred had an affair while working together. Years later, Ginger said they came close to getting married. Six of the nine musicals Fred created for RKO were the studio’s biggest money makers. He had other dancing partners, but his movies with Ginger made them both stars. He recalled: “Ginger had never danced with a partner before. She faked it an awful lot. She couldn’t tap and she couldn’t do this and that... but Ginger had style and talent and improved as she went along. It got so that, after a while, everyone else who danced with me looked wrong.” Ginger pointed out years later that she did everything Fred did— in high heels and backwards. Fred eventually became an accomplished actor and singer in ad-

Fred Astair dition to dancing. He introduced songs like Cole Porter’s “Night and Day” and Jerome Kern’s “The Way You Look Tonight.” He earned an Academy Award and many other honors in his long career of 76 years. He starred with every major actress of his time and was still dancing at age 76. His first wife, Phyllis Potter, died of cancer at age 46. They were married 21 years, and her death devastated Fred. Years later, he married Robyn Smith, an actress who shared his interest in race horses. Fred was also an avid golfer. He died at age 88 in 1987. Classical dancer Mikhail Baryshnokov said of him: “He’s a genius, a classical dancer like I never saw in my life.” 

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Laughter: Best Medicine A doctor asked a patient what he did for exercise, and the man answered: “Yesterday I walked about five hours up and down hills, through bramble bushes, around a lake, and ran from a bear in the woods.” “You must be a real outdoors man.” “No, just a bad golfer.” You wonder what technology is doing to you when you enter your PIN on the microwave, and you have a list of 8 phone numbers to reach your family of three. How some elementary school children answered questions about mothers: Why did God make mothers? “She’s the only one who knows where the scotch tape is.” What ingredients are mothers made of? “Mostly string, I think.” “Clouds and angel hair and

everything nice and one dab of mean.” Why did your mom marry your dad? “She got too old to do anything else with him.” A woman complained to her husband’s doctor, “After you treated him, he lost all interest in sex.”

night before. As Goldwater was putting, a dog ran across the green in front of him. Goldwater didn’t say a word. As they walked off the green, Crosby said, “Didn’t you see that dog?” Goldwater answered, “Was that a real dog?”

The doctor told her, “All I did was improve his vision.”

From golf announcer David Feherty:

Marriage can be fun sometimes. The trouble is, you’re married all of the time.

“That ball is so far left Lassie couldn’t find it if it was wrapped in bacon.”

Since there is a tourist season, why can’t we shoot them?

“Watching Phil Mickelson play golf is like watching a drunk chasing a balloon near the edge of a cliff.”

A woman told her friend, “My idea of a super bowl is a toilet that cleans itself.” Golf announcer Ken Venturi recalled a game he, Bing Crosby, and Senator Barry Goldwater played after they had partied the

Jim Furyk’s swing: “It looks like an octopus falling out of a tree.” “I’m sorry Nick Faldo couldn’t be here this week. He is attending

the birth of his next wife.” “It’s a glorious day. The only way to ruin a day like this would be to play golf in it.” Famous lines. “He has Van Gogh’s ear for music.” Billy Wilder “She has delusions of adequacy.” Walter Kerr “He loves nature in spite of what it did to him.” Forrest Tucker “He is a self made man and worships his creator.” John Bright 

Why do advertisers choose The Senior Voice? People age 50-plus have MORE SPENDABLE INCOME than any other age group. (U.S. Consumer Research Center)

Over 73% of them read newspapers and magazines. (Scarborough Research)

Larimer County's 55 to 60 population increased over 80% in the past 10 years. (U.S. Census Bureau). 15 • July 2013 • The Senior Voice

They read The Senior Voice every month. Call 970.229.9204 www.theseniorvoice.net


ave dreams of doing more H than resealing the driveway? Without the work and expense of taking care of a house, you could be traveling. Playing golf. Making new friends. Taking up a new hobby. By moving to the Good Samaritan Society – Water Valley Senior Living Resort, you could be part of a whole community helping you to get the most out of life. Our community opens up a world of possibilities, not a five-gallon can of sticky black stuff. To learn how you can get more out of life, call us at (970) 686-2743.

The Evangelical Lutheran Good Samaritan Society provides housing and services to qualified individuals without regard to race, color, religion, gender, disability, familial status, national origin or other protected statuses according to applicable federal, state or local laws. All faiths or beliefs are welcome. Copyright © 2013 The Evangelical Lutheran Good Samaritan Society. All rights reserved.

16 • July 2013 • The Senior Voice


July 2013