Issuu on Google+

NOVEMBER NOVE ELLA - TRANSFO ORM YOUR STO ORY IDEA INTO A NOVEL IN 30 DAYS

light, ash of l f n e a sudd space, nning f o k r e begi a h d t d s l d co ral nt, he In the . Its rmitte e t n i o view t n d n i a s ess ink soundl aft bl of his pacecr s A icance f i . n e g g i a s ew of the of a n hovers naware u s th he i a e t d n a d p n ccu . life a sole o kening etween b d re-awa e d s n i e h p s g u n . S awaiti return light, d n a w o n shad betwee

NOVEMBER 2016

seniortimesmagazine.com

INSIDE

VET. DUANE REYELTS

PUTTING PEN TO PAPER

Navy Man Narrowly Escaped USS Oklahoma

Handwritten Letters Rekindle Emotions

1


2

Drs. Art & Kim Mowery

Restoring Smiles in Gainesville for 20 Years • 20 Years’ Experience • Former UF Instructor • One Doctor - One Office • IV Sedation Available • No Part-time Doctors Here • Porcelain Crowns and Veneers • Tooth-colored Fillings • Single-tooth Implants • Implant-Secured Dentures • Thousands of Restorations Completed

Aesthetic

Reconstructive

Implants

4960 Newberry Road, #220, Gainesville (Next to Gainesville Health & Fitness)

(352) 332-6725 ExceptionalDentistry.com Actual Before and After Case Photos of Smiles Restored by Drs. Art and Kim Mowery

2

Drs. Art and Kim Mowery have been featured in:

“Whether your smile needs a little or a lot, we can help!” November 2016

seniortimesmagazine.com


MAKE YOUR NEXT BIG DREAM A REALITY. How would you transform your home with a low-rate HELOC?

BEFORE AFTER

e

Proudly serving our members and our community since 1957

877-786-7828 352-381-5200

www.sunstatefcu.org

SUNSTATE FCU IS FEDERALLY INSURED BY NCUA.

November 2016

3 3


4

20

8

28

30

14

CONTENTS NOVEMBER 2016 • VOL. 17 ISSUE 11

ON THE COVER – Remember the Smith-Corona Galaxie II typewriter from the ’60s? November is Novel Writing Month, so let’s get writing! Shown on the cover is the first paragraph from our editor-in-chief’s second novel, “Utopia Revisited.” PHOTO BY ERICKA WINTERROWD

departments 8 12 39

Tapas Community Page Calendar of Events

43 44 49

Theatre Listings Charity of the Month Crossword Puzzle

columns Enjoying Act Three

19

by Ellis Amburn

Tinseltown Talks

28

by Nick Thomas

features 14

November Novella Transforming Your Story Idea into a Novel in 30 Days BY HAYLI ZUCCOLA

20

Putting Pen to Paper Handwritten Letters Rekindle Emotions, Reveal Surprises BY STEPHANIE RICHARDS

4

November 2016

Embracing Life

38

30

Veteran Duane Reyelts Pearl Harbor Navy Man Narrowly Escaped USS Oklahoma, Went on to Fight Throughout Pacific BY MICHAEL STONE

by Donna Bonnell

50

Reading Corner Review by Terri Schlichenmeyer

WINNER! Congratulations to the winner from our OCTOBER 2016 issue…

Charles Toner from Gainesville, Florida

seniortimesmagazine.com


Your local geico office presents THE INAUGU RAL BEN EFIT EVEN T FOR THE ALACH U A COU N T Y H U MAN E SO C I E T Y

november 10, 2016 woofstock2016.com

Get your tickets today! Thursday, November 10th, 2016 | 6 PM – 10 PM The Barn at Rembert Farms in Alachua, Florida P R E S E N TE D B Y:

| NAYLOR R ASS ASSOCI O ATION SOLUTIONS | NEWBERRY ANIMAL HOSPITAL | ALTA SY SYSTE STEMS | WIND-FM | WUFT-FM/TV /TV BEACH BRE BREAK SALON | BUSBY CABINETS | CAMPBELL SPEL PELLIC LICYY ENGI ENG NEERING | CSI ACADEMY | DENISE MON MONGIA GIARDO RDO, REALTOR/BROKER ASSOCIATE | DOGGIE STYLES ES GROOMING FARM BUREAU INSURA URANCE | GAINESVILLE HEALTH & FITNESS | MELDON LAW | MIDTOWN JEWELRY & LOANS | GAINESVILLE REGIONAL AIRPORT | GAINESVILLE SCE CENE/GAINESVILLE GRUB

For sponsorship information and further details, please call Margot DeConna at 352-415-2460. www.woofstock2016.com November 2016 5 5


6

FROM THE EDITOR œ ALBERT ISAAC Published monthly by Tower Publications, Inc.

www.seniortimesmagazine.com PUBLISHER

Charlie Delatorre charlie@towerpublications.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Hank McAfee hank@towerpublications.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Albert Isaac editor@towerpublications.com Fax: 352-416-0175 MANAGING EDITOR

Novel and Letter Writing Did you know it is National Novel Writing Month? That’s NaNoWrMo for short. Indeed, this is the time of year to take the challenge and knock out that book you’ve been thinking about all these years. I might do it. After all, I only need to commit to 50,000 words in 30 days. What’s that, like 1,700 words per day? Piece of cake! Right? I’m thinking maybe I should write a prequel to my already-published Science Fiction novels. Or maybe I should finally write about my many years working for the Office of the Medical Examiner. I remember the feeling of being in the zone while working on my first novels. When writing, time has no meaning as the thoughts pour from my mind and through my fingertips. There were many nights when I’d look up to see the clock at 3 or 4 a.m. I didn’t want to stop. The story was practically writing itself; fully formed characters appeared seemingly out of nowhere as my imagination ran wild. So perhaps I’ll give this a go. Stay tuned and I’ll give you an update in December (if I do it). In the meantime, read about the Writers Alliance of Gainesville and the NaNoWrMo project, and meet one writer who has taken on the challenge. Along these lines, we also visited with

6

November 2016

Ericka Winterrowd ericka@towerpublications.com

a couple of locals who shared some letters from the past. As we all remember, there was a time before this modern age of instantaneous electronic communication, a time when people would sit down and put pen to paper, stuff it in an envelope and mail it. I have lots of old letters, some written by my great-grandfather! They are fascinating. To be honest, I can’t remember the last time I mailed a letter — I take that back. Recently, I was part of my granddaughter’s Flat Stanley project. This is a writing project for which she sent me a paper cutout of a book character named Flat Stanley. I spent some time with Stanley, bringing him to various events, including some band practices and a couple of concerts. Good times! I also snapped some photos of Stanley, wrote a letter about his adventures, and mailed him back to her school the old-fashioned way — in an envelope with a stamp. Lastly, we continue with our series about World War II veterans with our focus for the next couple of months on survivors of the attack on Pearl Harbor. As always, thank you for reading, and have a wonderful Thanksgiving — and be sure to thank a veteran come November 11! s

CREATIVE DIRECTION + GRAPHIC DESIGN

Hank McAfee, Neil McKinney EDITORIAL INTERNS

Teal Garth Cecilia Lemus ADVERTISING SALES

Visit seniortimesmagazine.com or call: 352-372-5468 For more advertising information including rates, coverage area, distribution and more – call or visit our website at: www.seniortimesmagazine.com MAILING ADDRESS

4400 NW 36th Avenue Gainesville, FL 32606 352-372-5468 352-373-9178 fax The articles printed in Senior Times Magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Tower Publications, Inc. or their editorial staff. Senior Times Magazine endeavors to accept reliable advertising; however, we can not be held responsible by the public for advertising claims. Senior Times Magazine reserves the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisement. If you would like to discontinue receiving Senior Times Magazine please call 352-372-5468 for assistance. © 2016 Tower Publications, Inc. All rights reserved.

If you would like us to publicize an event in Alachua or Marion counties, send information by the 13th day of the month prior. All submissions will be reviewed and every effort will be made to run qualified submissions if page space is available.

352-416-0175 (fax) or email: events@towerpublications.com

seniortimesmagazine.com


STAFF œ CONTRIBUTORS

Art That Connects Heaven and Earth “A Gift for this Planet.” - Georgian veteran journalist Helena Apkhadze

ALL-NEW 2017 SHOW WITH LIVE ORCHESTRA

clockwise from top left MICHAEL STONE is a journalist and photographer focusing now primarily on health care, technology and history, especially World War II. He also teaches in the journalism department at the University of Florida, and in his free time, he enjoys trying all the great vegan dishes at local restaurants. michaelstone428@gmail.com

STEPHANIE RICHARDS is a freelance writer and a native of suburban Chicago. She was the Story Editor for The Sturbridge Times Magazine before recently moving to Newberry from New England. She loves to exercise, volunteer and spend time with her family. sarichards7@gmail.com

HAYLI ZUCCOLA is a New England native who enjoys listening to music and traveling. After graduating high school with her AA degree she got her Bachelor’s in Journalism from the University of Florida. HayzDesigns@yahoo.com

Through The Universal Language of music and dance, Shen Yun weaves a wondrous tapestry of heavenly realms, enchanting dreams, ancient legends, and modern heroic tales, taking you on a journey through 5,000 years of divinely inspired Chinese civilization. Enter a world where the good and the righteous always prevail, and where beauty and purity have never been lost ...

Jan 24-25 Phillips Center, Gainesville

Tickets: ShenYun.com/FL 888.974.3698 Waive ticketing fee,with the code: SYGNV17 (Expires Nov 30, 2016)

November 2016

7 7


8

TAPAS œ NOVEMBER

Turkey Time It seems as soon as November hits everyone has their sights set on the delicious turkey that will come at the end of the month. And according to CNN. com, 91 percent of Americans eat turkey on Thanksgiving, there are four towns named Turkey in the U.S., and the largest turkey ever weighed 86 pounds. To top it all off, Benjamin Franklin wrote in a letter to his daughter that he thought the turkey should be our national bird instead of the bald eagle because it was a “much more respectable bird.” We Americans truly do love our turkey.

What a ird. table b respec

Veterans Day &

Raymond Weeks n! ks Be

Than

91% Of Americans eat turkey on Thanksgiving.

CANCER AWARENESS CA Oc October is known by many as Breast Cancer Aw Awareness Month, but almost every month is designated as the awareness of multiple forms of cancer. November is Lung, Carcinoid, Pancreatic, and Stomach Cancer Awareness Month, as well as National Family Caregiver Month. Na

8

November 2016

The first official celebration on Nov. 11 with the name Veterans Day took place in Birmingham, Alabama in 1947, according to www.va.gov.

Before this date, Veterans Day was known as Armistice Day and was held to honor World War I veterans, until Raymond Weeks, a World War II veteran came up with the idea to expand the holiday’s reach and honor all veterans. Armistice Day officially changed its name to Veterans Day in 1954.

seniortimesmagazine.com


THIS DAY IN HISTORY

Volunteer, Donate, Shop

Nov. 9 1989

“I enjoy the camaraderie at the Attic – we are just like family. As a volunteer, I always feel appreciated, and I have a true sense of accomplishment when I help Attic customers.� -Beanie Brooks, Haven Hospice Attic Volunteer



Shop the Attic for gently used furniture, brand name clothing, collectibles, electronics, books, housewares, antiques, jewelry, toys and more!

For more information on donating or volunteering, visit www.havenhospice.org/attics, call 352.378.7484, or visit the store at 300 NW 8th Avenue in Gainesville.

$OOVDOHVDWWKH+DYHQ+RVSLFH$WWLFEHQHÂżW the programs and services we provide to the patients and families we serve.

20% OFF your purchase

Haven Hospice gratefully thanks you for your kindness and compassion. ServLQJ1RUWK)ORULGDVLQFH/LFHQVHGDVDQRWIRUSURÂżWKRVSLFHVLQFH$ COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE (800-435-7352) WITHIN THE STATE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. HAVEN HOSPICE, REGISTRATION #CH7366.TIN # 59-2490893.

The fall of the Berlin Wall, after dividing Berlin for 28 years. The 27.9-mile wall had been constructed in 1961, separating East and West Berlin. As the Cold War began to thaw across Eastern Europe, the spokesman for East Berlin’s Communist Party announced a change in his city’s relations with the West, according to history.com. “Starting at midnight that day, he said, citizens of the GDR were free to cross the country’s borders. East and West Berliners ocked to the wall, drinking beer and champagne and chanting “Tor auf!â€? (“Open the gate!â€?). At midnight, they ooded through the checkpoints.â€? That weekend, more than 2 million people from East Berlin visited West Berlin to participate in a celebration that was, one journalist wrote, “the greatest street party in the history of the world.â€?

Cannot be combined with other offers. Please present coupon for discount. One coupon per purchase. ST NOV 16

INTRODUCING‌

! – while supplies last th on m y er ev s al de new

EE GIFT CERTIFICATES FR E N O ET G E, N O Y BU STORES! TO THE BEST LOCAL

Kelly’s Kreations gifts & flowers

Leonardo’s pizza

of Millhopper

Sp

VISIT BOGOBARGAIN.COM TODAY!

s Ba ort

ll a r d s r & Bi

BOGO BARGAIN DEALS AVAILABLE IN LIMITED QUANTITIES.

MEMBER OF

November 2016

9 9


10

Roseanne Barr NOVEMBER 3, 1952 Roseanne Barr is an Emmy Award-winning actress and comedian known for her hit sitcom, “Roseanne.” Born in Salt Lake City, Utah, Roseanne Barr started in stand-up comedy before starring in her own hit ABC sitcom, which ran for nine seasons and was pioneering in its break ffrom traditional family show formats. In 2011, she starred in an unscripted show, “Roseanne's Nuts,” about her life on a Hawaiian farm. The show lasted from July to September of that year. Barr won an Emmy Award and also starred in Years Old several films, including “She-Devil” and “Look Who's Talking Too.” In 2012 she ran for President of the United States. She tried for the Green Party's o presidential nomination, but she lost out to Dr. Jill Stein.

64

A FEW OTHER NOTABLE

November Birthdays

Neil Young (71) November 12, 1945

Born November 19, 1942 in Bronx, New York, this fashion designer is known for his line of menswear and womenswear. He studied fashion in New York City and apprenticed for a suit manufacturer. In 1968, he opened his own company. He was initially recognized for suits and coats, but his sportswear line became popular as well. He received three Coty Awards for womenswear. His business now includes clothing, cosmetics, fragrances and home collections.

10

November 2016

74 Years Old

Gary Player (81) November 1, 1935

Condoleezza Rice (62)

Corrine Brown (70)

Dani DeVito (72)

November 11, 1946

November 17, 1944

November 14, 1954

"You don't only worry about the people who hate or resent you; in a way, you're more worried about the people who love you." — CALVIN KLEIN

seniortimesmagazine.com


November 18, 2016 - January 1, 2017 • More than 2 million lights, acres of stunning decor and an ALL-NEW 60ft Christmas tree

• NEW! Breakfast with Charlie Brown™ & Friends

• NEW ICE! theme - 2 million pounds of colorful, hand-carved ice sculptures and slides featuring A Charlie Brown Christmas

• The Elf on the Shelf® Scavenger Hunt

• NEW! Mrs. Claus’ Christmas Traditions and Story Time Sing-a-long

• Cirque Dreams UnWrapped Stage Show • Gingerbread Decorating Corner • Build-A-Bear Workshop® • Alpine Rush Snow Tubing and more! KISSIMMEE, FL

Tickets and Packages on Sale Now!

ChristmasAtGaylordPalms.com

| (407) 586-4423 ICE! PRESENTED BY

PRESENTED BY

PEPSI, PEPSI-COLA and Pepsi Globe are registered trademarks of PepsiCo., Inc. Peanuts © 2016 Peanuts Worldwide LLC. The Elf on the Shelf ® and © CCA and B, LLC. All rights reserved. © & ® Build-A-Bear Workshop, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved. FUJIFILM and INSTAX are trademarks of FUJIFILM Corporation and its affiliates. © 2016 FUJIFILM North America Corporation. All rights reserved.

November 2016

11 11


12

COMMUNITY Ĺ“ DOWNTOWN FESTIVAL & ART SHOW

Art from the Heart The nationally recognized Downtown Festival & Art Show transforms downtown Gainesville into a masterful blend of art, music and entertainment, drawing in a crowd of more than 100,000. Presented by the City of Gainesville Department of Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs, the festival celebrates its 35th anniversary this year. For two days, visitors can leisurely stroll through historic downtown and marvel at works from 240 of the nation’s

most talented artists, who display their original oils and acrylics, vibrant watercolors, captivating sculptures, dazzling jewelry, decorative ceramics and vivid photography. With such a diverse array of unique art displayed for sale and competition, the Downtown Festival & Art Show is a great way to purchase one-of-a-kind art for yourself or a friend. Visitors can meet the exhibiting artists, enjoy live music and sample international cuisine.

Children can create their own art at the Imagination Station, a free hands-on art activity area including sidewalk-chalk drawing, painting, mask design, puppet creation, clay sculpting and interactive entertainment. Music lovers can look forward to continuous live entertainment on four stages by local bands, solo musicians and dance companies. Since its creation, the Downtown Festival & Art Show has risen dramatically in national rankings. Since 1996, it has ranked among the top festivals in the nation and has steadily climbed in recent years, even claiming the No. 14 spot on Sunshine Artist magazine’s “200 Bestâ€? list of top ďŹ ne arts festivals in the nation. The festival weekend will kick off with a free Downtown Blues Concert on Friday, Nov. 4, from 7 to 10 p.m. featuring three blues performances presented by the North Florida Blues Society. Art, food, and entertainment—what more could one ask for? s Visit gainesvilledowntownartfest.org for more information about times and parking arrangements.

Take care of your skin‌ with a board certified specialist Comprehensive Skin Care with Compassion and Professionalism

SKIN CANCERS GENERAL SCREENING THREE LOCATIONS FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE! GAINESVILLE • STARKE • LAKE CITY

)ĆŤ0(!5ĆŤ 5ĆŤ

* ĆŤÄ’ĆŤ.1%/!ĆŤ#!*0ĆŤ #!*0ĆŤ

Ä†Ä€ÄŠÄĄÄ†Ä‚Ä ÄĄÄ…Ä€Ä‚ÄƒĆŤ ĀĂă Robert A. Skidmore, Jr. MD Board Certified Dermatologist

12

November 2016

352-371-7546

333Ä‹.1%/!0%+*.#*%6!.Ä‹+)ĆŤ *%6!.Ä‹+)ĆŤ *!./Ä‹+)ĆŤ )Ä‹0(!5ÄŽ.1%/!(**!./Ä‹+)ĆŤ

seniortimesmagazine.com


FEELING OUT OF STEP? THE ENRGISE STUDY

REDUCING MARKERS OF INFLAMMATION Older adults can have slightly elevated markers of a blood test, with no signs of illness. Research has found that higher r easily getting tired or fatigued.

What can we do about ENRGISE is a research study to look at different ways to reduce the level of these markers in your blood to see if they could help increase mobility.

We will be looking at two • Omega-3, commonly found in • Losartan, a commonly used medication to treat high blood pressure

WE NEED YOU FOR A MOBILITY STUDY! We’re looking for those ages 70 and older who miss the pep in their step. If you are 70 years or older, call us at 352.273.5919 or toll-free at 866.386.7730 to schedule a screening visit.

WWW.ENRGISESTUDY.ORG

Van Dyke General and Implant Dentistry Preventative Care | Cosmetic Dentistry Crowns, Bridges & Implants | Dentures

If you are considering dental implants for your oral health...give us a call!

2 Office Locations: 4960 W. Newberry Rd. Ste 200 Gainesville, FL 32607 40 South Lake Ave Lake Butler, FL 32054

Get the smile you've always wanted. Schedule your next appointment or call us today at 352-377-1781 www.drwkvandyke.com

November 2016

13 13


14

WRITE ON, BUDDY!

November Novella Transforming Your Story Idea into a Novel in 30 Days by Hayli Zuccola

E

ver been enthralled by a really good book and caught yourself thinking, “I could write something like this?” Maybe you were drinking a cup of coffee at work or shopping for groceries and a book idea popped into your head that you knew could end up on the best-seller list. Though the mind is filled with endless imagination and stories, those ideas never seem to leave our thoughts. With excuses of not having enough time or lacking motivation to write, people often procrastinate putting pen to paper because it’s just easier that way. Luckily for those needing a little push, the whole month of November has been set aside just for writing. During those cozy autumn days, the National Novel Writing Month organization, or NaNoWriMo, is encouraging all writers to accept the challenge of writing a 50,000-word novel in just 30 days. Author and editor Wendy Thornton, who is the current digest editor and co-creator of the Writers Alliance of Gainesville, started WAG with Kal

14

November 2016

Rosenberg back in 2009 to provide a place for local writers to come together in a smaller forum with personalized feedback and the chance to hear from various speakers. Recently, Thornton was one of those speakers, and as November approached she

The first thing every NaNoWriMo enthusiast should know is that to reach the goal of 50,000 words by the end of the month one must write around 1,700 words a day. brought attention to the writing challenge created by NaNoWriMo — a national non-profit organization that started in 1999 — by providing advice to local authors who are anticipating seniortimesmagazine.com


November 2016

15 15


16

“It can get stressful when you’re close and you feel like you can’t think anymore.” Writers Wendy Thornton, Kimberley E. Mullins and Pat Caren share their experiences at a recent Writers Alliance of Gainesville meeting.

the annual event. Taking on this novel feat four times herself, it isn’t much of a surprise that Thornton has plenty of suggestions for budding and experienced writers who plan on devoting an entire month to writing. The first thing every NaNoWriMo enthusiast should know is that to reach the goal of 50,000 words by the end of the

16

November 2016

month one must write around 1,700 words a day. Thornton suggests using the excitement and energy that writers have in the beginning of the month to write well over that number. Try squeezing in 2,000 words a day if you can – you will thank yourself on days when writer’s block clouds your inspiration. Thornton notes that while writing that amount each day doesn’t sound like a lot, she advises writing 2,000 words of seniortimesmagazine.com


something in October so you can visually prepare yourself for writing that amount every day in November. If you feel like you want to participate but don’t know where your story will take you, Thornton said that creating an outline can help guide you and your ideas. Although you can certainly stray from the outline and go wherever your imagination may take you, an outline provides a sense of structure and something to fall back on if you feel stuck. Fair warning for those eagerly waiting for November 1st, writing 2,000 words a day may seem easy at first, but that momentum doesn’t last the entire month. It gets even harder when you beg for the words “The End” to appear on your screen only to realize you haven’t even reached the halfway point. “We had a local writer come to one of our meetings and she said she writes 2,000 words a day and sometimes her 2,000 words are ‘I hate this book, I hate this book, I hate this book,’” Thornton said in a recent telephone interview. All joking aside, writing a novel is no easy task especially with such a limited, chaos-inducing timeframe. “It can get stressful when you’re close and you feel like you can’t think anymore,” she said. “By the end of the month you’re a little crazy.” Anyone who has had the experience of living with or being in close-proximity to a writer on a deadline — even if it’s a deadline with no consequences if you don’t finish — knows to steer clear during NaNoWriMo. “My husband would come in the door and say, ‘did you finish yet?’ and I’d say, ‘no’ and he’d sneak back out,” Thornton joked. Because it lasts for an entire month, Thornton admitted that the whole process can consume you even when you aren’t writing. “I was driving sometimes and I’d pull over to the side of the road, I did really pull over, honestly, I’d pull over to the

Renew your skin WITH THE REVOLUTIONARY FRAXEL® LASER.

Non-invasive Fraxel® treatment reverses the signs of aging to reveal smoother, younger skin. Call today for a free consultation.

CLEAR SOUND AUDIOLOGY WELCOMES DR. JOSEPH SPARKS AND HIS PATIENTS!

Dr. Swamy is proud to announce the addition of Dr. Sparks to Clear Sound Audiology. With over 55 years of combined experience, Dr. Swamy and Dr. Sparks offer state of the art hearing technologies individually tailored to your hearing, lifestyle, and budget. Please call today to schedule your complimentary hearing consultation!

352-505-6766 clearsoundaudiology.com 2240 NW 40th Terrace, Suite C • Gainesville, Florida 32605

(352) 333-FACE (3223) YYYICKPGUXKNNGƃFGTOEQO

November 2016

17 17


18

side of the road and write little notes about something that I’ve thought about as I was driving down the road,” she said. Despite the challenge of pushing yourself to stay focused and believing that you can write 50,000 words in 30 days if you set your mind to it, Thornton said the best part of NaNoWriMo is that by the end of it, you actually have a draft for a novel — and it doesn’t have to end there. One of the novels Thornton wrote for last year’s event is being sent out to literary agents at the end of this year. For those still on the fence about joining the entertaining competition or starting a book in general, Thornton has some words of wisdom for you. “Sometimes you have to force yourself to write or you’ll never get anything done,” she said. “If you’re sitting there waiting for inspiration and for whatever reason your inspiration doesn’t come, you’re wasting time.” Thornton also pointed out that if you decide to participate, you have nothing to lose. There are no consequences if you don’t hit the 50,000 mark, but if you do, you have a pretty good first draft to a novel. If you think you’re ready to take on NaNoWriMo, remember you can sign up for free on NaNoWriMo.org to have access to helpful forums for when you need advice or motivation, as well as a place to write every day and track your word count. The Writer’s Alliance of Gainesville also offers different events and workshops throughout the month to help fellow writers so everyone can reach their goal before the clock strikes 12 and December begins. So what are you waiting for? Start writing! s

18

November 2016

Wendy Thornton has taken on the “write a novel in a month” challenge four times. To learn more, visit nanowrimo.org.

seniortimesmagazine.com


COLUMN œ ELLIS AMBURN

Enjoying Act Three Errol Flynn’s Robin Hood

A

favorite movie of many Seniors, The Adventures of Robin Hood represents the epitome of Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland’s achievement as a screen couple who made eight pictures together in the 1930s an early 1940s. That was almost as many as the record nine William Powell and Myrna Loy made with The Thin Man franchise. A heavy drinker, Flynn was partying so hard in 1938 that production manager T.C. Wright told Jack L. Warner, whose studio had decided to make Robin Hood the costliest movie in its history, “Kindly have a talk with Mr. Flynn and tell him to be on time for his call … Also, he is not to be dissipating around and come in to the studio with bags under his eyes, as this is a very expensive picture … Get him straightened out before we go into production.” The Sherwood Forest sequences were filmed on location in 2,400-acre Bidwell Park, northeast of Los Angeles near Chico, California. The picturesque park had huge oaks and sycamores and encompassed the 9-mile-high Chico Canyon and the Big Chico Creek. Shooting took place deep in the woods, and though it was a scene of lush natural beauty, the studio gussied it up with ferns, bushes and plants that had to be removed at the conclusion of filming. While there, the company got shots

of Robin Hood’s camp, the big outdoor feast celebrating the capture of the treasure caravan, and Robin Hood’s initial encounters with Little John, played by Alan Hale, and Friar Tuck, played by short, rotund Eugene Pallette, both destined to be members of his gang of Merry Men, who robbed the rich to feed the poor. In one scene Pallette, despite morbid obesity, had to carry the strapping Flynn across Big Chico Creek on his shoulders. Pallette fell, broke a finger, and caught a cold. It took him days to recover, and by the time he returned to work, Warner had rigged a guide wire to keep him from slipping. When a flu epidemic felled many in the cast and crew, Flynn, who as usual did his own stunts, demanded the icy creek into which he tumbles during his quarterstaff fight with Alan Hale be fitted with a heating system. De Havilland arrived in Chico aboard the Southern Pacific and stepped into a sticky wicket. She and Flynn were in love, but his wife Lili Damita was on the set making sure he wasn’t playing around. Damita posed stiff competition for de Havilland, who put art before love, unlike Damita, who sacrificed her career to give Flynn a gifted son, Sean. Flynn’s problems with women de Havil-

land blamed on his mother, who’d beaten him as a child and locked him in a room. During Robin Hood’s wilderness location shoot, Flynn tried to rape de Havilland but was restrained by his muscular double Jim Fleming, according to de Havilland’s stand-in Ann Robinson. When Robin Hood hit the theatres, critics raved and the box office jingled to the tune of $68,152,056 in profits — an immense figure considering the Great Depression-era admission price of 25 cents. New York Times critic Frank S. Nugent wrote, “A richly produced, bravely bedecked, romantic and colorful show, it leaps boldly to the forefront of this year’s best”—quite a compliment considering that 1938 was the year of You Can’t Take It With You, Jezebel, Alexander’s Ragtime Band, Marie Antoinette, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, and Boys Town. “Maid Marian has the grace to suit Olivia de Havilland,” Nugent added. In a 2003 reassessment, Roger Ebert called Robin Hood “a masterpiece … a triumph of the studio system … Olivia de Havilland was a great beauty … The bond between Robin and Marian stands at the heart of the movie … a textbook on how to get it right.” The American Film Institute included Robin Hood in its top 100 movies and rated Flynn’s Robin No. 18 among the all-time greatest screen characters, between Clint Eastwood’s Dirty Harry and Sidney Poitier’s Virgil Tibbs in In the Heat of the Night, and composer Erich Wolfgang Korngold’s music No. 11 among the best screen scores, between Dimitri Tiomkins’s High Noon and Bernard Herrmann’s Vertigo. s Ellis Amburn is in the Hall of Excellence at TCU’s Schieffer School of Journalism. His 2000 biography of Elizabeth Taylor, “The Most Beautiful Woman in the World,” has recently been reissued by HarperCollins. ellis.amburn@gmail.com

November 2016

19 19


20

LOST ART

Putting Pen to Paper Handwritten Letters Rekindle Emotions, Reveal Surprises story and photography by Stephanie Richards “And then there are the letters in our attic, the cache in a trunk or shoe box that may rewrite our family history. Most letters won’t hold dark secrets, but many will illuminate the shadows; this is how we felt, this is how we thought about things.” — Author Simon Garfield, Wall Street Journal article, “The Lost Art of Letter-Writing” Nov. 15, 2013

I

n an age of instant communication through emails, text messages and Twitter, handwritten letters almost seem to be a thing of the past. But that is exactly what they reveal — the past. They expose feelings and emotions between people, a chronology of what once was, and sometimes, a hidden secret that needs to be lifted from the paper and come out in the open. Two area Seniors share their stories of how handwritten notes have been pivotal in recounting relationships and shedding light on family history. Married for 53 years now, Sharon Traud still reads the letters her husband sent to her when he was in the Navy in the 1960s. She holds the letters as precious reminders of how their relationship flourished through affectionate words he wrote to

20

November 2016

her on pieces of paper. Ironically, Traud’s best friend was dating her future husband but had just broken up with him when he went into the military. She felt sorry that he had to leave his family and go so far away, and began sending him letters. “More than a friendship began to develop and when he came home on leave, we started dating,” Traud said in a phone interview. “He served 2 1/2 years (tour extended because of Cuban crisis) and when he got out, we married six months later.” The letters have played a pivotal role in refreshing her memory of the affection she and her husband found in each other. “At difficult points, I have gone back and read the letters ... they express love so deeply. The sweetness and sincerity of his letters are priceless,” the 73-year-old Alachua resident said. “It is a reminder that we married because we were in love and had a deep connection. We fought for our marriage and never gave up.” In addition to letters from her husband, Traud also has letters that her dad sent to her mom when he was drafted for WWII in the 1940s.


Sharon Traud keeps close to heart letters from her husband and those from her dad to her mom.

November 2016

21 21


22

Alachua resident Sharon Traud has kept letters written by her husband when he was in the Navy in the 1960s. She reads them as a reminder of his deep love for her.

“Myy mom kept the letter letters stashed t h d away in a secretary desk along with those from my older brother, Eddie, who joined the military out of high school. Dad never saw battle as he was discharged because of flat feet. He would refer to my brother as ‘little Eddie’ in his letters,” she said. “I also kept a letter my brother sent to me offering advice when I was going on a senior trip in high school. He told me to ‘watch out for the boys.’”

22

November 2016

Traud’s mom valued handwritten notes up to the end — she was 89 when she passed away. “My mom had a huge basket full of cards and letters. When she would get down and depressed, she would start reading them and look at the handwriting to know whom it was from,” she said. “It greatly saddens me that people don’t write letters anymore. Even short little quips express feelings. It is not just seniortimesmagazine.com


the written words, but the handwriting itself that is personal. That is why you feel an attachment and connection.” For Gary Marshall, handwritten letters from his dad to his mom from 1938 to 1941 uncovered a secret — one unknown it seems only to him. After his mom died in 2009 (his dad died six years earlier), Marshall went back home to the family farm in Virginia in January of the next year. “I knew about the letters but had never read them. I found my mother’s locked up cedar chest, opened it and discovered there were 120 letters,” Marshall said in a phone interview. “I had to first put the letters in sequence and then started to read them. It has been fascinating.” His parents had been high school sweethearts in Carroll County, Virginia. His dad’s family moved to Pennsylvania after he graduated in 1930. Eight years later, his dad’s parents sent him back to live with his grandparents. “My dad looked up my mother and found her in summer school at Radford University. They reconnected on July 4, 1938 — that’s when the letters started,” said Marshall, who now resides in Gainesville. “My mom earned her

Gainesville resident Gary Marshall. INSET: Ray and Kathleen Marshall in 1942.

November 2016

23 23


24

LEFT: Gainesville resident Gary Marshall holds a birth certificate of his half brother. Marshall discovered he had a sibling in love letters his dad wrote to his mom from 1938-41. ABOVE: Gary Marshall’s father, Ray, got repeated use out of this Valentine’s Day card to his wife, Kathleen. BELOW: A Western Union telegram Gary Marshall’s father sent to his mother.

two-year teaching certificate and was teaching, but she was trying to complete the last two years in summer school.” As Marshall read the eighth and ninth letters, he said it became clear his parents decided to date. “I only have my dad’s letters — not my mom’s — so it is only communication from one direction. But my dad tells my mom in his letters about a girlfriend he had back in Pennsylvania who is now pregnant. The letters describe plans for a resolution to that situation, plus life together for them,” he said. “They date through summer and then get together in person at the August meeting picnic in Carroll County. They become secretly engaged — mom was a teacher and back then, teach-

24

November 2016

ers had to be single — and dad says in the letter it was the high point of his life.” The story through the letters reveal a baby boy was born in September of 1938 — Ray Marshall Cunningham. “My dad decides to go back to Pennsylvania to get his old job back and face whatever consequences there were,” Marshall said. “My mom stayed in Virginia and they planned on getting married over Thanksgiving, but it ended up happening over Christmas. That began their lifelong union of 65 years.” With this new revelation that he might have a half brother, Marshall started investigating. He asked an aunt and uncle if there was validity in it, but they had a difference of opinseniortimesmagazine.com


ion. Through a series of other events, Marshall came across a southern gospel group, Kindred Spirits, comprised of five siblings of the Cunningham family. “They were playing in a Christian Coffeehouse when I was back in Pennsylvania and my wife and I stopped by. I told them, ‘I don’t know if you know who I am.’ Right away, the oldest sibling, Steve, responds that he thinks I am his dad’s half brother. After meeting the rest of them, my wife and I worshipped with them on Sunday morning,” said Marshall, who is a retired Presbyterian Minister. “They brought newspaper clips that were in their dad’s possession. One was a picture of a newspaper article announcing my wife and I getting married. So my brother knew about me.” The difficult part of this well-kept secret was that as Mar-

Affordable Dentures–Gainesville, P.A. Stephan M. Showstark, DMD,

Springhill Commons Shopping Center 9200 NW 39th Ave, Ste 200, Gainesville FL No Appointment Necessary

(352) 376-8229

“I don’t regret finding the letters, but I regret never knowing about my $ Full Set Dentures brother, who died before I knew about him.” $105

525 Economy

(D5110, D5120)

Routine Tooth Extraction Per tooth ( D714 0 )

shall continued to inquire about it to other people, it appeared to be common knowledge. “I was raised as an only child and my dad was best man in my wedding. My dad and I were so close and I don’t understand why he didn’t tell me,” said the 72-year-old Marshall. “I suppose it was my mother’s posture not to reveal this aspect of family history — she was a proper person and they had a model marriage. In addition, I think my dad never told me because I was a pastor, preacher, and had a reputation of my own and he tried to protect it.” Marshall penned the story with photos, titled “The Bridal Bridge,” in a quarterly journal of the Carroll County Historical Society and Museum. It included letters and his narrative. “I got a number of phone calls and notes after the journal came out on how touched people were by the story,” Marshall said. “I don’t regret finding the letters, but I regret never knowing about my brother, who died before I knew about him. There wasn’t a paternity test so I can’t prove it, but it doesn’t matter. I embrace this family (my brother’s kids, grandkids) as my own and we are building what my dad never got to enjoy.” s

General Dentist

165

$

SAV E

75

$

Complex Tooth Extraction Per tooth ( D7210 )

t Same- day service* tFive denture levels t FL Medicaid Accepted for Dentures Only t Financing available

SAV E

50

$

SAV E

25

$

PER DENTURE O N

PER DENTURE O N

PER DENTURE O N

U LT I M AT E or U LT R A

PREMIUM

C U S TO M

Complete or Partial Denture

Complete or Partial Denture

Complete or Partial Denture

1-800-DENTURE

®

20107-8

AffordableDentures.com

Offers good only at Affordable Dentures–Gainesville, P. A. Coupon must be presented at time of initial payment and cannot be combined with any other coupons, discounts, package price or prior order. Offer expires 12/30/16 and may change without notice. *Same-day service on Economy Dentures in most cases, call for details. Additional fees may be incurred depending on individual cases. Advertised fees effective through 12/30/16. These are minimum fees and charges may increase depending on the treatment required. THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT.

November 2016

25 25


ELATIONSHIP THAT IS BA A SE SED D ON N TRU RU US ST T, DI DIGN IG GN N IIT T Y, Y, A ND ND DE ED D ICAT I C AT IC AT IO ION N

E

XPERIENCE, EDUCATION, KN KNOW O W LE E DG D G E AN A DS SK K IL I L LS L S O F DO DOCT CT T OR OR RS S OF A UD U D IO I O LO LOGY O

S

ERVICE THAT IS CONSISTENT T AND AN N D BE BEY YO O OND D EX XP P E C TA TATI TION ON NS

P

ERSONALIZED CARE PLAN TA A IL LOR O E ED D TO YO O UR R NE EE E DS D S A ND D BU UD D GET GET GE

E

VIDENCE-BASED REHABILITATII ON O

C

ONVENIENT LOCATIONS AND HOURS S

T

RANSPARENT T P RI RICING I THAT SAVES S YO YOU M MO ON NE EY

4340 NEWBERRY ROAD, SUITE 301 | GAINESVILLE, FL 32607

www.GainesvilleAudiologist.com

The solution you seek with the integrity you expect.

A N N U A L S U N S TAT E F E D E R A L C R E D I T U N I O N

Scramble Cash Prizes!

2016 ALACHUA COUNTY

! . Y! ear DA st y TO t la UP ou GN ld SI t so en Ev

26

R

Championship at

DECEMBER 3

rd

IRONWOOD GOLF COURSE

9:00am shotgun start 2100 NE 39th Ave. • Gainesville, FL 32609 $ 100 per player — All proceeds to benefit:

Noah’s Endeavor For information and additional entry forms, visit www.SunStateFCU.org. You can also contact any SunState FCU manager or call Robert Hart at 386462-1185 with any questions. *See official rules. Cash prizes awarded to randomly drawn teams. To be eligible, team must be paid in full, finish the course and each winning player must be present.

26

November 2016

seniortimesmagazine.com


AD VERTISEMEN T

November is National Home Care Month WHILE HEALTH PROFESSIONALS ARE TRYING TO FIND WAYS TO MAKE HEALTH CARE MORE AFFORDABLE, SENIORS ARE SEEKING WAYS TO MAINTAIN THEIR INDEPENDENCE. BOTH GROUPS ARE FINDING A COMMON SOLUTION – HOME HEALTH CARE.

O

ur goal is to keep Seniors as independent as possible and in their homes for as long as possible, along with keeping them out of the hospital,” said Pamela Morgan, Senior Director of Professional Services with Caretenders of Gainesville. “It’s cheaper for a patient to be seen by a home care nurse once a week for two years than it is for an emergency room visit. Hospitals are looking at how to decrease rehospitalizations, and home care is going to be the big component to doing that.” So what exactly does “home care” encompass? With National Home Care Month upon us, Morgan discussed the many facets of quality in-home care that Caretenders provides. Nursing – Nurses care for wounds, give injections, reconcile and assess medication regime compliance and perform other medical care functions. They also assess the patient’s situation and educate relatives or caregivers. “When you have caregivers suddenly taking care of a family member, they don’t understand the disease process, they don’t understand all the medications,” said Morgan. “We can teach them how to take care of their family member and know what to expect.” Physical and Occupational Therapy – Physical therapists help Seniors regain their strength and maximize their ability to move about,

prevent falls and improve balance. Occupational therapists help with everyday tasks such as bathing, dressing and preparing food. Many elderly patients are not easily able to travel to another therapy location, where their in-home environment is not always replicated. “We can modify things that they can’t when they’re going to an outpatient facility or hospital,” Morgan explained. “We look at their home and, for example, explain how to negotiate stairs.” Speech Therapy – Speech therapists assess and assist patients in regaining or improving communication and swallowing. They can also administer VitalStim, a therapy that uses electronic stimulation along with swallowing exercises to help the patient relearn how to swallow. Speech therapists also provide therapy to teach the patient and caregiver about foods to eat or avoid. Home Health Aide – A home health aide can help a client perform basic tasks like bathing and grooming, making a light meal and changing linens. Medical social workers – These professionals can identify resources and offer counseling and support to patients and caregivers. Finding such help individually would be a monumental task. Caretenders’ ability to assemble such a team quickly is a key component in its quest for Senior Independence.

“I wondered if my family could manage all the care I needed after leaving the hospital.”

A Special Kind of Caring... That’s The Caretenders Tradition A dedicated team of compassionate, highly skilled healthcare professionals who treat their patients like family is our hallmark. • SKILLED NURSING • PHYSICAL THERAPY • OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY • CERTIFIED HOME HEALTH AID • CARDIAC CARE • DIABETIC CARE • ORTHOPEDIC REHAB • UROLOGY CARE • SPEECH THERAPY • OUTPATIENT RECOVERY

Committed To The Highest Quality Home Care Services. SERVING ALACHUA COUNTY AND SURROUNDING AREAS

4923 NW 43rd Street, Suite A Gainesville, Florida 32606

352-379-6217 Call For More Information About How Caretenders Can Help You.

LIC# HHA299991306

November 2016

27 27


28

Tinseltown Talks One of Britain’s Finest: Stephanie Cole by Nick Thomas

A

merican audiences were introduced to British actress Stephanie Cole when she portrayed grumpy, sharpwitted Diana Trent, a resident of the Bayview Retirement Village in the ‘90s sitcom “Waiting for God.” A decade later, Cole was back on U.S. Public Television playing a more congenial matriarchal character in another popular British comedy import, “Doc Martin.” Turning 75 last month, Cole’s current work schedule might be the envy of many actors. “I’m in two popular series (‘Man Down’ and ‘Still Open all Hours’) and do one in the spring and the other in autumn,” said Cole from her home near Bath, west of London. “That gives me time to fit a play in between.” This year, that summer theatrical diversion was a production of “King Lear” at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre (see www. bristololdvic.org.uk). “It’s their 250th anniversary making it the oldest continually working theatre in the British Isles,” Cole said. “For this year’s ‘King Lear’ production they used third-year students in all the roles except for Lear, Gloucester, and the Fool — I played the Fool! But it was very special for me.” Cole began her career at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School in the ‘50s and rubbed shoulders with theater greats such as Laurence Olivier. An encounter at a small comedy theater early in her career was especially memorable.

28

November 2016

TOP: Graham Crowden and Stephanie Cole in Waiting for God ABOVE: Stephanie Cole playing the Fool and full company in the 2016 Bristol Old Vic Theatre production of King Lear. (photo by Simon Annand, provided by the Theatre)

seniortimesmagazine.com


“A gentleman came backstage and wanted to visit someone in the dressing room. I recognized him immediately as John Gielgud. I led him to the room and as I raised my hand to knock on the door preparing to announce him, I turned and asked ‘Who shall I say it is?’ He said ‘It … it’s John Gielgud.’ I said ‘Yes, yes, of course, I’m sorry’ and felt an utter twit, but was so thrilled to be face to face with such a great actor.” In the early ‘80s, Cole’s big TV break came in “Tenko,” a sobering BBC drama that followed the hardships of woman prisoners held in internment camps after the Japanese invasion of Singapore in 1942. “When you’re seen every week in a very popular series it changes your career,” she said. While “Tenko” is less known in the U.S., it was “Waiting for God” that made Cole a household name to Public Television viewers across the country. “I laughed when I first read the script and knew I wanted the part,” Cole said. “I thought it was wonderful to have two elderly characters in the starring roles. Parts for older actors and actresses are often not interesting or their characters are just there to be made fun of.” Cole became a patron of British Age Concern, an organization that offers support and services to Seniors. She also worked with the British Schizophrenia Fellowship, and for all her work was awarded an O.B.E. “I’m not sure if I made an impact,” she said modestly, “but it would be nice if I did.” Beginning in 2004, Cole appeared in the first four seasons of “Doc Martin” playing aunt to star Martin Clunes. The show was filmed on the beautiful Cornwall coast, but Cole’s involvement was bittersweet. “My husband was ill when we filmed the first series and I signed on with the proviso that if he got worse they would immediately release me,” she explained. “Unfortunately, he did and I had to rush back home, but sadly he died. So although I worked with wonderful people in a beautiful setting, the show is not something I look back on with particular joy as it was such a sad and difficult personal time for me.” But there was no hint of trepidation surrounding her October birthday, an anniversary she says means less and less. “After a certain age you don’t feel old in your head, although your body might occasionally remind you!” she said with a laugh. “The passage of time, to coin a phrase, is a matter of complete embuggerance as far as I’m concerned.” s

Best of Gainesville AWARD

The Gainesville Award Program has awarded The Atrium its annual Best of Gainesville Award. RSVP - 352-378-0773 Let us show you our model apartments and join us for a meal.

THE ATRIUM 2431 NW 41st Street Gainesville, Fl 32606

352-378-0773 theatriumatgainesville.com

Nick Thomas teaches at Auburn University at Montgomery, Ala., and has written features, columns, and interviews for over 600 magazines and newspapers.

November 2016

29 29


30

TRIBUTE

Veteran Duane Reyelts Pearl Harbor Navy Man Narrowly Escaped USS Oklahoma, Went on to Fight Throughout Pacific Story and Photography by Michael Stone In recognition of the upcoming 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor, Senior Times is devoting its monthly World War II veteran tributes to survivors of the attack living in Florida. Featured this month is Navy Boatswain Warrant Officer Duane Reyelts of St. Augustine.

D

uane Reyelts is stretched out deeply asleep in his bunk on this fresh Sunday morning, having stayed on duty until 4 a.m. the night before, when an alarming wake-up stings his ears. “All hands, man your battle stations!” the ship’s address system calls. Reyelts has been in the Navy for almost two years, joining soon after graduating from high school in rural Iowa in 1939. But like most everyone at Pearl Harbor, the seaman second class is green when it comes to combat scenarios. He and a bunkmate groggily figure someone has returned to the ship drunk and accidentally pushed the general-quarters alarm. This theory, though, doesn’t last long. “All of a sudden, a bomb hit,” Reyelts, 94, recalls today from his St. Augustine home of the chaos thrust upon his 19-year-old self on Dec. 7, 1941, “and then we knew it was the real thing.” Not even having time to dress, the signalman runs to his battle station on the USS Oklahoma’s second deck in only undershorts, men yelling all around him, his heart pounding. He climbs up the final ladder to his battle station when — Krshoom!

30

November 2016

It feels as though the battleship has been lifted out of the water, and Reyelts is sent swinging around the ladder. But he rights himself and continues. Already at the assigned battle-station compartment are his supervisor, Andy Sauer, and other signalmen — a job whose duties include communicating information to other ships and elsewhere via visual transmission, like flags and Morse code with lights. As anti-aircraft fire booms outside, fear is obvious in the signalmen’s faces. And then — Krshoom! Another torpedo hit to the ship, which again jumps out of the water. She’s now obviously listing, and water can be heard rushing through the bowels below. Still awaiting orders from the bridge, the signalmen finally get them: head to the safety of the better-armored third deck. As Reyelts starts out, he comes face to face with an awful sight: Bob Young, skin and clothing covered in blood. Young had been topside for the morning flag-raising when the attack began, and he got hit by maybe strafing or shrapnel. Young won’t make it, and neither will 428 others on board. By the time Reyelts, Sauer and many others make it to the third deck, the ship is listing about 45 degrees and swiftly sinking to the bottom of the relatively shallow harbor. “Our ship was ready for [an] admiral’s inspection Monday morning, so all the hatches were wide open,” Sauer, now deceased, would remember in a 1990 radio interview. “And that’s why we capsized so fast: because each torpedo would fill those seniortimesmagazine.com


Duane Reyelts, 94, stands in front of his St. Augustine home. As a 19-year-old signalman aboard the battleship USS Oklahoma, Reyelts managed to escape the ship as it rolled over and sank in the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941.

November 2016

31 31


32

Meanwhile, men are screaming in the oiland-debriscovered water around the ship as a small boat zips around to pick them up.

compartments with water.” In the third deck, it’s dark because of losses to power, but one ray of light from a window provides the men with just enough to see. They’re clinging onto one another, trying to stay on the high part of the increasingly vertical compartment. And then, the situation grows drastically worse. The ship reaches such a severe angle that one man loses his grip and slides into the watery and oily darkness that’s now the bottom of the room. And then another man. And another. And another. The orders to abandon ship finally come, and Reyelts and Sauer are one of the first of many to begin moving up the compartment’s ladder to escape. Now above the third deck, the swarm pushes by Reyelts, who at some point loses Sauer but hears someone else say, “This way!” He heads toward the voice but doesn’t spot anyone, so he ends up alone. And this part of the Oklahoma is also dark. And

32

November 2016

gaining a foothold is nearly impossible because of the capsizing. “I was having quite a time,” he says today, “and I couldn’t figure out how I could get out of there.” But holding onto whatever he can, Reyelts presses forward with discovering a way out, and finally, through the door to the nearby sickbay, he spots one: a porthole, larger there than elsewhere on the ship. “I looked up there and saw that porthole,” he recalls. “I said, ‘That looks like the only way out of this thing right now.’” Once he maneuvers through the door, he leans against the wall on the other side — now essentially the floor — and plots if and how he’ll be able to climb through the hole — on what’s now essentially the ceiling. Shaking, Reyelts knows he has one chance and can’t fail because if he does, he’ll fall back through the door and slam into the wall-now-floor of the adjoining compartment. But his strength carries him through: He grabs onto an iron seniortimesmagazine.com


(Clockwise from left) A recovered Japanese aerial torpedo used in the attack on display today at Pearl Harbor. The USS Arizona Memorial, as seen from the battleship USS Missouri, now a permanent museum ship there. A picture of the USS Oklahoma in Reyelts’ home.

bar, swings toward the porthole, does a mighty pull-up, and pops his head, shoulders and full body through. The ship is now totally on its side, and Reyelts is standing on the starboard portion of the hull. The sights — most notably the USS Arizona, which exploded from a bomb hit to its forward magazine and when it’s all over will have lost 1,177 sailors and Marines — are devastating. But the gunfire close to him has ceased, so Reyelts has time to throw a line dangling from what had been the top deck into the porthole for others to escape with. He doesn’t see anyone follow his route, though. “I don’t know how come I was all alone doing that. It seems strange.” Meanwhile, men are screaming in the oil-and-debris-covered water around the ship as a small boat zips around to pick them up. Some of them are burned so badly that their flesh slides off from the grips of their rescuers. In deciding where to go, Reyelts labels two options: the

rescue boat and the nearby USS Maryland, which is still afloat. But Reyelts doesn’t have long to decide, for in the distance, more Japanese planes are making their approach. So he finally dismounts the Oklahoma by taking the long slide into the water, wiping oil from his face once he resurfaces. “The main thing that helped me get off the ship and everything is I followed all the instructions I’d had in case we got into battle and when we had our drills,” he remembers. “And I think that’s exactly how come I got off of the ship OK.” He instantly eliminates the rescue-boat option because it has so many men hanging on its side that it’s rolling and taking on water. So that leaves swimming to the Maryland, and as he makes the tiresome trek, the battleship’s guns are firing at the oncoming planes. Once Reyelts reaches the side of the Maryland, he finds a line to hold onto and rest. He then gives climbing a go, but his oily and wet hands drop him back into the water. November 2016

33 33


34

The USS Missouri at Pearl Harbor today. Between 1895 and 1944, the Navy finished 59 battleships: The Oklahoma was the 39th, and the Missouri was the final one.

The second attempt is also unsuccessful, but the third is a charm thanks to someone spotting him and making the climb shorter by pulling on the other end of the line. Aboard the ship, he joins the others — including several more saved crewmembers from the Oklahoma — in the defense, hopping in a line that’s passing ammo to a 5-inch deck gun. “Everybody was doing their job like it was a drill and not the real thing ‘cause that’s the way we were taught,” he recalls. The Maryland’s position between the Oklahoma and Ford Island shields it from torpedo hits and overall makes it less easy of a target, and it will end up as the least damaged of the eight battleships there.

34

November 2016

Once the attack lets up by 10 a.m., Reyelts is finally able to get a full set of clothes — thanks to whoever left theirs in a wash bucket on the Maryland’s deck. “They were sitting there, and I pulled them out and put them on.” He also gets his first undistracted look around the tragedy that will lead President Franklin Roosevelt to declare Dec. 7 as “a date which will live in infamy.” The tragedy that has killed 2,403 Americans. The tragedy that will launch the U.S. into the greatest armed conflict of all time. There lies the Oklahoma, still now after rolling 135 degrees from eight torpedo hits within the first 10 minutes of the battle and nine total, so badly crippled that it, like the Arizona, seniortimesmagazine.com


The USS Oklahoma memorial at Pearl Harbor was dedicated on Dec. 7, 2007, 66 years to the day after the ship sank from Japanese torpedo hits. The memorial’s 429 marble columns represents all those killed on the ship in the attack.

won’t return to service. The thought of those still trapped inside makes Reyelts sick. Indeed, the stories of sailors entombed alive that will emerge from the attack are hard to consider. Men drowning before their rescuers, who can’t carve out large enough holes in time. Blow torches accidentally igniting

pockets of gas, causing deadly explosions. Three unrescuable crewmembers inside the battleship USS West Virginia eerily banging on walls for what will total 16 days before they finally run out of air. But 32 of the trapped will be successfully rescued from inside the Oklahoma. “Suddenly, I was no longer a boy of [19] but had become a man,” Reyelts wrote of the experience in 1969 in a short autobiographical account, a document that helps fill in his memory’s gaps of an event that will hit its 75th anniversary in December. “There was quite a few lives lost on the ship that didn’t make it,” he recalled from his home, “and I feel very fortunate that I had gotten through it all after that bad attack, especially when you looked around the harbor afterward at all these other ships sunk and burning up. “I felt pretty fortunate.” But Pearl Harbor wouldn’t be the only iconic moment for Reyelts in World War II. November 2016

35 35


36

Without a ship after the attack, the signalman was immediately reassigned to the destroyer USS Dewey. (World War II destroyers were swift boats that protected others by quickly responding to enemy threats: dropping depth charges on submarines, launching antiaircraft fire at planes or shooting at shoreline emplacements.) The Dewey would go on to serve in many of the critical battles and campaigns in the Pacific, including Coral Sea, Midway, Guadalcanal, Saipan, Guam, Iwo Jima and Okinawa. In his autobiographical account, Reyelts wrote that the Dewey fired the first shot — at Japanese torpedo planes — of the Battle of Coral Sea, though this doesn’t appear to be noted in other accounts of the battle. Fought in May 1942, Coral Sea is most remembered for being the first-ever carrier-versus-carrier battle; being the first in which only planes, not ships, saw the opposing ships; and halting Japan’s expansion in the Pacific northeast of Australia. But the U.S. suffered a major loss in the battle: the aircraft carrier USS Lexington, which sunk after being hit by seven bombs and two planelaunched torpedoes. Most crewmembers were saved, though, including 112 plucked from the water by the Dewey. “This was hard to take, as she was our gallant lady,” Reyelts wrote of losing the Lexington. But out of all the hell in fighting, a different force emerged for Reyelts as the most hellish: December 1944’s Typhoon Cobra, which struck several dozen ships about 300 miles east of the island of Luzon in the Philippines. The violent storm pushed out gusts of up to 185 mph, sunk three U.S. destroyers, greatly damaged many others, destroyed 146 planes and killed 788 Americans. “The worst battle I was in out there really was a typhoon,” he said. “We lost three of our ships in that thing.” Aboard the Dewey, Reyelts felt rolls of up to 75 degrees or more, and the ship lost its steering control, lights and power. At some points, it nearly collided with other ships in its fleet. But overall, the Dewey made it through the war relatively unscathed, and Reyelts returned to Hawaii at the conclusion, remaining there until he left the service in 1946 as a boatswain warrant officer. He and his wife, Doris, had their second son there, and they’d have four altogether, three of whom became Marines and the other a Navy man. They’d also have many grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren before Doris passed away in 2012. For his career, Reyelts worked at a creamery in Elsie, Michigan; with cars — building and selling — in Lansing; and did other jobs before retiring to Florida in 1987.

36

November 2016

Reyelts and his wife, Doris (left), had four sons, all of whom would join the military. Two of the sons — Robert (left) and Barry — stand beside Reyelts outside his home and (below) are pictured with him as children.

seniortimesmagazine.com


In retirement, he’s kept himself busy, serving as a custodian at his church, as a school crossing guard, and as the final state chairman for Florida of the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association before the group disbanded nationwide in 2011 because of dwindling membership. The high estimate of the number of living service members from the many, many thousands present for the attack is 2,300, said Rick Carrway, immediate past president of the Sons and Daughters of Pearl Harbor Survivors, which is now the primary organization carrying the torch of Dec. 7, 1941. Past anniversaries attracted a good many survivors to Oahu, Carraway said, but the number has gradually shrunk in recent years. A few dozen, though, did still go for the 2015 anniversary, according to the Associated Press, and Carraway expects at least some to be there for the 75th this year. Three living in Pensacola won’t be able to make the journey, but Carraway said he plans to instead take them to the Na-

tional WWII Museum in New Orleans for a behind-the-scene tour and panel discussion. “I don’t think the 75th is the final anniversary of survivors showing up at Pearl Harbor, but is it the last [major] one?” he asked. “I think yes because the next biggest would be the 100th, and there won’t be any there for that one.” In reflecting on the infamous attack, Reyelts joked that talking about it — at schools, military events and the like — has “kinda got old after all these years.” But nonetheless, “at my age, it is nice to be able to tell the story.” “You don’t really forget it. [It’s] something to remember,” he said. “I just feel [good] that I made it, and I feel bad that some of them didn’t.” s If you know a WWII veteran in North Central Florida who would like to tell his or her story to Senior Times, please email Michael Stone at MichaelStone428@gmail.com.

November 2016

37 37


38

COLUMN œ DONNA BONNELL

Embracing Life Terrapins and Tortoises and Turtles! Oh My!

W

hen Lexi’s first grade class was scheduled to go on a field trip to Santa Fe Teaching Zoo, my sweet 7-year-old granddaughter asked me if I wanted to go. I jumped with joy. Exploring through the eyes of children is like seeing things for the first time. Their enthusiastic curiosity is contagious. Mitch, our tour guide, was exceptional, which added to the group’s excitement. He was passionate about educating others on conservation issues and zoo initiatives. Mitch carried a notebook filled with fascinating facts and was happy to answer every question the students posed. His notes where not needed when asked about frogs, lizards, snakes or any other reptiles. Proudly, he referred to himself as a reptile man. While I was not sure why, the terrapins, tortoises and turtles seemed to dominate our day. It could be because of the large number of inhabitants that live at the Santa Fe Zoo. Or, possibly because they co-exist well with many other animals and are not confined to one enclosure. Perhaps the height of 6 and 7 year olds was a factor, making it physically easier for them to see ground-level creatures. Who knows? Maybe it was all of the above with an added message intended for this column. In any case, as we meandered around the zoo, my mind wandered to my early childhood. In those days, tiny turtles

38

November 2016

were kept in plastic shallow bowls. Sea turtles were eaten in soup or stew and Cooter hunting was a sport. Oh my, so much has changed. Circa 1960s, in South Florida small green turtles with striped heads and yellow bellies were the perfect pets. They were easy to care for, inexpen-

Tales were told that included eating gopher tortoises, lovingly nicknamed the Hoover Chicken (after President Herbert Hoover). I did not share that information with Lexi and her classmates. However, most of the children recognized the gopher tortoises. These tortoises are often seen in Alachua County, alongside roads, in pastures, and in our wooded habitat. We learned (from Mitch) that they are a keystone species. Gophers dig deep burrows for their own shelter, but share them with about 400 other species. If gophers go extinct, many other animals will be tragically affected, along with our ecosystem. Fortunately, they are federally protected. Toward the end of the tour, a scene with Judy Garland from “The Wizard of Oz” played in my brain. Dorothy, the Tin Man and Scarecrow were going through a forest when they hear a roar. Fright-

It is imperative that the human population immediately embrace global conservation efforts. sive, and came with the cutest turtle bowls adorned with plastic palm trees. Unfortunately, children with pet turtles got sick. It was determined that turtles carry salmonella. The Food and Drug Administration later banned their sale, declaring them a public health menace. Regular readers know my ancestors are from Abaco Island, the Bahamas and the Florida Keys. Living in Miami as a child, our vacations were always on an island in the Conch Republic. On rare occasions we would have a meal at the Green Turtle Inn Restaurant in Islamorada. It was such a treat to eat their legendary turtle chowder, soup or steak. Due to over-harvesting, all species of sea turtles are now federally protected under the Endangered Species Act. Eating one today is a felony. I remember hearing survival stories about the great depression years.

ened for their lives, they began singing, Lions and Tigers and Bears! Oh My! Strangely, I began substituting the words — Terrapins and Tortoises and Turtles! Oh My! Visiting the teaching zoo and witnessing Mitch’s ambitious aspiration to enlighten folks of all ages became oddly frightening. It was different from Garland’s fear. I was not worried for my own survival, but for the future existence of reptiles. It is imperative that the human population immediately embrace global conservation efforts. If not, our grandchildren will not have the opportunity to share adventures like I did with Lexi and her friends. s Donna Bonnell is a freelance writer who moved to Newberry in 1983. She enjoys living and working in the town she now calls home. dbnewberry@aol.com

seniortimesmagazine.com


CALENDAR UPCOMING EVENTS IN ALACHUA & MARION

ARTWALK GAINESVILLE Last Friday 7:00pm - 10:00pm GAINESVILLE - Downtown. Artwalk is a free monthly self-guided tour that combines exciting visual art, live performance and events with many local galleries, eateries and businesses participating. www.artwalkgainesville.com.

LIVE MUSIC AND WINE Every Friday and Saturday

ENGLISH COUNTRY DANCING

LINE DANCING

Mondays

Wednesdays

6:45pm – 9:00pm GAINESVILLE - United Church of Gainesville, 1624 NW 5th Ave. Dance to jigs, reels and waltzes. No partner, experience or special dress required. Live music by Hoggetowne Fancy starts at 7:00pm.

6:00pm – 8:00pm OCALA - Forest Community Center, 777 S. 314A. The classes are free. Join other beginners and improve with in-class instruction. 352-438-2840.

GAINESVILLE PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB Third Monday 7:00pm – 9:00pm GAINESVILLE - LifeSouth Community Blood Center, 4039 Newberry Rd. Meet, share photographs and improve your skills. Located in the rear conference room. gainesvillephotoclub.com.

PARKINSON’S EXERCISE CLASS

BIRD WALK Wednesdays 8:30am - 11:30am GAINESVILLE - Sweetwater Wetlands Park, 325 SW Williston Rd. Birding field. Trips will be led by volunteers from Alachua Audubon Society. Walks are free, but park admission is $5 per car.

TRAFFIC SAFETY TEAM Third Thursday

9:30am GAINESVILLE - Alachua County Senior Recreation Center, 5701 NW 34th St. A fun and effective exercise class to help those living with Parkinson’s Disease and other balance-related health issues. The event is free. facebook. com/gainesvilleflparkinsonsnetwork.

10:00am – 12:00pm GAINESVILLE - Gainesville Technology Entrepreneurship Center, 2153 SE Hawthorne Rd. The CTST is a volunteer organization with the mission of helping to reduce crashes and improve safety on area roadways through events, information, ongoing programs and education.trafficsafetyteam.com.

JOYFUL MOTION FOR HEALTH

ENCORE DANCE WORKSHOP

Tuesdays

Thursdays

5:30pm - 6:15pm GAINESVILLE - Criser Cancer Resource Center, 1515 SW Archer Rd. Replace stress with dance moves, warm ups and dance phrases.

4:00pm – 5:00pm GAINESVILLE - Senior Recreation Center, 5701 NW 34th St. This dance workshop provides mature dancers with an opportunity to continue their practice in an adultfriendly environment. 352-733-0880.

Tuesday & Friday

SQUARE DANCE CLASS Tuesdays 6:15pm – 7:15pm GAINESVILLE - Westside Park Recreation Building, 1001 NW 34th St. The non-profit community organization teaches square dancing classes for singles, couples and families with children age 10 and up. September 6th and 13th are free, after that $5 per class. 352283-1296. susiemoon@cox.netdance.

WEST END LADIES GOLF ASSOCIATION

GAINESVILLE HARMONY SHOW CHORUS Thursdays 7:00pm – 9:30pm GAINESVILLE - Grace Presbyterian Church, 3146 NW 13th St. For all who are interested in learning and singing women’s Acapella barbershop harmony music. 352-318-1281.

LADY GAMERS

Wednesdays

Fridays

8:00am – 12:00pm NEWBERRY - West End Golf Club, 12830 W. Newberry Rd. Join the women’s golf league. The cost is $20 annually, $12 to walk or $18 to ride. 352-256-1917.

1:00pm HIGH SPRINGS - New Century Woman’s Club, 40 NW 1st Ave. Meet for fun, friendship and food. Everyone is invited. Meet old friends and make some new ones.

8:00pm – 11:30pm OCALA - Ocala Wine Experience, 36 SW 1st Ave. Join them upstairs for live music and enjoy a glass of wine or beer, pizza or cheese plate.

COMMUNITY YARD SALE First Saturday 7:30am – 2:00pm OCALA - Silver Springs Shores Community/Youth Center, 590 Silver Rd. Do you have antiques, toys or anything that is cluttering up your home, and want to make some money selling them? 352-438-2810.

ARTS MARKET Third Saturday 10:00am — 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Soma Art Media Hub LLC, 601 S. Main St. Visit the arts market in Gainesville and support innovative minds of all ages. Join them in connecting with local creatives during this monthly community event.

MEDICAL MILESTONES: TRANSITIONS IN HEALTH AND WELLNESS November 1 – December 6 11:00am – 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Matheson History Museum, 513 E. University Ave. Exhibition runs through December 23 and examines Alachua County’s rich healthcare history. The event is free. 352-378-2280.

JERZY GROTOWSKI AND THOMAS RICHARDS November 1 - 6 6:00pm GAINESVILLE - The Hippodrome, 25 SE 2nd Place. Hidden Sayings: The Workcenter of Jerzy Grotowski and Thomas Richards partner together to explore the core of an active and living culture. With the community, they will create evolving performances, lectures, and various encounters with a wide variety of communities across Gainesville.

STAYING SHARP Thursday, November 3 2:30pm – 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Senior Recreation Center, 5701 NW 34th Blvd. Stress Management. The Transcendental Meditation® Technique is a simple, natural, easyto-do mental process that reduces stress. Martha Peters, Ph.D. will describe how it works and discuss new research on PTSD, heart health, anxiety and mental clarity. Presented by PrimeTime Institute. www.primetimeinstitute.org or 352-367-8169.

November 2016

39 39


40

STARRY NIGHT November 4 - 6 6:00pm – 10:00pm GAINESVILLE - Florida Museum of Natural History, 3215 Hull Rd. Observe the night sky and explore the world beyond through high-performance telescopes at the stars, see a portable planetarium show and view a moonscape in 3-D. www. flmnh.ufl.edu/starrynight. 352-273-2062.

GAINESVILLE MASTER CHORALE Saturday, November 5 7:30pm GAINESVILLE - First United Methodist Church, 419 NE 1st St. The 80-member Gainesville Master Chorale under the direction of Dr. Will Kesling will perform the world premiere of “A Magdalene Requiem: In Search of Mercy,” an original work by Gainesville Civic Chorus Composer in Residence, Joshua Mazur. Free admission.

NEWBERRY FALL FESTIVAL Saturday, November 5 9:00am – 4:00pm NEWBERRY - Downtown, along Seaboard Drive. Enjoy vendors, food & entertainment.

HOLIDAY AND CRAFT FAIR Saturday, November 5 9:00am – 2:00pm OCALA - Grand Hall, 1468 SW 154th St. Rd. Find purses, gourmet goodies, unique jewelry, original artwork and much more. 352-307-2975.

DOWNTOWN FESTIVAL & ART SHOW November 5 – 6 Times Vary GAINESVILLE - 200 East University Ave. The streets of downtown Gainesville, from City Hall to the Hippodrome State Theatre, will be transformed into a celebration of art and creativity with live music, performing arts and a spectacular array of food. Saturday: 10:00am – 5:00pm; Sunday: 10:00am – 4:00pm.

MEET LOCAL WRITERS November 5 - 6 Times Vary GAINESVILLE - 25 SE 2nd Place. Local authors will meet the public and sell their books during Gainesville’s highly acclaimed Downtown Festival and Art Show. Find them in a booth sponsored by the Writers Alliance of Gainesville. Books for children and adults will be specially priced for the event. 10:00am – 5:00pm on Saturday; 10:00am - 4:00pm on Sunday. writersalliance.org.

JAMES B. KING VETERAN’S DAY CONCERT Sunday, November 6 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - First Presbyterian Church, 106 SW 3rd St. Gainesville Community Band concert, directed by Professor R. Gary Langford. Venue offering requested. www.gnvband.org.

40

November 2016

Bikers on Parade Sunday, November 6

8:00am – 2:00pm

GAINESVILLE - Santa Fe College, 3000 NW 83 St. Charity ride that benefits American Hometown Vets. The starting lot at Santa Fe College opens at 8:00am. Prices start at $20. The ride ends at Gainesville Raceway with an after party of live music, BBQ, beer and raffles. bikersonparade.org.

A SALUTE TO VETERANS

CANCER CONNECTIONS

Sunday, November 6

Wednesday, November 9

3:00pm OCALA - First Presbyterian Church, 511 SE 3rd St. The Marion Civic Chorale, with Artistic Conductor Hingrid Kujawinski and Accompanist Vicky Juliano, will present songs of praise and appreciation. Admission is free. Donations support a student scholarship program.

12:00pm – 1:00pm GAINESVILLE - HealthStreet, 2401 SW Archer Rd. Dr. David Tram will be speaking. Monthly meeting and networking opportunities for anyone involved in the care or treatment of cancer patients, or provides a service to them. Lunch provided for those who RSVP; $4 donation is requested. Barb Thomas: bnbbarb@ aol.com or www.myhealthstreet.org.

CANE BOIL AND FIDDLE FEST Saturday, November 6 10:00am – 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Morningside Nature Center, 3450 E University Ave. Experience the making and bottling of sugar cane syrup, biscuits hot from the wood cook stove, live roots music and more. 352-334-3326.

DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION Wednesday, November 9 11:00am - 1:00pm GAINESVILLE - Wesley United Methodist Church, 826 NW 23rd Ave. Gainesville Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution meets on the second Wednesday of each month, October through May. gainesvilleDAR@gmail.com.

THE ANATOMY OF NURSING Thursday, November 10 6:00pm GAINESVILLE - Matheson Museum, 513 East University Ave. The Anatomy of Nursing: What Happened to Their Caps, and How Can There be a Nurse Who is a Doctor? Jodi Irving, UF Professor Emeritus and College of Nursing Historian, and Ann Smith, former Director of Nursing Services and Health Care Risk Manager at North Florida Regional Medical Center will be discussing how the profession of nursing has mirrored women’s changing roles in society.

seniortimesmagazine.com


VETERANS DAY CONCERT Friday, November 11 7:00pm GAINESVILLE - University Auditorium, 333 Newell Drive. The Buchholz High School Bands, under the direction of conductor Shawn Barat, present their annual salute to our local veterans. The concert features performances by the nationallyrenowned Buchholz Wind Symphony, Jazz Band, Aviance dance ensemble and the Buchholz Choirs. Guests include BHS Director of Bands Emeritus Paula Thornton, guest narrator and Mayor Lauren Poe, along with emcee Richard Drake. The event is free. www.buchholzbands.com.

VETERANS DAY MARCH Friday, November 11 5:00pm – 8:00pm OCALA - Frank DeLuca YMCA Family Center, 3200 SE 17th St. Registrants will March from the Frank DeLuca YMCA to the Veterans Memorial (25th Avenue), take a water break and enjoy rest time. Then they return to the Y where they will have a choice of two workouts: “The Chris Kyle” or “The Murph,” which will be run by the YMCA Personal Trainers. Registration cost is $15.

SPECIAL FOR VETERANS Friday, November 11 10:00am – 5:00pm GAINESVILLE - The Florida Museum of Natural History, 3215 Hull Road. Veterans and up to five family members will receive a free value admission to the Butterfly Rainforest and Wicked Plants: The Exhibit. 352-846-2000. www.flmnh. ufl.edu/calendar/grid/veterans-promotion-2/.

VETERAN’S DAY SPECIAL Friday, November 11 9:00am – 5:00pm GAINESVILLE - Kanapaha Botanical Gardens, 4700 SW 58th Dr. Active or retired military get into the Gardens free on Veteran’s Day.

AKC Dog Shows and Trials November 18 – 20

8:00am – 4:00pm

OCALA - Greater Ocala Dog Club Show Grounds, 10205 NW Gainesville Rd. More than 1,500 dogs competing daily for Best in Show and High in Trial. Plenty of vendors on hand with all your dog needs. Food vendors as well. Bring a chair.

CIVIL WAR ROUNDTABLE Thursday, November 10 6:00pm - 8:00pm GAINESVILLE - Trinity United Methodist Church, 4000 NW 53rd Ave. Education Building #232. This monthly meeting is held the second Thursday of each month, is open to the public. They share our interest, further their knowledge and promote the cause of battlefield preservation. 352-378-3726. www.cwrnf.org.

THE GAINESVILLE ORCHESTRA Friday, November 11 7:30pm. GAINESVILLE - Santa Fe College Fine Arts Hall, 3000 NW 83rd St. Romp with Rossini; Bump with Beethoven. Featuring vocal virtuosity and favorite tunes from the Italian king of musical comedy and the German maestro of the symphony: The Barber of Seville, William Tell, Cenerentola, The Thieving Magpie, to name a few. www.GCOmusic.org.

DISCUSSION ABOUT RUTH BADER GINSBERG

THIRD ANNUAL DAY OF GRACE

Thursday, November 10

10:00am – 1:00pm GAINESVILLE - Grace Marketplace, 3055 NE 28th Dr. Enjoy catered lunch, live music by Jazz Bandits and Uptown Swing, tour of the facility, stay for a chair massage, a pickup kickball game, or a yoga class, sample goodies from GRACE Catering and learn more about GRACE Marketplace. Event is free of charge, but donations for lunch greatly appreciated.

2:30pm – 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Senior Recreation Center, 5701 NW 34th Blvd. Barbara Oberlander, retired Santa Fe professor and presenter of popular programs on First Ladies at PTI programs returns, will explain why Justice Ginsberg has become such a pop icon. Presented by PrimeTime Institute. www.primetimeinstitute.org or 352-367-8169.

Saturday, November 12

November 2016

41 41


42

GOURD SHOW AND SALE

GAINESVILLE BIG BAND

November 11 – 13

Friday, November 18

Times Vary BELLEVIEW - The Market of Marion, 12888 SE US HWY 441. Visit the many Gourd Artists displaying and selling their art. Show hours are Friday and Saturday from 8:00am 3:00pm and Sunday 8:00am 2:00pm. www.MarionCountyGourdArtists.com.

8:30pm - 11:30pm GAINESVILLE - Market Street Pub & Cabaret, 112 SW 1st Ave. Gainesville’s premier Big Band is returning to Market Street’s main stage for a night of classic swing and new favorites for you to dance to.

HOGTOWN HOMEGROWN’S 10TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY Sunday, November 13 5:00pm GAINESVILLE - Matheson History Museum, 513 E. University Ave. Home-cooked potluck, recipes auctioned off by Storm Roberts of WKTK, and keynote speakers Anna Prizzia of Forage Farm and Chef Bert Gill of Mildred’s, New Deal and Blue Gill. Tickets are $10 and only available online at www.eventbrite.com.

CAR FIT Tuesday, November 15 9:00am – 2:00pm GAINESVILLE - Senior Recreation Center, 5701 NW 34th St. The UF College of Public Health and Health Professions’ department of occupational therapy will offer CarFit, a free national program designed to help older drivers fit more comfortably and safely in their vehicles. Interested participants are asked to call Angela Black at 352-273-6817 or email ablack888@phhp.ufl.edu to schedule an appointment. All ages are welcome.

MEDICATIONS AND DEMENTIA Tuesday, November 15 3:30pm – 4:30pm GAINESVILLE - The Village Tower Club Ballroom, 800 NW 27th Blvd. Pharmacist Andrea Koff from the Senior Healthcare Centers will explain the different types of dementia and review the medications that may improve symptoms. RSVP: 1-800-611-6913.

SUCCESSFUL AGING Thursday, November 17 2:30pm – 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Senior Recreation Center, 5701 NW 34th Blvd. Successful Aging: What Is It and How Can We Achieve It? Stephan Anton, Ph.D., from the UF Institute on Aging, Aging & Geriatric Research, returns to give an update on current research. Presented by PrimeTime Institute. www.primetimeinstitute.org or 352-367-8169.

CANDLELIGHT VIGIL Saturday, November 19 5:45pm - 6:45pm GAINESVILLE - Cofrin Nature Park, 4810 NW 8th Ave. Join the 4th Annual Survivors of Suicide Candlelight Vigil which will be at the Survivors of Suicide Memory Garden. Activities will start at 4:00 p.m. with a ceremony beginning at 5:45pm. This event is free and open to the community. Refreshments will be provided. Raggedyds@aol.com.

LIGHT UP OCALA Saturday, November 19 4:00pm – 9:00pm OCALA - Downtown Ocala. Live entertainment, crafts, food, children’s activities, Junior Sunshine Christmas parade and a visit by Santa will all be a part of the 33rd annual Light Up Ocala. Highlights include the lighting of downtown Ocala and a 42-foot Christmas tree which is scheduled for 6:30pm. 352-368-5517.

HOLIDAY EXPO & BAKE SALE FUNDRAISER

Thursday, November 17 5:30pm – 7:30pm HIGH SPRINGS - Lanza Gallery, 23645 US Hwy 27. Painting class for adults. Bring a bottle of wine, bring a friend, and be ready for a night of creativity and laughs. All supplies will be provided. Local artists Robin Popp or Tina Corbett will show you how to create a beautiful piece of artwork and you will go home with a finished canvas painting. $35 per person. Sign up by the Tuesday before each class. 352-474-9922.

42

November 2016

WINTER HOLIDAY CONCERT Sunday, December 4 3:00pm GAINESVILLE - Santa Fe College Fine Arts Hall (Bldg FA). Concert by the Gainesville Community Band, directed by Professor R. Gary Langford. $6 donation requested. www.gnvband.org. If you would like us to publicize an event in Alachua or Marion counties, send information by the 13th day of the month prior. All submissions will be reviewed and every effort will be made to run qualified submissions if page space is available.

352-373-9178 (fax) or email: events@towerpublications.com

November 19 – 20 10:00pm – 4:00pm HIGH SPRINGS - New Century Woman’s Club, 23674 West U.S. Highway 27. Fundraiser offering beautiful and unique items to keep for yourself or to give as gifts. There will be frito pies and other food, with a chance drawing for the gift baskets at 3:00pm, Sunday. www.GFWCHighSpringsNewCentury.com.

LLOT’S OF TREASURE’S FFROM THE PAST! Open Friday, Saturday & Sunday 8-4pm

Chiefland

CIRQUE ITALIA

FARMER’S FLEA

December 1 – 4

MARKET

Times Vary GAINESVILLE - The Oaks Mall, 6419 Newberry Rd. Outside Macy’s in the rear parking lot near bus stop. Experience the magical world of Cirque Italia. The extraordinary stage holds 35,000 gallons of water and features a dynamic lid, which lifts 35 feet into the air. www.cirqueitalia.com. 941-704-8572.

HOLIDAY TREE LIGHTING Saturday, December 3

PAINT SIP CREATE

Tour showcasing homes on SE 5th Street, and the HOPS – Bryant House at 712 SE Fort King Street. There will be seasonal music along with tasty refreshments and visit with Mr. & Mrs. Santa Claus. Also, wine tasting by Island Grove Wine Company at the Bryant House. Tickets are $18 in advance and $20 the night of the event at locations on SE 5th Street. Tickets go on sale on November 1st. Call HOPS at 352-351-1861.

6:00pm – 8:00pm GAINESVILLE - The Historic Thomas Center, 302 NE 6th Ave. The heart of the celebration is the holiday decorations on the giant tree and around the building, which are annually provided by the Thomas Center Associates. 352-334-ARTS.

We have something for ev Youn and Old. everyone! Young

FFRESH P PRODUCE • • • • •

GENUINE LEATHER SHOP JEWELRY CHRISTIAN BOOK STORE GROCERIES COMPUTER REPAIR

• • • • •

TOOLS CHILDREN’S CLOTHING ANTIQUES COLLECTABLES R.V. PARK WEATHER KING SHEDS

2 RESTAURANTS WITH HOME COOKED MEALS PHONE & DIRECTIONS

352-493-2022 1206 N YOUNG BLVD. (US 19) CHEIFLAND, FL 32626

FROM GAINESVILLE - JONESVILLE: FROM HIGH SPRINGS - ALACHUA:

CHRISTMAS CANDLELIGHT TOUR Saturday, December 3 4:30pm – 8:00pm OCALA - SE 5th St & 712 SE Fort King St. Historic Ocala Preservation Society (HOPS) presents the

TAKE S.R. 26 TO TRENTON, TAKE S.R.41 TO S.R. 26 TO TRENTHEN 129 SOUTH TO U.S. 19 N. TON THEN 129 SOUTH TO U.S. FLEA MARKET ON THE LEFT. 19 N. FLEA MARKET ON LEFT

WWW.CHIEFLANDFLEAMARKET.COM

seniortimesmagazine.com


THEATRE Acrosstown Repertory Theatre.....................619 S. Main Street, Gainesville Curtis M. Phillips Center ........................................... 315 Hull Road, Gainesville Fine Arts Hall Theatre - SFC ........................... 3000 NW 83rd St., Gainesville Gainesville Community Playhouse ....... 4039 N.W. 16th Blvd., Gainesville Hippodrome State Theatre................................. 25 SE 2nd Place, Gainesville UF Constans Theatre ................................................. Museum Road, Gainesville McGuire Pavilion Black Box Theatre................ Museum Road, Gainesville Actors’ Warehouse .............................................. 608 N. Main Street, Gainesville Ocala Civic Theatre ..................................4337 East Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala High Springs Playhouse ................................ 130 NE 1st Avenue, High Springs

HIPPODROME STATE THEATER

Ultimate Christmas Show

November 25 - December 18 When none of the acts arrive to a scheduled performance at the Annual Holiday Variety Show and Christmas Pageant, three members are pressed into service to perform the entire show and pageant themselves. An irreverent yet heartwarming trip through the holidays.

A Christmas Carol

November 26 - December 22 A Gainesville family tradition of a new adaptation of the holiday classic. Don’t miss the wonderment and joy of this most recent rendition of the classic A Christmas Carol, featuring Scrooge, Marley, and of course, Tiny Tim.

OCALA CIVIC THEATRE

The Mousetrap

November 3 – November 27 Despite disturbing news of a recent local murder with a haunting history, four guests and their hosts at Monkswell Manor are enjoying a winter weekend in the English countryside until an unexpected stranger appears and everyone is trapped by a snowstorm. As dark secrets are exposed, the uneasy guests and their frightened hosts realize that everyone is in danger and no one is above suspicion of who they seem to be. This classic whodunit by the Queen of Crime opened in 1952 in London’s West End and has been thrilling audiences ever since as the world’s longest-running play.

352-371-1234 352-392-ARTS 352-395-4181 352-376-4949 352-375-4477 352-273-0526 352-392-1653 352-222-3699 352-236-2274 386-454-3525

THE GAINESVILLE COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE

Little Women

November 25 – December 18 This play is based on Louisa May Alcott’s American classic. Set in Civil War times, follow Meg, the romantic eldest sister, the spirited and tomboyish Jo, sweet and loving Beth and playful Amy as they journey through life filled with personal discovery, heartache, hope, and everlasting love. Filled with adventures real and imagined, the struggle of these Little Women to find their own voices mirrors the growing pains of young America. Little Women is a story of love and family which stands the test of time.

ACTORS’ WAREHOUSE

Affordable Housing for Senior Citizens

Pine Grove Apartments Federally subsidized apartments for persons 62 and older. • Studio & One-Bedroom Apartments. • ADA accessible apartments are also available. • Rent is based on income.

Telling: Gainesville

November 10 - November 19 Seven Veterans, living in Gainesville, come together to tell their life stories and openly discuss what it means to have served their county and to now live as Veterans in the USA. With first-hand accounts of a soldier’s life in Vietnam, Iraq and Afganistan, in-depth insights into the difficulties of returning home. “Telling: Gainesville” creates a space for discussion, reflection, and understanding.

FINE ARTS HALL THEATER - SFC

Peter and the Wolf

November 9 In a classic retelling of a classic theme of Good versus Evil, young Peter decides to leave the safety of his farm to hunt the evil Wolf. Each character is represented by an instrument in the orchestra, so not only is it a great story but a great way for kids of all ages to learn about music.

for your appointment, call

352-373-1213 TDD: 800-955-8771 Total annual income limit for eligibility:

One Person $21,250 Two Persons $24,300 1901 NE 2nd Street Gainesville, Florida OFFICE HOURS: MON-FRIDAY 9am-12pm 1pm-4pm CLOSED SATURDAY AND SUNDAY

November 2016

43 43


44

We feel the best way to find and recognize local charities in our communities is by asking you! The SunState Community Foundation is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization that serves the communities in and around North Central Florida by promoting and facilitating philanthropy. The Foundation was established to promote and provide charitable assistance that contributes towards the development, education and well-being of the communities, areas and residents of Alachua, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, and Levy Counties in Florida. The foundation’s initial goal is to administer and fully fund the award winning Facebook Charity-ofthe-Month program. SunState Federal Credit Union started the program in 2013, but has turned over administration of the program to the foundation, with SunState Federal Credit Union acting only as a sponsor. This has been done in the belief that this path will ensure the program remains a strong and expanding community resource long into the future. The SunState Community Foundation, Inc., provides donors/members opportunities to participate in the furtherance of the foundation’s goals in multiple ways. First, and foremost, the donors/members are providing funds to support the foundation’s charitable initiatives. Donors/members can also nominate groups for the Charity of the Month program, and then vote for the group of their choice. Donors/members are encouraged to participate and vote in the Charity of the Month program. Ultimately, the voters choose where foundation donations go as part of the infrastructure of the program.

SunState Community Foundation, Inc. S PONSORSHIP LEV ELS AVA ILA BLE $

1,000 CHARITY OF THE MONTH SPONSOR

$

Recognized on all 4 Entercom Communication stations, 30 times (120 total); KTK, SKY, WRUF and ESPN.

Recognized on the Charity of the Month Facebook Contest page, KTK’s Facebook page and Senior Times’ Facebook page.

Mentioned in the Charity of the Month page in Senior Times Magazine.

44

November 2016

500 RANDOM CHARITY SPONSOR Recognized on 2 of Entercom Communications stations, 30 times (60 total); WRUF and ESPN Recognized on the Charity of the Month Facebook Contest page, KTK’s Facebook page and Senior Times’ Facebook page. Mentioned in the Charity of the Month page in Senior Times Magazine.

$

300 NOMINATOR SPONSOR

Recognized on the Charity of the Month Facebook Contest page, KTK’s Facebook page and Senior Times’ Facebook page.

Mentioned in the Charity of the Month page in Senior Times Magazine.

$

100 RANDOM VOTER SPONSOR

Recognized on the Charity of the Month Facebook Contest page.

Mentioned in the Charity of the Month page in Senior Times Magazine

seniortimesmagazine.com


COMMUNITY PARTNERS >> CHARITY OF THE MONTH

CH A RIT Y OF THE MONTH WINNER S MOST RECENT WINNING ORGANIZATIONS TO NOMINATE A CHARITY OF YOUR CHOICE OR TO VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE NOMINEES, VISIT:

www.facebook.com/SunStateFCU and click on “Charity of the Month”

Christian Service Center of Columbia County

SEPT. WINNER – 1,447 VOTES

The Christian Service Center provides help with food, clothing, household goods, medications, transient transportation, and partial help with utilities. They also have a resale gift shop open two days a week with all proceeds used to purchase food. Each year the organization holds special events to give Christmas toys and Christmas baskets, back to school shoes and garage sales. The center works inter-denominationally with local churches as well as other service agencies to accomplish our mission. The Center will receive $1,000; Leslie Stanziani will receive $300 for nominating them; the winner of the $500 random drawing is Children’s Table; and the $100 random voter winner is Janice Ashmore.

A project of the SunState Community Foundation, Inc. Presented by SunState Federal Credit Union, Our Town Family of Magazines and Entercom Communications

November 2016 6

45 45


46

CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE C O M P I L E D A D S F R O M C P F, N A N I , S A P A , C A D N E T & A M E R I C A N C L A S S I F I E D S

AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINING Get FAA Technician certification. Approved for military benefits. Financial Aid if qualified. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance

866-453-6204

ADOPTION P R I VAT E A D O P T I O N Living/Medical Expenses Paid. Select & Meet a Loving Family to Care f o r Yo u r C h i l d . C a l l 24/7 Attorney Charlotte Danciu. 1-800-395-5449 www.adoption-surrogacy. com FL Bar #307084 PRIVATE (EXPENSES PA I D ) A D O P T I O N A Childless Couple Seeks to Adopt. Financial Security. Doctor Mom/Devoted Dad. Attorney Adam Sklar FL.Bar#0150789 Re: Christine & Tommy 1-800-790-5260

AUTO CARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!! Top Dollar! Free Towing From Home, Office or body Shop. All Makes/Models 20002016. Same Day Pick-Up Av a i l a b l e ! C a l l N o w : 1-800-761-9396 D o n a t e Yo u r C a r t o Veterans Today! Help and Support our Veterans. Fast - FREE pick up. 100% tax deductible. Call 1-800-245-0398 CARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!! All Make/ Models 2000-2015! Any Condition. Running or Not. Competitive Offer! F r e e To w i n g ! We ’ r e Nationwide! Call Now: 1-888-416-2330. Got an older car, boat or RV? Do the humane thing. Donate it to the Humane Society. Call 1- 800-831-6309

46

November 2016

CAPITAL CLASSIC CARS Buying All European & Classic Cars. ANY Condition, ANY Location, P o r s c h e , M e rc e d e s , Jaguar & More! Top Dollar PAID. CapitalClassicCars. com Steve Nicholas 1-571-282-5153, steve@ capitalclassiccars.com CAPITAL CLASSIC CARS Buying All European & Classic Cars. ANY Condition. ANY Location. P o r s c h e , M e rc e d e s , Jaguar & More! Top Dollar PAID. CapitalClassicCars. com 1-571-282-5153 or steve@capitalclassiccars. com Does your auto club offer no hassle service and rewards? Call American Auto Club (ACA) & Get $200 in ACA Rewards! (new members only) Roadside Assistance & Monthly Rewards. Call 800-519-6058 TEXAS PRIDE Trailers on sale now! Lowboy, Deck Over, Dump, Roll Off, 14,000 LB, 16,000 LB, 24,000 LB GVWR Tandem Axle, equipment trailers, triple axle, triple tandem, dual tandem dumps, tandem axle dumps, 7000 lb., 20,000 lb, Gooseneck, Bumper Pull Hitch, Sales, Parts, Service, Repairs, Bumper pull flat deck, Bumper pull tube top, Gooseneck tube top, Gooseneck flat deck, Manufacturer Direct. Madisonville, Bryan, N o r m a n g e e , Te x a s , College Station. www. texaspridetrailers.com

HAVE YOU OR SOMEONE YOU LOVED SUFFERED SEVERE COMPLICATIONS FROM THE USE OF: Call The Sentinel Group now!

AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINING - Get FAA Technician certification. Approved for military benefits.  Financial Aid if qualified. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-453-6204

DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a driver for Stevens Transport! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! New drivers can earn $800+ per week! PAID LOCAL CDL TRAINING! 1-888-743-1573 drive4stevens.com

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINING - Get FAA certification. Approved for military benefits. Financial Aid if qualified. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-686-1704

TRAIN ONLINE FOR A NEW CAREER! Accounting, Media Billing & Computer! No Experience needed! Train at Home! 1-877-649-3155 Tr a i n O n l i n e N o w. c o m GED/HS Diploma needed.

Earn up to $36,351 or MORE per month, just by inviting two people (or LESS) into a $14.95/month program. ICANGetMy2.net $500 Daily! Mailing simple letters and depositing checks! Exciting FREE DETAILS! Write: LISTS, Box 396 Dept. NANI Springhouse, PA 19477-0396

EDUCATION/ TRAINING AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINING – Get FAA Technician certification. Approved for military benefits. Financial Aid if qualified. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)724-5403.

MEDICAL BILLING SPECIALISTS NEEDED! Begin training at home for a career working with Medical Billing & Insurance! Online training with the right College can get you ready! HS Diploma/GED & Computer/Inter net needed. 1-888-734-6711 OCEAN CORPORATION 800-321-0298. New career, commercial diver, under water construction, NDT weld inspector, 30 weeks of training, job placement, financial assistance, employment, welding, education, inspection, job, 10840 Rockley Road, Houston, 77099, 800-321-0298, www.oceancorp.com AVIATION CAREERS – Hands on training for career opportunities in aviation, manufacturing and more. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-5838

You may be due Compensation, free consultation.

1-800-655-5256

The Sentinel Group is an advertising group and represents lawyers jointly advertising their services. It is not a law firm or lawyer referral service. No representation is made that the quality of the legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of legal services performed by other lawyers. You should not rely upon any information herein as legal advice. The choice of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements.

DONATE YOUR CAR, T R U C K O R B O AT T O H E R I TA G E F O R THE BLIND. Free 3 D a y V a c a t i o n , Ta x Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. CALL 1-800-902-7815

20 PEOPLE NEEDED! Make money while improving your health. Suffering From: Obesity, Fatigue, High Blood Pressure, Joint/Back pain? Great Opportunity Awaits You! 24/7 Hotline 1-800-367-8917. www. lifechangingincome.biz

Xarelto, Talcum Powder or  IVC Filter?

EARN YOUR High School Diploma from home in a few short weeks from First Coast Academy, nationally accredited. Call for more information: 1-904381-1935 or www.fcahighschool.org A D U LT E D U C AT I O N PROGRAM Get your high school diploma. Fully accredited. Call now 1-800-590-9611. Visit our page www.educatorsinc.org. Like us on Facebook: https://www. facebook.com

EMPLOYMENT PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! NO Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! www. WorkingCentral.NET Make $1,000 Weekly! Paid in Advance! Mailing B ro c h u re s a t H o m e . Easy Pleasant work. Begin Immediately. Age U n i m p o r t a n t . w w w. HomeMoney77.com

DRS Now Hiring Satellite Installers. Company Provides: -Paid training -Performance Bonuses -Vehicle and tools -Great Benefits. Locations throughout Florida. Apply at WWW. DRSINSTALL.COM Dish Network Service Provider $$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home. CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 Ext 320 www.easywork-greatpay. com Alquiler De Utero $25,000.00 y más par Manutencion Ayudanos, N o P o d e m o s Te n e r Hijos. Llama a Nuestra Abogada. 561-674-6857 Fl. Bar #307084

FINANCIAL Beware of loan fraud. Please check with the Better Business Bureau or Consumer Protection Agency before sending any money to any loan company. SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. Unable to work? Denied benefits? We Can Help! WIN or Pay Nothing! Contact Bill Gordon & Associates at 1-800-6704805 to start your application today! Lung Cancer? And 60 Years Old?  If So, You And Your Family May Be Entitled To A Significant Cash Award. Call 800375-9380 To Learn More. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket.

seniortimesmagazine.com


READER ADVISORY: National Trade Associations we belong to have purchased the classifieds on these pages. Determining the value of their service or product is advised. In order to avoid misunderstandings, some advertisers do not offer employment but rather supply the readers with manuals, directories and other materials designed to help their clients establish mail order selling and other businesses at home. Under NO circumstance should you send any money in advance or give the anyone your checking, license ID, or credit card numbers. Also beware of ads that claim to guarantee loans regardless of credit and note that if a credit repair company does business only over the phone it is illegal to request any money before delivering its service. Toll free numbers may or may not reach Canada. Will Reynoso, MBA 954.252.1049 | wreynoso@svn.com Keith Kidwell, SIOR, CCIM 954.234.8777 | kkidwell@svn.com

MOECKER REALTY AUCTIONS

BANKRUPTCY

www.svnmoecker.com

THE ENCLAVE AT HILLSBORO BEACH 1174 - 1185 Hillsboro Mile | Hillsboro Beach, FL 33062

Consisting of 12 Land Parcels; 6 Ocean & 6 Intracoastal Parcels RM-16 Zoning Multiple Family Medium Density Partially Constructed Marina Assessed Value: $47,847,840 Auction Date: Oct. 6, 2016 | 10AM Initial Bids due: Oct. 4, 2016 | 4PM | Case #15-26155-EPK

BANKRUPTCY

PRESTIGIOUS HILLSBORO MILE LOTS 1103 - 1107 Hillsboro Mile | Hillsboro Beach, FL 33062

Ultra-Luxury Estate Lot; +/- 340 Feet of Beach Footage; Intercoastal No-Wake Frontage Could be Subdivided Up to 3 Lots Auction Date: Oct. 6, 2016 | 1:30PM Initial Bids due: Oct. 4, 2016 | 4PM | Case #15-26155-EPK

BANKRUPTCY

ICE CATH LAB | MOB | MEDICAL PRACTICE

GET HELP NOW! One Button Senior Medical Alert. Falls, Fires & Emergencies Happen. 24/7 Protection. Only $19.99/mo. Call Now 888-876-6128 Stop OVERPAYING for your prescriptions! SAVE!

HEALTH & MEDICAL

Call our licensed Canadian and International pharmacy,compare prices

Got Knee Pain? Back Pain? Shoulder Pain? Get a pain-relieving brace at little or NO cost to you. Medicare Patients Call Health Hotline Now! 1- 800-480-7503

and get $25.00 OFF your

VIAGRA and CIALIS USERS! Cut your drug costs! SAVE $$! 50 Pills for $99.00. FREE Shipping! 100% Guaranteed and Discreet. CALL 1-800-290-0314

Blue Pill, your #1 Trusted

Lung Cancer? And Age 6 0 + ?   Yo u A n d Yo u r Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 1-866-590-3140 for Information. No Risk.  No Money Out Of Pocket.

PRESCRIPTION MEDS Verified and Approved Pharmacy Affiliate, 40%80% Less! (Viagra, Cialis, Lipitor, Advair, Crestor, Lantus Solostar, Cozaar, Nexium) and Many More! Prescription Required. www.AffordableRxMeds. com 1-800-786-1237

Got Knee Pain? Back Pain? Shoulder Pain? Get a pain-relieving brace at little or NO cost to you. Medicare Patients Call Health Hotline Now! 1- 800-752-2108

ENJOY A FREE CUP ON US! World’s Healthiest Coffee! Rep’s Wanted! www.SeedOilCoffee.net 1-800-279-7848

Ocala, FL & Summerfield, FL 23,437 Sq. Ft. Cath Lab (Built 2012) 8,766 Sq. Ft. MOB (Built 2002) Two Vacant Lots - 2.27 Acres Operating Cardiology Practice available as an ongoing concern Personal Property, Accounts Rec., Intellectual Property, Intangible Assets All Medical Equipment & Furnishings Initial Bids due: Oct. 7, 2016 | Case #3:16-bk-01491-JAF

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. Unable to work? Denied benefits? We Can Help! WIN or Pay Nothing! Contact Bill Gordon & Associates at 1-800-8606175 to start your application today!

C h ro n i c P a i n ? B a c k or joint pain, arthritis? Recent Medicare/health coverage changes may benefit you! Products are little to NO COST, if qualified. FREE Shipping. Accredited Pain Specialists. CALL 1- 800-498-9321

first prescription! CALL 1-800-265-0768 Promo Code CDC2016251 VIAGRA!! 52 Pills only $99.00! The Original Little Provider for 10 years. Insured and Guaranteed D e l i v e r y. C a l l t o d a y 1-888-410-1767. Male Enhancement Medical Pump Gain 1-3 inches Permanently! FDA Licensed for Erectile Dysfunction. 30-Day Risk Free Trial. Free Brochure. Call 1-619-294-7777 www.DrJoelKaplan.com

VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS 20mg! 50 Pills $99.00 FREE Shipping! 100% guaranteed. CALL NOW! 1   -866-312-6061 Hablamos Espanol  FREE VIAGRA PILLS 48 PILLS + 4 FREE! VIAGRA 100MG/ CIALIS 20mg Free Pills! No hassle, Discreet Shipping. Save Now. Call Today 1-888-410-0514 VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS 20mg! 40 Pills + 10 FREE. SPECIAL $99.00 100% guaranteed. FREE Shipping! 24/7 CALL: 1-888-223-8818 Hablamos Espanol.

Safe Step Walk-In Tub Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 800-886-9771 for $750 Off. S t o p O V E R PAY I N G for your prescriptions! SAVE! Call our licensed Canadian and International pharmacy, compare prices and get $25.00 OFF your first prescription! CALL 1-800749-6515 Promo Code CDC201625

CPAP/BIPAP supplies at little or no cost from Allied Medical Supply Network! Fresh supplies delivered right to your door. Insurance may cover all costs. 800-665-0718

Canada Drug Center es tu mejor opcion para ordenar medicamentos seguros y economicos. Nuestros servicios de farmacia con licencia Canadiense e Internacional te proveeran con ahorros de hasta el 75 en todas las medicinas que necesites. Llama ahora al 1-800-261-2368 y obten $10 de descuento con tu primer orden ademas de envio gratuito.

VIAGRA & CIALIS! 50 pills for $95. 100 pills for $150 FREE shipping. NO prescriptions needed. Money back guaranteed! 1-877-743-5419

Viagra!! 52 Pills for Only $99.00. Your #1 trusted provider for 10 years. Insured and Guaranteed D e l i v e r y. C a l l t o d a y 1-888-403-8602

MISCELLANEOUS ADVERTISE to 10 Million Homes across the USA! Place your ad in over 140 community newspapers, with circulation totaling over 10 million homes. Contact Pam @ 1-800-294-4033 or pam@4400media.com for more information. Safe Step Walk-In Tub: Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included.Call 800-701-9850 for $750 Off. A PLACE FOR MOM. The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted, local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1-800-319-8705 Xarelto users have you had complications due to internal bleeding (after January 2012)? If so, you MAY be due financial compensation. If you don’t have an attorney, CALL Injuryfone today! 1-800-531-0529

Exede High Speed I n t e r n e t . P l a n s f ro m $39/mo. Blazing Fast Broadband in areas cable can’t reach. Great for  business o r h o m e . We I n s t a l l Fast. 1-888-822-0480. Life Alert. 24/7. One press of a button sends h e l p FA S T ! M e d i c a l , Fire, Burglar. Even if you can’t reach a phone! FREE Brochure. CALL 800-734-2638 HIGH RISK DRIVER? HAD A DUI? Stop paying too much for R-22, FR-44, or similar High-Risk Car Insurance! Call our FREE hotline today & SAVE money! 888-591-1852 Stop paying for EXPENSIVE AUTO REPAIRS! Get discounted warranty coverage from the wholesale source, and don’t pay for expensive covered repairs! Start saving now! Call 844-274-6148 Suffering from hearing loss? You might qualify for ListenClear’s FREE 45-day, in-home trial of revolutionary, practically invisible, hearing aids. Experience the difference - FOR FREE! Call 844-715-3358. MAKE A Connection. Real People, Flirty Chat. Meet singles right now! Call LiveLinks. Try it FREE. Call now 1-888-909-9978 18+. Tired of the same old dating sites? Meet real people in your area & make a new connection on your terms! 18+ Only. Call 1-800-610-0814 P l e a s e g o t o HillaryAccountability.com to understand the laws Hillary Clinton broke when she improperly handled classified information.

November 2016

47 47


48

Make a Connection. Real People, Flirty Chat. Meet singles right now!   Call LiveLinks. Try it FREE. Call NOW: 1-888-9099905 18+. 

DISH Network -NEW

Stop paying for EXPENSIVE AUTO REPAIRS! Get discounted warranty coverage from the wholesale source, and don’t pay for expensive covered repairs! Start saving now! Call    888-415-9330 

$14.95 a month. CALL

Suffering from hearing loss? You might qualify for ListenClear’s FREE 45-day, in-home trial of revolutionary, practically invisible, hearing aids. Experience the difference - FOR FREE! Call    855-364-4854 

House website at www.

A PLACE FOR MOM. The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted, local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1-800-217-3942 CASH FOR CARS: We Buy Any Condition Ve h i c l e , 2 0 0 0 a n d Newer. Nation’s Top Car Buyer! Free Towing From Anywhere! Call Now: 1-800-864-5960.

FLEX PACK- Select the C h a n n e l s Yo u Wa n t . FREE Installation. FREE Streaming. $39.99/24 months. ADD Internet for 1-800-686-9986 HERO MILES - to find out more about how you can help our service members, veterans and their families in their time of need, visit the Fisher fisherhouse.org ENJOY A FREE CUP ON US! World’s Healthiest Coffee! Rep’s Wanted! www.SeedOilCoffee.net 1-800-279-7848 DIVORCE $50 TO $240*. Covers children, etc. Only one signature required! *Excludes govt fees. Call 1-888-498-7075. Extn 200 Baycor & Associates, Established 1973. DIRECTV. NFL Sunday Ticket (FREE!) w/Choice All-Included Package. $60/mo for 24 months. No upfront costs or equipment to buy. Ask about next day installation!

CRUISE VACATIONS – 3, 4, 5 or 7+ day cruises to the Caribbean. Start planning now to save $$ on your fall or winter getaway vacation. Royal Caribbean, Norwegian, Carnival, Princess and many more. Great deals for all budgets and departure ports. To search for your next cruise vacation visit www.NCPtravel.com CASH PAID for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS! 1 DAY PAYMENT & PREPAID shipping. HIGHEST PRICES! Call 1-888-776-7771. www. Cash4DiabeticSupplies. com Make a Connection. Real People, Flirty Chat. Meet singles right now! Call LiveLinks. Try it FREE. Call NOW: Call 1-877737-9447 18+

48

November 2016

Life Alert. 24/7. One press of a button sends h e l p FA S T ! M e d i c a l , Fire, Burglar. Even if you can’t reach a phone! FREE Brochure. CALL 800-370-4824! Protect your home with fully customizable security and 24/7 monitoring right from your smartphone. Receive up to $1500 in equipment, free (restrictions apply). Call 1-800-912-1985 SAVE on internet and TV bundles! Order the best exclusive cable and satellite deals in your area! If eligible, get up to $300 in Visa Gift Cards. CALL NOW! 1-800-736-9957 A PLACE FOR MOM. The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted, local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1-800-671-9104 Computer problems viruses, lost data, hardware or software issues? Contact Geeks On Site! 24/7 Service. Friendly Repair Experts. Macs and PCs. Call for FREE diagnosis. 1-800-995-0869

DISH Network -NEW FLEX PACK- Select the C h a n n e l s Yo u Wa n t . FREE Installation. FREE Streaming.$39.99/24 months. ADD Internet for $14.95 a month. CALL 1-800-351-0850

ALL INCLUSIVE RESORT

DIABETIC TEST STRIPS

packages at Sandals,

N E E D E D . We b u y

Dreams, Secrets, Riu,

SEALED - Unexpired

Barcelo, Occidental and

Diabetic Test Strips.

many more. Punta Cana,

To p $ $ $ G u a r a n t e e .

Mexico, Jamaica and

EXTRA money for your

many of the Caribbean

Extra Boxes. Expedited

islands. Search available

payment! Call today

DIRECTV. NFL Sunday Ticket (FREE!) w/Choice All-Included Package. $60/mo for 24 months. No upfront costs or equipment to buy. Ask about next day installation! 1- 800-371-5352

options for 2017 and

1-800-250-4599.

19.99/mo. for DIRECTV - HD Channels + Genie HD DVR + 3 months FREE HBO, SHOW, MAX & STARZ + FREE NFL Sunday Ticket! Call Now 888-437-6598

Will Finance With $10,000

DISH Network - New customers save up to $1000! FREE Hopper Upgrade. TV starts at $19.99/mo. Bundle Inter net & Save! Call Today!! 888-283-8693 *REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL* Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $24.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, SO CALL NOW 888-302-6535

1- 800-769-1035 DISH Network - NEW F L E X PA C K - S e l e c t the Channels You Want. FREE Installation. FREE Streaming. $39.99/24

VIAGRA #1 VIAGRA 100MG/ CIALIS 20mg. 52 Pills, only $99.00! No hassle, Discreet Shipping. Save Now. Call Today. 1-800-224-0792

months. ADD Internet for $14.95 a month. Call 800438-8168 (New Ad Copy)

SATELLITE TV/ INTERNET

FAST Internet! HughesNet Satellite Internet. HighSpeed. Avail Anywhere. Speeds to 15 mbps. Starting at $59.99/mo. Call for Limited Time Price 1-800-958-6917 SUPPORT our service members, veterans and their families in their time of need. For more information, visit the Fisher House website at www. fisherhouse.org.

FAST Internet! HughesNet Satellite Internet. HighSpeed. Avail Anywhere. Speeds to 15 mbps. Starting at $59.99/mo. Call for Limited Time Price. 1-800-916-7609 SAVE on internet and TV bundles! Order the best exclusive cable and satellite deals in your area! If eligible, get up to $300 in Visa Gift Cards. CALL NOW! 1-800-791-0713

DISH Network -NEW FLEX PACK- Select the C h a n n e l s Yo u Wa n t . FREE Installation. FREE Streaming.$39.99/24

REAL ESTATE/ TRAVEL FLAGLER BEACH FLORIDA Oceanfront Va c a t i o n R e n t a l , Tr i p a d v i s o r A w a r d , Furnished Studio, 1-2-3 B R ’s , F u l l K i t c h e n s , WiFi, TV, Pool. Seasonal Specials. 1-386-517-6700 or www.fbvr.net

SAVE at www.NCPtravel. com

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!!    All Makes/

* 2 5 - A C R E S N O RT H FLORIDA* For Home or Investment. Subdividing OK. ONLY $74,900. Seller Down. Call (877)983-6600 or www.FloridaLand123. com

Models 2000-2016! Any Condition.      Running or Not. Top $$$ Paid! Free Towing!      We’re Nationwide! Call Now: 1-888-985-1806  WANTED KAWASAKI,

P R E S T I G I O U S HILLSBORO MILE LOTS 1103-1107 Ultra-

BMW, HONDA, SUZUKI AND HARLEY DAVIDSON MOTORCYLES    1903 TO

Luxury Estate Lot; +/-

1983 500, 750, 900, 1000

340 Feet of Beach

and 1200 CC    Top Dollar

Footage; Intercoastal

Paid Call 570 939-2091 

N o - Wa k e F r o n t a g e Could be Subdivided

CASH PAID- up to $25/

Up to 3 Lots THE

Box for unexpired, sealed

ENCLAVE AT HILLSBORO

DIABETIC TEST STRIPS.

BEACH LOTS 1174-

1 - D A Y P A Y M E N T.

1185 Consisting of

1-800-371-1136

12 Land Parcels; 6 Ocean & 6 Intracoastal

WANTED OLD JAPANESE

Parcels RM-16 Zoning

MOTORCYCLES

Multiple Family Medium

KAWASAKI Z1-900 (1972-

DensityPartially

75), KZ900, KZ1000

Constructed Marina

(1976-1982), Z1R, KZ

Assessed

Value:

1000MK2 (1979,80),

$47,847,840 Auction

W1-650, H1-500 (1969-

Date: Oct. 6, 2016 |

72), H2-750 (1972-

1:30PM Initial Bids due:

1975), S1-250, S2-350,

Oct. 4, 2016 | 4PM | Case

S3-400, KH250, KH400,

#15-26155-EPKCall:

SUZUKI-GS400, GT380,

Will Reynoso, MBA

HONDA-CB750K (1969-

954.252.1049

1976), CBX1000 (1979,80)

|

wreynoso@svn.com

CASH!! 1-800-772-1142 1-310-721-0726 usa@

WANTED TO BUY Wants to purchase minerals and other oil and gas

classicrunners.com Cash for unexpired DIABETIC TEST STRIPS!

interests. Send details to

F re e S h i p p i n g , B e s t

P.O. Box 13557 Denver,

Prices & 24 hr payment!

Co. 80201

Call 1-855-440-4001 www.TestStripSearch.

EAST TN ONLINE ONLY Absolute Auction Smoky Mtn Dream Place 9 3 + A C 9 B i g Tr a c t s Ending Oct 11 2PM EDT McCarterAuction.com 1-877-282-8467 Auction

Cash for unexpired

Lic#335

com. Habla Espanol.

DIABETIC TEST STRIPS! Free shipping. Best Prices

WANTS TO purchase min-

& 24 hr payment! Call

erals and other oil & gas

1-855-378-1147 www.

interests. Send details

TestStripSearch.com

P.O. Box 13557, Denver,

Habla Español.

Co 80201

seniortimesmagazine.com


Like our Facebook page to see last month’s correct puzzle and winner!

www.facebook.com/seniortimesmagazine CORRECTLY COMPLETE THE CROSSWORD PUZZLE AND MAIL IT TO US FOR YOUR CHANCE TO $

Win a 50 Gift Card you can use anywhere that accepts Visa! One Prize awarded per month through random drawing of a correct and complete entry. Winners will be contacted by Tower Publications and should receive their prize within 30 days of being chosen. Please do not call or email to request winner information.

Submit completed entries to: Senior Times Mailbag 4400 N.W. 36th Avenue • Gainesville, Florida 32606

Name:

Phone:

Address:

City, State, Zip:

November 2016

49 49


50

BOOK REVIEW BY

TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER

They Left Us Everything PLUM JOHNSON c.2016, Putnam, $26.00, 279 pages

Y

our grandmother’s jewelry will be yours someday. You’ve known that since you were small, and were caught playing with them. Someday, you were told, you’d be the proud owner of a necklace, pins, rings and other pretties bequeathed. But in the new memoir “They Left Us Everything” by Plum Johnson, some things are simply not treasured. “Nineteen years, one month, and twenty-six days…” That was exactly how long Plum Johnson had been taking care of her

50

November 2016

elderly parents when it finally “brought me to my knees.” At 93, her Mum was forgetful and needy, and the daily trip alone was daunting: Johnson lived 45 minutes away from the family home — too close for her, too far for Mum. Her parents purchased the 4,000-square-foot house in 1952 and they’d done almost nothing to it; aside from added storage areas and some bookcases, it was nearly the same as it had been at the turn of the century. To Johnson’s chagrin though, over the years the house filled with forgotten sports gear, keepsakes, Christmasfuture gifts, clothes, ancient books, and five decades of family bric-a-brac. Yes, she’d tried to clean up the mess once or twice but it was a huge task, both physically and emotionally. Her late father, an intense war hero, had a “dark side” and kept every reminder of his military service. Johnson’s Mum was breezy and devil-may-care, a sometimes-vindictive person who “didn’t give a [darn]” but who cared enough to voice criticism of Johnson’s life. How did it happen that two people who were so different would fall in love and stay together for the rest of their days? There were so many questions — even more, after Johnson’s Mum died. The answers, Johnson hoped, might lie somewhere in the 23-room mess, the cleanup for which there was the gift of time. Johnson, the only sibling with few obligations, moved back to her childhood home and started sorting.

Tucked away amidst junk were old love letters and ancient magazines, expired food, “pocket litter,” and receipts from 1953. Clothes jammed the closets; her brothers claimed paintings and other small memorabilia. And there, in the house of her childhood, Johnson learned that inheritances aren’t always found in a box… You got your grandma’s jewelry. Your mother’s favorite sweater is now yours. Your dad gave you his watch. And “They Left Us Everything” will give you goosebumps. It’s the rare Baby Boomer, I think, who won’t see herself inside author Plum Johnson’s story. First of all, it’s the quintessential mother-daughter-strife story, complete with old criticisms that don’t make sense and new awakenings that come too late. It’s also about that parenting-our-parents thing that so

This book will touch a nerve like no other, especially if you’re a Boomer with an elderly parent in need of care. Bring tissues, and bring your heart. “They Left Us Everything” is a jewel. many Boomers do now, and what makes that bearable is that Johnson is able to say what we’re thinking: it’s hard, irritating, funny, rewarding, and we can’t stop aching from it. This book will touch a nerve like no other, especially if you’re a Boomer with an elderly parent in need of care. Bring tissues, and bring your heart. “They Left Us Everything” is a jewel. s Terri Schlichenmeyer has been reading since she was 3 years old and she never goes anywhere without a book. She lives with her two dogs and 11,000 books.

seniortimesmagazine.com


New low, low, low Home Equity Line of Credit Rates Introductory rate for the first 12 months

Then variable rates as low as

After introductory period

www.SunStateFCU.org ~ (352) 381-5200 or (877) SunState *Subject to credit approval. After 12 months, the applicable rate may be 4.50% to 18.00% Annual Percentage Rate (APR) depending on creditworthiness. The variable APR is as low as Prime + 0.00, however, under no circumstances will the annual percentage rate go below 4.50% for the term of the loan. The Annual Percentage Rate is subject to change annually. Rate and payment amount may vary based on property value, loan amount, and other factors. Your actual rate may be higher than the advertised rate. Offer is available for owner-occupied property only and excludes manufactured homes. Offer is not available for the refinance or consolidation of existing SFCU loans. Offer valid as of 9/1/16 and is a limited time offer and may be canceled without notice. If SunState Federal Credit Union pays your closing costs and you pay off and close your line within 36 months, you must reimburse SunState Federal Credit Union in the amount of the fees paid by us.

November 2016

51 51


52

Betty’s Story Heart attack survivor Betty McMahon returned to North Florida Regional to thank a special group of people. From the moment she arrived in our ER and Chest Pain Center, Betty received a level of care she says made it possible for her to come back strong. Betty has returned to her work and her hiking and wants to share her story because the things she knows now might help save your life. The full story about the people who were there when Betty needed them most is on our website. The ER and Chest Pain Center at North Florida Regional. Lifesaving care for Life’s Emergencies.

www.NFRMC.com/ER

52

November 2016

seniortimesmagazine.com


November 2016