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VETERAN CASS PHILLIPS | HOLIDAY TREE LIGHTING | HEALTHY EDGE

75 years after Pearl Harbor Survivor Cass Phillips Reflects on That Fateful Day

DECEMBER 2016

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INSIDE

HELPING ON THE HOLIDAYS

MUSICA VERA

The Gift of Giving Through Volunteering

Holidays with a Renaissance Twist

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CONTENTS DECEMBER 2016 • VOL. 17 ISSUE 12

COVER STORY – The USS Arizona Memorial graces our cover this month, in recognition of the 75th Anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Read about one of the Pearl Harbor survivors — Veteran Cass Phillips.

departments 8 12 36

Tapas Community News Charity of the Month

columns 38 41 42

Calendar of Events Theatre Listings Crossword Puzzle

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Embracing Life by Donna Bonnell

24

Tinseltown Talks by Nick Thomas

features 14

Musica Vera Celebrate the Holidays with a Renaissance Twist

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Healthy Edge by Kendra Siler-Marsiglio

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Reading Corner Review by Terri Schlichenmeyer

BY PEGGY MACDONALD

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Helping During the Holidays The Gift of Giving Back Through Volunteering BY TEAL GARTH

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Veteran Cass Phillips In Pearl Harbor Attack, Unarmed Navy Flyer Took Cover But Would Go On Offensive In The Pacific BY MICHAEL STONE

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December 2016

WINNER! Congratulations to the winner from our NOVEMBER 2016 issue…

Dorothy Truhon from Gainesville, Florida

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FROM THE EDITOR œ ALBERT ISAAC

Seasons Greetings Alas, another year has come and gone (nearly) and by this time next year, I will have been the editor here at Tower Publications for over a decade. How is that even possible? Crazy. Seems like I just started. So, Christmas and the New Year are upon us and I have a lot to do, in addition to finishing up this here magazine. When it comes to shopping, I tend to procrastinate and this year is no exception. I was going to make a resolution to stop procrastinating but I keep putting it off. All kidding aside, in the past decade things have really settled down in our household. Two of our three children have grown up and moved out of the house – one all the way to Ohio, of all places. So Christmas, while still joyous, will not be as boisterous as it once was. When I was a youngster, we – my siblings and I – would be up at the crack

of dawn, hounding our parents to let us get out of bed and attack the gifts. Years later it was our children sneaking out of bed early to dive into their bounty. This year, it is highly likely that our 15-year-old will try to sleep till noon on Christmas day. Perhaps we’ll all sleep in. So times are certainly changing, as they always do. One thing that doesn’t change is our commitment to bring you, our readers, some great stories, every month in Senior Times. In this issue we continue with our series on veterans, again focusing on a Pearl Harbor survivor. There are an estimated 2,000 or so survivors thought to be still alive. “They are in their twilight years, so now is the time to honor them and thank them for their service,” said Eileen Martinez, chief of interpretation for the USS Arizona Memorial, according to a recent Washington Post article. My uncle was at Pearl Harbor on that fateful day of December 7, 1941. I didn’t know this until late in his life and, sadly, never got to hear his story before he passed away. I imagine it was amazing. We also have a story about a Gainesville group that plays medieval, Renaissance and Baroque music. Learn all about the group and its upcoming concert. The holidays are a time for giving, and with that in mind we have a feature on Eldercare and its efforts to help people in the community. So, from the Tower family to yours, we wish you a healthy and happy holiday season! s

Published monthly by Tower Publications, Inc.

www.seniortimesmagazine.com PUBLISHER

Charlie Delatorre charlie@towerpublications.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Hank McAfee hank@towerpublications.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Albert Isaac editor@towerpublications.com Fax: 352-416-0175 MANAGING EDITOR

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4400 NW 36th Avenue Gainesville, FL 32606 352-372-5468 352-373-9178 fax The articles printed in Senior Times Magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Tower Publications, Inc. or their editorial staff. Senior Times Magazine endeavors to accept reliable advertising; however, we can not be held responsible by the public for advertising claims. Senior Times Magazine reserves the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisement. If you would like to discontinue receiving Senior Times Magazine please call 352-372-5468 for assistance. © 2016 Tower Publications, Inc. All rights reserved.

If you would like us to publicize an event in Alachua or Marion counties, send information by the 13th day of the month prior. All submissions will be reviewed and every effort will be made to run qualified submissions if page space is available.

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CLEAR SOUND AUDIOLOGY WELCOMES DR. JOSEPH SPARKS AND HIS PATIENTS!

STAFF œ CONTRIBUTORS

clockwise from top PEGGY MACDONALD is a native Gainesvillian and the executive director of the Matheson History Museum. She has taught history at Florida Polytechnic, Stetson and UF. She is the author of Marjorie Harris Carr: Defender of Florida’s Environment. peggymacdemos@gmail.com

Dr. Swamy is proud to announce the addition of Dr. Sparks to Clear Sound Audiology. With over 55 years of combined experience, Dr. Swamy and Dr. Sparks offer state of the art hearing technologies individually tailored to your hearing, lifestyle, and budget. Please call today to schedule your complimentary hearing consultation!

TEAL GARTH is a third year journalism major at the University of Florida. She grew up in Pensacola, Florida and loves the beach, traveling, anything pizza- or Netflix-related, and spending time with her family and her two cats. tealgarth@gmail.com

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MICHAEL STONE

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is a journalist, photographer and communications teacher based in Gainesville. His primary topics of focus include health care, conservation and wildlife, and business. He enjoys traveling, wildlife photography and trying all the great vegan dishes at area restaurants. michaelstone428@gmail.com

December 2016

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TAPAS œ DECEMBER

75 YEARS AGO

TODAY Seasons Greetings Sometimes getting caught up in the festivities that surround the holiday season can distract from just how many different celebrations are going on around us. December hosts an array of holidays from Hanukkah, Kwanzaa and Christmas on to Buddhist Bhodi Day and the Pagan celebration of There are about

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different religious holidays in the month of December

ecember 7, 2016, is the 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor Day and another reminder of the respect our veterans have earned. The day after the attack, President D. ent Franklin D Roosevelt gave what is now known as his "Day of Infamy" or "Pearl Harbor" speech, in which he asked Congress to declare war against Japan. A little known fact is that his first draft referred to the attack as “a day which will live in world history.” Roosevelt made a last minute change in his speech to include “A date which will live in infamy.”

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December 2016

Yule on the winter solstice. There are about 14 different religious holidays that fall in the month of December in 2016, celebrated by Christians, Buddhists, Jews, Pagans, Muslims, people of African-American decent, and Zoroastrians.

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Kirk Douglas DECEMBER 9, 1916 Actor Kirk Douglas is known for his distinctive voice, strapping physique, and cleft chin. The son of RussianJewish immigrants, Douglas grew up poor. He worked odd jobs to pay for his college education and to support himself while studying acting at the American Academy of o Dramatic Arts. In the 1950s and '60s, Douglas was one of the most popular leading men in cinema. He went on to critical acclaim in such films as 1952's “The Bad and the Beautiful” and 1956's “Lust for Life.” One of his biggest hits was Years Old 1960's “Spartacus.” Douglas has received many honors, including the Life Achievement Award from f the American Film Institute in 1991. He received an honorary Academy Award in 1996.

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A FEW OTHER NOTABLE

November Birthdays

Connie Francis (78) December 12, 1938

Little Richard (84)

Born Rosa Dolores Alverio on December 11, 1931, in Humacao, Puerto Rico, Rita Moreno is best known as Anita in “West Side Story” in 1961, a role that earned her an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress, making her the first Latina actress to win the honor. She appeared on Broadway and in her first film role in her early teens. She is one of only 12 people to have received the four major entertainment honors — Emmy, Oscar, Tony and Grammy awards.

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85

December 5, 1932

Bob Barker (93) December 12, 1923

Susan Collins (64)

Jimmy Buffet (70)

December 7, 1952

December 25, 1946

“You always have to be able to get up, dust yourself off, and move forward.” — RITA MORENO

Years Old

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Holiday Tree Lighting On Saturday, Dec. 3, the City of Gainesville Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs Department is hosting its annual Holiday Tree Lighting Celebration at the Historic Thomas Center. Gainesville Mayor Lauren Poe will be on hand to welcome citizens, and call for the giant tree to be lit. The free program runs from 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., and light refreshments will be served. The heart of the celebration is the holiday decorations on the giant tree and around the building, which are annually provided by the Thomas Center Associates. Santa Claus takes some time from his busy holiday schedule to visit with the children and listen to their fondest wishes. Visitors can listen to the joyful sounds of holiday music on the hammered dulcimer and autoharp by Jim and Joyce Lillquist of the Gypsy Guerrilla Band along with the

dulcet carols sung by the Singers of the Reformation as well as the Gainesville Harmony Show Chorus. The Gainesville Harmony Show Chorus was just awarded a fifth place medal in the Sweet Adelines International Harmony Classic small chorus competition held in Las Vegas. A highlight of the occasion is the horse-drawn wagon rides provided by the Duckpond Neighborhood Association during the event. Passengers can enjoy rides around the historic Duckpond neighborhood to view the luminaries that are set out each year for the holidays. Prices for the rides are $7 for adults and $3 for children. IF YOU GO… Holiday Tree Lighting Celebration Historic Thomas Center - 302 N.E. 6 Ave. Saturday, December 3 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. seniortimesmagazine.com


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MUSIC OF THE AGES

Musica Vera Celebrate the Holidays with a Renaissance Twist

by Peggy Macdonald

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very Tuesday night a dedicated group of local musicians gathers at the University of Florida Music Building to breathe new life into medieval, Renaissance and Baroque music. While playing, each musician works his or her way through a curious assortment of modern recreations of instruments from centuries past. Hearing music from these early periods is one thing, said John Kitts-Turner, an emeritus professor of music at the University of Florida. “But playing it … it gets into your very soul,” he said after a recent rehearsal in November. Kitts-Turner is the founding director of Musica Vera, a professional early music consort that performs across north central Florida. Some of the musicians are former students of Kitts-Turner. Several have performed with the group — which formed in the late 1980s — for decades. “The thing is when you make music together something happens,” Kitts-Turner explained. “You become not 14 people, you become a single entity.” Like many Musica Vera musicians, Vicki Kitts-Turner worked at the University of Florida before joining the group. She met John Kitts-Turner when she became his student many years ago. “She phoned to say she wanted to take recorder lessons,” Kitts-Turner said. “I said come on down and see me, and she said but I’m not a [UF] student, and I said, ‘Even better, you can pay me.’” John and Vicki became friends over a period of several years before they fell in love and were married. In 2003, Vicki

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retired from her position as Information Technology Training Coordinator after working at UF for 25 years. Kitts-Turner played bassoon with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra for nine seasons before he joined the UF music faculty in 1966. A retired full Colonel of Field Artillery with the United States Army Reserve, he performs with the Gainesville Community Band and arranges music for Musica Vera, at age 85. He said he plans to continue making music for as long as he is ambulatory. “It’s the reason I’m in the shape I’m in at 85,” Kitts-Turner said. “I don’t feel 85. Working on this music keeps me young.” The Musica Vera Consort began as a group of just six musicians.

“We’ll just flip through a book with about 100 tunes in it and play whatever we want.” “I could play every single part,” Kitts-Turner recalled. Now there are 16 instrumentalists in the group plus Kitts-Turner as conductor and director. Before the Musica Vera Consort was formed, Kitts-Turner founded the University of Florida Renaissance Ensemble in the early 1970s. The ensemble played at University Madrigal Dinners and early medieval fairs. The Renaissance Ensemble also became a university course, as did the study of early instruments in Kitts-Turner’s studio. seniortimesmagazine.com


PHOTO BY VICKI KITTS-TURNER The Musica Vera Consort is comprised of professional musicians, including many who have performed with the group for decades. PHOTOS BY PEGGY MACDONALD

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PHOTOS BY PEGGY MACDONALD

Musica Vera employs a variety of instruments from the medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods, including finger cymbals and African rattle (center). John Kitts-Turner (at right) founded the Musica Vera Consort.

Kitts-Turner formed the smaller Musica Vera Consort as he approached retirement. He and the instrumentalists exchange playful banter during rehearsals. They have worked together for so long that they are almost like a family. “It’s just a really special group,” said Nina Kaharl, whose instruments include a viola da gamba topped with a carved head named Amelia. Kaharl started playing with the Musica Vera Consort when a colleague invited her to join the group almost 20 years ago. “Most of us are townies,” she said. “Most of us are employed by the university in one capacity or another.” Kaharl works at the UF Foundation. Each year the Musica Vera Consort plays several 30-minute sets at the Hoggetowne Medieval Faire. It is one of the high-

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December 2016

lights of the year for the group. “Talk about fun,” Kitts-Turner said. “We’ll just flip through a book with about 100 tunes in it and play whatever we want.” The members of the Musica Vera Consort don colorful costumes at performance time. One thing that differentiates a Musica Vera performance from other small orchestra concerts is that each woodwind and string player changes instruments throughout the performance, sometimes within the same piece. The musicians also demonstrate the different instruments during the concert. Many of the instruments are unrecognizable and have uncommon names such as the krummhorn, shawm, rackett, gemshorn, sordune and kortholt. Two instruments that resemble trombones are actually ancestors of the modern trombone called sackbutts, according to Kitts-Turner. The name is seniortimesmagazine.com


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COLUMN œ DONNA BONNELL

Embracing Life The Golden Girls

W

ith each passing year, I reflect on my past and plan how to embrace life more fully in the future. As the decades have elapsed, my ambitions and anxieties have evolved. Yet, elements essential to happiness have remained the same. Faith, family and friendships laid the foundation (and later became the glue) that held me up during tumultuous times. The older I get, the more golden these invisible intangible factors become. All three components contributed to an impromptu visit to celebrate my sister’s 60th birthday. After surviving an excruciating epoch, she needed funfilled down time. Her prayers were answered when a spontaneous retreat took place in Sebastian. Sandy flew in from Buffalo, Myrna, I drove from Newberry, and Amy joined us from Ormand Beach. By the end of the weekend, we called ourselves the ‘Golden Girls.’ “The Golden Girls” was a television series from 1985 – 1992. It was a seemingly silly sitcom, centered around the lives of four older roommates who lived in Miami. Their shenanigans sometimes centered on sensitive subjects. Primarily, though, the plot highlighted the women’s diverse backgrounds and personalities. In spite of their differences, an inseparable camaraderie developed. Amy, Myrna, Sandy and I had our own special bonding episode. Our real life experience seemed to parallel the funny fictional television show from

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30+ years ago. I am not quite sure who had this revelation. Somehow, however, we were all sitting on one couch visiting with my elderly dad, when the idea seemed to materialize. Since it was Sandy’s birthday, she picked first. Her choice was Dorothy (Beatrice Arthur). Sandy and Dorothy have similar tastes in clothing. On a shopping trip (that weekend) I learned Sandy likes tunics. Similarly, Dorothy wore stylish long shirts. Myrna chose

other for years. Visits are rare, yet we are aware of each other’s emotional, physical and spiritual needs and challenges. The sitcom’s theme song lyrics, written by Andrew Gold, fit us perfectly. “Thank you for being a friend. Traveled down the road and back again. Your heart is true you’re a pal and a confidant.” Nothing changed in our lives when we returned home the following Monday. Yet, our stress levels (at least temporarily) had significantly subsided. I wondered why. Regular readers know I could not end this story without learning the reason(s) we felt better. Research on the subject began. Volumes of information are available, but the study conducted at University of California, Los Angeles, “UCLA Study on Friendship in Women,” best answered my questions. Prior to this this study, it was believed that stress triggered hormones, which signaled the body to either fight or flee. This report revealed that humans also release oxytocin when stressed, which

What came to light that weekend was the importance of finding time to unwind in a safe environment. Sophia (Estelle Getty). Sophia was from Sicily and Myrna from Nicaragua. Of course, very different countries, but both brought their heritage into the mix. Myrna matched Amy with Blanche (Rue McClanahan). Amy, the youngest, sexiest and most fashion-minded of our group seemed to best fit that character. By process of elimination, I became Rose (Betty White). Ironically, Rose and I share two important interests — Girl Scout Leadership and storytelling. Obviously, none of that mattered. Strangely, however, it allowed us to act innocently foolish in the roles we briefly assumed. What came to light that weekend was the importance of finding time to unwind in a safe environment, without ridicule or unsolicited advice. It was especially comforting because we had known each

buffers the fight or flight response. In addition, men produce high testosterone levels, reducing oxytocin’s calming effects. Estrogen, produced by women, enhances its sedative element. Furthermore, when women befriend each other their bodies release even more oxytocin. An abundance of oxytocin was released during our Golden Girls weekend, which explains the euphoric results. Friends are not only good for the soul, but a key factor in maintaining happiness in our Senior years. Embracing meaningful friendships will remain high on my 2017 priority list! s Donna Bonnell is a freelance writer who moved to Newberry in 1983. She enjoys living and working in the town she now calls home. dbnewberry@aol.com

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‘TIS THE SEASON

Helping During the Holidays The Gift of Giving Back Through Volunteering

by Teal Garth

E

ldercare of Alachua County is one of the many local organizations that dedicates its time to helping others in the community. Some people, like the ones teaching classes and delivering meals at Eldercare, reap the rewards of volunteering year round, but for a lot of others, the spirit of giving back appears as suddenly as Christmas decorations after Thanksgiving then slowly fades away after the holiday season comes to an end. There’s something about the seasonal festivities that reminds people that there are others in our community that need help, but most people all too often forget that volunteers benefit just as much as those they are helping. Studies have revealed that volunteers showed increased brain functioning, and retired people who volunteered were significantly healthier than those who didn’t. Not to mention the happiness and sense of purpose and fulfillment that comes with knowing you did something meaningful. “I think for the volunteer it becomes just a way to give back to the community,” Eldercare Executive Director Anthony Clarizio said in a recent phone interview. “I think people should volunteer regardless of whether they volunteer with us or not.” Eldercare serves Seniors in Alachua County who are at risk for institutional care by providing services like meals and transportation. Clarizio also said they provide an outlet for socialization through the Senior Recreation Center, which offers an impressive variety of classes ranging from Zumba to Woodcarving and Whittling.

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“It’s mostly retired folks teaching the classes who have some expertise,” Clarizio said, “For example, we have the gentleman who teaches the iPad and iPhone classes. He’s a Senior himself, but he’s very proficient at it.” Clarizio described the Center, which provides hundreds of classes a month and serves thousands of Seniors, as more of a social environment for those who can transport themselves to the events. Other outreach programs, for less able Seniors, include Meals on Wheels and Al’z place. Al’z place is an adult day care for those with neurological deficits, typically Alzheimer’s. It’s one of only three funded at the state level. Meals on Wheels brings meals to homebound Seniors in Alachua County five days a week. According to Eldercare’s website, they deliver about 53,350 meals annually. Along with the meals, the Seniors

“I think people should volunteer regardless of whether they volunteer with us or not.” also receive a well-being check in the form of volunteers getting the chance to see them, speak to them and make sure they’re alright. While the majority of volunteers in the Senior Recreation Center are retired, Clarizio said Meals on Wheels and Al’z Place volunteers are more of a mix including Seniors, students, workseniortimesmagazine.com


A crowd gathers at UF Healthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s holiday drive, where gifts are donated to Eldercareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seniors.

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Two volunteers lend a hand for Eldercare’s Meals on Wheels program. Meals are delivered five days a week on 13 different routes throughout Alachua county.

ing professionals, and musicians — specifically at Al’z place. “There are a lot of musicians that come out there because music is one of those activities that regardless of what stage of dementia or Alzheimer’s the Senior is in, they’re able to recall certain songs from different eras,” Clarizio said. While it’s clear that Eldercare does its fair share of helping throughout the year, holiday initiatives are not to be forgotten. “At the holiday time, almost every organization wants to adopt our Seniors, which is awesome,” Clarizio said. “So, we

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participate with a lot of civic and philanthropic groups who want to find out what our Seniors need.” He said these donations range from clothing to basic household items, such as blankets and sheets. UF Health also does an annual holiday drive where every unit fills boxes with various presents and supplies. Eldercare sorts the items so every Senior receives one of each. In addition to this more generic gift giving, Eldercare also takes inventory of what each Senior needs and then finds people willing to get those specific gifts for them. seniortimesmagazine.com


“I think that’s why we’re here and I think that’s one of the things we can do to try to pay it forward.” Clarizio explained that around the holidays organizations also take Seniors’ pets into consideration and will adopt a pet by donating food, blankets, beds, toys and any other items they may need. In addition to the holiday drive, the Senior Center also offers some seasonal events. Whatever reason people decide to give back, whether they donate presents or their time and make it their full-time job, programs like Eldercare, which provide so much and rely almost completely upon volunteers, are a great reminder of why the act of volunteering is so important. In the case of Eldercare, Clarizio said the fewer volunteers they have, the more staff they have to hire. Hiring staff comes out of their budget, which means not as many resources can be provided for those that depend on them. Even if this isn’t the case for every philanthropic organization, more volunteers will always provide greater potential to help those in need. “I think people should figure out what they like, whether it’s kids or animals or Seniors or whatever it might be, and they should try to figure out a way to do that,” Clarizio said. “I think that’s why we’re here and I think that’s one of the things we can do to try to pay it forward.” s

Season of Giving If you are looking to lend your services to a charitable organization or program other than Eldercare this holiday season, here’s a list of a few that could always use your help:

Salvation Army (Gainesville) St. Francis House Serves Thanksgiving and Christmas meals and runs gift and toy programs, such as Angel Tree and others. 352376-1743

Helping Hands Foundation (Ocala) Collects toys and gifts to children, infants, and the less fortunate. The items are then given for free to families in poverty as well as the homeless that apply. 352-732-4464 352519-5542 (Gainesville)

(Gainesville) Homeless shelter that provides transitional or permanent housing. Services include clothing vouchers, personal tutors, laundry services, bus passes, victim advocacy services, phone access, health services from UF nursing students, life skills classes, food services and case management. 352-378-9079 to volunteer.

The Church of God Deliverer USA (Ocala) Passes out gifts to children. 352-875-4950

Wings of Faith Fellowship Church of God (Ocala) Toys for Tots (Ocala)

Donates gifts to children, clothes, food baskets and other services. 352-687-4600.

The Soup Kitchen at Brothers Keeper (Ocala) Serves free Thanksgiving and Christmas meals to the homeless. 352-629-1292.

The Peace Lutheran Church (Dunnellon) Partners with the Salvation Army in Marion to provide free toys, gifts, meals, and more to low-income families. They have toys for children in addition to a free holiday meal for families. 352-489-5881

Provides free toys and gifts to children and those that are struggling. 352-347-1643

The Marion County Sheriff ’s Office (Ocala) Full participant is holiday toy drives. They collect gifts, coordinate fundraisers, and support low-income families during the holidays. 352-732-8181.

Adopt-a-child For Christmas (Mount Dora) This nonprofit helps provide Christmas toys and gifts to children and families in need because of underemployment, illness, or other hardships. 352-630-0418.

Want to get involved? Contact UF Health: 352265-0360 or visit ufhealth.org/volunteering to learn how to help. Want to reach Eldercare

To learn more about volunteering opportunities, visit www.gainesvillevolunteer.com.

directly? 352-265-9040.

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Tinseltown Talks 50 Years on, “Dark Shadows” still looms large PHOTOS PROVIDED BY KATHRYN LEIGH SCOTT

by Nick Thomas

W

ere you one of those people who dashed home from school in the late ‘60s to catch the latest developments in the fantasy/horror TV serial “Dark Shadows”? When the show first aired on daytime television on June 27, 1966, Kathryn Leigh Scott was among the original cast of the landmark soap opera. Five years and 1,225 episodes later, Scott had left the series, but Lara Parker was on hand for the final episode. The actresses have been attending conventions and reunions all year to commemorate the show’s 50th anniversary. “This year is special and a huge milestone for the show which is still so fondly remembered,” said Scott from Los Angeles. “We have a reunion every year,” said Parker, also from LA. “Around 1,000 fans showed up at the end of June for a convention in New York and it’s amazing the following that the show still generates.” In their twenties and with only stage experience when hired, “Dark Shadows” was the first time in front of a camera for both actresses. Each went on to play multiple characters in the series, which eventually expanded its Gothic romance themes to include time travel and parallel universe plots while incorporating supernatural characters such as witches, ghosts, werewolves and vampires. Shot at ABC’s East Coast Manhattan studio and set in the fictional town of Collinsport, Maine, the show was

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TOP: Kathryn Leigh Scott, David Selby and Lara Parker in 2015 at Lyndhurst (location for two DS films). LEFT: 1966 Cast photo - Kathryn Leigh Scott, in waitress uniform at left, Joan Bennett at right, vampire Jonathan Frid and blond Nancy Barrett with Alexandra Isles, center. Lara Parker (middle) as Angelique and Kathryn Leigh Scott (right) as Josette from Dark Shadows.

initially slow to gain an audience. “That’s when writer Dan Curtis said ‘What the hell, let’s add a vampire’ and the show became a cult hit,” explained

Scott, who initially played diner waitress Maggie Evans and still recalls the first episode. “I was petrified!” she said with a laugh. seniortimesmagazine.com


While Parker and Scott faced the camera as rookies, one veteran Hollywood actress was present throughout the series. “Joan Bennett was our movie star,” Parker said. “She brought a lot of attention to the show.” “She was so beautiful, and with four daughters treated us very motherly,” Scott added. “She really understood camera acting and I picked up a lot of technical things from her.” Scott left “Dark Shadows” in 1970, a few months before the show ended, but overlapped for much of the series with Parker who arrived in late 1967. “I remember our first episode together because we were speaking French,” recalled Scott. “I played Josette, a countess during the flashback sequence to 1795. Lara played my maid, Angélique, who was actually a witch. Both characters loved Barnabas Collins, the vampire character played by Jonathan Frid, and that gave rise to much of the series drama.” “I remember being catatonic with fear on my first day on the set,” Parker said. “But I soon settled down as there was a tight schedule to produce a daily show and a lot to remember.” After “Dark Shadows,” Scott and Parker continued in film, television, and theater. Both also became successful authors, writing about the show. Parker’s fourth book, ‘Heiress of Collinwood,’ came out in November (see www.laraparker.com).

Experience A Gift ... from Heaven

“Thank you so much for doing this as it’s enormouslyy important, p , and if heaven is the the way way we we saw saw it it tonight, tonight, count count me me in!” in!” –Nathaniel –N Natha atha at hani nieell K Kahn, ahn, Ac ah A Academy caaddeem my and and Em an Emmy Emmy my A Awards wardds nom wa nnominated no omi minat naated ted fifil te filmmaker lm mm mak aker e

“I remember being catatonic with fear on my first day on the set.” Scott has written companion guides to the show and published other topics through her publishing house, Pomegranate Press. ‘Dark Shadows: Return to Collinwood,’ written with Jim Pierson, contains behind-the-scenes stories, photos, and an episode guide (see www.kathrynleighscott.com). As the show continues to draw new fans with all episodes now available on DVD, Scott and Parker believe “Dark Shadows” had an enduring influence on later popular culture. “The supernatural element that Dan Curtis introduced was new to daytime TV,” said Scott. “It’s the granddaddy of all the contemporary TV series dealing with the paranormal, vampires and horror.” “The horror of Gothic romance takes place in the anticipation and imagination of the audience, and we gave ours plenty,” Parker added. “Sure, they were over-the-top theatrical stories, but we played them with total believability, and our fans, old and new, still appreciate that.” s Nick Thomas teaches at Auburn University at Montgomery, Ala., and has written features, columns, and interviews for over 600 magazines and newspapers.

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COLUMN œ KENDRA SILER-MARSIGLIO

Healthy Edge When Anxiety Creeps Up on You… And Stays

L

ate-life anxiety has been called the “silent geriatric giant.” It’s difficult to diagnose and often missed. Read on if you are (or a loved one is) excessively worrying or feeling unable to cope with life’s demands. Anxiety disorders in Seniors are two times as prevalent as dementia, and 4-8 times more prevalent than major depressive disorders. Based on National Institute of Mental Health findings, 1-2 out of 10 Seniors have an anxiety disorder and fewer than 20 percent of those seek help. Although anxiety disorders have historically been considered a childhood and early adulthood issue, Seniors are also highly vulnerable. They are most at risk for general anxiety disorder (GAD), which makes up half of the anxiety diagnoses in Seniors. Specific phobias make up 40 percent of the diagnoses. The remaining 10 percent of anxiety disorder diagnoses are attributed to obsessivecompulsive, post-traumatic stress and panic disorders.

What’s the difference between GAD and specific phobias? GAD is characterized by more than six months of worry about life domains (e.g., relationships, finances, and health); difficulty in controlling worrying; and

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associated physical symptoms such as restlessness, fatigue, pain, muscle tension and trouble sleeping. New onset of GAD in Seniors is often related to a depressive disorder. Specific phobias are characterized by persistent irrational fear of an object, activity, or circumstance. The most common phobia amongst Seniors is agoraphobia, the fear and avoidance of places or situations that might cause someone to panic and make him or her feel trapped, helpless or embarrassed. Agoraphobia represents up to 80 percent of new-onset phobia-related anxiety cases in Seniors. The development of agoraphobia often follows a traumatic event such as medical illness, mugging or a fall. The fear of falling (FOF) is also very common; it occurs in 30-77 percent of Seniors who have fallen. Seniors with FOF may become housebound and become depressed. FOF also impedes Seniors ability to rehabilitate after a fall.

• Losses and traumatic events (e.g., major illness or death of a partner or other relative) • Lack of social support • Being female • The presence of other behavioral health conditions such as another anxiety disorder or depression (e.g., 50-97 percent of late-life GAD cases are exacerbations of anxiety disorders experienced earlier in life)

How are anxiety disorders diagnosed in Seniors? According to Geriatric Aging, the following assessment tools (called “scales”) can help an appropriate healthcare professional identify anxiety disorders in Seniors over age 65: • Fear Survey (this screens for panic, phobia, GAD) • Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (Post-traumatic Stress) • Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS)

What are the symptoms of anxiety disorders in Seniors? Anxiety disorders in Seniors are hard to diagnose because Seniors often express the issues physically, such as in the form of pain or fatigue. According to the American Psychiatric Association, anxiety may present as: • Impaired sleep, concentration, attention, and memory • Fatigue • Muscle tension • Agitation or restlessness • Chest and abdominal pain, headaches, and shortness of breath.

What makes Seniors vulnerable to anxiety disorders?

How are anxiety disorders treated in Seniors?

According to the Healthy Aging Research Journal, Seniors are at risk for anxiety disorders for reasons such as: • Disabilities and loss of vitality • Medical conditions and medications

According to Medscape, treatment of anxiety in Seniors can be tricky. Although antidepressants are recommended, they’re not always tolerated. Benzodiazepines (e.g., Xanax©, Librium©, seniortimesmagazine.com


Valium©, Ativan©) are often not a first choice for Seniors because they may increase risks for cognitive impairment and injuries. Cognitive behavioral therapy is often effective, particularly when it’s combined with tolerable medications. If you believe that you are experiencing an anxiety disorder, please let your healthcare professional know how you feel. There’s no reason to continue feeling vulnerable, afraid, or unable to handle day-to-day life. For more information about late-life onset of anxiety disorders, visit NIHSenior Health at: nihseniorhealth.gov/ anxietydisorders/aboutanxietydisorders/01.html. s

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TRIBUTE

Veteran Cass Phillips In Pearl Harbor Attack, Unarmed Navy Flyer Took Cover But Would Go On Offensive In The Pacific Story and photography by Michael Stone In recognition of this month’s 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor, Senior Times is devoting its World War II veteran tributes to survivors of the attack living in Florida. Featured here is Navy Lt. Cmdr. Cass Phillips of Pensacola.

I

t’s the night of Dec. 6, 1941, and Cass Phillips and friend Bruce Smithy are winding down the Saturday evening out with two lady pals. The two men, quite new to adulthood, are Navy radio operators for PBY Catalina seaplanes, which take off and land aquatically and patrol for enemy boats and subs with machine guns, depth charges and bombs. Before taking the women home, they head to a beach near their base on the east side of the island, Naval Air Station Kaneohe Bay. On the sand, maybe 20 yards away, is a group of people of Japanese appearance, celebrating. “They were having a very riotous party out there — a lot of shooting firecrackers, fireworks of all kinds, lot of laughing, lot of talking,” Phillips — 21 then, 96 today — remembered from his Pensacola home. “And it was more than just a casual meeting, we thought.” Indeed, Hawaii is home to a sizeable population of Japa-

nese-Americans, and as tensions between the two countries are at their boiling point, the U.S. military’s top brass fears sabotage. So after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor and other Oahu military installations the next day, Phillips figures the beach party to be of a nefarious origin. “A little bit later, when we got to thinking, we couldn’t help but believe that those people knew that the attack was going to happen the next morning.” On alternative theories to Pearl Harbor, Phillips said he does “see some validity” to the theory of foreknowledge of the attack — from the Japanese, which has been proven with at least one anecdote of a spy, but also from within the U.S. A long-hypothesized theory is that the U.S. — namely President Franklin Roosevelt, who received a memo three days prior that suggested Hawaii as a potential conflict point — knew the attack was coming but let it happen as a reason to enter the war and aid ally nations, especially embattled England. “And I understand that, but the American people didn’t want to go to war,” Phillips said. “Consequently, [after Pearl Harbor] everybody wants to go to war, and they can all act as a group together and do the thing that’s necessary to beat them, which fortunately we did.” But regardless of the backstage workings of the attack — which hits its 75th anniversary this month — Phillips doesn’t remove the significance attached to it and continues to tell his story at schools and other organizations.

“So then we started to realize that someone was attacking us and for real.”

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seniortimesmagazine.com


Cass Phillips outside his Pensacola home. As a seaplane radio operator at Naval Air Station Kaneohe Bay, Phillips endured Japanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s surprise attack on Oahu 75 years ago.

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(Left) Phillips and his wife, Lydia. He’s in his Navy uniform (above) and, posing with a Catalina PBY seaplane crew (below), is second from right in the middle row.

“Special occasions like the attack on Pearl Harbor are significant enough that we need to remember them,” he said, “and we need to remember why they were important to us and what happened and why it happened. And we need to make sure that history stays true.” Phillips’ story of Dec. 7 starts about 7 a.m., when the radioman second class got cleaned up and dressed and headed from his barracks to the base’s exchange for food with Smithy. As they walked, a plane flew in front of them. “It was painted kind of dark green, had what we called meatballs — round red circles — on the side and under the wings,” he recalled, describing the look of a Japanese fighter plane. “The Army had been having maneuvers for a couple of weeks before that, and we were used to that going on. So I commented to

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[Smithy] that they were really making it look realistic.” The two spotted another one, but they didn’t realize the true situation until after arriving at the exchange, where a worker directed them to look out a window toward a hangar. Smoke billowed up from it, and people were running in that direction. “So then we started to realize that someone was attacking us and for real.” Launched from its fleet north of Oahu that morning, Japan’s first of two waves of fighter, bomber and torpedo planes hit the airfields across the island first before striking the ships in the harbor at the island’s south end. Except for the small auxiliary Haleiwa Field, all Oahu airfields — Bellows Field, Ewa Marine Corps Air Station, Ford Island Naval Air Station, Hickam Field, Kaneohe and Wheeler seniortimesmagazine.com


Field — will be attacked by strafing and bombing and will suffer at least one death each. At the sight of the attack, Phillips and Smithy headed toward the hangar. There, they found wounded personnel, a bomb hole in the hangar’s roof, and several damaged or destroyed PBYs (only three — ones that were out on patrol — of the 36 there will be flyable by the attack’s end). Japan’s first swipe at the base had ended, so Phillips helped transport wounded by vehicle to the nearby dispensary and moved the less damaged planes away from burning ones. But then, “someone looked up toward the north,” Phillips remembered, “and they said, ‘Here they come again!’” Kaneohe’s guns that could be wielded by hand weren’t readily accessible, he said, and neither were ground mounts needed to properly fire the PBYs’ large machine guns. “You try to hold it and shoot it and hit anything, forget it, because you can’t hold it steady enough to do that,” Phillips said of using the guns without a stand. But one man, Chief Petty Officer John Finn, found a machine gun on a makeshift mount made of pipes and, in the open, fired until the attack ended. “He stood out there during the entire second attack firing at those planes, being wounded I believe it was 22 times, wouldn’t leave, stayed there, and consequently, he was given the Medal of Honor, which he absolutely deserved,” Phillips said of Finn, whom he knew of but not personally. (Finn, who died in 2010, was the first of the war to receive the U.S.’s highest military honor. Of the 15 who’d eventually receive it for actions at Pearl Harbor, 14 were rescue efforts while Finn’s was the only one for combat.) Not having anything to shoot with himself, Phillips headed for cover in a concrete compartment within the damaged hangar. “Well sure enough, while we were there, they dropped a bomb right in the middle of the hangar again, and it blew,” he said. From his position, Phillips could see a man sitting elsewhere in the hangar when the bomb hit. “He kind of stood up, and then he sat right back down. And he didn’t move anymore,” Phillips recalled. “So after that bomb had gone off and after the whole thing was over … we started checking people. He’s still sitting there and not moving. “So what had happened when that bomb went off, a very, very tiny piece of shrapnel went into his chest directly into his

heart, and he was killed instantly.” The young man was one of 20 people at Kaneohe — and one of 2,403 overall — killed in the attack, which ended by 10 a.m., about two hours after it began. Many others were left with terrible injuries, including a man Phillips tended to before he was taken to a medical facility. “His leg was really torn up, and he couldn’t get comfortable,” Phillips said. “And so he would say, ‘Move my leg,’ and so I would kind of move it. He’d say, ‘Oh, that’s better.’ But almost immediately, it would start hurting again.” All the while, the potential for another attack kept apprehension high. “We thoroughly expected them to come back, and we thought they’d maybe invade,” Phillips said. “But luckily and happily, that did not happen.” In preparation, one person’s snap decision was for everyone at Kaneohe to dip their white clothing in a pot of tea. “What that did was dye them” a brownish color, Phillips said, “and that was supposed to be a camouflage.” He wore his clothes wet the rest of the day. Later, another radioman delivered what he thought to be an important alert. “‘Men, men,’ he says, ‘I’ve sniffed the mist, and it’s gas!’” Phillips remembered. “Well, what it really was was this … fog that forms in the evening out there at certain spots in low areas.” That night, a rainy and cold one, the anxiety didn’t relent, and it led to friendly fire against U.S. forces. Six F4F Wildcat fighter planes from the USS Enterprise — which like the other two aircraft carriers in the Pacific had been out to sea during the attack — were searching for the Japanese fleet. With the loss of daylight and fuel, they were forced to make emergency landings on Ford Island in the harbor, but in the day’s confusion, U.S. forces opened fire. Five of the six planes were shot down, and three of the six pilots died. Maybe two or three days after the attack, Phillips flew aboard one of the few operational PBYs to Ford Island. From up high, he got a full look at the blow delivered to the Pacific Fleet: 16 damaged ships plus three — the battleships Arizona and Oklahoma and the old target ship Utah — struck so badly they’d never return to service.

“He stood out there during the entire second attack firing at those planes, being wounded I believe it was 22 times, wouldn’t leave, stayed there, and consequently, he was given the Medal of Honor, which he absolutely deserved.”

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(Clockwise from top) Phillipsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pearl Harbor Survivors Association shirt and hat. Visitors inside the USS Arizona Memorial in 2015. The World War II Valor in the PaciďŹ c National Monument sign at the entrance at the park at Pearl Harbor. The outside of the USS Arizona Memorial.

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(Top) A statue honoring Chester Nimitz, who commanded U.S. forces in the Pacific, at the entrance of the USS Missouri Memorial at the harbor. (Bottom) Oil still leaks today from the battleship Arizona, which serves as a tomb for those killed in her as well as survivors who later elected to be interred with their shipmates.

“The damage and seeing those ships on their side and on their top — it was really a sorry sight to see and something that made you feel terrible,” Phillips said. They were ships that he’d seen plenty of time in their full glory. In 1938, soon after graduating high school in Riverside, California, Phillips joined the Navy at age 18 and became a radioman aboard the USS Argonne, an old transport and support ship. At some point prior to the attack, the Argonne moved from the States to Pearl Harbor, putting Phillips among the Pacific Fleet’s build-up in Hawaii as Japanese-American tensions grew. But with ambitions for aviation, Phillips requested and received a transfer to join a flight squadron. So he was sent to VP-11 on Ford Island before the squadron moved to Kaneohe. In February 1942, two months after the attack, Phillips was accepted to pilot school and headed to the mainland for training. This likely saved his life, for on April 5, the crew he’d been a radioman for accidentally crashed their PBY amid bad weather into a hillside at Makapu’u Point at Oahu’s southeastern tip. After graduating as a pilot that July, Phillips joined squadron VP-61 and eventually headed for Alaska’s Aleutian Islands, two of which — Attu and Kiska — were held by the Japanese. Along with the duties of strafing, bombing and dropping depth charges on enemy vessels, the PBYs — larger planes with crews of seven to 10 — had the tasks of reconnaissance and landing on water to rescue downed airmen. Another thing Phillips recalls them doing: dropping propaganda leaflets over eastern Asia meant to demoralize the Japanese forces. “Like the [kiri] leaf, which falls at a certain time, the bombs from the United States will come and drop on you,” he remembered one leaflet saying. Phillips said his PBY hit one Japanese ship in the Aleutians with depth charges, immobilizing it until it could be captured by a U.S. boat. The U.S. had the Aleutian Islands fully cleared by August 1943, and Phillips eventually moved on to fighting in the far Pacific, including over waters off the Philippines and New Guinea, where he switched to piloting the similar PBM Mariner. Phillips recalls his plane bombing two ships, which burned up from the blasts, but another incident turned more visibly gory. Patrolling over Philippine waters, the crew came across three rafts carrying maybe eight to 10 Japanese each near December 2016

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Japan-occupied islands. The plane radioed back to base and received orders to strafe the rafts. Phillips’ navigator didn’t want the plane to follow through. “They had a lot of professors and so forth who learned to navigate. He was standing right over my shoulder [and said], ‘Cass, don’t do this. Please don’t do it.’ But I couldn’t listen to him.” “Those people were virtually defenseless,” he added, “but they’re going over toward [a Japanese-controlled island]. And if they get over there, somebody’s going to have to kill ‘em over there or fight them or be killed by them.” So Phillips took the plane in, and the crew opened fire, killing many or all on the rafts before the base ordered the ceasefire, red from blood visible from the plane. He didn’t feel remorse for the ship and raft attacks. “That was our job then,” Phillips said. “You can’t afford to worry about them. That’s your job. War is killing people. That’s all war is — nothing more. If you can kill them faster than they kill you, you’re going to win.” Rotated off the front lines, Phillips was at his parents’ home in California when the war ended. He found out about 3 a.m. from his sister and brother-in-law, who shook him out of bed. “What are you doing in bed? Get out of there,” they said. “Don’t you know the war is over?” He stayed in the Navy as a career officer, remaining stateside during Korea and the beginning of Vietnam and leaving in 1960 as a lieutenant commander. He retired to the Navy-rich city of Pensacola with his wife, Lydia, whom he met as she served in the Navy’s Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service, or WAVES, during the war. Once golf and boats lost their excitement, he got into real estate and operated launderettes before he eventually really

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December 2016

retired. He and Lydia, who haven’t moved in their 56 years in Pensacola, have two children, three grandkids, and four great-greats. In retirement, he became active in the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association, which once had a large Pensacola contingent but is now down to three: Phillips; the battleship Pennsylvania’s Frank Emond, who was the oldest member of the ship’s band at the time of the attack and is now its only living survivor; and Marine William Braddock, who was on duty on Ford Island during the attack. Though members like those in Pensacola stay friends, the association disbanded in 2011 as membership has dwindled

“Anybody who’s been a victim of these sorts of attacks, you want to learn from their living links to these major events.” (the estimated high mark of living survivors is 2,300 from the roughly 84,000 service members there for the attack). “Anybody who’s been a victim of these sorts of attacks, you want to learn from their living links to these major events,” said George Esenwein, a University of Florida associate professor of history who teaches courses on World War II. “And I think we also want to honor them in the sense they had to withstand the pressures of war in ways that most of us never have to.” Those who took part in another great hardship during the war, the invasion of Normandy, somewhat knew the struggles that lay ahead, Esenwein said. “But the people at Pearl Harbor were taken off guard,” he said. “So the victims here were obviously the sailors and others who were in the harbor and who were just completely unaware of this potential threat.” Yet throughout the years, Phillips has never come to consider himself a hero. “They call you one, and they say they think you are,” he said. “But, of course, we who just happened to be there when it happened, we did what we could and what our job was and that was about it. “That doesn’t make you a hero.” While still enshrining the trials of that day, Phillips’ priority has remained on what can be learned from them. “To think that we allowed that to happen — that’s really the bad part is to know that our people who should’ve known, should’ve done something, should’ve had people ready for that didn’t,” he said. “You can’t just forget that.” s seniortimesmagazine.com


AD VERTISEMEN T

Beating the Holiday Blues CARETENDERS HELPS CLIENTS DETERMINE IS IT THE BLUES OR DEPRESSION?

E

veryone feels blue sometimes. The holiday season affects people in a variety of ways. For some it brings about hope and joy, for others it stirs up feelings of loneliness and despair. If you find yourself in the second category, try some of these tips and tricks to beat the holiday blues.

TIPS & TRICKS TO BEAT THE BLUES: Be Realistic – Don’t compare your situation to anyone else. Be kind to yourself and seek support when you need it. Create New Traditions – Life is ever changing. Don’t hold on to the past so tightly that you can’t make your present enjoyable. Help Others – You are never too young, too old, or too financially strapped to help others. A kind word, a genuine smile, or a helping hand can go a long way to change someone’s day – including your own! Grieve – Remember with joy those who are no longer here to celebrate this holiday season with you. Allow yourself time to enjoy, remember, and heal. Forgive – Offering forgiveness to others is a wonderful holiday gift. You will

more than likely find that the gift is one that also benefits you.

“I wondered if my family could manage all the care I needed after leaving the hospital.”

Love – Love everything! From the silly songs to the twinkling lights, find a way to love this holiday season…and most importantly love yourself! For many seniors the ideas above will work. However, when the feelings of sadness and “the blues” don’t go away he or she may be clinically depressed. Identifying depression in older adults is not always easy. Many older Americans grew up in a time where depression was not understood as a biological illness. They may fear being labeled as “difficult” or “weak” when they cannot overcome these feelings. Is your loved one having a hard time finding motivation to get dressed in the morning? Has his or her appetite diminished? Do they appear to have lost the will to live? Are the things that they once looked forward to no longer appealing? If so, Caretenders’ comprehensive behavioral health nursing program might be the answer. Call today if you feel you or your loved one could benefit from help in managing the troubles listed here. Remember, depression is a medical illness that will not simply go away, but it can be managed with the help of Caretenders’ senior advocacy team.

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We feel the best way to find and recognize local charities in our communities is by asking you! The SunState Community Foundation is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization that serves the communities in and around North Central Florida by promoting and facilitating philanthropy. The Foundation was established to promote and provide charitable assistance that contributes towards the development, education and well-being of the communities, areas and residents of Alachua, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, and Levy Counties in Florida. The foundation’s initial goal is to administer and fully fund the award winning Facebook Charity-ofthe-Month program. SunState Federal Credit Union started the program in 2013, but has turned over administration of the program to the foundation, with SunState Federal Credit Union acting only as a sponsor. This has been done in the belief that this path will ensure the program remains a strong and expanding community resource long into the future. The SunState Community Foundation, Inc., provides donors/members opportunities to participate in the furtherance of the foundation’s goals in multiple ways. First, and foremost, the donors/members are providing funds to support the foundation’s charitable initiatives. Donors/members can also nominate groups for the Charity of the Month program, and then vote for the group of their choice. Donors/members are encouraged to participate and vote in the Charity of the Month program. Ultimately, the voters choose where foundation donations go as part of the infrastructure of the program.

SunState Community Foundation, Inc. S PONSORSHIP LEV ELS AVA ILA BLE $

1,000 CHARITY OF THE MONTH SPONSOR

$

Recognized on all 4 Entercom Communication stations, 30 times (120 total); KTK, SKY, WRUF and ESPN.

Recognized on the Charity of the Month Facebook Contest page, KTK’s Facebook page and Senior Times’ Facebook page.

Mentioned in the Charity of the Month page in Senior Times Magazine.

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500 RANDOM CHARITY SPONSOR Recognized on 2 of Entercom Communications stations, 30 times (60 total); WRUF and ESPN Recognized on the Charity of the Month Facebook Contest page, KTK’s Facebook page and Senior Times’ Facebook page. Mentioned in the Charity of the Month page in Senior Times Magazine.

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300 NOMINATOR SPONSOR

Recognized on the Charity of the Month Facebook Contest page, KTK’s Facebook page and Senior Times’ Facebook page.

Mentioned in the Charity of the Month page in Senior Times Magazine.

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100 RANDOM VOTER SPONSOR

Recognized on the Charity of the Month Facebook Contest page.

Mentioned in the Charity of the Month page in Senior Times Magazine

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COMMUNITY PARTNERS >> CHARITY OF THE MONTH

CH A RIT Y OF THE MONTH WINNER S MOST RECENT WINNING ORGANIZATIONS TO NOMINATE A CHARITY OF YOUR CHOICE OR TO VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE NOMINEES, VISIT:

www.facebook.com/SunStateFCU and click on “Charity of the Month”

GetALong Dachshund Rescue OCTOBER WINNER – 3,586 VOTES The October Charity of the Month $1,000 winner, GetALong Dachshund Rescue, is a nonprofit organization working in Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Maryland, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia. It focuses on rescuing abandoned Dachshunds of all ages, rehabilitating Senior Dachshunds or those with medical issues, and finding “forever homes” for all its dogs. The rescue provides a safe foster home for elderly or sick Dachshunds living out their final days, and Dachshunds that were abandoned because they were no longer able to provide healthy puppies to their owners. The Dachshunds come in all shapes and colors, and some are even purebreds. For more information visit the website at www.getalongdachshundrescue.org/.

A project of the SunState Community Foundation, Inc. Presented by SunState Federal Credit Union, Our Town Family of Magazines and Entercom Communications

December 2016 6

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CALENDAR UPCOMING EVENTS IN ALACHUA & MARION

CHRISTMAS TREE LIGHTING & SANTA VISIT Friday, December 2 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. ALACHUA - Downtown Main Street Park and then Theatre Park. 386-418-6100.

ARTWALK GAINESVILLE Friday, December 2

ENGLISH COUNTRY DANCING Mondays

GAINESVILLE HARMONY SHOW CHORUS

6:45pm – 9:00pm GAINESVILLE - United Church of Gainesville. 1624 NW 5th Ave. Come dance to jigs, reels and waltzes. No partner, experience or special dress required. Live music by Hoggetowne Fancy starts at 7:00pm.

Thursdays

SQUARE DANCE CLASS

LADY GAMERS

Tuesdays

Fridays

6:15pm – 7:15pm GAINESVILLE - Westside Park Recreation Building, 1001 NW 34th St. The non-profit community organization teaches square dancing classes for singles, couples and families with children age 10 and up. $5 per class. 352-283-1296. susiemoon@cox.netdance.

1:00pm HIGH SPRINGS - New Century Woman’s Club, 40 NW 1st Ave. The Lady Gamers meet for fun, friendship and food. Everyone is invited. Meet old friends and make some new ones.

PARKINSONS EXERCISE CLASS Tuesday & Friday 9:30am GAINESVILLE - Alachua County Senior Recreation Center, 5701 NW 34th St. A fun and effective exercise class to help those living with Parkinson’s Disease and other balance-related health issues. The event is free. facebook. com/gainesvilleflparkinsonsnetwork.

WEST END LADIES GOLF ASSOCIATION Wednesdays 8:00am – 12:00pm NEWBERRY - West End Golf Club, 12830 W. Newberry Rd. Join the women’s golf league. The cost is $20 annually, $12 to walk or $18 to ride. 352-256-1917.

LINE DANCING Wednesdays 6:00pm – 8:00pm OCALA - Forest Community Center, 777 S. 314A. Join other beginners and improve with in-class instruction. Classes are free. 352-438-2840.

BIRD WALK Wednesdays 8:30am - 11:30am GAINESVILLE - Sweetwater Wetlands Park, 325 SW Williston Rd. Birding field. Trips will be led by volunteers from Alachua Audubon Society. Walks are free, but park admission is $5 per car.

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December 2016

7:00pm – 9:30pm GAINESVILLE - Grace Presbyterian Church, 3146 NW 13th St. For all who are interested in learning and singing women’s a cappella barbershop harmony music. 352-318-1281.

7:00pm - 10:00pm GAINESVILLE - Downtown. This free monthly self-guided tour combines exciting visual art, live performance and events with many local galleries, eateries and businesses participating. www.artwalkgainesville.com.

NATURE WALK Saturday, December 3 8:00am OCALA - Silver Springs State Park, 1425 NE 58th Ave. Learn about native vs. exotic plants, why the park prescribes burning and hope that the wildlife shows up as you walk. 352-236-7148.

COMMUNITY YARD SALE LIVE MUSIC AND WINE

Saturday, December 3

Every Friday and Saturday

37:30am – 2:00pm OCALA - Silver Springs Shores Community/ Youth Center, 590 Silver Rd. Do you have antiques, toys or anything that is cluttering up your home, and want to make some money selling them? Then join others from your community yard sale. 352-438-2810.

8:00pm – 11:30pm OCALA - Ocala Wine Experience, 36 SW 1st Ave. Join them upstairs for live music and enjoy a glass of wine or beer, pizza or cheese plate.

ARTS MARKET Third Saturday 10:00am — 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Soma Art Media Hub LLC, 601 S. Main St. Visit the arts market in Gainesville and support innovative minds of all ages. Join them in connecting with local creatives during this monthly community event.

MEDICAL MILESTONES: TRANSITIONS IN HEALTH AND WELLNESS

HOLIDAY TREE LIGHTING Saturday, December 3 6:00pm – 8:00pm GAINESVILLE - The Historic Thomas Center, 302 NE 6th Ave. The heart of the celebration is the holiday decorations on the giant tree and around the building, which are annually provided by the Thomas Center Associates. 352-334-ARTS.

Through December 6

A SILENT AND LIVE AUCTION

11:00am – 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Matheson History Museum, 513 E. University Ave. Exhibition runs to December 23 and examines Alachua County’s rich healthcare history. The event is free. 352-378-2280.

Saturday, December 3

WINTER WONDERLAND OF WATERFALLS December 1 – February 28 Times Vary GAINESVILLE - The Florida Museum of Natural History, 3215 Hull Rd. View spectacular colored lights in the waterfalls of the Butterfly Rainforest. Daily butterfly releases are held at 2:00pm with additional weekend releases at 3:00pm and 4:00pm, weather permitting. 352-846-2000.

8:00am ALACHUA - Forest Grove Baptist Church, 22575 NW 94th Ave. Silent Auction begins at 8:00am and Live Auction starts at 1:00pm Lunch will be available for purchase at noon. 386-462-3921.

GAINESVILLE BIG BAND Saturday, December 3 7:00pm GAINESVILLE - Depot Park. 200 SW Depot Ave. Conducted by Marco Thomas, the Gainesville Big Band is a jazz ensemble that performs a wide range of big band styles such as traditional swing, dance, Latin, and contemporary jazz.

seniortimesmagazine.com


CANE FESTIVAL Saturday, December 3 9:00am to 3:00pm NEWBERRY - Dudley Farm Historic State Park, 18730 W Newberry Rd. See an original Florida working farm from the post Civil War to the 1940s as they grind sugar cane and boil it into syrup. Old-time demonstrations include woodworking, blacksmithing, washday and butter churning. $8 per vehicle, www.friendsofdudleyfarm.org

WINTER HOLIDAY CONCERT Sunday, December 4 3:00pm GAINESVILLE - Santa Fe College Fine Arts Hall (Bldg FA). Concert by the Gainesville Community Band, directed by Professor R. Gary Langford. $6 donation requested. www.gnvband.org.

HAILE HOMESTEAD HOLIDAYS Sunday, December 4 12:00pm - 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - The Historic Haile Homestead, 8500 SW Archer Rd. Stroll through the 1856 plantation home decked out in an array of traditional greenery and Victorian finery. Watch docents in Victorian costumes and see the Homestead’s famous Talking Walls. Enjoy live holiday music performed by young musicians. Sip some hot cider as you browse a selection of home-baked goodies, and special holiday ornaments. 352-336-9096. hailedocent@yahoo.com.

BACOPA LITERARY REVIEW

Poinsettia Sale December 8 – 9 GAINESVILLE - Fifield Hall, 2550 Hull Rd., greenhouse on campus. Over 5,000 plants and 140 varieties for sale by the UF Environmental Horticulture Club. Proceeds go to the club for educational opportunities. 8:00am - 5:00pm on December 8 and 8:00am – 3:00pm on December 9. Now accepting credit cards. 321-615-0193.

Sunday, December 4 2:30pm - 4:30pm GAINESVILLE - Millhopper Branch Library, 3145 NW 43rd St. The Writers Alliance of Gainesville celebrates the 2016 publication of its Bacopa Literary Review. Bacopa’s editorial board and local writers will read from the journal. Bacopa continues to garner national and international recognition with almost fifteen hundred submissions this year. Copies of Bacopa will be for sale.

AGING WELL: MEETING NUTRITIONAL NEEDS Thursday, December 8 2:30pm – 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Senior Recreation Center, 5701 NW 34th Blvd. Dr. Bobroff leads Extension programs that address prevention and management of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, as well as nutrition and health through the lifecycle. Her work promotes healthy lifestyle choices for active retirees and high-risk older adults to improve nutritional status and quality of life. Presented by PrimeTime Institute. www. primetimeinstitute.org or 352-367-8169.

CANDLELIGHT VISITS Friday, December 9 6:00pm - 9:00pm GAINESVILLE - The Historic Haile Homestead, 8500 SW Archer Rd. See the old Homestead, decked out for the holidays and aglow with candlelight and soft lights. Docents in costume top off the stunning beauty of the 1856 plantation home. $10 donation per person, children under 12 enter free. $7 in advance. Order online via PayPal at www.hailehomestead.org. 352-336-9096.

AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS December 9 - 10 Times Vary GAINESVILLE - First United Methodist Church, 419 NE 1st St. The Gainesville Chamber Singers present this one-act opera that brings the meaning of the holiday season home for all. Join the cast after the performance in singing Christmas carols. Admission: $10 Adults $5 Children. www.GCChorus.

HIGH SPRINGS CHRISTMAS PARADE Saturday, December 10 6:00pm - 9:00pm HIGH SPRINGS - Downtown. Annual Christmas Parade. www.highsprings.com.

ALACHUA CHRISTMAS PARADE Saturday, December 10 2:00pm – 3:00pm ALACHUA - Main Street. Annual Christmas Parade. 386-462-3333.

STOP CHILDREN’S CANCER BENEFIT CONCERT Sunday, December 11 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center, 3201 Hull Rd. A wonderful holiday concert featuring area youth choral and orchestra groups. The tradition continues under the direction of Professor Gary Langford, Conductor for the Alachua County Youth Orchestra.

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LESSONS FROM OUR GENERAL ELECTION Thursday, December 15 2:30pm – 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Senior Recreation Center, 5701 NW 34th Blvd. What can we learn from our recent election and what might the future hold in its wake? Donna Waller, retired Santa Fe College Political Science Professor, will provide her insight (This program topic and title were planned well before November 8th). Presented by PrimeTime Institute. www. primetimeinstitute.org or 352-367-8169.

VOICES RISING COMMUNITY CHORUS Friday, December 16 7:30pm GAINESVILLE - First United Methodist Church, 419 NE 1st St. Voices Rising Community Chorus will present “Winter Holidays in Song” featuring music for Christmas, Hanukkah, Winter Solstice, Kwanzaa, and the New Year. Suggested donation is $5 to $20. www.vrccgainesville.org.

NEWBERRY CHRISTMAS Saturday, December 17

Downtown Countdown Saturday, December 31

9:00pm – 12:30am

GAINESVILLE - Bo Diddley Plaza, 111 E. University Ave. Downtown Gainesville rocks in the New Year with live music. There will be a countdown to midnight, along with the sounds of noisemakers, taking place at the newly renovated Bo Diddley Community Plaza. This event is free. 352-334-ARTS.

ALACHUA COUNTY YOUTH ORCHESTRA WINTER CONCERT

MUSICA VERA CONSORT

Sunday, December 11

7:30pm GAINESVILLE - Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 4225 NW 34th St. Performance featuring an ensemble made up of UF students and local residents. It specializes in the music of the Renaissance and Baroque. They perform upon historical reproductions of the instruments from those time periods.

7:00pm – 8:30pm GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center, 3201 Hull Rd. This is one of two free concerts performed annually for the public by the ACYO. This year’s Winter Concert features classical compositions and holiday favorites: Mozart’s Overture to “The Magic Flute.” Highlights from “Jurassic Park,” “Romeo and Juliet” Overture, Festive Sounds of Hanukkah, A Most Wonderful Christmas, Anderson’s Christmas Festival, and Concert Suite from Polar Express. 352-392-1900.

HOLIDAY RECITAL Monday, December 12 6:30pm GAINESVILLE - Celebration United Methodist Church, 9501 SW Archer Rd. Concert by the Celebration Suzuki Strings and Celebration String Orchestra. Admission is Free.

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Tuesday, December 13

CANCER CONNECTIONS Wednesday, December 14 12:00pm – 1:00pm GAINESVILLE - HealthStreet, 2401 SW Archer Rd. Monthly meeting and networking opportunities for anyone involved in the care or treatment of cancer patients, or provides a service to them. Lunch provided for those who RSVP; $4 donation is requested. Barb Thomas: bnbbarb@ aol.com or www.myhealthstreet.org.

5:00PM – 7:00pm NEWBERRY - Downtown. All ages are welcome. Parade will come out onto Newberry Road and 253rd Street behind Walker’s Produce. The event is free.

HOLIDAY AFFAIR Saturday, December 17 8:00pm GAINESVILLE - Phillips Center, 3201 Hull Rd. Dance Alive National Ballet presents a holiday party with dancing, dining and a memorable fashion show to make this truly an affair to remember. 352-392-2787.

GAINESVILLE PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB Monday, December 19 7:00pm – 9:00pm GAINESVILLE - LifeSouth Community Blood Center, 4039 Newberry Rd. Share photographs and improve your skills. Meets on the third Monday. Located in the rear conference room. gainesvillephotoclub.com. If you would like us to publicize an event in Alachua or Marion counties, send information by the 13th day of the month prior. All submissions will be reviewed and every effort will be made to run qualified submissions if page space is available.

352-373-9178 (fax) or email: events@towerpublications.com

seniortimesmagazine.com


THEATRE

HIGH SPRINGS PLAYHOUSE

Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol

December 2 – 18 Why did Jacob Marley return to warn

Acrosstown Repertory Theatre.....................619 S. Main Street, Gainesville Curtis M. Phillips Center ........................................... 315 Hull Road, Gainesville Fine Arts Hall Theatre - SFC ........................... 3000 NW 83rd St., Gainesville Gainesville Community Playhouse ....... 4039 N.W. 16th Blvd., Gainesville Hippodrome State Theatre................................. 25 SE 2nd Place, Gainesville UF Constans Theatre ................................................. Museum Road, Gainesville McGuire Pavilion Black Box Theatre................ Museum Road, Gainesville Actors’ Warehouse .............................................. 608 N. Main Street, Gainesville Ocala Civic Theatre ..................................4337 East Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala High Springs Playhouse ................................ 130 NE 1st Avenue, High Springs

352-371-1234 352-392-ARTS 352-395-4181 352-376-4949 352-375-4477 352-273-0526 352-392-1653 352-222-3699 352-236-2274 386-454-3525

his business partner, Ebenezer Scrooge, to change his ways? What was in it for him? Enjoy this classic tale of hope and redemption told by Jacob Marley in this irreverent, funny and deeply moving story.

PHILLIPS CENTER

The Nutcracker

December 16 - 18 The Dance Alive National Ballet presents an international roster of

HIPPODROME STATE THEATER

The Ultimate Christmas Show (Abridged)

THE GAINESVILLE COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE

holiday classic.

Little Women

November 25 - December 18

November 25 – December 18

When none of the acts arrive to a scheduled performance at the Annual Holiday Variety Show and Christmas Pageant, three members are pressed into service to perform the entire show and pageant themselves. An irreverent yet heartwarming trip through the holidays, it’s festive, funny, physical and family fun.

Based on Louisa May Alcott’s American classic. Set in Civil War times, follow Meg, the romantic eldest sister, the spirited and tomboyish Jo, sweet and loving Beth and playful Amy as they journey through life filled with personal discovery, heartache, hope, and everlasting love. Filled with adventures real and imagined, the struggle of these Little Women to find their own voices mirrors the growing pains of young America. Little Women is a story of love and family that stands the test of time.

FINE ARTS HALL THEATRE – SFC

Songs for the Season

December 1 The Santa Fe Singers, under the direction of Lynn Sandefur, create an evening of memorable holiday music certain to be a delight for audience members of all ages. Under the direction of SF Faculty member Dr. Steve Bingham, this concert also features a variety of percussion sounds and rhythms, and is sure to be a family holiday tradition.

Holiday at Santa Fe

December 3 Come enjoy a wonderful fun-filled day at Santa Fe College’s Fine Arts Hall! There will be kid-friendly crafts and refreshments in the lobby, a great Holiday musical performance in the theatre and chance to meet Santa Claus after a bit of Winter Wonderland magic. A holiday tradition for the whole family!

award-winning dancers performing a

UF CONSTANS THEATRE

Agbedidi: A Fusion of Traditional African and Contemporary Dance

December 2 - 4 An annual favorite returns to the university and greater Gainesville community. As with last year’s program, Agbedidi will celebrate traditional West African dance together with the postmodern expressions of choreographers of the African Diaspora. A high-energy performance from world-class musicians and an incredible ensemble of dancers will have you wanting to get up and dance.

ACROSSTOWN REPERTORY THEATRE

Gainesville Homegrown Local Playwrights’ Showcase

December 8 - 11 This is the third annual celebration of area playwrights. Previous showcases have included world premiers of staged script readings, and performances. These new plays have the potential to be fully produced as mainstage shows. If you know of an aspiring local playwright, direct them to acrosstown.org to submit their work for consideration.

ARTY: Herschel & the Hanukkah Goblins The Baker’s Dozen, A Saint Nicholas Tale

December 17 - 18 The Acrosstown’s Youthtroupe is sure to delight children of all ages in cheerful adaptations of these timeless and beloved children’s books. Regardless of whatever holiday(s) you celebrate, come celebrate with the Acrosstown! December 2016

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Like our Facebook page to see last month’s correct puzzle and winner!

www.facebook.com/seniortimesmagazine CORRECTLY COMPLETE THE CROSSWORD PUZZLE AND MAIL IT TO US FOR YOUR CHANCE TO $

Win a 50 Gift Card you can use anywhere that accepts Visa! One Prize awarded per month through random drawing of a correct and complete entry. Winners will be contacted by Tower Publications and should receive their prize within 30 days of being chosen. Please do not call or email to request winner information.

Submit completed entries to: Senior Times Mailbag 4400 N.W. 36th Avenue • Gainesville, Florida 32606

Name:

Phone:

Address:

City, State, Zip:

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December 2016

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BOOK REVIEW BY

TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER

And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer BY FREDRIK BACKMAN

Y

c.2016, Atria Books $18.00, 76 pages

ou can’t remember a thing these days. Whatchamacallit’s name doesn’t come quite as easily anymore. You can’t recall the title of that movie you used to love. Thingamabobs are never where you put them last, your glasses are on top of your head and, as in the new novella, “And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer” by Fredrik Backman, your storage square shrinks. Noah didn’t know where he was, exactly. Grandpa didn’t give him a map or compass. That was always part of the game: Grandpa would take Noah somewhere and Noah would figure out how to get them home. But this time, Grandpa forgot and now they were sitting in a round town square, on a bench, surrounded by things that looked faintly familiar to the boy. The old man didn’t know for sure why his forehead was bleeding, and he didn’t think Noah should be sitting next to him on the bench. Everything had gotten smaller, very quickly. It all seemed strange, until he saw the 16-year-old beauty he’d fallen for, 50 years before. He held her hand again, wondering why she left and

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December 2016

whether math could prove that he’d meet her in Heaven, just as he’d hoped. And there they sat, boy and man,

side by side in a round town square that smelled of hyacinths — the kind that Noah’s Grandma used to grow. Noah hated seeing Grandpa so sad, but he knew everything would be all right; he’d yelled for his Dad when Grandpa fell. In

the meantime, he started another game, to distract Grandpa from the confusion. Ted told his father not to take Noah on that rickety old boat, but nobody could ever tell his dad anything; his whole childhood, Ted tried to explain how much words meant but his father insisted that math was more important. Ted supposed it was fitting that Noah loved numbers. The old man always got his way. And things kept getting smaller. Soon, they’d be gone, fluttered and cluttered inside his brain but Grandpa wanted to keep Noah from disappearing. To keep him for last. Forever. Oh, how Grandpa hated goodbyes… Two words for you: Bring. Tissues. Bring a carton of them. That might be enough when you’re reading “And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer.” And yet, here’s the thing: this book isn’t going to make any sense for you the first time, maybe not even the second but you’ll cry just the same. It’s so lightly nuanced, so subtly told in wispy bits of memory that it feels too dream-like to make sense. It’s not clear at first who’s even who here, but when you’ve finished this book and dried your tears, give it another go. Author Fredrik Backman has another phenomenal story for you — you just have to let it sink in. At under 100 pages, this book won’t take long to finish, and it won’t take long to want to share. “And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer” is a thing you’ll remember. s Terri Schlichenmeyer has been reading since she was 3 years old and she never goes anywhere without a book. She lives with her two dogs and 11,000 books.

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December 2016  

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