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The Senior

OIC V E Published Locally Since 1980

January 2012

Pioneers in North Colorado

Mesa Verde Discovery


Early Settler in Fort Collins

(Editor’s Note: Fort Collins historian Arlene Ahlbrandt wrote this story years ago.)

C

ameron Pass west of Fort Collins was named for Robert A. Cameron, an unusual pioneer.

He was born in New York and headed west as a young man. He attended medical college in 1850

and was a doctor for about ten years.

Next he was attracted to political activities with the Indiana legislature. At age 33, he joined the military during the Civil War and, because of his bravery, became a brigadier general.

Many people were moving

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west after the Civil War. Cameron joined Nathan Meeker and with others founded the Union Colony at Greeley

When the federal government opened the land of the Fort Collins military reservation in 1872, Cameron and some of his friends left the Greeley colony and organized an agriculture colony at Fort Collins. The industrious group had a newspaper, livery stable, bank, sawmill and several shops. They did not allow gambling halls or saloons.

In the summer of 1873, grasshoppers came in black clouds and stripped all the crops. Some settlers became disappointed and left. Cameron left and later headed the Manitou Colony in Colorado Springs. At age 57, he was appointed by the governor to

Robert Cameron. Hazel Johnson Collection.

serve as warden at the Colorado State Penitentiary.

Years later in the 1920s, roads were being built in Poudre Canyon, and in 1926 the road above Chambers Lake over the 10,285foot pass was named Cameron Pass as a tribute to the pioneer. 


Mesa Verde Discovery T

Published Locally Since 1980

By Bill Lambdin

Vol. 32, No. 2

he ancient Indian cliff dwellings at Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado were an amazing find.

Online at www.theseniorvoice.net PUBLICATION INFORMATION The Senior Voice has been published the first of each month since 1980 for residents age 50+ in Fort Collins, Greeley, Loveland and nearby towns.

Richard Wetherill and his brothers were hunting stray cows in 1888. They looked across a canyon in southwestern Colorado near Durango, and couldn’t believe their eyes. It was the ruins of an entire Indian village, centuries old.

ADVERTISING Ad deadline is 20th of month. For rates, call 970-229-9204; email wolf@theseniorvoice.net or see www.theseniorvoice.net

The Wetherills later said they were struck by the feeling that “the eerie sight could not be a reality.” They lowered themselves on ropes down the high canyon walls and into the cliff dwellings. Walking through the dust of centuries, they saw stone arrowheads, axes, pottery and other artifacts. Whole objects and pieces were everywhere. The men simply bent over and picked them up, holding a thousand years of history in their hands.

“Things were arranged in the rooms as if the people might just have been out visiting,” they remembered. “Perfect specimens of pottery sat on the floors... stone implements and household equipment were where the (people) had last used the articles.” Many of the priceless artifacts the Wetherills found, including mummified corpses, have never been seen by Americans. They were taken by a Swedish nobleman who in 1891 paid the Wetherills to help him excavate some of the site.

Baron Gustaf Nordenskiold loaded many of the most valuable artifacts onto donkeys, took them to a train station at Durango, and shipped them to Sweden. A few Durango residents tried to stop the shipment, asking the sheriff to impound the artifacts. But no U.S. laws protected such relics at that time, and the precious cargo

One of the cliff dwellings at Mesa Verde. Photo by Peggy Donovan of Loveland.

left the country.

Richard Wetherill knew that ancient Indian tribes had inhabited the Mancos valley in southwestern Colorado before he stumbled onto the cliff dwellings at Mesa Verde. He had found pottery and arrowheads on his ranch.

In fact, he found so many that he knew the area had been home to many Indians. But neither Weatherill nor anyone else knew then just how many ancient tribes once lived there, or for how long. Archaeologists now know there was a huge nation of many tribes throughout southwestern Colorado at least 1000 years ago. Those at Mesa Verde remained until about 1300 AD, when they probably migrated farther south due to a prolonged drought or other changing conditions.

For hundreds of years afterwards, their stone kivas and dwellings stood silent in the massive canyons. Only the winds moved through them. An occasional coyote sniffed at the pieces of pottery, scratched at a stone wall and went on its way, disturb-

3 •January 2012 • The Senior Voice

ing little.

When the Wetherills discovered the ruins, they were surprisingly well preserved. It was easy for archaeologists to rebuild them later, so that visitors today see accurate examples of ruins and villages. And what a sight they are. Few places on earth offer such a revealing look into the past.

Congress made Mesa Verde a national park in 1906, thanks to President Theodore Roosevelt and some Colorado women who formed a group to preserve the ruins and stop lootings in them.

Richard Wetherill went on to explore Chaco Canyon and other ancient Indian sites. Some said that, in 1910 in New Mexico, a man shot and killed Wetherill during an argument. 

Wolfgang Lambdin Advertising Director Fort Collins, Colorado (970) 229-9204 wolf@theseniorvoice.net SALES OFFICES: Fort Collins & Loveland (970) 229-9204 Greeley (970) 223-9271 EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Announcements and stories must be received by the 10th of the month; ads by the 20th of the month. READER INFORMATION: Subscriptions $48 a year. The Senior Voice welcomes readers’ letters and contributions. The Senior Voice assumes no responsibility for damaged or lost material submitted by readers. © Copyright 2012 The Senior Voice EDITORIAL OFFICE: (970) 223-9271 email: thevoice@frii.com www.theseniorvoice.net Design Production by Ellen Bryant Design ellen@ellenbryantdesign.com. A+ Rating

________________

COVER PICTURE: One of Mesa Verde’s cliff dwellings taken by Colorado photographer Andy Cook. See his photos, books and videos at www. RockyMountainReflections. com.

No material may be reproduced by any means without permission of the Senior Voice. William and Peggy Lambdin Founders, 1980


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State Legislature

By John Kefalas Colorado State Representative n Colorado, the legislature is required to pass a balanced budget; and your opinions matter, especially when there are limited resources that must be targeted and used wisely. On November 1, Governor Hickenlooper submitted his fiscal year 2012-13 proposed budget that strives to address structural budget gaps and focuses on strategic priorities, which are: protecting vulnerable, economic development; education reform; modernizing government; and long-term budget planning. The Joint Budget Committee (JBC) conducts open meetings to hear from the various state departments; and in March, the JBC submits a budget bill to the legislature, which we must pass and send to the governor for his approval. The total proposed budget is $20.1 billion with $7.4 billion

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from the General Fund, which primarily comes from income and sales taxes. The General Fund rate of growth is 3.2 percent ($227.1 million), and most of this money is going for increases in mandatory budget areas such as Medicaid, which has seen a 72 percent increase in enrollment over the past five years—281,000 even after $31.9 million in Medicaid budget reductions. Despite a moderate decline in the incarceration rates, the number of people entering state jails is expected to be higher than prior estimates. These two areas, Medicaid and Corrections, represent 92 percent of the General Fund increase. ________________ Contact Colorado State Rep. John Kefalas at 604 Sycamore Street, Fort Collins, CO 80521; phone 970.221.1135; email johnk1@frii. com; or see www.johnkefalas. org. 

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The Senior Voice

ON THE INTERNET AT:

www.TheSeniorVoice.net 4 •January 2012 • The Senior Voice

By Ron Rutz, Attorney his is about tax rules for gifting. One spouse can give any amount to the other tax-free. No estate tax return is required.   Each person can give any number of “gifts” to any number of people as long as the total to each individual is less than $13,000 in value in any calendar year. No tax return is required to be filed.   A person can give up to $5 million to one person at one time or any number of people at any time as long as the total of all gifts away does not exceed $5 million. On December 31, 2012, the amount drops to $1 million. A gift tax return needs to be filed. This amount is in addition to the $13,000 transfer per person per year.   With certain exceptions, trans-

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fers to qualifying charities and organizations can be made tax free, either directly or through properly drafted trusts. Gift tax returns need to be filed.   Transfer directly to educational organizations for tuition and transfers directly to health care providers for medical services also have an unlimited exemption. When less than the equivalent value is received in return, a transfer is subject to approximately a 50% combined state and federal gift tax on the net differential value. This in theory would include such things as Christmas or birthday presents.  ________________ Attorney Ron Rutz will answer questions sent to 2625 Redwing Road, Suite 180, Ft. Collins, CO 80526. Email rutz@ronaldrutz. com; phone 970.223.8388. 


Tall Tales on the Frontier

(Editor’s Note: Greeley historian Hazel Johnson wrote the following story years ago.) ioneers could spin some pretty good yarns. A cowboy named

P

Jackson was out hunting on one of the coldest days ever. “I had shot a big deer,” said Jackson. “But to my surprise, the deer got mad and took after me.

Selected Events FORT COLLINS The Fort Collins Museum of Art is featuring the “Chihuly Venetians” exhibit through March 18. It includes the famous Laguna Murano Chandelier. Call 4822787. Lincoln Center: Open Stage Theatre presents Alfred Hitchcock’s “The 39 Steps,” beginning January 7 through February 5. Award-winning Comedian Kathleen Madigan, January 7. Dance troupe “Stomp,” January 13-14. “Yes” concert, January 20. Dance troupe “Pilobolus,” January 25. Classical musicians Shai Wosner and Jennifer Koh, January 25. Music by The Jayhawks and Justin Townes Earle, January 26. African music and dance “Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters,” January 28. Call 221-6730. CSU Music: Mathew Evans, January 23. Eric Hollenbeck, January 30. Vasanta Percussion Quartet, January 30. Call 492-5529. CSU Theatre: The Kafka Project, January 31, February 1-5. Call 491-5529. TIMNATH The Timnath Historical Calendar is available from the Timnath Columbine History Club. Call 2210338. GREELEY Civic Center: Missoula Children’s Theatre, January 7. “Wales: Land of Songs,” January 15. Greeley Philharmonic Orchestra “Connoisseur Concert,” January 21. Pilobolus Dance Company, January 27. Blues Brothers Revue, January 28. Ethnic Fest, January 31. UNC Dance Alliance, February 3. Call 356-5000. UNC Music: Faculty recitals, January 17, 23, 31. Jazz Compos-

ers’ Concert, February 1. Symphony Orchestra, February 6. Jazz Singers’ Showcase, February 8. Call 351-2515. UNC Theatre: “Dancing at Lughnasa,” begins February 9. Call 351-2515. Greeley Gluten Free Support Group. For information, call 3563050. LOVELAND Rialto Theater: “A Celtic New Year with the McTeggart Irish Dancers,” January 7. “The Kitchen Witches” theatre, begins January 20. Call 962-2120. “Mythbusters” live performance at Budweiser Center, January 12. Call 980-4764. “Portraits of the Prairie: Nebraska Landscapes that Inspired Willa Cather,” Museum-Gallery, January 13. Call 980-4764. ESTES PARK Kruger/Bunin Concert, January 8. Call 577-9900 for all events shown here. Winter Festival featuring a candyland ice village, games, ice skating, pony rides, music, and more, begins January 13. Fred Peterbark and Anthony Green Concert, January 15. Telsa String Quartet, January 22. Rampart Winds Concert, January 29. Snowshoeing trek for families, January 28. Frost Giant 5K and 10K races, January 29. CHEYENNE CIVIC CENTER “Vicki Lawrence and Mama,” performed by Vicki Lawrence, January 20. Call 307-637-6364 for all events here. “Mamma Mia,” musical by ABBA, February 11. “Doc Severinsen,” music by the Tonight Show Band and Doc Severinsen, March 2. 

5 •January 2012 • The Senior Voice

“I was close to a tree, so I dropped my gun and made for it. But the deer was quicker than I was. “Just as I reached the tree, he made a jump and caught me. One of his antlers went on one side of me and the other stuck on the other side. “The tree was just large enough for him to pin me fast between him and the tree. “There we were. I couldn’t move and the deer wouldn’t. His breath shot out in great streams against the tree, rose up like steam and instantly congealed about me. “I looked back over my shoulder and, to my horror, saw ice forming all around me. I expected to be frozen to death if not killed by the deer. “On any other day, the wound I gave him would have killed him. The bullet went clean through him.

“But it was so cold that the hole froze up on each side, and the deer was as sound as ever. “The circle of ice got so tight around me that it was difficult to breath. But then a ray of hope arose. I figured that the deer’s nose would eventually be closed by the ice. He would die of suffocation, fall and break the ice bonds. “And that is exactly what happened. “By then, I was so numb I had to climb up the tree several feet and slide down over the rough bark to start my circulation. “But I made it and lived to tell about it.”

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A Gambler and a Lawman D

By Bill Lambdin

oc Holliday and Bat Masterson were two of the early West’s most famous characters, and both spent considerable time in Colorado. In fact, Holliday died at Glenwood Springs and was buried there. John Henry “Doc” Holliday was born in 1852 in Georgia. He graduated from a Philadelphia dental school in 1872 and came west for his health. He practiced dentistry only occasionally, preferring gambling instead. William Barclay “Bat” Masterson was born in 1855 in Illinois. He became a lawman in 1877 at Dodge City, Kansas, and pursued that profession, though he was often on the edge of the law as a gambler. Masterson knew Holliday through Wyatt Earp, a friend of

both men. Masterson didn’t care much for Holliday but helped him out of some encounters with the law because of their common friendship with Earp. “Doc had few real friends,”

It was ironic that these two men who lived by the gun did not die by it. said Masterson. “He was selfish and of a perverse nature. I never liked Holliday. I tolerated him and helped him at times solely on Wyatt Earp’s account.” Holliday first came to Colorado in 1876 before the infamous gunfight at the O.K. Corral in Tombstone, Arizona, in 1881. He was 24 years old, already in poor

health from tuberculosis, working at a Denver gambling house. By 1883, Holliday was in Leadville, sick with pneumonia and broke. A local named Billy Allen had loaned Holliday some money and threatened him, publicly, if he didn’t repay it. Though many knew Holliday’s reputation as a gunman, he didn’t look like much of a threat at the time. He weighed about 120 pounds and looked like death warmed over. Allen stormed into a saloon where Holliday stood at the far end of the bar. Holliday calmly reached behind the bar, picked up a pistol, and shot Allen. A friend of Allen then came looking for Holliday. He found him in another saloon. As the man approached, Holliday asked, “Are you armed?” The man drew his gun. Holliday did the same. In an instant, the man lay dying on the floor. A jury called both shootings self defense and acquitted Holliday.

Doc Holliday. Colorado Historical Society.

take a slap in the face from some drunken fool who didn’t know his record, and not resent the insult.” In 1891 Masterson married a Denver dance-hall girl, Emma Walters, and they later moved to New York where he worked as the sports editor for a newspaper. He died there in 1921. It was ironic that these two men who lived by the gun did not die by it. 

By 1887, Holliday’s health and luck had both run out. He died in Glenwood Springs that year and was buried at the local Linwood Cemetery. He was only 35 years old.

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Bat Masterson lived to age 66, was married for nearly 30 years and enjoyed a much more peaceful life in his later years than Holliday ever had. Masterson’s reputation as a lawman who shot men down in cold blood was grossly exaggerated. He killed very few and gave up the life of lawman before he was age 40. One Denver reporter said Masterson had “a muscular build and pleasant face. He is quiet in demeanor and sober in habit. There is no blow or bluff or bullyism about him. He has been known to

Bat Masterson. Colorado Historical Society.


Colorado Crosswords By Tony Donovan

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The solution is for you to go to the investment. Don’t be afraid. And don’t call yourself a “moron.” You’re just not informed. That’s a condition you can change quite easily. All it takes is a little effort.

66. D-Day craft, for short 67. Understand? 68. Plumber’s tool DOWN 2. City in Saudi Arabia where Muhammad was first accepted as the supreme Prophet and now the site of his tomb 3. Letters on a perfume bottle 4. It’s found on the “plus” side of the ledger 5. Fix the roof, maybe 6. Prefix with angle or cycle 7. Weld County town west of I-25 8. Type of mind which houses the Devil’s Workshop, according to lore 9. Playground retort to “Am not!” 10. Supports the original motion according to parliamentary procedure 11. Twenty years 12. Request to a blackjack dealer but not a boxer 16. A no-no in a hospital area or library 17. Abbreviation on a map 22. In a movie title, at least, a gentleman might prefer one 24. Town on the Colorado River between New Castle and Rifle 25. Otero County town on the #51 across whose name means “the junction” 27. Steve Fairchild’s team 30. When said three times, a movie of WW II 31. Something acted upon without much consideration 33. The Sea separates Greece and Turkey 34. Part of KKK 35. Something shared by actresses Lanchester and Martinelli 37. Weld County locale on Hwy. 85 about halfway between Greeley and Cheyenne 39. Sports channel owned by Disney 41. Some Fords 43. The Pyrenees separates this country from France 45. All points in Colorado are downhill from this peak 47. Something not to be raised? (2 wds.) 48. This mountain town is home to the Wheeler Opera House and the Hotel Jerome 50. Company with white and orange vans and trucks with black lettering 52. Soldier wearing gray in the early 1860s (briefly) 53. Boat bottoms 54. Town on U.S. Hwy. 34 between Brush & Yuma 56. Town neighboring #54 down 57. Cold, alpine wind 62. Abbr. on the envelope to a French lady 63. Hawaiian flowers used in lei making: Mauna .

If you want to invest at the lowest possible cost, you’ll have to go to Vanguard, and that will limit you to online investing. If bricks, mortar and people make you feel better, Fidelity and Schwab have offices all around the country. Find one close to you. ________________

Scott Burns is a longtime financial writer for the Dallas Morning News and other papers. 

See Your Best...

MEDICAL SURGICAL

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7 •January 2012 • The Senior Voice

Colorado Crosswords are created exclusively for The Voice by Tony Donovan, who lives in Loveland.

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The smaller the amount a customer is likely to invest—teachers are not big-time investors—the bigger the sales commission has to be to make it possible to retain a sales force. That’s why high-commission products are all that teachers and military personnel are likely to see. It costs a lot to have the investment come to you.

Where do you go to invest at low cost? Here’s a short list: Vanguard, Fidelity, T. Rowe Price, American Century, and Charles Schwab.

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ACROSS 1. Defeat soundly 6. “That’s more than I want to know.” (briefly) 9. Beast of burden 13. Military directive to troops: “At ” 14. Trial lawyers’ ploy following cross examination 15. Revolution 18. Prefix with “friendly” or “terrorism” 19. “Thou” in Paris 20. “ , drink and be merry!” 21. One signing I.O.U.’s 23. Al Jolsen’s specialty: shows 26. Social misfit 28. Morales of La Bamba fame 29. Logan County site south of Sterling on the South Platte 32. Fisherman’s destination near Walden 36. Cooke or Rayburn 38. Originally called Columbia, this mining town was the scene of Butch Cassidy’s first bank robbery in 1884 40. Chief Ouray, for one 42. Chevron and Exxon, say 44. “According to an eye witness, you were the bank just before it was robbed.” 46. Hemingway’s sobriquet 49. Montrose County town founded as a utopian community in 1894 & initially called Cottonwood Camp 51. Bent’s Old Fort was built on the River 55. Move in high society’s circles 58. Stereotypical scream of female encountering a mouse 59. Iceberg part that’s visible 60. Surface measure equal to 100 square meters 61. Gene Fowler’s famous book about the history of the Denver Post. It also refers to the elevation where trees don’t grow and the tundra begins. 64. Moral philosophy which exhibits unselfish concern for others 65. Bird found in the most northern climes in the U.S. and Canada. It feeds by diving under water to catch small fish and amphibians. ANSWERS

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I have been using an investment manager for about 10 years, but I now know he is probably not a good choice since he has front-load investing and management fees that don’t produce what they should. How do I find someone who can help me without charging me big fees? I am a 55-year-old teacher and a moron about investing.

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By Scott Burns Financial Writer

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Loveland Pioneers I

By Peggy Hunt

n the 1800s, the road from Loveland to Estes Park was a wagon trail that did not go up Big Thompson Canyon. It went southwest of Loveland over Bald Mountain and west through a pioneer settlement called Pinewood.

He said roads could never be made through the canyon.

The narrows in Big Thompson

Canyon at that time were impassable. Not until 1905 was a road blasted along the rock ledges of the river.

The postmaster at Pinewood on the early trail was Joseph Heukaufer. He was remembered by Alvin Shields, who carried the mail from Loveland to Pinewood: “Joe was a good jeweler and engraver, and always had the walls lined with crippled clocks and old watches.

“But he was generally too busy to attend to them, as he was

The Pinewood PO and Joe Heukaufer's home. Loveland Public Library.

a lover of nature’s products and loved to ramble over the mountains looking for specimens such as crooked cedar trees, mineral specimens, Indian relics, etc... “All postmasters then were required to send in reports of departure and arrival of mail, but neither Joe nor the mail carrier kept these records strictly accurate as the mail carrier was sometimes delayed in hunting rabbits when the mail was in

transit...

“The oldest citizen here then said roads could never be made through the (Big Thompson) canyon, for even the Indians could not go to the park without making a trail around the south side of the canyon.” In 1905 the road was built up Big Thompson Canyon, bypassing the pioneer settlement of Pinewood; and Joe Heukaufer’s old post office stood silent. 

Alcohol Good for You?

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umerous studies have said moderate alcohol consumption might help avoid heart attacks, but a recent report in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition says that’s not true.

It isn’t moderate drinking that lowers the risk for heart disease; it’s the overall healthy lifestyle of moderate drinkers, said researchers. They tend to have a higher social status, exercise more, and

take care of themselves. They’re also less likely to suffer from depression and other problems that plague non-drinkers and heavy drinkers.

“The relationship between moderate drinking and lower cardiovascular risk is due to confounding factors,” said Dr. Boris Hansel. “That is because moderate drinking is in large part a matter of higher social status.” 

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The Mystery of Mount Alice S

By Lois Hall

everal places in the mountains near Estes Park have interesting stories associated with them.

Mount Alice is one of them. It is located southwest of Longs Peak and stands over 13,000 feet. It was obviously named for a woman, but who? Historians suspect it was one of three woman. Alice Roosevelt, daughter of President Theodore Roosevelt, was the darling of the nation in the early 1900s. Some writers thought the mountain was named for her.

But it was probably named before she was born; and Alice Roosevelt herself said, “I have never heard of Mount Alice, and I don’t think it could have been named for me.” Another possibility was the sweetheart of Rev. Elkanah Lamb, the Estes Park pioneer who arrived in 1871, became the first famous guide on Longs Peak, and built the Longs Peak Inn.

He often talked of a childhood sweetheart named Alice he left in Indiana when he came west. Though he had a wife, in his memoirs he said the girl he left behind “left a shadow over my life which more than 50 years cannot efface.”

Lamb named many mountains and other features in the area, and it is quite possible he named Mount Alice for his sweetheart— probably without the approval of his wife. Another likely candidate was Alice Munroe, a celebrated English actress in the late 1800s who reportedly accompanied the Earl of Dunraven on one of his visits to Estes Park.

Dunraven was married, but his

wife disliked the wild west and never came with him to Estes Park. So he brought other women for himself and his friends. It is possible that he named Mount Alice for that companion. Nearby Jims Grove in Glacier Gorge also had romance associated with it. It was named for Rocky Mountain Jim Nugent, who came here as a fur trapper about 1854 and guided British adventurer

Did he name Mount Alice for his sweetheart? Isabella Bird to the top of Longs Peak in 1873.

Isabella was one of the first women to climb Longs. She wrote about the event and described Jim as “a man any woman could love but no sane woman would marry.”

Mount Alice is behind Longs Peak seen here. The Voice photo. founder Joel Estes.

Mary was a true pioneer, living in the wilds of these mountains with her family, miles from any town or conveniences. She was one of the first settlers to see Estes Park as a primeval wilderness. Lake Agnes, near the northern edge of Rocky Mountain National Park, was named for Agnes Zim-

merman, daughter of Poudre Canyon pioneer John Zimmerman.

In the 1800s, Agnes helped her family establish one of the first homesteads just east of Cameron Pass. She never married and spent her entire life in the beautiful mountains she loved. She and her family often climbed to this high lake near the headwaters of the Colorado River. 

Jim was unusually handsome and charming, she said, except for two things: He was violent when drunk and one side of his face had been disfigured years earlier when he was attacked by a bear. She and Jim spent two nights in the place now called Jims Grove on their way up Longs Peak. She wrote: “It was exciting to lie there with no better shelter than a bower of pines, on a mountain 11,000 feet high, in the very heart of the Rocky Range...hearing sounds of wolves, with shivering stars looking through the fragrant canopy, with arrowy pines for bed-posts and for a night lamp the red flames of a campfire.” Other places associated with woman include Mary’s Lake near Estes Park. It was named in 1861 for Mary Fleming, the wife of Milton Estes, son of Estes Park

9 •January 2012 • The Senior Voice

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Ghost Town of Caribou C

By Peggy Hunt

olorado has many ghost towns that are fun to discover when you’re driving or hiking in the mountains, and they can put you in touch with the state’s colorful past.

Caribou was west of Boulder (five miles west of present-day Nederland) and is still marked on most maps. It was located near the Con-

“Grant was impressed with America’s only pure silver sidewalk.” tinental Divide just east of 12,800-foot Mount Neva in

Caribou in the 1800s. Note poles bracing buildings against wind on right. Colorado Historical Society. such a high, wind-blown place that miners had to prop up their buildings with poles to keep the

wind from blowing them over. In its heyday, it was the richest silver mining area on Colorado’s front range, producing over $20 million worth of ore. In fact, its silver was so plentiful that miners squandered it. They made silver bricks to pave a walkway for President Ulysses S. Grant when he visited Central City in 1873. Grant was impressed with America’s only pure silver sidewalk. The riches at Caribou were discovered in a curious way. A man named Sam Conger was elk hunting there in 1860 and noticed some unusual looking rocks but didn’t realize what they contained. Nine years later, Conger saw similar rocks in Wyoming and was told they were full of silver. He quickly raced back to Colorado and staked a claim, naming the place after the reindeer found in British Columbia because a friend accompanying him had prospected there.

10 •January 2012 • The Senior Voice

It was 1869 when Conger and his five friends hit paydirt. The Caribou Mine alone produced over $8 million worth of silver. By 1871, Caribou had several hotels, stores and houses. It reached its peak in 1875 with 3,000 population but began to decline after several fires destroyed most of the buildings. The weather was so severe that people could barely survive the winters. One man said he had to drive his horses and sleigh through 25-foot snow banks to reach Caribou. When he thought he should be there, he looked up the mountain but couldn’t see a town—until he noticed stovepipes sticking out above the snowdrifts. Hotel guests reported the snow was so deep they had to crawl through the second-story windows to reach their rooms. There may have been some exaggeration in those reports, but probably not much. Caribou was a mean place in winter.


Family Health Guide Breast Cancer Treatment Women who get the quick radiation treatment called brachytherapy have double the risk of needing a mastectomy within five years because of complications or because the tumor came back, said researchers at the University of Texas. Women’s Heart Problems Fewer women than men get lifesaving surgery for heart attacks, said a report from Health Grade researchers who studied more than 5 million health records. Researchers said some doctors need to do a better job of diagnosing and treating women’s heart problems. Artificial Joints Those made with titanium might cause painful inflammation and bone damage from minute titanium particles that flake off during normal wear, said a report in the Journal of Immunology. Weight Loss Products So-called “homeopathic” weight loss products are dangerous and

should not be taken, say FDA officials. Over-the-counter products include HCG Diet Homeopathic Drops; hCG Diet Drops; HCG Fusion 30; and others. Sugar in Cereals Cereals containing very high amounts of sugar include the following, says the Environmental Working Group: Kellogg’s Honey Smacks; Post Golden Crisp; Froot Loops; Quaker Cap’n Crunch; Quaker Oats Oh’s; Smorz; and Apple Jacks. Obesity Screening Medicare now covers obesity screening and counseling to help patients lose weight, said Medicare official Dr. Donald Berwick. Patients do not have to make any copay. Hormone Study Low doses of DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone) might ease women’s menopausal symptoms and improve their sex life, said a report in the journal Climacteric from re-

Tax Money Wasted? By Bill Lambdin taxpayer-funded government agency spent $374,000 to see if inhaling lemon and lavender scents would heal wounds. It spent $406,000 to see if coffee enemas were good treatments for pancreatic cancer. And it spent $666,000 to see if a prayer could heal AIDS. None of those treatments worked. Neither did many others like them. The agency is the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), a little known branch of the National Institutes of Health, according to an investigation by the Chicago Tribune. NCCAM began 12 years ago and so far has spent over $1 billion on such research, which prompted breast cancer researcher Dr. David Gorski to say, “How can we justify wasting money on something like this when there

A

are so many other things that are much more plausible and much more likely to result in real benefit?” Stanford University researcher Dr. Wallace Sampson added, “Some of these treatments were just distinctly made up out of people’s imaginations. We don’t take public money and invest it in projects that are just made up out of people’s imaginations.” But apparently we do. And it doesn’t matter which political party is in control. The real people in control are bureaucrats with creative talents for spending taxpayers’ money. NCCAM director Dr. Josephine Briggs defended the spending by saying the agency has a new “strategic plan” that will focus on natural products and the effects of “mind and body” therapies. That should make everything okay. 

11 •January 2012 • The Senior Voice

searchers at the University of Pisa in Italy. Medicare Enrollment Sign up as soon as you turn age 65 even if you continue working. You might have to pay a higher monthly premium if you wait, say Medicare officials. Type 1 Diabetes A pager-size device that’s worn outside the body and tracks blood sugar with a pump that automatically delivers the right insulin is awaiting FDA approval, says Jeffrey Brewer with the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. This could be a major benefit to some Type 1 diabetics. Pregnant Women They should try to avoid cold and flu medicines because they might harm fetuses and adequate research has not been done on such medicines, said researchers at the University of California. Breast Implants Some made in France are rup-

turing at very high rates, but U.S. officials say they are not sold in America, according to the New York Times. Implants made by Poly Implant Prothese (PIP) have industrial instead of medical silicone and are causing anxiety among European women. Experts don’t know if the ruptures can cause cancer; but French surgeon Laurent Lantieri said, “In case of rupture, you’d have a dangerous quantity of silicone in your body.” Death from Medicines More people die from overdoses of pain killers and other medicines than from car accidents, said a report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Most such deaths are accidental from opioid painkillers. 

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A Historic Hotel often more than just a soft bed. Ladies from “houses” across the street were slipped into the hotel.

F

by Margaret Laybourn

rom its inception in 1911, the Plains Hotel in Cheyenne caused excitement. It was located on the route of the transcontinental highway (now Interstate 80) and was known coast to coast as a fine hostelry. Harry P. Hynds, millionaire owner of oil and diamond mines in Mexico, insisted the road pass near the hotel. Wealthy cattlemen flocked to the hotel where the night life was

Later, when the socialites of Cheyenne began entertaining in the tea rooms, those other ladies were banned from the premises. But a tunnel was built from the hotel to the houses. When Harry Hynds and his vivacious wife, Nell, managed the Plains, there was always excitement. The fabulous Mrs. Vanderbilt was a friend of Nell’s and gave her a large framed portrait of herself. It hung for years in the lobby. When Diamond Jim Brady of New York visited the hotel, he was sporting a diamond that had been implanted in his front tooth. Harry was so impressed with

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this show of wealth that when he went on a business trip, Nell had a diamond put in her front tooth to surprise him. When he returned on a midnight train, Harry was enraged and demanded the dentist come immediately to remove it. People liked to tell stories of Nell’s humble beginnings as a pretty red-haired dancer who caught Harry’s eye. She never forgot her beginnings and was seen weekly in her surrey with baskets of produce from the hotel to give to the poor. Gossip flourished when Nell put a nude bronze in the fine home that Harry built for her. In the first snow storm, she wrapped the statue in red flannel. Fred Cariaso worked as a page boy, walking through the hotel’s

Harry Hynds. Voice file photo.

lobby and mezzanine calling out people’s names for messages. He earned enough in tips to pay his way through college. Stories swirled about the activities at the Plains of politicians, business and professional men— and their wives. You can still see reminders of the hotel’s grandeur. 

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A Colorado History Quiz H

By Lois Hall

ere’s a brief quiz that will let you check your knowledge of Colorado history. Answers appear at the end. A good score is 40% to 50% correct.

1.The first ancient people lived in northern Colorado: (a) 500 years ago. (b) 12,000 years ago. (c) 5,000 years ago.

2.Longs Peak was first climbed by explorer: (a) Stephen Long in 1820. (b) Zebulon Pike in 1806. (c) John Wesley Powell in 1868. 3.Pikes Peak was first climbed by: (a) Zebulon Pike’s group. (b) Stephen Long’s group. (c) Colorado Springs’ first settler. 4.The first Indian tribe in northern Colorado was the: (a) Arapaho. (b) Cheyenne. (c) Ute.

5.Indians here got their first horses from: (a) White settlers. (b) Spaniards. (c) Fur trappers. 6.Some people found gold in Colorado 50 years before the gold rush began in 1859: (a) False. (b) True. 7.Poudre Canyon was a major gold mining area: (a) False. (b) True. 8.The town of Loveland was named for: (a) Its Valentine’s

mailing program. (b) Its first settler. (c) A railroad builder.

9.Settler Joel Estes named Estes Park for himself: (a) False. (b) True.

10.A group of pioneers called the Chicago Colorado Colony settled: (a) Longmont. (b) Greeley. (c) Fort Collins.

11.The first pioneer trail that went through northern Colorado was the: (a) Oregon Trail. (b) Overland Trail. (c) Cherokee Trail.

12.The first explorers in Colorado were: (a) French trappers. (b) Spanish soldiers. (c) Scouts like Kit Carson. 13.The U.S. government explorer who first traveled up Poudre Canyon was: (a) John Charles Fremont. (b) Stephen Long. (c) John Gunnison.

14.Greeley founder Nathan Meeker was killed by: (a) Indians. (b) Outlaws. (c) An accident.

Explorer John Charles Fremont. Colorado Historical Society. 4.(c) Ute. 5.(b) Spaniards. 6.(b) True. 7.(a) False. 8.(c) A railroad builder. 9.(a) False. 10.(a) Longmont. 11.(c) Cherokee Trail. 12.(b)

Spanish soldiers. 13.(a) John Charles Fremont. 14.(a) Indians. 15.(b) False. Wyoming was the first. Colorado was the second. 

Your loving memories, our compassionate guidance.

15.Colorado was the first state in the nation to grant women the right to vote: (a) False. (b) True. ________________

ANSWERS: 1.(b) 12,000 years ago. 2.(c) John Wesley Powell in 1868. 3.(b) Stephen Long’s group.

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Humphrey Bogart By Bill Lambdin he American Film Institute named Humphrey Bogart the greatest male actor of all time. Many people might agree, but his tough-guy image on screen was very different from the young man who was born in 1899 to a well-to-do family and a background of privilege in New York City. His father, Belmont DeForest Bogart, was a successful surgeon. His mother, Maud, was a highly paid commercial illustrator earning $50,000 a year when other people were lucky to earn $5,000 a year. The family of three children lived in a fashionable section of New York City and had a 55acre country place in upstate New York. His mother dressed Humphrey in Little Lord Fauntleroy clothes and often had him pose for

T

pictures she drew. He took a lot of teasing from other boys about his clothes and name “Humphrey.” He attended private schools, including the prestigious Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts; and his parents planned for him to attend Yale. But for some reason—a prank or poor grades maybe—he left Phillips Academy before graduating and joined the U.S. Navy. It was 1918 at the end of World War I, and Bogart loved the Navy:

They never drank the local water, only bourbon. “At eighteen, war was great stuff,” he said, “Paris, French girls, hot damn!” After the Navy, he worked at a small movie studio doing a little screen writing and directing; but he did not excel at those. Eventually he got bit parts in plays and liked acting. He said, “I was born to be indolent, and this was the softest of rackets.” He began to develop his toughguy image, partly by hanging around bars and drinking a lot. He and Spencer Tracy were drinking buddies, along with director John Huston. Bogart’s first big success came on Broadway when he played an escaped killer in “The Petrified Forest” in 1935. Audiences and

critics loved his dry voice and slothful mannerism that fit the character of Duke Mantee perfectly. Bogart then played the same part in the movie with great success. But it typecast him. Toughguy roles in B movies were all he could get for years, and he churned out a movie every two months for Warner Brothers studio. He hated it, especially when he had to play a mad scientist in “The Return of Doctor X” in 1939. “If it had been Jack Warner’s blood, I wouldn’t have minded so much,” Bogart said. “The trouble was they were drinking mine and I was making this stinking movie.” He also disliked the shallow, pretentious people of Hollywood and often spoke his mind to the press about inept directors and actors. That made enemies and prompted some people to view him as a bitter, uninteresting man. But Bogart was far from uninteresting. He enjoyed stimulating conversation and could discuss many subjects. He read the Harvard Law Review. His favorite musical composers were Bach and Debussy. He finally got a leading role he wanted in “The Maltese Falcon,” which allowed him to exhibit his acting talent. He later said of that film, “I don’t have many things I’m proud of...but that’s one.” And then came “Casablanca.”

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Bogart in "The Caine Mutiny."

It won an Oscar for best picture in 1943, and Bogart was nominated for best actor. He didn’t win, but his career took a giant leap. His salary went to $460,000 a year, making him the highest paid actor in the world. But more important, the movie let everyone see what talent he had. The British Film Institute called it “the best film ever made.” Bogart was married four times; the last one endured, to Lauren Bacall. When they met, she was 19 and he was 45. Their first movie together was “To Have and Have Not” in 1945. That year, they were married and later had two children, a son and daughter. While filming “The African Queen” with Katharine Hepburn in Africa, nearly all of the cast suffered from dysentery—except Bogart and director John Huston. They never drank the local water, only bourbon, said some actors. But the drinking and heavy smoking caught up with him. He got cancer of the esophagus and became very ill quickly. Katharine Hepburn remembered the last time she and Spencer Tracy saw him: “Spence patted him on the shoulder and said, ‘Goodnight, Bogie.’ Bogie turned his eyes to Spence very quietly and with a sweet smile covered Spence’s hand with his own and said, ‘Goodbye, Spence.’ Spence’s heart stood still. He understood.” Bogart died in 1957. 


Laughter: Best Medicine The shin bone was designed for finding furniture in the dark. If you lined up all the cars in the world, a California driver would try to pass them.

Forgive your enemy but remember his name. Alcohol does not solve problems, but neither does milk

Some people are alive only because it’s illegal to shoot them.

Two old guys were drinking in a bar. One pointed to two guys and said, “That’s us in ten years.” The other said, “That’s a mirror.” A little boy asked his grandmother how old she was. “I’m 62,” she said. He thought a while and said, “Did you start at one?”

A blonde was flying in an early two-seater airplane with just the pilot. He had a heart attack and died.

She grabbed the microphone and yelled, “Help! Help! My pilot died, and I don’t know how to fly the plane!” A voice came on: “This is the tower. I will talk you through the landing. Just relax. Look at the instrument panel and tell me your height and position.” “I’m five four and in the front seat.” There was a silence, and the voice said, “Repeat after me, ‘Our Father Who art in heaven...’”

From Rodney Dangerfield: My wife is such a bad cook we pray after the meal. The dog begs for Alka-Seltzer. If we leave dental floss in the kitchen, the roaches hang themselves. Her low-fat diet is working. The fat hangs lower every day. A Southern boy would never say: “Duct tape won’t fix that.” “You can’t feed that to the dog.”

“Checkmate.”

A teacher was reading the story of Three Little Pigs to her class and said, “The first little pig was gathering straw for his house and saw a man with a wagon of straw. ‘May I have some straw?’ the little pig asked.” The teacher turned to the class and asked, “What do you think the man said?” Johnny raised his hand and said, “The man said, ‘I’ll be damned, a talking pig!’”

A teenager told his mother, “I lost a contact lens while playing basketball by the driveway, and I can’t find it.” She went out and in five minutes came in with the lens. He said, “How did you do that?” She said, “You were looking for a lens. I was looking for $150.” Alternate meanings for common words submitted for a Washington Post contest:

Balderdash. A rapidly receding hairline. Flabbergasted. Appalled by discovering how much weight one has gained.  Abdicate. To give up all hope of ever having a flat stomach. Negligent. Answering the door wearing only a nightgown. Flatulence. Emergency vehicle that picks up someone who has been run over by a steamroller. 

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15 •January 2012 • The Senior Voice


2012 Tax Planning T

By Kevin Dunnigan Financial Writer

his is a good time to review personal finances.

Should you switch to a Roth between now and the end of 2012? While you can no longer divide the income from a Roth IRA conversion across two years of federal tax returns, converting a traditional IRA to a Roth before 2013 may make sense for another reason: federal taxes might be higher in 2013. Congress extended the Bush-era tax cuts through the end of 2012; that sunset may not be delayed any further.

If you turned 701/2 in 2011, you can postpone your first Required Minimal Distribution (RMD) from a traditional IRA until April 1, 2012. But you would have to take two RMDs in 2012; and both are taxable events—one April 1, 2012 for

2011 taxes and one by December 31, 2012 for 2012 taxes. And remember that failure to make a RMD results in a penalty equal to 50 percent of the RMD amount.

IRA contribution limits won’t increase in 2012. You will be able to contribute up to $5,000 to a Roth or traditional IRA if you are age 49 or younger, and up to $6,000 if you are age 50 and older. Your Modified Adjusted Gross Income may affect how much you can put into a Roth IRA. ________________

Kevin Dunnigan, MBA, is a Certified Financial Planner with Investment Centers of America located at Home State Bank in Loveland, 300 East 29th Street. Phone 970-622-2366; email kevin.dunnigan@investmentcenters.com. 

Myths About ER Visits

I

s it true that hospital emergency rooms are packed with uninsured people and illegal immigrants? Not entirely, says a report from the National Center for Health Statistics. Most emergency room visitors have insurance, and they do not use the ER for routine care. Ninety percent of the visits are for urgent care. One in five people in the United States goes to an emergency room each year, said researchers. ER’s “are experiencing higher patient volume and overcrowding, and patients seeking care are experiencing longer wait times,” said researchers. That is partly because the number of emergency departments across the nation has decreased. It doesn’t seem to matter whether people have a primary care doctor; they still go to the ER the same number of times. 

Alzheimer's Research

H

igh blood pressure not only causes heart attacks and strokes, it might also cause Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, according to reports in the Journal of Clinical Hypertension and the journal Stroke. Researchers say high blood pressure causes scarring in the brain like that observed in Alzheimer’s patients. The scarring occurs in the brain’s “white matter lesions,” nerve fibers that allow brain cells to communicate with each other. Even slightly elevated blood pressure can cause the damage. That’s why some researchers are wondering if the current recommendations for healthy blood pressure (135 over 80) should be lowered—perhaps from systolic 135 to 120 or lower. High blood pressure has long been called a silent disease of the heart, but perhaps it should also be called a disease of the brain. 

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www.theSeniorVoice.net Fort Collins & Loveland (970) 229-9204 • Greeley (970) 227-6062 16 •January 2012 • The Senior Voice

Sylvia Mucklow


January 2012