Page 1

AC C S O F RA AU D P R OT ECT T IO O N | B U RT WA A RD’S S N E X T P ROJJ E C T | C R O S SW WO R D

A Place in the Sun Meet Sophy Mae Mitchell, the First Female Member of the Fightin’ Gator Marching Band OCTOBER 2016

seniortimesmagazine.com

INSIDE

BATTLING CANCER

VETERAN FRANCIS SCHOLTZ

Local Luminaries Share Their Stories

Pearl Harbor Survivor Who Used Music to Help Soldiers

1


2

Drs. Art & Kim Mowery

Restoring Smiles in Gainesville for 20 Years • 20 Years’ Experience • Former UF Instructor • One Doctor - One Office • IV Sedation Available • No Part-time Doctors Here • Porcelain Crowns and Veneers • Tooth-colored Fillings • Single-tooth Implants • Implant-Secured Dentures • Thousands of Restorations Completed

Aesthetic

Reconstructive

Implants

4960 Newberry Road, #220, Gainesville (Next to Gainesville Health & Fitness)

(352) 332-6725 ExceptionalDentistry.com Actual Before and After Case Photos of Smiles Restored by Drs. Art and Kim Mowery

2

Drs. Art and Kim Mowery have been featured in:

“Whether your smile needs a little or a lot, we can help!” October 2016

seniortimesmagazine.com


Your local geico office presents THE INAUGU RAL BEN EFIT EVEN T FOR THE ALACH U A COU N T Y H U MAN E SO C I E T Y

november 10, 2016 woofstock2016.com

Get your tickets today! Thursday, November 10th, 2016 | 6 PM – 10 PM The Barn at Rembert Farms in Alachua, Florida

e PRES EN T ED BY:

| NAYLOR R ASS ASSOCI O ATION SOLUTIONS | NEWBERRY ANIMAL HOSPITAL | ALTA SY SYSTE STEMS | WIND-FM | WUFT-FM/TV /TV BEACH BRE BREAK SALON | BUSBY CABINETS | CAMPBELL SPEL PELLIC LICYY ENGI ENG NEERING | CSI ACADEMY | DENISE MON MONGIA GIARDO RDO, REALTOR/BROKER ASSOCIATE | DOGGIE STYLES ES GROOMING FARM BUREAU INSURA URANCE | GAINESVILLE HEALTH & FITNESS | MELDON LAW | MIDTOWN JEWELRY & LOANS | GAINESVILLE REGIONAL AIRPORT | GAINESVILLE SCE CENE/GAINESVILLE GRUB

For sponsorship information and further details, please call Margot DeConna at 352-415-2460. www.woofstock2016.com October 2016 3 3


4

20

32

34

14

28

CONTENTS OCTOBER 2016 • VOL. 17 ISSUE 10

ON THE COVER – University of Florida alumna Sophy Mae Mitchell, who turns 85 this month, with the “Pride of the Sunshine” Gator Marching Band last year. She has played in the alumni band for nearly every homecoming game since 1973. PHOTO BY GABRIELLE CALISE

departments 8 12 38

Tapas Community Page Charity of the Month

columns 40 45 49

Calendar of Events Theatre Listings Crossword Puzzle

Embracing Life

18

by Donna Bonnell

Tinseltown Talks

32

by Nick Thomas

50

features 14

“I Knew I Was Going to Beat It”

Review by Terri Schlichenmeyer

28

BY GABRIELLE CALISE

BY PEGGY MACDONALD

Veteran Francis Scholtz Pearl Harbor Survivor Who Later Soothed Soldiers with Music BY MICHAEL STONE

4

October 2016

A Place in the Sun Sophy Mae Mitchell, the First Female Fightin’ Gator Marching Band Member

Local Luminaries Discuss Their Battles with Cancer

20

Reading Corner

34

Spotting False Promises Helping Area Seniors Fight Fraud BY MICHELLE CERULLI MCADAMS

WINNER! Congratulations to the winner from our SEPTEMBER 2016 issue…

Charles Snavely from Gainesville, Florida

seniortimesmagazine.com


We’re #1 in Florida. World-class care in your time of need.

The neurology and neurosurgery program at UF Health Shands Hospital, which includes the UF Health Comprehensive Stroke Center, is ranked highest in Florida by U.S. News & World Report. This ranking, along with our national certification as a comprehensive stroke center from The Joint Commission, demonstrates our commitment to offering a wider range of treatments and providing better care for you. In case of a stroke, call 911 immediately, and tell them to take you to UF Health Shands Hospital.

UF HEALTH SHANDS COMPREHENSIVE STROKE CENTER UFHealth.org/stroke October 2016

5 5


6

FROM THE EDITOR œ ALBERT ISAAC

Cancer Awareness Chances are pretty good that you or someone close to you has battled cancer. In my case, this dreaded disease has struck my mom and my sister — proving them both to be strong-willed survivors. This disease has also claimed two of my college roommates, while some of my other friends are still fighting with remarkable tenacity and hope either the disease itself or the aftereffect of therapeutic radiation and other treatments. So with October being Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we bring you a story about two local survivors (you might recognize these names) and their experiences beating the disease and being cancer free. On a much lighter note, we caught up with a University of Florida alumna who just happens to be the first female to march in the “Pride of the Sunshine” Gator Marching Band. Meet Sophy Mae Mitchell, a woman who has performed with the alumni band for homecoming every year (except for one) since the event began. And yes, this octogenarian plans to attend the Gator Band Alumni Weekend on October 14-15.

6

October 2016

Being a “Gatorbone,” I had once marched in the Gator Alumni Band, some years back. It was a marvelous and surreal experience. At the time I hadn’t played my trombone in about a decade. And it showed. But I marched onto that field with my fellow band members, clutching my sheet music against my bell, and gave it my best. It was a gazillion degrees that day, but as luck would have it, a brief but drenching downpour fell upon us after we marched onto the field. My music dissolved into a clump of illegible soggy pulp. Luckily, we were nearly finished by this time. The gazillion degree temperature suddenly dropped to below zero. (I could be exaggerating, but it was cold!) I saw one of the Gatorettes shivering (not an exaggeration). Miraculously, I remembered the fight song well enough to play it without having to read the music as I marched off the field. At least that’s my story and I’m sticking to it. Good times! On yet another note, we bring you an article about Seniors and fraud. Don’t be scammed! Read about things to be wary of, from the telephone to the Internet. Lastly, we continue with our series on World War II veterans. If you know of a WWII veteran in North Central Florida who would like to tell his or her story to Senior Times, please email Michael Stone at MichaelStone428@gmail.com. As always, we hope you enjoy this edition of Senior Times! s

Published monthly by Tower Publications, Inc.

www.seniortimesmagazine.com PUBLISHER

Charlie Delatorre charlie@towerpublications.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Hank McAfee hank@towerpublications.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Albert Isaac editor@towerpublications.com Fax: 352-416-0175 MANAGING EDITOR

Ericka Winterrowd ericka@towerpublications.com CREATIVE DIRECTION + GRAPHIC DESIGN

Hank McAfee, Neil McKinney EDITORIAL INTERN

Cecilia Lemus ADVERTISING SALES

Visit seniortimesmagazine.com or call: 352-372-5468 For more advertising information including rates, coverage area, distribution and more – call or visit our website at: www.seniortimesmagazine.com MAILING ADDRESS

4400 NW 36th Avenue Gainesville, FL 32606 352-372-5468 352-373-9178 fax

The articles printed in Senior Times Magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Tower Publications, Inc. or their editorial staff. Senior Times Magazine endeavors to accept reliable advertising; however, we can not be held responsible by the public for advertising claims. Senior Times Magazine reserves the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisement. If you would like to discontinue receiving Senior Times Magazine please call 352-372-5468 for assistance. © 2016 Tower Publications, Inc. All rights reserved.

If you would like us to publicize an event in Alachua or Marion counties, send information by the 13th day of the month prior. All submissions will be reviewed and every effort will be made to run qualified submissions if page space is available.

352-416-0175 (fax) or email: events@towerpublications.com

seniortimesmagazine.com


STAFF œ CONTRIBUTORS

Affordable Dentures–Gainesville, P.A. Stephan M. Showstark, DMD,

General Dentist

Springhill Commons Shopping Center 9200 NW 39th Ave, Ste 200, Gainesville FL No Appointment Necessary

(352) 376-8229

525

$

Full Set Dentures Economy

clockwise from top left PEGGY MACDONALD is a native Gainesvillian and the executive director of the Matheson History Museum. She has taught history at Florida Polytechnic, Stetson and UF. She is also the author of Marjorie Harris Carr: Defender of Florida’s Environment. peggymacdemos@gmail.com MICHAEL STONE is a journalist and photographer focusing now primarily on health care, technology and history, especially World War II. He also teaches in the journalism department at the University of Florida, and in his free time, he enjoys trying all the great vegan dishes at local restaurants. michaelstone428@gmail.com GABRIELLE CALISE is a junior journalism major at the University of Florida and freelance writer. In her spare time she enjoys collecting vinyl records, taking photographs and watching movies. gcalise@ufl.edu MICHELLE CERULLI MCADAMS is a freelance writer and editor in Gainesville. She is a graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill’s School of Media and Journalism and Harvard University. She has written for AARP, The Boston Globe, Austin American-Statesman and other news outlets. michelle.cerulli@gmail.com

105 $165

$

SAV E

75

$

(D5110, D5120)

Routine Tooth Extraction Per tooth ( D714 0 )

Complex Tooth Extraction Per tooth ( D7210 )

t Same- day service* tFive denture levels t FL Medicaid Accepted for Dentures Only t Financing available

SAV E

50

$

SAV E

25

$

PER DENTURE O N

PER DENTURE O N

PER DENTURE O N

U LT I M AT E or U LT R A

PREMIUM

C U S TO M

Complete or Partial Denture

Complete or Partial Denture

Complete or Partial Denture

1-800-DENTURE

®

20107-8

AffordableDentures.com

Offers good only at Affordable Dentures–Gainesville, P. A. Coupon must be presented at time of initial payment and cannot be combined with any other coupons, discounts, package price or prior order. Offer expires 12/30/16 and may change without notice. *Same-day service on Economy Dentures in most cases, call for details. Additional fees may be incurred depending on individual cases. Advertised fees effective through 12/30/16. These are minimum fees and charges may increase depending on the treatment required. THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT.

October 2016

7 7


8

TAPAS œ OCTOBER

ON THIS day

OCTOBER R 4, 1927 From 1927 to 1941 the 400 workers at Mount Rushmore were building a memorial that people from across the nation and around the world would come to see for generations. Ninety percent of the mountain was carved using dynamite. Workers cut and set charges of dynamite of specific sizes to remove precise amounts of rock. Construction ended on Oct 31, 1941.

Bear with me

OCT 13, 1958 958 Paddington Bear has been featured in more than 20 books. Paddington books have been translated into 30 languages across 70 titles and sold more than 30 million copies worldwide.

8

October 2016

OCTOBER 23, 1941 The fourth Disney animated feature film, “Dumbo” was released.

It is based upon the storyline written by Helen Aberson about a circus elephant deemed Dumbo d bbecause of his bbig ears. In re recent news, The Ringling Bros. T and a nd Barnum & Bailey Circus used Bail B elephants in its elep e perf performances for the final time in May. The circus company has used elephants in its shows for the last 145 years but changed its policies after animal rights groups and others campaigned against the practice.

seniortimesmagazine.com


OCTOBER 15, 1951

“I Love Lucy” is often regarded as one of the greatest and most influential sitcoms in history. The black-and-white series originally ran on CBS from October 15, 1951, to May 6, 1957.

OCTOBER 27, 1904 The New York City subway began operating, becoming the first underground & underwater rail system in the world.

OCTOBER 30, 1938 The radio broadcast, “The War of the Worlds,” panicked millions of Americans. Actor Orson Welles and the Mercury Players rs dramatized the e story by H.G. Wells depicting a Martian artian invasion of New w Jersey. Their script criptt utilized simulated ted radio news bulletins, which h many listeners thought were real.

October 2016

9 9


10

Susan Sarandon OCTOBER 4, 1946 Activist and Academy Award-winning actress Susan Sarandon is perhaps best known for roles in “Bull Durham,” “Thelma and Louise” and “Dead Man Walking.” Born in New York City, Sarandon began acting after college. In 1975 she landed a role in the cult classic film “The Rocky Horror Picture Show.” She went on to win an Academy Award for her performance in “Dead Man Walking,” and received Oscar nominations for her roles in “Atlantic City,” “Thelma and Louise,” “Lorenzo's Oil” and Years Old “The Client.” Aside from film acting, Sarandon is involved with charity work. In 1999 she rreceived the Amnesty International USA Media Spotlight Award for Leadership and the same year was appointed UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador.

70

A FEW OTHER NOTABLE

October Birthdays

Hillary Clinton (69) October 26, 1947

Christopher Lloyd was born in Stamford, Connecticut, on October 22, 1938. The awardwinning actor became an apprentice in summer stock productions at age 14 and appeared in more than 200 stage productions before working in film. Lloyd made his big-screen debut in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” in 1975, which won five Academy Awards. He also starred in the commercially successful Back to the Future films as the eccentric Dr. Emmett “Doc” Brown. One of Lloyd’s more famous television roles was as “Reverend” Jim Ignatowski on the hit series Taxi.

10

October 2016

Sigourney Weaver (67)

Jeff Goldblum (64)

October 8, 1949

October 22, 1952

Cliff Richards (76)

Caitlyn Jenner (67)

October 14, 1940

October 28, 1949

78 Years Old

“A sign that negotiations were handled well on both sides is that everybody probably feels a little bit like they didn't get what they wanted. — CHRISTOPHER LLOYD

seniortimesmagazine.com


New low, low, low Home Equity Line of Credit Rates Introductory rate for the first 12 months

Then variable rates as low as

After introductory period

www.SunStateFCU.org ~ (352) 381-5200 or (877) SunState *Subject to credit approval. After 12 months, the applicable rate may be 4.50% to 18.00% Annual Percentage Rate (APR) depending on creditworthiness. The variable APR is as low as Prime + 0.00, however, under no circumstances will the annual percentage rate go below 4.50% for the term of the loan. The Annual Percentage Rate is subject to change annually. Rate and payment amount may vary based on property value, loan amount, and other factors. Your actual rate may be higher than the advertised rate. Offer is available for owner-occupied property only and excludes manufactured homes. Offer is not available for the refinance or consolidation of existing SFCU loans. Offer valid as of 9/1/16 and is a limited time offer and may be canceled without notice. If SunState Federal Credit Union pays your closing costs and you pay off and close your line within 36 months, you must reimburse SunState Federal Credit Union in the amount of the fees paid by us.

October 2016

11 11


12

COMMUNITY œ SENIOR RECREATION CENTER

AN OLD SOLDIER WHO WILL NOT FADE AWAY For the dwindling members of the Greatest Generation, memories of the war are never far away. At age 95, Joseph Bauer, Jr. of Summerfield was proud of his time in the U.S. Navy but humble about his service. “I was a cook on a PT boat,” he would tell visitors. But the nearby photograph of Bauer in his dress blues with a chest full of medals told another story, one of a combat veteran who saw plenty of action in the Pacific Theatre from 1942 until VJ Day in 1945. To commemorate that service, Hospice of Marion County performed a Veterans’ Pinning Ceremony for Bauer at the end of April. His children, grandchildren, and friends gathered at his home in Stonecrest to witness the moving ceremony conducted by Hospice volunteer Bob Levenson, himself a Marine Corps veteran. In his one-and-half-years as a volunteer, Levenson has conducted more than 20 pinnings, but said this

12

October 2016

Joseph Bauer, Jr., seated, is flanked by the barbershop quartert, Equinox, led by his son, Pat, second from right. Hospice of Marion County volunteer Bob Levenson, far right, conducted the honorary veterans’ pinning ceremony just two weeks before Bauer’s passing.

was one of the most memorable. Bauer’s son Pat brought his barbershop quartet, Equinox, from Tampa to perform songs with special meaning from his father’s life. There wasn’t a dry eye in the house when Bauer was presented with the three-flag stand (U.S., State of Florida, and Navy) as Equinox sang the Navy’s unofficial but beloved fight song, “Anchors Aweigh.” Just two weeks after his recognition, Bauer passed away peacefully knowing his family, his friends, and his country appreciated his sacrifice. Hospice of Marion County began veterans’ pinnings in 2008 and is a Level III partner in the We Honor Veterans program, affiliated with the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization. Since its inception, more than 1,850 pinning ceremonies have been performed in homes, hospice houses and nursing facilities in Marion County — a final and lasting tribute to our military men and women. seniortimesmagazine.com


Van Dyke General and Implant Dentistry Preventative Care | Cosmetic Dentistry Crowns, Bridges & Implants | Dentures

If you are considering dental implants for your oral health...give us a call!

2 OfямБce Locations: 4960 W. Newberry Rd. Ste 200 Gainesville, FL 32607 40 South Lake Ave Lake Butler, FL 32054

Get the smile you've always wanted. Schedule your next appointment or call us today at 352-377-1781 www.drwkvandyke.com

R

ELATIONSHIP THAT IS BA A SE SED D ON N TRU RU US ST T, DI DIGN IG GN N IIT T Y, Y, A ND ND DE ED D ICAT I C AT IC AT IO ION N

E

XPERIENCE, EDUCATION, KN KNOW O W LE E DG D G E AN A DS SK K IL I L LS L S O F DO DOCT CT T OR OR RS S OF A UD U D IO I O LO LOGY O

S

ERVICE THAT IS CONSISTENT T AND AN N D BE BEY YO O OND D EX XP P E C TA TATI TION ON NS

P

ERSONALIZED CARE PLAN TA A IL LOR O E ED D TO YO O UR R NE EE E DS D S A ND D BU UD D GET GET GE

E

VIDENCE-BASED REHABILITATII ON O

C

ONVENIENT LOCATIONS AND HOURS S

T

RANSPARENT T P RI RICING I THAT SAVES S YO YOU M MO ON NE EY

4340 NEWBERRY ROAD, SUITE 301 | GAINESVILLE, FL 32607

www.GainesvilleAudiologist.com

The solution you seek with the integrity you expect.

October 2016

13 13


14

INSPIRING STRENGTH

“I Knew I Was Going to Beat It” Pegeen Hanrahan and Storm Roberts Discuss Their Battles with Cancer by Peggy Macdonald

F

or almost 30 years, Robert Whalen — better known by his radio name, Storm Roberts — has kick-started radio listeners’ day with a combination of good tunes, playful banter and outrageous comedy on 98.5 KTK morning radio. Roberts kept his listeners laughing even after he was diagnosed with prostate cancer six years ago. When Roberts’ doctor told him he had cancer, he said he felt a shock go through his body. “Then a second later, I thought, ‘I got this,’” Roberts said. “I’m going to kick this.” The treatment process took time. For two years, Roberts’ testosterone was chemically lowered to what he described as near castration level to prevent the cancer growing. Like breast cancer, prostate cancer can be fueled by hormones. In addition, Roberts had radioactive seeds implanted in his prostate to kill the cancer. The seeds are like little grenades that are directly inserted into a prostate tumor, according to the Johns Hopkins University website. After being diagnosed with prostate cancer, Roberts sought a second opinion from the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, which U.S. News & World Report recently ranked the number six cancer hospital in the nation. Roberts’ doctor confirmed the diagnosis and advised him that his best options were prostate surgery or a combination of hormone therapy and radioactive seeds. Roberts said losing the prostate is “way too much of a price to pay.” When he meets God, he said, he’d like to point out a few problems with human anatomy.

14

October 2016

“When I get to heaven, I’m going to tell Her — because God’s a woman — it’s a lousy design,” Roberts said about the prostate. “The prostate — not your best plan.” Roberts’ robust sense of humor helped him remain optimistic throughout the lengthy treatment process. In addition, he had a good role model. Roberts’ mother, Mary Ellen Whalen, was a triple cancer survivor. “She beat it three times and died of a stroke at age 90,” he said. After beating cancer, Roberts pays it forward by doing about 50 to 100 fundraisers a year. He is currently working with Real Men Wear Pink, an organization that raises money for breast cancer research. He can be spotted in a pink tutu on Oct. 22 at the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk in downtown Gainesville.

“Early detection is it. It worked with my mom and it worked with me.” Roberts observed the rapid pace of changes in breast cancer treatment when his mother battled the disease. Her first breast cancer treatment involved a radical mastectomy with lymph node removal. When she was diagnosed with breast cancer again eight years later, Roberts’ mother had more options to choose from, including less extensive surgery. seniortimesmagazine.com


PHOTO BY PEGGY MACDONALD

PHOTO BY PEGGY MACDONALD

Pegeen Hanrahan with her husband, Tony Malone, and their three children.

Storm Roberts on the air in the 98.5 KTK studio. October 2016

15 15


16

Storm Roberts (left) at the 2015 Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk. Pegeen Hanrahan (above) during cold cap therapy and chemotherapy treatment.

Six years after being diagnosed with cancer, Roberts is in the best shape of his life. “I’ve lost a Backstreet Boy,” he joked. Roberts doubled up on his exercise during treatment to give his body the best chance to fight off the cancer. Now he volunteers his time to promote cancer research and early detection. “Early detection is it,” Roberts said. “It worked with my mom and it worked with me.” Former Mayor of Gainesville Pegeen Hanrahan was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2013. A mother of three, Hanrahan reported that she had spent four of the previous eight years either pregnant or nursing. “I hadn’t been in the habit of getting any testing that wasn’t baby-related,” she explained. When she detected a lump the size of a pea, she realized it was time to get a mammogram. At the time, Hanrahan was at the helm of the successful Amendment One campaign to use one-third of revenues from the Florida documentary stamp

16

October 2016

tax for acquisition and restoration of conservation and recreation lands. Hanrahan was diagnosed with a very aggressive, yet early stage, treatable form of breast cancer. At the time, her children were only two, six and seven years old. Hanrahan was quickly scheduled for a lumpectomy at UF Health Shands Hospital. After two initial surgeries (to date she has had 11), she started chemotherapy. Hanrahan used an innovative treatment called cold cap therapy to prevent her fiery red hair from falling out, not so much for herself as for her children. She did not want them to view their mother as a victim. Penguin Cold Caps were cooled to 35 degrees below zero Fahrenheit, then placed on Hanrahan’s head for approximately nine hours before, during and after chemotherapy. Hanrahan’s husband, Tony Malone, brought a cooler of dry ice with multiple cold caps that had to be changed frequently during chemotherapy to restrict chemically laden blood flow to the scalp, which helps preserve the hair, Hanrahan wrote in a fundraising letter for the American Red Cross. “After the first chemo, the surgical site of the lymph node biopsy became terribly infected,” Hanrahan recalled. “Then I had a severe reaction to a prescribed antibiotic.” Hanrahan developed such a high fever due to the infection that she was hospitalized. “My advice is to avoid hospitals at all costs the day after Thanksgiving,” she joked. While undergoing chemotherapy, Hanrahan continued to work full time and care for her three children. Although she admits the experience was “an ordeal,” she said she was seniortimesmagazine.com


PHOTO BY ERICKA WINTERROWD

grateful for the devoted friends and family members who helped keep her spirits up. For at least five years after treatment, Hanrahan must take anticancer medication. Her doctor also prescribed rigorous exercise at least five days a week. Hanrahan has been active in the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life. In 2015, she served as the Event Lead in Gainesville. She said she has shared her story in the hope that it will “help someone still wading through theirs.” Storm Roberts and Pegeen Hanrahan are more than cancer survivors. They are an inspiration to all who struggle with cancer, and their stories serve as a reminder of the power of early detection. Now that they have “kicked cancer’s butt,” as Storm Roberts said, they both work to promote cancer awareness and solicit funds for cancer research in the community. “I’m not a glass half full or a glass half empty kind of guy,” Roberts said. “I’m let’s fill up your glass.” Cheers to two of Gainesville’s best-loved cancer survivors. s

FEELING OUT OF STEP? THE ENRGISE STUDY

REDUCING MARKERS OF INFLAMMATION Older adults can have slightly elevated markers of a blood test, with no signs of illness. Research has found that higher r easily getting tired or fatigued.

What can we do about ENRGISE is a research study to look at different ways to reduce the level of these markers in your blood to see if they could help increase mobility.

We will be looking at two • Omega-3, commonly found in • Losartan, a commonly used medication to treat high blood pressure

WE NEED YOU FOR A MOBILITY STUDY! We’re looking for those ages 70 and older who miss the pep in their step. If you are 70 years or older, call us at 352.273.5919 or toll-free at 866.386.7730 to schedule a screening visit.

WWW.ENRGISESTUDY.ORG

October 2016

17 17


18

COLUMN œ DONNA BONNELL

Embracing Life Kevin — A Kind Soul Who Had an Enlarged Heart

L

ife has a way of teaching valuable lessons from unplanned brief encounters. Sometimes it takes years to receive the intended messages. Such was the case for me with Kevin. The occasion was my son’s wedding. Family from across the country traveled to Newberry. The nearest hotel was miles away, so everyone crashed at our home. Chaotic? Yes! Campers were parked in the back yard and people were everywhere. My brother, Don, invited Kevin to ride with him from Atlanta. Kevin and I met once before, so he came along. Don forgot to mention the wedding. When they arrived, Kevin’s eyes were as big as his enlarged heart. He took one look at the surroundings and glared at my brother in disbelief. Don simply said, “Come on Kev, it will be alright.” Fortunately, Kevin was easy-going and quickly became an integral member of the party. With so many people present, we did not schedule meals. There was plenty to eat and drink. The idea was for everyone to help themselves and feel free to cook whatever they desired. When I explained the plan (or lack thereof ) to Kevin, he smiled and shook his head. The next few days are somewhat of a blur. My son moved and we hosted a rehearsal dinner almost as big as the reception. On the big day somehow everyone bathed and dressed. Wallets

18

October 2016

were lost, tuxedos came in the wrong sizes and bathroom time was scarce. This good-natured man laughed at our shenanigans and rejoiced in the spirit. As last minute details were reviewed, Kevin helped load and organize items. However, he had not taken his turn in

My brother swiftly escorted Kevin to sit with the family. The next morning, Kevin woke up early and prepared a feast from all the leftovers. He said, “It’s the least I could do. You are the craziest bunch of white folks I have ever met.” Later that day everyone left. Sadly, it was the last time I saw Kevin. His enlarged heart failed shortly thereafter and he passed. This true tale became significant in my understanding of racism many years later. Kevin was African-American. Even though he was at ease with us, he was insecure in attending the wedding wearing inappropriate clothing. He knew we wanted him to be there, but also realized we did not understand his dilemma. An article, sponsored by Mecklenburg Ministries, “We Need to Talk: Com-

This true tale became significant in my understanding of racism many years later. the sacred shower. I scooted out those applying hairspray and insisted that our new friend take his turn. It was then we learned that Kevin only brought shorts and t-shirts, as he was unaware of the wedding. We did not care what he wore, but he made it perfectly clear that he was uncomfortable and would not be attending. In a matter of 10 minutes, miraculously (maybe) the men put together an outfit for Kevin to wear. My husband had a sports jacket; my brother-in-law an extra pair of dress pants; my nephew a spare belt. Kevin surrendered to our pleas, got a speedy shower and away we went to the church. Everyone took their respective roles, as Kevin sat silently alone in the back pew. I glanced back from the front of the sanctuary to soak up the view and saw this sweet gentleman sitting all alone.

munity Conversations for Healing & Change,” triggered my ‘Aha!’ moment. It stated, “We should try to walk in another person’s shoes; understand that a white person has more liberty to go anywhere, while a black man, even when dressedup, has more restricted access.” My memory flashed back to Kevin. While we never talked about it, I know now he was worried that (white) people in the church would pre-judge him for his casual clothing, based on the color of his skin. Kevin unintentionally illustrated how we all must do better in understanding each other’s paths thus far and work towards embracing unity. s Donna Bonnell is a freelance writer who moved to Newberry in 1983. She enjoys living and working in the town she now calls home. dbnewberry@aol.com

seniortimesmagazine.com


November 18, 2016 - January 1, 2017 • More than 2 million lights, acres of stunning decor and an ALL-NEW 60ft Christmas tree

• NEW! Breakfast with Charlie Brown™ & Friends

• NEW ICE! theme - 2 million pounds of colorful, hand-carved ice sculptures and slides featuring A Charlie Brown Christmas

• The Elf on the Shelf® Scavenger Hunt

• NEW! Mrs. Claus’ Christmas Traditions and Story Time Sing-a-long

• Cirque Dreams UnWrapped Stage Show • Gingerbread Decorating Corner • Build-A-Bear Workshop® • Alpine Rush Snow Tubing and more! KISSIMMEE, FL

Tickets and Packages on Sale Now!

ChristmasAtGaylordPalms.com

| (407) 586-4423 ICE! PRESENTED BY

PRESENTED BY

PEPSI, PEPSI-COLA and Pepsi Globe are registered trademarks of PepsiCo., Inc. Peanuts © 2016 Peanuts Worldwide LLC. The Elf on the Shelf ® and © CCA and B, LLC. All rights reserved. © & ® Build-A-Bear Workshop, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved. FUJIFILM and INSTAX are trademarks of FUJIFILM Corporation and its affiliates. © 2016 FUJIFILM North America Corporation. All rights reserved.

October 2016

19 19


20

TRIBUTE

Veteran Francis Scholtz Pearl Harbor Survivor Who Later Soothed Soldiers with Music on Guadalcanal Recalls the Attack story and photography by Michael Stone In recognition of the upcoming 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor, Senior Times is devoting its monthly World War II veteran tributes to survivors of the attack living in Florida. Featured this month is Army Air Forces Staff Sgt. Francis “Dutch” Scholtz of Jacksonville.

F

rancis “Dutch” Scholtz played a late gig with his dance band that Saturday at an officers club and didn’t get back to his barracks until 1 a.m. This was nothing new for the skilled pianist and private in the U.S. Army Air Forces. Officers would often have their wives with them there on the Hawaiian island of Oahu, and the couples’ cocktail parties needed some background music. Volunteering in late 1940 after high school in Iron Mountain, Michigan, Scholtz’s peacetime year on the tropical island carried this vacation-like gaiety: music, tennis, poker, getting off work early daily. “It was a nice place to be,” he remembered. “There’s good weather. It couldn’t be better — played tennis every day. Oh, it was great. … We only worked half days, and so half the day was for fun.” But the merriment came to a devastating end on Dec. 7, 1941 — “a date,” President Franklin D. Roosevelt told Congress and the nation on Dec. 8, “which will live in infamy.” For on the morning of Dec. 7, Japan launched 353 planes — torpedo planes, dive bombers, high-level bombers and fighters — in two waves from a fleet north of Oahu. Their target: the naval and air installations at Pearl Harbor.

20

October 2016

“When I woke up, all hell was breaking loose,” Scholtz said of the Japanese bombs that acted as an alarm clock. “I thought, ‘Well, what am I going to do?’” A 19-year-old radio operator for the 46th Fighter Squadron, Scholtz was stationed at Wheeler Field airbase, north of the harbor and relatively central on Oahu. So with Japan’s 183 planes in the first wave jetting in from the north and wanting to quickly knock out the parked U.S. planes to maintain air superiority, Wheeler became the attack’s first target, taking hits a few minutes before the first bomb fell on the harbor at 7:55 a.m. That makes Scholtz’s alarm clock essentially the start of World War II for the U.S.

“I stood there and watched airplanes come in and bomb and strafe our outfit.” Yet Wheeler’s situation appeared hopeless even before then. Planes there, at Hickam Field at the harbor and Bellows Field in eastern Oahu had been lined up in the center of the runways for better guarding against ground sabotage — but this made them easy targets for an air raid. Because of the surprise, Scholtz recalled, Oahu’s military installations had no dugouts or other defenses prepared. seniortimesmagazine.com


Staff Sgt. Francis Scholtz, a survivor of the attack on Pearl Harbor and a pianist, holds a map in his Jacksonville home showing his war route in the PaciďŹ c. Stationed at the Army Air Forces’ Wheeler Field airbase, Scholtz played a late gig with a dance band the night before and was awoken the next morning by bombs.

October 2016

21 21


22

Scholtz managed to carry his Gulbransen piano with him through the Pacific, playing it as a morale booster. This happened mainly on Guadalcanal, and the place he performed there — a tent atop a hill — became known as Harmony Hill. The 94-year-old continues to play today.

But most stunning to Scholtz, Oahu’s 43,000 Army air, coastal and ground personnel had been called off alert the day before the attack despite being on guard leading up to then. This resulted in them handing over their weapons and receiving leave. Scholtz found out the stand-down orders in a Wheeler hangar on Dec. 6 from 1st Lt. Lewis M. Sanders, who commanded the 46th, some hours before his band gig at the officers club. “[Sanders] said, ‘I don’t understand this. We know the Japanese fleet is out there, but we’re going off alert. And you’re free to go on pass,’” Scholtz, now 94, remembered in the living

22

October 2016

room of his Jacksonville home. “And so naturally, the guys who had been on alert for a month ran off to Honolulu, and I had a dance job that night.” So uncontested, Japanese dive bombers began dropping from 500 feet over Wheeler’s hangars, planes and barracks, and once the lack of opposition became apparent, their fighters joined in for strafing runs. Scholtz emerged from his barracks and saw it unfold. “I stood there and watched airplanes come in and bomb and strafe our outfit, which is just 30 yards from the hangar line,” he said, calling Wheeler’s planes “sitting ducks.” seniortimesmagazine.com


Defenseless, Scholtz “knew when he motioned for the attack on the this wasn’t the place to be.” Zeros. “God, I almost died.” So he took off for the nearby Sanders and Sterling each got one officers quarters, “plastered Zero kill, as did another pilot in the myself up against the wall, four-man attack. (Overall, six U.S. pilots and I just stayed there until had confirmed kills across the island the [first wave] was over.” that day — 10 kills altogether — with six There, he also prayed. of the kills coming from famed pilots Lt. “I was just praying to end Kenneth Taylor and Lt. George Welch, up alive,” he said. “I didn’t whose actions were depicted in the 2001 pray any bad things about movie Pearl Harbor.) anybody else. I just hoped we But Sterling didn’t make it through, get it over with.” and Scholtz watched from below as his Once Japan’s first run plane was shot down in the close-toat Wheeler let up, Scholtz the-ground dogfight. It’d be the only Scholtz and his wife, Barbara, met as music majors at Lawrence University in Wisconsin and have been headed for an emplacement death he saw that day, though he did married for 65 years. nest surrounded by sandbags also lose his friend Don Plant, who was and containing a portable radio. He contacted Fort Shafter, the shot in the head elsewhere at Wheeler in a strafing run. Army’s headquarters on Hawaii, and the orders were to get “It was one big mess,” Scholtz said. “It all was horrific. It Wheeler’s fighter planes — P-36s and P-40s — in the air. was a nightmare.” “They thought that we were going to save them, of course, Scholtz said Japan’s planes far exceeded the build of the because we had airplanes,” Scholtz said, “but everybody was U.S.’s and described the P-36s and P-40s as “antiques comattacked at the same time. In fact, I think they hit the airpared to the Japanese.” planes first.” “The Japanese had Zeros,” he said. “They were fast, and Though Wheeler took heavy plane losses, it did get a few airborne. The number of U.S. Army planes that did take off — from Wheeler and the other DISCOUNT fields — isn’t a widely cited number, but a Dec. 7, 1983, Associated Press article puts it at 11, including one flown by Sanders. The main source in the article, • Full Service Photography SITTIING FEE Sanders discusses how he and three • Free Tours & Consultations other U.S. pilots attacked a group of • By Appointment Only eight Japanese Zero fighter planes. As he motioned the other three to launch the attack, Sanders noticed that one of the other pilots was 2nd Lt. Gordon Sterling, who Sanders described as not being “cut out for a fighter pilot.” Sanders had rounded up three pilots — not including Sterling — to take off with him. But while one went to grab a parachute, Sterling had apparently jumped into that pilot’s plane, unbeknownst to Sanders. “When I turned around, there sat Sterling,” Sanders says in the article of

Mike Shea

SE N I OR

PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY

Capture Memories 352-317-4484 • Mikeshea-photo.com

October 2016

23 23


24

they were very lightweight. But most of the weight was in gun armory.” Sanders’ dogfight likely occurred as planes from Japan’s second wave stormed across Oahu. Not all attack maps show the second wave hitting Wheeler, but several do. And Scholtz remembers follow-up attacks clearly because a Zero went on a strafing run on his sandbag emplacement. “In fact,” he said, “a bullet just went right by my ear. I carried it for a long time, but then I lost it.” As the attacked continued, Scholtz could see incredible smoke coming from Japan’s main target: battleship row, where the U.S. Pacific fleet took severe blows from bombs and torpedoes, including to three battleships that were so crippled they’d never return to service: the Arizona, Oklahoma and Utah. The single largest tragedy of the day was an armor-piercing

“In Guadalcanal, we had air raids, and we had one every night for 26 nights straight.” bomb detonating the forward magazine on the Arizona, which lost 1,177 sailors and Marines in the attack. Despite the extreme volume of the explosion, Scholtz said he doesn’t remember that sound specifically. “It was just one thing after another exploding — didn’t know what was blowing up.” By the time the attack ended, 2,403 Americans were dead, including 33 personnel at Wheeler. When Sanders got out of his plane after landing, “he was just beside himself,” Scholtz recalled. “He didn’t understand how this could have happened.” The rest of the day was spent preparing for the next attack. “We thought they would come back and retry to take the island, and that was our fear because they could have,” he said. “They pretty well wiped out our Navy and our Air Force. … Nobody knew anything, so we just lived in fear.” But in spite of all the tragedy, Scholtz said, the mood on Oahu remained at: “We can always win.” “I think the American psyche is not losing,” he said. “We’re winners, so that’s part of it. But there was a lot of fear and a lot of sleepless nights.” Maybe three or four days after the attack and because of the possibility of another strike, Scholtz said, the Army moved surviving planes to an area with an airstrip on Oahu’s north beach named Mokuleia, also called Dillingham Ranch. After some time there and into 1942, Scholtz’s squadron was deployed to the Pacific, hopping among a few smaller islands and

24

October 2016

seniortimesmagazine.com


LLOT’S OF TREASURE’S FFROM THE PAST!

INTRODUCING…

Open Friday, Saturday & Sunday 8-4pm

Chiefland FARMER’S FLEA

MARKET We have something for ev Youn and Old. everyone! Young

FFRESH P PRODUCE • • • • •

GENUINE LEATHER SHOP JEWELRY CHRISTIAN BOOK STORE GROCERIES COMPUTER REPAIR

• • • • •

while supplies last! – th on m y er ev s al new de

GIFT CERTIFICATES EE FR E N O ET G E, N O BUY STORES! TO THE BEST LOCAL

TOOLS CHILDREN’S CLOTHING ANTIQUES COLLECTABLES R.V. PARK WEATHER KING SHEDS

2 RESTAURANTS WITH HOME COOKED MEALS PHONE & DIRECTIONS

352-493-2022 1206 N YOUNG BLVD. (US 19) CHEIFLAND, FL 32626

Kelly’s Kreations gifts & flowers

Leonardo’s pizza

of Millhopper

FROM GAINESVILLE - JONESVILLE: FROM HIGH SPRINGS - ALACHUA:

TAKE S.R. 26 TO TRENTON, TAKE S.R.41 TO S.R. 26 TO TRENTHEN 129 SOUTH TO U.S. 19 N. TON THEN 129 SOUTH TO U.S. FLEA MARKET ON THE LEFT. 19 N. FLEA MARKET ON LEFT

WWW.CHIEFLANDFLEAMARKET.COM

Sp

s Ba ort

ll a r d s r & Bi

BOGO BARGAIN DEALS AVAILABLE IN LIMITED QUANTITIES. VISIT BOGOBARGAIN.COM TODAY!

Want more time to cheer for your team? Give Mini Maid a call! Call Mini Maid today for a free, no-hassle housecleaning quote.

352-374-4141

www.MiniMaidGainesville.com © 2 016 A l ac hu a Cou n t y M ini M aid . A ll r ig ht s re se r ve d .

BATHROOMS • KITCHEN • VACUUM CARPETS • MOP • PICK UP HOUSE • LOAD DISHWASHER • CHANGE BEDS

October 2016

25 25


26

“I think everybody in the country of [my] age is upset that World War II is taught in two paragraphs in a school.” eventually setting up on Guadalcanal, the site of the U.S.’s first offensive campaign in the Pacific. When the campaign ended by February 1943, the U.S. had lost about 7,100 soldiers, 29 ships and 615 aircraft. The ground threat had been extinguished by the time Scholtz arrived, but the Japanese continued to hammer the island with untargeted bombings. “They’d come over at night and drop bombs and just not knowing what they’re trying to hit,” he said. “In Guadalcanal, we had air raids, and we had one every night for 26 nights straight.” The intensity of the conflict hit the soldiers hard mentally, but they received some relief from Scholtz. Before, when he was about to deploy from Hawaii, Scholtz bought a Gulbransen piano for $50 from a chaplain and asked Sanders if he’d be able to bring it along as a morale booster. Sanders said yes, so the piano was crated up and followed Scholtz through the Pacific. Though formally a radio operator, coordinating plane takeoffs, landings and other movements, Scholtz became more

26

October 2016

known for his piano playing, on Guadalcanal and the previous islands he stopped on. “They didn’t know what the hell” was in the crate, he recalled. “The sailors who unloaded the ships caught on maybe about the third island, and they said, ‘There’s that damn piano again.’” He performed in a large tent on Guadalcanal, and it sat atop a hill overlooking an airstrip. And because his playing could be heard by nearby soldiers of all branches and ranks, and brought them together under the tent, the hill became known as “harmony hill.” The Japanese “would bomb us, and I would play the piano after the bombing,” Scholtz said. His peaceful presence on Guadalcanal got him the ironic name “Dutch,” a reference to the mobster Dutch Schultz. “And I was just the opposite of a gangster.” Sometime in 1945, before the war came to a close, Scholtz received orders to leave Guadalcanal and head to Australia. But now a staff sergeant, he had enough points to instead be sent back to the States and be discharged. After the war, Scholtz got a music degree from Lawrence seniortimesmagazine.com


University in Appleton, Wisconsin, through the G.I. Bill. There, he met fellow music major Barbara, and the two have been married for 65 years and have two children, six grandchildren and a great-grandchild. “In the beginning, it was just something all the guys did,” Barbara Scholtz said of her husband’s service. “They didn’t talk about it. When I went to Lawrence, the upperclassmen were former G.I.s, and they just got on with their lives. They didn’t talk about it much — ever.” Dutch Scholtz continued with music in Appleton after college, serving as a church organist, dance-band player and school band director. He continued with those gigs until 1968, when he became superintendent of schools for the Catholic Diocese of Sioux Falls, and six years later, he headed for Minneapolis-Saint Paul for the same position. Then, in 1986, he left for Jacksonville, where he worked as director of stewardship under John Snyder, the bishop of the Diocese of Saint Augustine, before retiring in 2002 at age 80. When the Scholtzes first moved to Florida, they made friends through the state’s northeast chapter of the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association. Obituaries indicate that maybe only three or four members of the chapter are still living, and it — along with the overall association — disbanded in 2011 because of the dwindling number of Pearl Harbor survivors. The main group now carrying on the legacy is the Sons and Daughters of Pearl Harbor Survivors, and member Rick Carrway, the immediate past president, estimated the number of living survivors at perhaps about 2,300. A precise number isn’t possible because even though the final president of the survivors association keeps a death roster of past members, not all survivors were association members, said Carraway, whose dad, Navy vet Jay Carraway, a Pensacola resident who was a crewman on the USS Hulbert during the attack, died in August at age 94. A main mission for Sons and Daughters — a non-political organization that takes a stand only on having a strong military — is ensuring today’s Americans have a thorough understanding of the events leading up to, during and after Pearl Harbor, Carraway said. Members will speak to “anybody that’ll have us, really” but especially to schools. “Part of what the Sons and Daughters wants to do is keep these memories alive in the school system,” he said. “And obviously, it’s not going well: I think everybody in the country of [my] age is upset that World War II is taught in two paragraphs in a school.” On being able to continue to tell his personal story of the roughly two-hour attack that changed the course of America, Scholtz said, “I’m very proud of the fact that I contributed something to it.” “It wasn’t much,” he added, “but it was the best I could do.” But what Scholtz leans toward more from his time in the service: comforting his fellow soldiers with music. “I’m proud of the fact that I provided a lot of entertainment for troops, for officers, because the piano, like on Guadalcanal, was an attraction,” he said. “I had a great life. I loved everything I did.” s

! s r o t a G Go

Affordable Housing for Senior Citizens Federally subsidized apartments for persons 62 & older. • Studio & One-Bedroom Apartments. • ADA accessible apartments are also available. • Rent is based on income. For your appointment, call:

352-373-1213 TDD: 800-955-8771 Total annual income limit for eligibility:

One Person $21,250 Two Persons $24,300

Pine Grove Apartments 1901 NE 2nd Street Gainesville, Florida OFFICE HOURS: MON-FRIDAY 9am-12pm 1pm-4pm CLOSED SATURDAY AND SUNDAY

If you know a WWII veteran in North Central Florida who would like to tell his or her story to Senior Times, please email Michael Stone at MichaelStone428@gmail.com

October 2016

27 27


28

SOPHY MAE PLAY

A Place in the Sun Sophy Mae Mitchell, the First Female Fightin’ Gator Marching Band Member

story and photography by Gabrielle Calise

O

n the day of a University of Florida Homecoming football game, everywhere Sophy Mae Mitchell goes, fans come to find her. Moms and their daughters are her biggest admirers, especially those who have played in band themselves. They ask for photographs. They call her an inspiration. A rock star. Mitchell, an 85-year-old bell lyre player with a warm, broad smile, doesn’t look like a rock star. But the first female member of the Fightin’ Gators Marching Band definitely has something special about her. Sophy Mae Mitchell was 17 when she enrolled at UF. In 1949, college tuition was $50 a semester and there were no girls in the marching band. Still, Mitchell wanted to play. She had marched with the high school band while she was still a middle school student and reigned as the head drummer while she was a student at Sebring High School. Half of the band were female then, she said. “Where I grew up in Sebring, band was a way of life,” she said. She went to Col. Harold Bachman, the UF band director, right away and asked for a place in the band. “He said, ‘You learn to play the bell lyre and we’ll talk about it,’” Mitchell said. Mitchell had never played the bell lyre before, but she practiced every day until she learned each song. When she had learned the instrument, Bachman wanted to give her the spot, but it had already filled her place with a male bell lyre player. Mitchell was allowed to sit with the band and play her instrument in the stands as a civilian. She didn’t even have a

28

October 2016

uniform until Bachman called her back into his office later in the semester with a surprise. While there was still no room for Mitchell on the team, she could wear a uniform and run around the field with a banner that said “University of Florida Fightin’ Gator Band.” Mitchell took the opportunity. After some of the boys graduated, she took her place as the first female marching band player.

“The boys in the band didn’t mind at all that we were in the band. We were all friends.” A freshman from Lake Worth enrolled the next year and became the second girl in the band, and the following year that girl’s sister also joined. By Mitchell’s senior year of college, a fourth female bell lyre player had been added to the band. Mitchell said that if anyone had a problem with her being a girl in the band, she never heard about it. “The boys in the band didn’t mind at all that we were in the band,” she said. “We were all friends.” Mitchell connected with the other musicians. She said they were special. “Band people are sort of different,” she said. “They love doing what they do.” Everyone was there out of choice, Mitchell said. There was no music college at UF yet, so each member of the band seniortimesmagazine.com


Sophy Mae Mitchell holds a photograph from her second year of college at UF. In 1950, Mitchell was just one of two women in the Fightin’ Gator Marching Band.

October 2016

29 29


30

was studying something different. They gave their time to the band purely out of joy. “People play for nothing,” she said. “People play because they just love playing.” Mitchell has fond memories of being a member of Tau Beta Sigma, a national band sorority. Mitchell was the first president of UF’s chapter of TBΣ. Since the group was new, it mostly just helped the band fraternities hold events. The girls also served hot coffee and donuts to the band at early morning practices. Mitchell enjoyed traveling with the band. It was too expensive to send the full band to each away game, but once a year, the whole Fightin’ Gators Marching Band got to travel to an out-of-state game. During the summer after her freshman year, the band took a 20-hour train ride to a national convention in NYC and played at Madison Square Garden. Not only is Mitchell a pioneer for Gator Band, said old friend and roommate Kathryn “Kitty” Mena Ramos, she is also wonderfully sweet and fun. Ramos has known Mitchell since high school, and the pair lived together in Reid Hall during their sophomore year of college. They were among the first girls on campus, Ramos said. She recalled going in rides in Mitchell’s car — an old 1933 Chevy that the girls painted blue with pink polka dots. “Now, the car did run but it didn’t start, so we used to get the boys from next door and they would come over and push us until we could get going,” she said. “And that’s how we got to the football games.” Another time, Mitchell — who was studying agriculture —

30

October 2016

filled the dorm room with African violets. “We just had a lot of fun together,” Ramos said. After graduating from UF, Mitchell hoped to become a florist but didn’t have enough money to open up her own shop right away. She took a job with the Welcome Wagon. It didn’t pay very well, but the job allowed her to see the working world for the first time. After three years she decided that it was time for a change. She submitted her letter of resignation, bought a Vagabond trailer and drove to New Orleans so that she could experience Mardi Gras. Mitchell had always wanted to work at a hotel resort for a summer but had never gone while she was in college because she felt obligated to see her parents. “I was their only daughter and they already were going to lose me to my career,” she said. After the Welcome Wagon, however, she had time to pursue her dream. Mitchell started to work at Lake Placid Hotel and Resort in New York, serving meals three times a day plus high tea in the afternoon. Mitchell fell in love with the hospitality industry, and after finishing up the summer at Lake Placid she enrolled at Florida State University. Before the schools became co-educational, UF had been reserved for boys and FSU was for girls, Mitchell said. She recalled being just one of a few girls in her courses at UF, which had only been co-educational for two years before she arrived. When she went to FSU, Mitchell once again found herself surprised to be the only female in her classes. After about a year taking the hospitality courses, she realized that women seniortimesmagazine.com


weren’t well received in the hotel industry. Nevertheless, she got her master’s degree in hotel and restaurant administration. “It was a door opener having a master’s degree, but I was still a woman,” she said. With her education and passion for traveling, Mitchell was still able to have a career that she loved. She managed dining facilities around the country, from Alabama to Louisiana to Texas to Missouri. Mitchell took a few years to teach at FSU, and then worked for over 18 years in New York City before retiring. “It was an exciting career,” she said. “I was where I belonged.” Mitchell came back to her hometown of Sebring after retirement. She now rescues animals, taking care of three rescue dogs and 12 rescue cats in addition to three dogs of her own. She has also rescued people; a homeless man and his son have lived with her and helped her take care of the animals for the past five years. Mitchell has also played orchestra bells in the community band during the past two decades. And every fall, she returns to UF to play with the alumni band during the homecoming game. “She’s just one of those people you love to see every year,” said Gator Alumni Band director Gary Langford. “She’s quite a known celebrity around here on Gator Band Alumni Day.”

While the marching band doesn’t have bell lyre players anymore, Langford writes Mitchell a special part each year so that she can perform at the homecoming game. “We would cancel the game if she wasn’t here!” Langford said. Mitchell joined the alumni band as soon as it started in 1973. She performed with the alumni band every single year during the homecoming game halftime show, except for in 1999 when she was overseas with the military for work. Last year she came back again, but the arthritis in her knee made it hard for her to keep up with the pace of the band. While the alumni band came onto the field, Mitchell had to focus on marching and couldn’t start playing her bell lyre until the group stopped moving. “Last year it was hard to go fast enough,” she said with a laugh. Mitchell will be back this year, but she isn’t sure if she will march. Unless her arthritis gets better, she may wait on the sideline and join the band on the field for the halftime show after it has marched into position. No matter what she has to do, Mitchell will keep coming to the games as long as she can. “All my life I’ve said it was my place in the sun,” she said, “that it was where I was meant to be.” s October 2016

31 31


32

Tinseltown Talks Caped Crusader Burt Ward now Canine Crusader by Nick Thomas

Burt and Tracy Ward in their bedroom surrounded by just a few of their rescue dogs.

T

here was a time when Burt Ward would leap dramatically across our TV screens in green shorts, beige tights, and a gold cape masquerading weekly as ‘Robin, the Boy Wonder,’ one-half of the crime fighting Dynamic Duo in the popular television show “Batman,” which first aired 50 years ago this year. Today, you’ll find Burt more comfortable at home in jeans, rescuing dogs, although he hasn’t abandoned the citizens of Gotham City entirely. “I was the Caped Crusader, but now I’m the Canine Crusader,” Ward said with a laugh from his five-acre property in Norco, California. “Since my wife Tracy and I began running Gentle Giants 22 years ago, we have rescued over 15,500 dogs and found safe, loving

32

October 2016

homes for them” (see www.gentlegiantsrescue.com). The Wards actually share their home — inside and out — with up to 50 dogs, mostly large breeds like Great Danes, Greyhounds and St. Bernards. The pack of pooches consumes 600 lbs. of food each day, costing around $14,000 a month, while veterinary expenses run a staggering $50,000 per year. Adoption fees and donations make little dent in the bills, and the money received from selling their own brand of dog food, also called Gentle Giants, goes directly to support the animals. “We pay for everything and take no salary,” Ward explained. “This is our charity.” In addition to saving the lives of

‘Man’s Best Friend,’ the Wards claim to have also extended those lives by creating a unique, healthy dog food. “Right now, we have 24 dogs between 15 to 26 years old!” Ward said. “But there’s nothing magical, it’s all based on quality and science.” With a team of nutritionists, Ward said they developed a special formula which contains much less fat than many commercial dog foods. They tested it on their dogs for two years before making it commercially available in 2008. “It’s now sold in 1,200 stores in California, Arizona and Florida, and available nationally online from walmart. com and amazon.com,” Ward said proudly, and with a level of enthusiasm reminiscent of the youthful exuberance he brought to his Robin role. The original Batman series lasted for three seasons in the ‘60s and led to a 1966 feature film and animated series in the ‘70s, all starring Ward and Adam West as Batman. Fans of the franchise will be delighted to learn that Ward hasn’t entirely retired from crime fighting. Together with West and the original Catwoman, Julie Newmar, the trio have reunited to provide voices for a new animated feature called “Batman: Return of the Caped Crusaders” due for release in October on Digital HD. “This is a Warner Bros. project that I’ve been aware of for about 18 months,” Ward said. “It incorporates all of the seniortimesmagazine.com


WARNER BROS & DC COMICS

20TH CENTURY FOX TELEVISION

Best of Gainesville AWARD

Burt Ward and Adam West as Robin and Batman (top) from the 1960s TV show Batman. The duo is set for a return in the animated feature Batman - Return of the Caped Crusaders (above), due for an October 11 release.

great things that made Batman wonderful then — including the humor — and combines that with some of the style in the recent, edgier Batman features.” While the reunion was enjoyable, Ward recalls the original series as being especially fun with all the gadgets and tonguein-cheek humor, “except for the explosions, third-degree burns, and broken bones!” that occurred during filming. But despite the injuries, he said the cast was a joy to work with. “Adam and I have been great friends for 50 years,” he said. “And Alan Napier (‘Alfred’) was the sweetest man in the world, and so cultured. He carried around this tiny dog which would fit in the palm of his hand and only put it down while doing his scenes.” Today, the Wards have no such luxury in dog transportation with their giant breeds that can weigh up to 300 pounds. Now 71, Ward said they do hire helpers to assist with the dog feeding and other heavy duties. But every other aspect of the rescue is essentially a two-person operation between Burt and Tracy, “but mainly Tracy” he added. “In our hearts, we know it’s really important what we’re doing,” Ward said. “We’re involved in other charitable work, but this is our daily hands-on cause.” s

The Gainesville Award Program has awarded The Atrium its annual Best of Gainesville Award. RSVP - 352-378-0773 Let us show you our model apartments and join us for a meal.

THE ATRIUM 2431 NW 41st Street Gainesville, Fl 32606

352-378-0773 theatriumatgainesville.com

Nick Thomas teaches at Auburn University at Montgomery, Ala., and has written features, columns, and interviews for over 600 magazines and newspapers.

October 2016

33 33


34

STAY SMART

Spotting False Promises Helping Area Seniors Fight Fraud

by Michelle Cerulli McAdams

C

rime Prevention Deputy Cary Gallop, of the Alachua County Sheriff’s Office, is in the business of protecting people from fraud. The types of crime run the gamut — from Internet and inperson scams to phone fraud. There was a father-and-son duo that was duped into purchasing a new car that they had no intention of buying and an elderly couple that spent thousands of dollars to help someone posing as their grandchild. Gallop tries to keep the public from becoming victims of these crimes and others by offering presentations and training in the community. He’s presented to local interest groups, social clubs, financial institutions and others at churches, recreation centers and municipal buildings across the county. “I try to cover as much of the topic as possible,” said Gallop, who has worked in law enforcement in Florida for nearly 30 years. “It all sort of relates to each other.” The foundation of Gallop’s presentations are current local, state and national fraud trends, and he draws most of his facts from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). He names crimes such as “skimming, sucker lists, phishing, the 407 Nigerian letter scam, foreign lotteries, travel scams and fake charities, which use the same tactics that legal telemarketers use to scam money from people,” he said. The victims who share their stories with Gallop vary in age and location, but many of those interested in his presentations are Seniors. “Florida is number one for frauds and identity scams in the nation even though we have a smaller population than

34

October 2016

California,” Gallop said. “What these scammers are finding out is that it’s easier to scam our senior population, which is growing faster than any population in Florida. They’re not naïve; they’re just not informed about some of the things that are going on.” Gallop encourages Seniors and others to sign up for the FTC’s scam alert emails (www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts). He also directs people to programs and resources from Elder Options, which is part of the Mid-Florida Area Agency on Aging, as well as AARP for resources on detecting and beating fraud. (Note: The writer is a contributor to the AARP Bulletin.)

ONLINE DATING DISASTER About two years ago, Patricia Clayton sought help from Seniors vs. Crime, a nonprofit sponsored by the Office of the Attorney General that provides support and advice to Seniors who are targets of fraud. Comprised of more than 40 offices across the state of Florida, Seniors vs. Crime is committed “to reduc[ing] the victimization of senior citizens who are often targeted for specific crimes or scams based on their age,” according to its website. Similar to the work Gallop is doing, Seniors vs. Crime offers educational and crime prevention presentations to Seniors. Organization volunteers, or “senior sleuths,” also investigate victims’ complaints and connect them to additional resources to help with their cases. According to Seniors vs. Crime’s 2015 annual report to Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi, program volunteers asseniortimesmagazine.com


PHOTO BY MICHELLE CERULLI MCADAMS

October 2016

35

35


36

sisted 13,861 Florida Seniors in 2015, from “directing Seniors to proper help organizations” to the “actual recovery of property or money that was fraudulently taken from them.” Recoveries totaled nearly $1.3 million in 2015, with about “31 percent of workable complaints result[ing] in a recovery of funds for Seniors.” Additionally, in 2015, 133 cases were deemed criminal in nature and referred to law enforcement. “Law enforcement reported that nine criminal arrests had been made based on the Seniors vs. Crime case files,” according to the annual report. As for Clayton, the fraud began when she met someone on a dating website geared toward Seniors. She says he was a handsome man who “looked like an upstanding person” from his profile photos. They spoke on the phone a few times and communicated by email. “He said he had to go to Egypt, and once he was over there, his luggage got stolen,” Clayton said. So she decided to help him, wiring money as requested and continuing to do so when he told her of other disasters that kept cropping up overseas. She put the pieces together when she realized how much money she had sent him over time. “My life was upside down” at the time, Clayton said. “I finally woke up one day and realized this was a scam.” When she asked her online companion when he was going to repay her the $40,000 she sent to him, he cut off all communication. “They prey on innocent people,” she said. “It’s scary out there.” Clayton contacted Seniors vs. Crime, which tried to better identify the suspect and narrow down his location. After that, the organization suggested she contact law enforcement with the proper jurisdiction. Clayton had saved all of her online communications with the scammer and brought them to the FBI. “I’m sure I’m not the only one it’s happened to,” she said. Clayton has not recovered the money she is owed, and she recommends that other Seniors stay away from dating sites geared toward older people. She had been looking for companionship and instead got “traumatized for life.” There are other ways to meet people, she said. “He caught me at a time in my life when I was not thinking properly,” Clayton said. “I don’t turn over money to people I don’t know.”

36

October 2016

A MYRIAD OF MISDEEDS Gallop said that one of the most popular scams targeted at Seniors occurs over the phone. “Baby Boomers were raised to believe that they are supposed to be polite with people on the phone, even if it’s a wrong number or they don’t know [the caller],” Gallop said. “I encourage our Seniors that if you don’t recognize the phone number, don’t answer it. It’s a similar type of thought when we have people ring our doorbells or knock on our doors; it’s just not safe to answer our door to a stranger anymore.” Recent fraud that Gallop heard about involved an elderly couple that put a second mortgage on their home to assist their grandchild, or so they thought. Someone had called the couple’s home pretending to be one of their grandchildren, saying he or she was in trouble in a foreign country — the hallmark of what’s known as the “grandparent scam.” “They literally lost their house and risked everything they had to save the grandchild, and there’s no way to prosecute the scammers,” Gallop said. “Eighty to 90 percent of scammers are not from a country seniortimesmagazine.com


where we have law enforcement sanctions.” Though Gallop recommends people avoid answering phone calls from unrecognized numbers, if you do pick up such a call, he suggests asking the person who he or she is and then hanging up and calling the person back on the number you have for them — to confirm the call is not a hoax. “A lot of these people are getting personal information through sucker lists that everyone and anyone gets on during their life by entering drawings, lotteries and information online — all legal forms of gathering information,” Gallop said. “Later, scammers can buy those lists and scam people.”

he said. “Scam artists continue to find things that are brought to us to make our lives easier and to use them against us, so I try to figure out how to use social media and public information to provide ways to broadcast this information to people.” Social and civic groups, including support groups for veterans, have invited him to come speak with them, and then word spreads from there. Two detectives dedicated to fraud and identity theft help Gallop give presentations, too. “Anytime I’m invited — it doesn’t matter the number of people,” he said. “If I can find one interested person, to me, that’s worth my time.” s

FIGHTING FRAUD WITH AWARENESS

If you’d like to make a request for a presentation by Deputy Gallop,

Gallop believes that people learn from stories, which is part of why he enjoys meeting and teaching Seniors and others in the community through his in-person presentations. “Scams are a problem that I don’t think will ever go away,”

call 352-374-1800. You can reach the Elder Options Elder Helpline at 800-963-5337. To request assistance, learn more or volunteer with Seniors vs. Crime, call 1-800-203-3099. The organization says it is always in need of new volunteers.

October 2016

37 37


38

We feel the best way to find and recognize local charities in our communities is by asking you! The SunState Community Foundation is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization that serves the communities in and around North Central Florida by promoting and facilitating philanthropy. The Foundation was established to promote and provide charitable assistance that contributes towards the development, education and well-being of the communities, areas and residents of Alachua, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, and Levy Counties in Florida. The foundation’s initial goal is to administer and fully fund the award winning Facebook Charity-ofthe-Month program. SunState Federal Credit Union started the program in 2013, but has turned over administration of the program to the foundation, with SunState Federal Credit Union acting only as a sponsor. This has been done in the belief that this path will ensure the program remains a strong and expanding community resource long into the future. The SunState Community Foundation, Inc., provides donors/members opportunities to participate in the furtherance of the foundation’s goals in multiple ways. First, and foremost, the donors/members are providing funds to support the foundation’s charitable initiatives. Donors/members can also nominate groups for the Charity of the Month program, and then vote for the group of their choice. Donors/members are encouraged to participate and vote in the Charity of the Month program. Ultimately, the voters choose where foundation donations go as part of the infrastructure of the program.

SunState Community Foundation, Inc. S PONSORSHIP LEV ELS AVA ILA BLE $

1,000 CHARITY OF THE MONTH SPONSOR

$

Recognized on all 4 Entercom Communication stations, 30 times (120 total); KTK, SKY, WRUF and ESPN.

Recognized on the Charity of the Month Facebook Contest page, KTK’s Facebook page and Senior Times’ Facebook page.

Mentioned in the Charity of the Month page in Senior Times Magazine.

38

October 2016

500 RANDOM CHARITY SPONSOR Recognized on 2 of Entercom Communications stations, 30 times (60 total); WRUF and ESPN Recognized on the Charity of the Month Facebook Contest page, KTK’s Facebook page and Senior Times’ Facebook page. Mentioned in the Charity of the Month page in Senior Times Magazine.

$

300 NOMINATOR SPONSOR

Recognized on the Charity of the Month Facebook Contest page, KTK’s Facebook page and Senior Times’ Facebook page.

Mentioned in the Charity of the Month page in Senior Times Magazine.

$

100 RANDOM VOTER SPONSOR

Recognized on the Charity of the Month Facebook Contest page.

Mentioned in the Charity of the Month page in Senior Times Magazine

seniortimesmagazine.com


COMMUNITY PARTNERS >> CHARITY OF THE MONTH

CH A RIT Y OF THE MONTH WINNER S MOST RECENT WINNING ORGANIZATIONS TO NOMINATE A CHARITY OF YOUR CHOICE OR TO VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE NOMINEES, VISIT:

www.facebook.com/SunStateFCU and click on “Charity of the Month”

AUGUST WINNER - 13,000+ VOTES

AUGUST WINNER - 13,000+ VOTES

The Educators’ Emporium

Basketball Cop Foundation

SunState is naming both the Basketball Cop Foundation

Founded and operated by active duty Police Officer

and the Columbia County Educators’ Emporium as

Bobby White, this 501(c)(3) non-profit organization

Charities of the Month for August. Both charities will

is dedicated to building Police/Youth relationships

receive a $1,000 donation; their nominators, Bobby

across the U.S. It began with a noise complaint. Officer

White and Brandi Keen, will receive $300 each for nomi-

White responded and arrived on the scene to find kids

nating winning charities. The random winner is Paws on

playing basketball. He joined them and video of the

Parole, which receive a $500 donation, and the random

incident went viral. News outlets picked up the story as

voter winner is Hilary Hynes, who will receive $100.

a “rematch” with the kids was being planned. White and

The Columbia County School District Educators’

his team of officers gathered in the GPD briefing room

Emporium gives free office supplies, art and crafts

preparing to head out to play with the kids when the

materials, and other supplies to local teachers. This

door opened and in walks basketball legend Shaquille

organization could not be possible without donations.

O’Neal. Shaq had seen the video and decided that he was

The Emporium is always looking for and accepting

going to join White in the rematch. Learn more about

donations that teachers can use in their classrooms.

the organization: www.basketballcop.net .

Sometimes, businesses and individuals have items that they do not realize would be helpful in the classroom. A project of the SunState Community Foundation, Inc. Presented by SunState Federal Credit Union, Our Town Family of Magazines and Entercom Communications

October 2016 6

39 39


40

CALENDAR UPCOMING EVENTS IN ALACHUA & MARION

visual art, live performance, and events with many local galleries, eateries and businesses participating. www.artwalkgainesville.com.

ZUMBA First Saturday 5:00pm – 6:00pm GAINESVILLE - Bo Diddley Plaza, 111 E. University Ave. Free Zumba class with Cristiane Machado.

ARTS MARKET Third Saturday

MEDICAL MILESTONES EXHIBITION

BIRD WALK

Through December 23

8:30am - 11:30am GAINESVILLE - Sweetwater Wetlands Park, 325 SW Williston Rd. Birding field trips will be led by volunteers from Alachua Audubon Society. Walks are free, but park admission is $5 per car.

11:00am – 4:00pm Matheson History Museum, 513 E. University Ave. The new exhibition examines Alachua County’s rich healthcare history. The exhibition and all related programs are free and open to the public. Matheson is open Tuesday – Saturday.

Every Wednesday

Mondays 6:45pm – 9:00pm GAINESVILLE - United Church of Gainesville, 1624 NW 5th Ave. Come dance to jigs, reels and waltzes. No partner, experience or special dress required. Live music by Hoggetowne Fancy starts at 7:00pm.

PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB Third Monday 7:00pm – 9:00pm GAINESVILLE - LifeSouth Community Blood Center, 4039 Newberry Rd. Meet, share photographs and improve your skills. Located in the rear conference room. gainesvillephotoclub.com.

12:00pm – 4:00pm HIGH SPRINGS - Downtown Farmers Market, 115 NE Railroad Ave. Find fresh peaches, blueberries, carrots, and other produce all picked fresh from the garden.

Tuesday & Friday 9:30am GAINESVILLE - Alachua County Senior Recreation Center, 5701 NW 34th St. A fun and effective exercise class to help those living with Parkinson’s Disease and other balance-related health issues. Free. facebook. com/gainesvilleflparkinsonsnetwork.

JOYFUL MOTION FOR HEALTH Every Tuesday 5:30pm - 6:15pm GAINESVILLE - Criser Cancer Resource Center, 1515 SW Archer Rd. Replace stress with dance moves, warm ups and dance phrases.

SQUARE DANCE CLASS Tuesdays 6:15pm – 7:15pm GAINESVILLE - Westside Park Recreation Building, 1001 NW 34th St. The non-profit community organization teaches square dancing classes for singles, couples and families with children age 10 and up. September 6th and 13th are free, after that $5 per class. Contact Susie: 352-283-1296; susiemoon@cox.netdance.

40

October 2016

1:00pm – 2:00pm GAINESVILLE - First Magnitude Brewery, 1220 SE Veitch St. Brewery Yoga in the warehouse. All experience levels welcome; suggested donation of $5. Visit fmbrewing.com/calendar.

STRESS MANAGEMENT ENCORE DANCE WORKSHOP

Thursday, October 6

Thursdays

2:30pm – 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Senior Recreation Center, 5701 NW 34th Blvd. Learning about Stress and Stress Management: New Knowledge from an Ancient Tradition, Transcendental Meditation. Martha Peters, Ph.D., will describe how it works and discuss new research on PTSD, heart health, anxiety and mental clarity. Presented by PrimeTime Institute. www. primetimeinstitute.org or 352-367-8169.

4:00pm – 5:00pm GAINESVILLE - Senior Recreation Center, 5701 NW 34th St. This dance workshop provides mature dancers with an opportunity to continue their practice in an adultfriendly environment. 352-733-0880.

HARMONY SHOW CHORUS Thursdays

PARKINSON’S EXERCISE CLASS

YOGA Sundays

HIGH SPRINGS FARMERS MARKET Thursdays

ENGLISH COUNTRY DANCING

10:00am— 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Soma Art Media Hub LLC, 601 S. Main St. Visit the arts market in Gainesville and support innovative minds of all ages. Join them in connecting with local creatives during this monthly community event.

7:00pm – 9:30pm GAINESVILLE - Grace Presbyterian Church, 3146 NW 13th St. For all who are interested in learning and singing women’s Acapella barbershop harmony music. 352-318-1281.

WIC FARMERS MARKET Fridays 10:00am – 2:00pm GAINESVILLE - Alachua County Health Department, 224 SE 24th St. Through October, stop by and support local farmers and choose from a variety of seasonal fruits and vegetables. 800-494-2543.

FEMINISTS, PHYSICIANS AND CHILDBIRTH: FLORIDA & BEYOND Thursday, October 6 6:00pm GAINESVILLE - Matheson Museum, 513 E. University Ave. Dr. Caton, author of “What a Blessing She Had Chloroform: The Medical and Social Response to the Pain of Childbirth from 1800 to the Present” will discuss the impact of first-wave and second-wave feminism upon medical and social responses to childbirth. A book signing will follow the presentation.

UF SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA LADY GAMERS

Thursday, October 6

Fridays

7:30pm GAINESVILLE - University Auditorium, 333 Newell Dr. Free concert in memory of Dr. Arthur Jennings. Featured songs include Bach C.P.E. Symphony in D, and Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 5 “Emperor.”

1:00pm HIGH SPRINGS - New Century Woman’s Club, 40 NW 1st Ave. The Lady Gamers meet for fun, friendship and food. Everyone is invited. Meet old friends and make some new ones.

FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK ARTWALK GAINESVILLE

Friday, October 7

Last Friday

6:00pm – 9:00pm OCALA - Downtown Square, SE 1st Ave. First Friday of the month. Live entertainment. www.ocalafl.org/recpark.

7:00pm - 10:00pm GAINESVILLE - Downtown. Artwalk is a free monthly self-guided tour that combines exciting

seniortimesmagazine.com


ERIC CLAPTON & JJ CALE TRIBUTE Friday, October 7 8:00pm – 10:00pm GAINESVILLE - Bo Diddley Plaza, 111 E. University Ave. Gainesville’s “Free Fridays” Concert Series presents: Mark Miale, Tony McMahon & Friends. Visit gvlculturalaffairs.org.

COMMUNITY YARD SALE Saturday, October 8 8:00am – 2:00pm OCALA - Silver Springs Shores Community Center, 590 Silver Rd. Wide and generous spacing is available for $5 and with oversized tables to use for an additional $5 per table. First Saturday of every month.

JEAN DORNEY MEMORIAL WILDFLOWER WALK Saturday, October 8 9:00am - 10:30am GAINESVILLE - Morningside Nature Center, 3450 E. University Ave. Enjoy the spectacular fall wildflower bloom in the piney woods. 352-334-3326.

OCALA CULTURAL FESTIVAL Saturday, October 8 10:00am – 4:00pm OCALA - Tuscawilla Park. 828 NE 8th Ave. Highlighting diversity in the community. There will be food, live music and dance.

SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARK AND RENAISSANCE FAIRE

Hollywood Jazz

Saturday, October 8

Friday, October 14

12:00pm – 9:00pm OCALA - Tuscawilla Park, 829 NE Sanchez Ave. The main performances will take place on the outdoor stage next to the Reilly Arts Center. 352-362-8548.

GAINESVILLE - Thomas Center, 302 NE 6 Ave. The Nick DeCarlis Quartet concert will feature jazz standards that came from movies, and movie themes by jazz composers. $15 general admission, $10 students.

TWO HAWK COUNTRY CIRCUS Saturday, October 8 1:00pm and 3:30pm WILLISTON - Two Hawk Hammock, 17950 NE 53rd Lane. The event features AscenDance acrobats, live music, door prizes, arts & crafts and more. $12 for advance tickets and $15 at the door. www.sconnection.org.

NATIONAL NOVEL WRITING MONTH

NATIONAL FOSSIL DAY

Sunday, October 9

1:00 pm – 4:00 pm GAINESVILLE - Florida Museum of Natural History, 3215 Hull Rd. Celebrate National Fossil Day and Earth Science Week and enjoy docentled tours of the “Florida Fossils: Evolution of Life and Land” exhibit. 352-846-2000.

3:00pm - 7:00pm OCALA - Reilly Arts Center, 500 NE 9th St. An evening of live music, brew and authentic German cuisine. Stay late to watch the UF vs. LSU game.

2:30pm - 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Millhopper Library, 3145 NW 43rd St. NaNoWriMo organizes events to inspire, encourage and coach children and adults to achieve their creative potential in a fun approach to creative writing. Wendy Thornton will share her experience of participating in NaNoWriMo, the challenges, procedure, format, discipline, frustrations, joys, and benefits. Hear the pros and cons and then plan to join the friendly challenge in November as you write with 300,000+ people. The meeting is open and free to all interested in the written word.

LITERARY JOURNALISM WORKSHOP

DUSTY’S RAGTIME & SILENT MOVIES

OKTOBERFEST Saturday, October 8

Sunday, October 9 2:00pm – 3:00pm GAINESVILLE - Headquarters Library, 401 E. University Ave. Fiona Lama will discuss how to write a literary journalism article and present the elements and examples of this type of writing. Free.

7:30pm

Sunday, October 9 6:00pm - 9:00pm GAINESVILLE - Market Street, 112 SW 1st Ave. Enjoy classic and original ragtime pieces to a backdrop of silent films with participation by local acrobat artists, AscenDance and more. Cover is $5.

Wednesday, October 12

FIELD TRIP Thursday, October 13 9:45am GAINESVILLE - Leveda Brown Environmental Park, 5115 NE 63 Ave. Presented by PrimeTime Institute. Tour on a trolley and hear a brief history of solid waste management in Alachua County, learn how various waste components are recycled, and more. Space is limited; sign up at a PTI meeting or call Jean Outler at 367-8169 by Oct. 6th. Meet at the Park (off Waldo Rd.) by 9:45 am. A flyer with more details and directions is available at PTI meetings. www.primetimeinstitute.org.

October 2016

41 41


42

HORMONE TREATMENT PANEL Tuesday, October 18 3:30pm – 4:30pm GAINESVILLE - The Village Tower Club Ballroom, 8000 NW 27th Blvd. Learn about hormone replacement therapy at this free session. 1-800-611-6913.

CANCER CONNECTIONS Wednesday, October 19 12:00pm – 1:00pm GAINESVILLE - HealthStreet, 2401 SW Archer Rd. Dr. Tina Lam (surgeon), will be speaking on breast cancer. Monthly meeting and networking opportunities for anyone involved in the care or treatment of cancer patients, or provides a service to them. Lunch provided for those who RSVP; $4 donation is requested. Barb Thomas: bnbbarb@aol.com or www.myhealthstreet.org.

MEDICAL HISTORY TALK Thursday, October 20 6:00pm GAINESVILLE - Matheson Museum, 513 E. University Ave. Local historian and author Murray D. Laurie and medical historian Dr. Nina Stoyan-Rosenzweig will examine the history of the University of Florida College of Medicine, which celebrates its 60th anniversary this year.

STAYING SHARP Thursday, October 20

Downtown Festival & Art Show

2:30pm – 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Senior Recreation Center, 5701 NW 34th Blvd. Innovative Mindfulness and ‘Brain Health’ Strategies for Optimal Cognitive Aging by Jackie Maye, MS, from the UF Clinical and Health Psychology Department. Presented by PrimeTime Institute. www. primetimeinstitute.org or 352-367-8169.

November 5 - 6

UF WORLD MUSIC ENSEMBLES

Times Vary

GAINESVILLE - Downtown. Watch the art scene swing into high gear on Saturday, from 10:00am – 5:00pm, and on Sunday from 10:00am – 4:00pm. The streets of historic downtown Gainesville, from City Hall to the Hippodrome State Theatre will be transformed into a celebration of art and creativity complete with live music, performing arts and an array of food.

Friday, October 21 8:00pm – 10:00pm GAINESVILLE - Bo Diddley Plaza, 111 E. University Ave. Gainesville’s “Free Fridays” Concert Series presents: Jacaré Brazil, Agbedidi Africa & Others. Visit gvlculturalaffairs.org.

DINING IN THE DARK CIVIL WAR ROUNDTABLE

FALL FESTIVAL

Saturday, October 22

Thursday, October 13

Saturday, October 15

6:00pm - 8:00pm GAINESVILLE - Trinity United Methodist Church, 4000 NW 53rd Ave., Education Bldg. #232. This monthly meeting, held the second Thursday of each month, is open to the public and features guest speakers. 352-378-3726, www. cwrnf.org or diane@proofinggrounds.com.

4:00pm - 10:00pm OCALA - Downtown Square. Food, live bands and contests. The event is free and there will be annual attempt to break the Largest Simultaneous Dance with Michael Jackson’s “Thriller.” Participation fee for the dance is $5 per person in advance and $7 at the night of the event.

5:30pm OCALA - Jumbolair Ballroom. Featuring a fullcourse meal prepared by Mojo’s Grill, and live music, this event will raise awareness about the challenges faced by those who are blind and visually impaired and will raise funds for the local not-for-profit Florida Center for the Blind. 352-873-4700; www.flblind.org.

GRAM FEST Friday, October 14 8:00pm – 10:00pm GAINESVILLE - Bo Diddley Plaza, 111 E. University Ave. Gainesville’s “Free Fridays” Concert Series presents: Gram Parson’s Tribute. Visit Gvlculturalaffairs.org.

42

October 2016

AUDUBON TOUR Sunday, October 16 8:00am GAINESVILLE - Kanapaha Gardens, 4700 SW 58th Dr. Join a special tour by the Audubon Society and learn about the birds of Kanapaha. Bring binoculars and arrive promptly at 8am. $4 per person. Members are admitted free of charge.

ORCHIDS IN THE GARDEN October 22 – 23 9:00am – 5:00pm GAINESVILLE - Kanapaha Botanical Gardens, 4700 SW 58th Dr. About 50 booths will be set up selling a wide variety of plants. The American Orchid Society will have its annual American Orchid Society’s judged show. Admission is free. Bring cash for most vendors.

seniortimesmagazine.com


CLEAR SOUND AUDIOLOGY WELCOMES DR. JOSEPH SPARKS AND HIS PATIENTS!

)ĆŤ0(!5ĆŤ 5ĆŤ

* ĆŤÄ’ĆŤ.1%/!ĆŤ#!*0ĆŤ #!*0ĆŤ

Ä†Ä€ÄŠÄĄÄ†Ä‚Ä ÄĄÄ…Ä€Ä‚ÄƒĆŤ ĀĂă 333Ä‹.1%/!0%+*.#*%6!.Ä‹+)ĆŤ *%6!.Ä‹+)ĆŤ *!./Ä‹+)ĆŤ )Ä‹0(!5ÄŽ.1%/!(**!./Ä‹+)ĆŤ

"Ă•Ă€LÂœ>Ă€`ViĂ€ĂŒÂˆwi` dermatologists are trained in

effective skin cancer removal. Mohs Surgery for

%CNNVQFC[VQUEJGFWNG CEQPUWNVCVKQP

(352) 332-4442 YYYICKPGUXKNNGĆƒFGTOEQO

Advertise Here for as little as $219 per month!

Dr. Swamy is proud to announce the addition of Dr. Sparks to Clear Sound Audiology. With over 55 years of combined experience, Dr. Swamy and Dr. Sparks oer state of the art hearing technologies individually tailored to your hearing, lifestyle, and budget. Please call today to schedule your complimentary hearing consultation!

To request more information and a copy of the rate card, please contact us through our website.

352-505-6766 clearsoundaudiology.com 2240 NW 40th Terrace, Suite C • Gainesville, Florida 32605

www.seniortimesmagazine.com October 2016

43 43


44

FLORIDA BAT FESTIVAL Saturday, October 22 10:00am - 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Lubee Bat Conservancy, 1309 NW 192nd Ave. There will be games, music, environmental organizations, food and bats. Adults $8.

ELECTRO AERIAL SHOW Saturday, October 22 8:00pm – 11:00pm GAINESVILLE - Market Street, 112 SW 1st Ave. Acrobats will perform aerial bartending. AscenDance is the professional cirque performance ensemble of Gainesville’s own circus school. The event also features live music. Cover is $5.

CYCLING FESTIVAL October 22 - 23 Times Vary GAINESVILLE - 2700 NW 51st St. Join the Orthopaedic Institute Santa Fe Century, benefitting the Boys & Girls Club on Saturday. The Horse Farm Hundred on Sunday, as they cycle through town. Sign up at gccfla.org.

FALL BOOK SALE October 22 - 26 Times Vary GAINESVILLE - Friends of the Library Bookhouse, 430 N. Main St. Sale to benefit Alachua County Library System and Literacy programs. Browse thousands of books,

artwork, comics, manga, software, CDs, DVDs, videos, records and more. Cash or check only. Visit folacld.org or call 352-375-1676.

SUNNY’S HOWL-A-PALOOZA CARNIVAL Sunday, October 23 3:00pm – 6:00pm NEWBERRY - Sun Country Sports Center, 333 SW 140th Terr. Activities include costume contests, haunted houses, train rides, bounce houses, raffle, carnival games and hay rides. All proceeds from the carnival directly benefit the March of Dimes. 352331-8773; suncountrysports.com/howlapalooza.

GAINESVILLE GONE AUSTIN Thursday, October 27 6:00pm – 10:00pm ALACHUA - Santa Fe River Ranch, 29220 NW 122nd St. A silent and live auction, live music and dinner catered by an Austin-based restaurant institution. All proceeds will benefit the Child Advocacy Center’s mission to end the cycle of child abuse. gainesvillegoneaustin.org.

PAINT SIP CREATE Thursday, October 27 5:30pm – 7:30pm HIGH SPRINGS - Lanza Gallery, 23645 US Hwy 27. Painting class for adults. Bring a bottle of wine, bring a friend, and be ready for a night of creativity and laughs. All supplies will be provided. Local artists Robin Popp or Tina Corbett will show

you step by step how to create a beautiful piece of artwork and you will go home with a finished canvas painting. $35 per person. Sign up by the Tuesday before each class. 352-474-9922.

EXERCISE IS FOR EVERYONE Thursday, October 27 2:30pm – 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Senior Recreation Center, 5701 NW 34th Blvd. Come get ideas about how Seniors who have experienced illness or injury, or just need to be more active, can increase their fitness levels safely. Presented by PrimeTime Institute. 352-367-8169; www.primetimeinstitute.org.

PARTY ON THE PATIO Thursday, October 27 6:00pm – 9:00pm HIGH SPRINGS - Great Outdoors Restaurant, 65 N. Main St. This event is a “Survivors for Research” fundraiser with a portion of all money taken in going to treatment-resistant breast cancer research at the UF Health cancer center.

ALL SAINTS DAY CEMETERY TOUR Sunday, October 30 1:00pm – 4:00pm GAINESVILLE - Historic Kanapaha Cemetery, 4101 SW 63rd Blvd. Meet some of Alachua County’s pioneers and prominent citizens who were laid to rest in this historic cemetery, founded in the late 1850s. Have the name of your loved one, who passed during the year, read and the bell rung in memory. Headstone cleaning and preservation demonstrations. Exhibits, refreshments. All proceeds benefit the preservation and maintenance of the cemetery. Admission: Donation. 352-378-9080.

A SALUTE TO VETERANS Sunday, October 30 3:00pm OCALA - West United Methodist Church, 93340 SW 105th St. The Marion Civic Chorale, with Artistic Conductor Hingrid Kujawinski and Accompanist Vicky Juliano, will present songs of praise and appreciation. Admission is free. Donations support a student scholarship program. If you would like us to publicize an event in Alachua or Marion counties, send information by the 13th day of the month prior. All submissions will be reviewed and every effort will be made to run qualified submissions if page space is available.

352-373-9178 (fax) or email: events@towerpublications.com

44

October 2016

seniortimesmagazine.com


THEATRE Acrosstown Repertory Theatre.....................619 S. Main Street, Gainesville Curtis M. Phillips Center ........................................... 315 Hull Road, Gainesville Fine Arts Hall Theatre - SFC ........................... 3000 NW 83rd St., Gainesville Gainesville Community Playhouse ....... 4039 N.W. 16th Blvd., Gainesville Hippodrome State Theatre................................. 25 SE 2nd Place, Gainesville UF Constans Theatre ................................................. Museum Road, Gainesville McGuire Pavilion Black Box Theatre................ Museum Road, Gainesville Actors’ Warehouse .............................................. 608 N. Main Street, Gainesville Ocala Civic Theatre ..................................4337 East Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala High Springs Playhouse ................................ 130 NE 1st Avenue, High Springs

352-371-1234 352-392-ARTS 352-395-4181 352-376-4949 352-375-4477 352-273-0526 352-392-1653 352-222-3699 352-236-2274 386-454-3525

ACTORS’ WAREHOUSE

The Boys in the Band

October 14 – 30 In his upper eastside Manhattan apartment, Michael is throwing a birthday party for Harold, a self-avowed “32-year-old, pockmarked, Jew fairy,” complete with surprise gift: “Cowboy” a street hustler. As the evening wears on, fueled by drugs and alcohol, bitter, unresolved resentments among the guests become exposed when a game of “Truth” goes terribly wrong.

HIGH SPRINGS PLAYHOUSE CURTIS M. PHILLIPS CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Rent

October 4 - October 5 In 1996, an original rock musical, RENT follows an unforgettable year in the lives of seven artists struggling to pursue their dreams without selling out. With its inspiring message of joy and hope in the face of fear, this timeless celebration of friendship

and creativity reminds us to measure our lives with the only thing that truly matters—love. Please note: RENT deals with mature subject matter and includes adult language. This performance is recommended for ages 17 and above.

Judgment at Nuremberg

October 24 – October 26 After War War II, when the crimes against humanity came to light, they were so shockingly horrific that they could not go unpunished. The American-led tribunals held in Nuremberg dealt with horrendous military crimes committed against a civilian population. The target? Jews, Romani, homosexuals, the mentally and physically challenged and others considered inferior to the Aryan Race. This morally-charged courtroom drama peels back the layers of humanity and history, grappling with issues such as shared culpability and the depths to which human cruelty can descend.

Blithe Spirit

September 30 - October 23 A haunting comedy by Noël Coward. Socialite and novelist Charles Condomine, invites the eccentric Madame Arcati, to his house to conduct a séance, hoping to gather material for his next book. The scheme backfires when he is haunted by the ghost of his annoying and temperamental first wife, Elvira. She makes continual attempts to disrupt Charles’s marriage to his second wife, Ruth, who cannot see or hear the ghost.

HIPPODROME STATE THEATER

Whatever Happened to Baby Jane

October 14 - November 6 In 1962, Bette Davis and Joan Crawford starred in a masterpiece that quickly became a cult classic. Live on stage, Whatever Happened to Baby Jane brings you the story of a former child star who torments her sister in their decaying Hollywood mansion. Just in time for the Halloween season, get ready for a gloriously campy black comedy with a twist. October 2016

45 45


46

CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE C O M P I L E D A D S F R O M C P F, N A N I , S A P A , C A D N E T & A M E R I C A N C L A S S I F I E D S

HAVE YOU OR SOMEONE YOU LOVED SUFFERED SEVERE COMPLICATIONS FROM THE USE OF: Call The Sentinel Group now!

Xarelto, Talcum Powder or  IVC Filter? You may be due Compensation, free consultation.

AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINING SAVE ON YOUR NEXT ALL INCLUSIVE RESORT PACKAGE

1-800-655-5256

Call us today or visit us online

1-877-270-7260

The Sentinel Group is an advertising group and represents lawyers jointly advertising their services. It is not a law firm or lawyer referral service. No representation is made that the quality of the legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of legal services performed by other lawyers. You should not rely upon any information herein as legal advice. The choice of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements.

ADOPTION

AUTO

OPEN ADOPTION Free Services & Support. Help With Living Expenses. You Choose the Family. Substance-exposed OK. Call Anytime 1-800-9ADOPT-4 or 1-727-4930936 LifetimeAdoption.com Lic#1000056488

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!! Top Dollar! Free Towing From Home, Office or body Shop. All Makes/ Models 2000-2016. Same Day Pick-Up Available! Call Now: 1-800-761-9396

A childless, financially secure married couple seeks to adopt. Will be hands-on parents. Your e x p e n s e s PA I D . To d d & Sharon. Call 1-844377-4077 or email: ToddAndSharonAdopt@ hotmail.com (FL Bar# 0150789)\OPEN ADOPTION Free Services & Support. Help With Living Expenses. You Choose the Family. Substance-exposed OK. Call Anytime. 1-800-9ADOPT-4 or 1-727-4930936 LifetimeAdoption.com Lic#1000056488 PRIVATE ADOPTION Living/ Medical Expenses Paid. Select & Meet a Loving Family to Care for Your Child. Call 24/7 Attorney Charlotte Danciu. 1-800395-5449 www.adoptionsurrogacy.com FL Bar #307084 P R I VAT E ( E X P E N S E S PA I D ) A D O P T I O N A Childless Couple Seeks to Adopt. Financial Security. Doctor Mom/Devoted Dad. Attorney Adam Sklar FL.Bar#0150789 Re: Christine & Tommy 1-800-790-5260 Alquiler De Utero $25,000.00 y más par Manutencion Ayudanos, No Podemos Tener Hijos. Llama a Nuestra Abogada. 561-674-6857 Fl. Bar #307084

46

October 2016

NCP Travel.com WE BUY DAMAGED VEHICLES! Top Dollar Offer. Free Towing From A n y w h e re . A l l M a k e s / Models 2000-2015 Wanted. America’s Top Car Buyer! Call Now: 1-800-761-9396

Donate Your Car to Veterans Today! Help and Support our Veterans. Fast - FREE pick up. 100% tax deductible. Call 1-800-245-0398

CAPITAL CLASSIC CARS Buying All European & Classic Cars. ANY Condition. ANY Location. Porsche, Mercedes, Jaguar & More! Top Dollar PAID. CapitalClassicCars. com Steve Nicholas 1-571-282-5153

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!! All Make/Models 20002015! Any Condition. Running or Not. Competitive Offer! Free Towing! We’re Nationwide! Call Now: 1-888-416-2330.

D O N AT E Y O U R C A R , T R U C K O R B O AT T O HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. CALL 1-800-902-7815

CAPITAL CLASSIC CARS Buying All European & Classic Cars. ANY Condition, ANY Location, Porsche, Mercedes, Jaguar & More! Top Dollar PAID. CapitalClassicCars.com Steve Nicholas 1-571-2825153, steve@capitalclassiccars.com

TEXAS PRIDE Trailers on sale now! Lowboy, Deck Over, Dump, Roll Off, 14,000 LB, 16,000 LB, 24,000 LB GVWR Tandem Axle, equipment trailers, triple axle, triple tandem, dual tandem dumps, tandem axle dumps, 7000 lb., 20,000 lb, Gooseneck, Bumper Pull Hitch, Sales, Parts, Service, Repairs, Bumper pull flat deck, Bumper pull tube top, Gooseneck tube top, Gooseneck flat deck, Manufacturer Direct. Madisonville, Bryan, Normangee, Texas, College Station. www.texaspridetrailers.com 

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!!    All Makes/Models 20002 0 1 6 ! A n y C o n d i t i o n .      Running or Not. Top $$$ Paid! Free Towing!    We’re Nationwide! Call Now: 1-888-985-1806  A-1 DONATE YOUR CAR FOR BREAST CANCER!  Help United Breast Foundation education, prevention, & support programs. FAST FREE PICKUP - 24 HR RESPONSE - TAX DEDUCTION  855-403-0213  Does your auto club offer no hassle service and rewards? Call American Auto Club (ACA) & Get $200 in ACA Rewards! (new members only) Roadside Assistance & Monthly Rewards. Call 800-519-6058 Got an older car, boat or RV? Do the humane thing. Donate it to the H u m a n e S o c i e t y. C a l l 1- 800-831-6309

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

EDUCATION / TRAINING AIRLINE MECHANIC T R A I N I N G – G e t FA A Technician certification. A p p ro v e d f o r m i l i t a r y benefits. Financial Aid if qualified. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)724-5403. AIRLINE MECHANIC T R A I N I N G - G E T FA A CERTIFICATION. NO HS DIPLOMA OR GED- WE CAN HELP. APPROVED F O R M I L I TA RY BENEFITS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL AVIATION INSTITUTE OF MAINTENANCE 1-866-724-5403 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a driver for Stevens Transport! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! New drivers earn $800+ per week! PAID CDL TRAINING! Stevens covers all costs! 1-888-734-6714 drive4stevens.com AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINING - Get FAA certification. No HS Diploma or GED - We can help. Approved for military benefits. Financial Aid if qualified. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-686-1704

ADVERTISE to 10 Million Homes across the USA! Place your ad in over 140 community newspapers, with circulation totaling over 10 million homes. Contact Pam @ 1-800-294-4033 or pam@4400media.com for more information.

MEDICAL BILLING SPECIALISTS NEEDED! Begin training at home for a career working with Medical Billing & Insurance! Online training with the right College can get you ready!

$60K IN ONE DAY! Twice my annual salary. And from mailing postcards. Watch the video at www. To o D a m n E a s y. c o m 2 4 hour Recording; 1-800230-6866 Ext 1000 Referral ID#MR70623

AIRLINE MECHANIC T R A I N I N G - G e t FA A Technician certification. Approved for military benefits. Financial Aid if qualified. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-453-6204 

Get FAA Technician certification. Approved for military benefits. Financial Aid if qualified. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance

866-453-6204

TRAIN AT HOME FOR  A NEW CAREER! Online training for Medical, Paralegal, Admin & more! Free Info K i t !   1 - 8 8 8 - 4 2 4 - 9 4 1 6    TrainOnline123.com  AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINING - Get FAA certification. No HS Diploma or GED - We can help. Approved for military benefits. Financial Aid if qualified. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-453-6204  A D U LT E D U C AT I O N PROGRAM Get your high school diploma. Fully accredited. Call now 1-800590-9611. Visit our page www.educatorsinc.org. Like us on Facebook: https:// www.facebook.com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a driver for Stevens Transport! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! New drivers can earn $800+ per week! PAID LOCAL CDL TRAINING! 1-888-743-1573 drive4stevens.com QUICKBOOKS & PAYROLL Training Program! Online Career Training can get you ready! Ask about our Laptop Program! HS Diploma/GED required. 1-877-649-3155 TRAIN ONLINE FOR A NEW CAREER! Accounting, Media Billing & Computer! No Experience needed! Train at Home! 1-877-6493155   TrainOnlineNow. com   GED/HS Diploma needed.

EMPLOYMENT PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! NO Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! www.WorkingCentral. NET Frac Sand OWNER O P E R AT O R S N e e d e d ! Experienced Only. FREE Trailer Lease! 80/20, South Texas Work. Eagle River Energy Services Jeff 214-250-1985.

$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home. CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 Ext 320 www.easyworkgreatpay.com OCEAN CORPORATION, new career, commercial diver, under water construction, NDT weld inspector, 30 weeks of training, job placement, financial assistance, employment, welding, education, inspection, job, 10840 Rockley Road, Houston, 77099, 800-3210298, www.oceancorp.com SURROGATE MOTHER NEEDED To Carry Our Baby! Generous Compensation and Expenses Paid. Call Attorney Charlotte Danciu 1-800-395-5449 www. adoption-surrogacy.com FL Bar #307084 AVIATION CAREERS – Hands on training for career opportunities in aviation, manufacturing and more. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-5838. DRS Now Hiring Satellite Installers. Company Provides: -Paid training – Performance bonuses – Vehicle and tools –Great benefits. Locations throughout Florida. Apply WWW. DRSINSTALL.COM. Dish Network Service Provider. Alquiler De Utero $25,000.00 y más par Manutencion Ayudanos, No Podemos Tener Hijos. Llama a Nuestra Abogada. 561-674-6857 Fl. Bar #307084

FINANCIAL / LEGAL Beware of loan fraud. Please check with the Better Business Bureau or Consumer Protection Agency before sending any money to any loan company.

seniortimesmagazine.com


READER ADVISORY: National Trade Associations we belong to have purchased the classifieds on these pages. Determining the value of their service or product is advised. In order to avoid misunderstandings, some advertisers do not offer employment but rather supply the readers with manuals, directories and other materials designed to help their clients establish mail order selling and other businesses at home. Under NO circumstance should you send any money in advance or give the anyone your checking, license ID, or credit card numbers. Also beware of ads that claim to guarantee loans regardless of credit and note that if a credit repair company does business only over the phone it is illegal to request any money before delivering its service. Toll free numbers may or may not reach Canada.

AIRLINE CAREERS Get FAA approved maintenance training at campuses coast to coast. Job placement assistance. Financial Aid for qualifying students. Military friendly. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance

800-481-7894

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. Unable to work? Denied benefits? We Can Help! WIN or Pay Nothing! Contact Bill Gordon & Associates at 1-800-670-4805 to start your application today! Lung Cancer? And 60 Years Old? If So, You And Your Family May Be Entitled To A Significant Cash Award. Call 800-375-9380 To Learn More. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. Unable to work? Denied benefits? We Can Help! WIN or Pay Nothing! Contact Bill Gordon & Associates at 1-800-860-6175 to start your application today! SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. Unable to work? Denied benefits? We Can Help! WIN or Pay Nothing! Contact Bill Gordon & Associates at 1-800-670-4805 to start your application today! Lung Cancer? And 60 Years Old? If So, You And Your Family May Be Entitled To A Significant Cash Award. Call 800-375-9380 To Learn More. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket.

HEALTH & MEDICAL S t o p O V E R PAY I N G for your prescriptions! SAVE! Call our licensed Canadian and International pharmacy,compare prices and get $25.00 OFF your first prescription! CALL 1-800-265-0768 Promo Code CDC2016251 Got Knee Pain? Back Pain? Shoulder Pain? Get a painrelieving brace at little or NO cost to you. Medicare Patients Call Health Hotline Now! 1- 800-480-7503

VIAGRA and CIALIS USERS! Cut your drug costs! SAVE $$! 50 Pills for $99.00. FREE Shipping! 100% Guaranteed and Discreet. CALL 1-800-290-0314 Lung Cancer? And Age 6 0 + ?   Yo u A n d Yo u r Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call  1-866-590-3140 for Information. No Risk.  No Money Out Of Pocket. GET HELP NOW! One Button Senior Medical Alert. Falls, Fires & Emergencies Happen. 24/7 Protection. Only $19.99/mo. Call Now 888-876-6128 VIAGRA!! 52 Pills only $99.00! The Original Little Blue Pill, your #1 Trusted Provider for 10 years. Insured and Guaranteed D e l i v e r y. C a l l t o d a y 1-888-410-1767. Struggling with DRUGS or ALCHOHOL? Addicted to PILLS? Talk to someone who cares. Call The Addiction Hope & Help Line for a free Assessment. 800-511-6075 Male Enhancement Medical Pump Gain 1-3 inches Permanently! FDA Licensed for Erectile Dysfunction. 30-Day Risk Free Trial. Free Brochure. Call 1-619-2947777 www.DrJoelKaplan. com VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS 20mg! 40 Pills + 10 FREE. SPECIAL $99.00 100% guaranteed. FREE Shipping! 24/7 CALL: 1-888-223-8818 Hablamos Espanol. FREE VIAGRA PILLS 48 PILLS + 4 FREE! VIAGRA 100MG/ CIALIS 20mg Free Pills! No hassle, Discreet Shipping. Save Now. Call Today 1-888-410-0514

VIAGRA 52 PILLS + 4 FREE! VIAGRA 100MG/ CIALIS 20mg Free Pills! No hassle, Discreet Shipping. Save Now. $99.00 Call Today 1-800-213-6202 VIAGRA & CIALIS! 50 pills for $95. 100 pills for $150 FREE shipping. NO p re s c r i p t i o n s n e e d e d . Money back guaranteed! 1-877-743-5419 Penis Enlargement Medical Pump Gain 1-3 Inches Permanently! FDA L i c e n s e d F o r E re c t i l e Dysfunction. 30-Day Risk Free Trial. Free Brochure: Call (619) 294-7777   www. DrJoelKaplan.com  HAVE YOU or someone you loved suffered severe complications from the use of Xarelto, Pradaxa, Talcum Baby Powder or IVC Filter?  You maybe due Compensation, free consultation.  Call The Sentinel Group now! 1-800-577-1007  VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS 20mg! 50 Pills $99.00 FREE Shipping! 100% guaranteed. CALL NOW! 1-866312-6061 Hablamos Espanol CPAP/BIPAP supplies at little or no cost from Allied Medical Supply Network! Fresh supplies delivered right to your door. Insurance may cover all costs. 800-665-0718 Got Knee Pain? Back Pain? Shoulder Pain? Get a painrelieving brace at little or NO cost to you. Medicare Patients Call Health Hotline Now! 1- 800-752-2108 Safe Step Walk-In Tub Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 800-886-9771 for $750 Off. Stop OVERPAYING for your prescriptions! SAVE! Call our licensed Canadian and International pharmacy, compare prices and get $25.00 OFF your first prescription! CALL 1-800749-6515 Promo Code CDC201625

Canada Drug Center es tu mejor opcion para ordenar medicamentos seguros y economicos. Nuestros servicios de farmacia con licencia Canadiense e Internacional te proveeran con ahorros de hasta el 75 en todas las medicinas que necesites. Llama ahora al 1-800-261-2368 y obten $10 de descuento con tu primer orden ademas de envio gratuito. 52 Pills for Only $99.00. Your #1 trusted provider for 10 years. Insured and Guaranteed Delivery. Call today 1-888-403-8602 Struggling with DRUGS or ALCHOHOL? Addicted to PILLS? Talk to someone who cares. Call The Addiction Hope & Help Line for a free Assessment. 800-511-6075

WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201 

MISCELLANEOUS A-1 DONATE YOUR CAR FOR BREAST CANCER! Help United Breast Foundation education, prevention, & support programs. FAST FREE PICKUP - 24 HR RESPONSE - TAX DEDUCTION 855-306-7348 Safe Step Walk-In Tub: Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 800-701-9850 for $750 Off.

S t o p O V E R PAY I N G for your prescriptions! SAVE! Call our licensed Canadian and International pharmacy,compare prices and get $25.00 OFF your first prescription! CALL 1-800-265-0768 Promo Code CDC2016251

A PLACE FOR MOM. The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted, local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1-800-319-8705

Got Knee Pain? Back Pain? Shoulder Pain? Get a painrelieving brace at little or NO cost to you. Medicare Patients Call Health Hotline Now! 1- 800-480-7503

Xarelto users have you had complications due to internal bleeding (after January 2012)? If so, you MAY be due financial compensation. If you don’t have an attorney, CALL Injuryfone today! 1-800-531-0529

VIAGRA and CIALIS USERS! Cut your drug costs! SAVE $$! 50 Pills for $99.00. FREE Shipping! 100% Guaranteed and Discreet. CALL 1-800-290-0314 Lung Cancer? And Age 6 0 + ? Yo u A n d Yo u r Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 1-866-590-3140 for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. VIAGRA!! 52 Pills only $99.00! The Original Little Blue Pill, your #1 Trusted Provider for 10 years. Insured and Guaranteed D e l i v e r y. C a l l t o d a y 1-888-410-1767. Male Enhancement Medical Pump. Gain 1-3 Inches Permanently! FDA Licensed for Erectile Dysfunction. 30-Day Risk Free Trial. Free Brochure: Call (619) 2947777 www.Dr.JoelKaplan. com

Exede High Speed Internet. Plans from $39/mo. Blazing Fast Broadband in areas cable can’t reach. Great for  business or home. We Install Fast. 1-888-822-0480. Life Alert. 24/7. One press of a button sends help FAST! Medical, Fire, Burglar. Even if you can’t reach a phone! FREE Brochure. CALL 800-734-2638 MAKE A Connection. Real People, Flirty Chat. Meet singles right now! Call LiveLinks. Try it FREE. Call now 1-888-909-9978 18+. HIGH RISK DRIVER? HAD A DUI? Stop paying too much for R-22, FR-44, or similar High-Risk Car Insurance! Call our FREE hotline t o d a y & S AV E m o n e y ! 888-591-1852

Enjoy your own therapeutic walk-in luxury bath. Get a free in-home consultation and receive $1,750 OFF your new walk-in tub! Call Today!!! (800) 241-7636. A PLACE FOR MOM. The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted, local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1-800-217-3942 CASH FOR CARS: We Buy Any Condition Vehicle, 2000 and Newer. Nation’s Top Car Buyer! Free Towing From Anywhere! Call Now: 1-800-864-5960. CRUISE VACATIONS – 3, 4, 5 or 7+ day cruises to the Caribbean. Start planning now to save $$ on your fall or winter getaway vacation. Royal Caribbean, Norwegian, Carnival, Princess and many more. Great deals for all budgets and departure ports. To search for your next cruise vacation visit www. NCPtravel.com CASH PAID for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS! 1 DAY PAYMENT & P R E PA I D s h i p p i n g . HIGHEST PRICES! Call 1-888-776-7771. www. Cash4DiabeticSupplies. com Make a Connection. Real People, Flirty Chat. Meet singles right now! Call LiveLinks. Try it FREE. Call NOW: Call 1-877-737-9447 18+ D I S H T V 2 Ye a r P r i c e Lock with Flex Pack. Only $49.99/mo. Includes FREE Hopper and 3 Months HBO, Cinemax, Showtime, Starz & Dish Movie Pack Call Today 1-800-686-9986 HOTELS FOR HEROES – to find out more about how you can help our service members, veterans and their families in their time of need, visit the Fisher House website at www. fisherhouse.org Make a Connection. Real People, Flirty Chat. Meet singles right now!  Call LiveLinks. Try it FREE. Call NOW: 1-888-909-9905 18+.  

October 2016

47 47


48

KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killers/KIT. Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com Enjoy your own therapeutic walk-in luxury bath. Get a free in-home consultation and receive $1,750 OFF your new walk-in tub! Call Today!!! (800) 987-1543  Struggling to get into a Car, House, or Apartment because of your Credit Score? Call to get a free credit score, report, and consultation. 800-953-5979  LOTT’S JANITORIAL SERVICES Professional Cleaner. Residential and Commercial. Stripping and Waxing, Shampoo Carpet C l e a n i n g , R e s t ro o m s , Offices, Homes and Apartments. Sparkling Clean Every Time! Call 678-799-0445 MOVING SERVICES - ALL FLORIDA Professional & Reliable! Best prices, FREE ESTIMATES Servimos Toda La Florida. Mejores precios! Estimados GRATIS. Satisfaccion garantizada. MUNDANZAS GARLOBO CALL Today!!! 786-468-6632 AT&T U-Verse Internet starting at $15/month or TV & Internet starting at $49/ month for 12 months with 1-year agreement. Call 1-800-404-1570 to learn more. DISH TV 190 channels plus Highspeed Internet Only $49.95/mo! Ask about a 3 year price guarantee & get Netflix included for 1 year! Call Today 800-438-8168 FAST Internet! HughesNet Satellite Internet. HighSpeed. Avail Anywhere. Speeds to 15 mbps. Starting at $59.99/mo. Call for Limited Time Price 1-800-958-6917 HERO MILES – To find out more about how you can help our service members, veterans and their families in their time of need, visit the Fisher House website at www.fisherhouse.org. Life Alert. 24/7. One press of a button sends help FAST! Medical, Fire, Burglar. Even if you can’t reach a phone! FREE Brochure. CALL 800-370-4824! Protect your home with fully customizable security and 24/7 monitoring right from your smartphone. Receive up to $1500 in equipment, free (restrictions apply). Call 1-800-912-1985

48

October 2016

SAVE on internet and TV bundles! Order the best exclusive cable and satellite deals in your area! If eligible, get up to $300 in Visa Gift Cards. CALL NOW! 1-800-736-9957 ULTIMATE BUNDLE from DIRECTV & AT&T. 2-Year Price Guarantee -Just $89.99/month (TV/fast internet/phone) FREE Whole-Home Genie HD-DVR Upgrade. New Customers Only. Call Today 800-769-1035 A PLACE FOR MOM. The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted, local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1-800-671-9104 C o m p u t e r p ro b l e m s viruses, lost data, hardware or software issues? Contact Geeks On Site! 24/7 Service. Friendly Repair Experts. Macs and PCs. Call for FREE diagnosis. 1-800-995-0869 DIVORCE $50 TO $240*. Covers children, etc. Only one signature required! *Excludes govt fees. Call 1-888-498-7075. Extn 200 Baycor & Associates, Established 1973. OLD WATCHES WANTED!! Rolex, Patek Philippe, Omega, Audemars Piguet, Vacheron, Cartier, Longines, Universal, Breitling, Breguet, Chronographs, Daytona, Submariner, GMT-Master, Moonphase, Day Date, Speedmaster, etc. TOP CA$H PAID 1-800-401-0440 LOTT’S JANITORIAL SERVICES Professional Cleaner. Residential and Commercial. Stripping and Waxing, Shampoo Carpet C l e a n i n g , R e s t ro o m s , Offices, Homes and Apartments. Sparkling Clean Every Time! Call 678-799-0445 1-SIGNATURE DIVORCE OR MISSING SPOUSE DIVORCE! (Starting at $65) Children/property okay! Also Evictions, Wills and Adoption! Statewide since 1992. Court Documents, Inc. 1-800-973-6698 A-1 DONATE YOUR CAR FOR BREAST CANCER! Help United Breast Foundation education, prevention, & support programs. FAST FREE PICKUP - 24 HR RESPONSE - TAX DEDUCTION 855-306-7348 MAKE A Connection. Real People, Flirty Chat. Meet singles right now! Call LiveLinks. Try it FREE. Call now 1-888-909-9978 18+.

Safe Step Walk-In Tub: Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 800-701-9850 for $750 Off. A PLACE FOR MOM. The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted, local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1-800-319-8705 Xarelto users have you had complications due to internal bleeding (after January 2012)? If so, you MAY be due financial compensation. If you don’t have an attorney, CALL Injuryfone today! 1-800-531-0529 Does your auto club offer no hassle service and rewards? Call American Auto Club (ACA) & Get $ 2 0 0 i n A C A R e w a rd s ! (new members only) Roadside Assistance & Monthly Rewards. Call 800-867-3193. Lower Your TV, Internet & Phone Bill!!! Fast Internet from $15/mo - qualifying service. Limited Offer. Plus, qualified callers get a FREE $300 Gift Card. Call Today!! 844-613-2228 Exede High Speed Internet. Plans from $39/mo. Blazing Fast Broadband in areas cable can’t reach. Great for business or home. We Install Fast. 1-888-822-0480. Life Alert. 24/7. One press of a button sends help FAST! Medical, Fire, Burglar. Even if you can’t reach a phone! FREE Brochure. CALL 800-734-2638 AVIATION Grads work with JetBlue, Boeing, Delta and others- start here with hands on training for FAA certification. Financial aid if qualified. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)724-5403 SUPPORT our service members, veterans and their families in their time of need. For more information, visit the Fisher House website at www.fisherhouse.org. C o m p u t e r p ro b l e m s viruses, lost data, hardware or software issues? Contact Geeks On Site! 24/7 Service. Friendly Repair Experts. Macs and PCs. Call for FREE diagnosis. 1-800-995-0869

Struggling to get into a Car, House, or Apartment because of your Credit Score? Call to get a free credit score, report, and consultation. 800-935-6178

DISH Network -NEW FLEX PACK- Select the Channels You Want. FREE Installation. FREE Streaming.$39.99/24 months. ADD Internet for $14.95 a month. CALL 1-800-351-0850

SAVE on internet and TV bundles! Order the best exclusive cable and satellite deals in your area! If eligible, get up to $300 in Visa Gift Cards. CALL NOW! 1-800-791-0713

REAL ESTATE / TRAVEL

DIRECTV. NFL Sunday Ticket (FREE!) w/Choice AllIncluded Package. $60/mo for 24 months. No upfront costs or equipment to buy. Ask about next day installation! 1- 800-371-5352

WANTED TO BUY

FLAGLER BEACH FLORIDA O c e a n f r o n t Va c a t i o n Rental, Tripadvisor Award, Furnished Studio, 1-2-3 BR’s, Full Kitchens, WiFi, TV, Pool. Seasonal Specials. 1-386-517-6700 or www. fbvr.net ALL INCLUSIVE RESORT packages at Sandals, Dreams, Secrets, Riu, Barcelo, Occidental and many more. Punta Cana, Mexico, Jamaica and many of the Caribbean islands. Search available options for 2017 and SAVE at www. NCPtravel.com *25-ACRES NORTHFLORIDA* For Home or Investment. Subdividing OK. ONLY $74,900. Seller Will Finance With $10,000 Down. Call (877)983-6600 or www.FloridaLand123. com IS GEORGIA ON YOUR MIND? 30 Acres Left, Hurry! Beautiful Georgia land for sale. 2-4 Acre Homesites as low as $499-Down/$199Month w/Owner financing. 706-833-0204 www.jlbproperties.com KENTUCKY 40 ACRES, NEW LOG CABIN Overlooking Kentucky River. Additional hunting in adjacent land, miles of off road trails. $150,000 Call 606-567-8800 DENIED CREDIT??? Personal Credit, Business Credit. Would you LIKE BOTH??? No p-Front Fees… Credit Repair Law Firm Chartered www.cleaningcredit.com 1-877-733-2733

SATELLITE TV / INTERNET

19.99/mo. for DIRECTV HD Channels + Genie HD DVR + 3 months FREE HBO, SHOW, MAX & STARZ + FREE NFL Sunday Ticket! Call Now 888-437-6598 DISH Network - New customers save up to $1000! FREE Hopper Upgrade. TV starts at $19.99/mo. Bundle Internet & Save! Call Today!! 888-283-8693 DISH TV 190 channels plus Highspeed Internet Only $54.94/mo! Ask about a 3 year price guarantee & get Netflix included for 1 year! Call Today 1-800-351-0850 DISH TV 190 channels plus Highspeed Internet Only $49.95/mo! Ask about a 3 year price guarantee & get Netflix included for 1 year! Call Today 1-800-351-0850 Reduce your Cable Bill. Get a Home Satellite System installed FREE with packages starting under $1 per day. Free HD/DVR upgrade to new callers. Call 844600-8891 Today!! ULTIMATE BUNDLE from DIRECTV & AT&T. 2-Year Price Guarantee -Just $89.99/month (TV/fast internet/phone) FREE Whole-Home Genie HD-DVR Upgrade. New Customers Only. Call Today 1-800-371-5352 *DISH SPECIAL* 190+ Channels For Just $34.99/ Month. No Extra Fees Plus, FREE Next-Day Installation. Call Today 1-888-635-3770

FAST Internet! HughesNet Satellite Internet. HighSpeed. Avail Anywhere. Speeds to 15 mbps. Starting at $59.99/mo. Call for Limited Time Price. 1-800-916-7609

19.99/mo. for DIRECTV HD Channels + Genie HD DVR + 3 months FREE HBO, SHOW, MAX & STARZ + FREE NFL Sunday Ticket! Call Now 888-437-6598

SAVE on internet and TV bundles! Order the best exclusive cable and satellite deals in your area! If eligible, get up to $300 in Visa Gift Cards. CALL NOW! 1-800-791-0713

FAST Internet! HughesNet Satellite Internet. HighSpeed. Avail Anywhere. Speeds to 15 mbps. Starting at $59.99/mo. Call for Limited Time Price ? 1-800-916-7609

Cash for unexpired DIABETIC TEST STRIPS! Free shipping. Best Prices & 24 hr payment! Call 1-855-378-1147 www. TestStripSearch.com Habla Español. DIABETIC TEST STRIPS NEEDED. We buy SEALED - Unexpired Diabetic Test Strips. Top $$$ Guarantee. EXTRA money for your Extra Boxes. Expedited payment! Call today 1-800-250-4599. WANTED OLD JAPANESE M O T O R C Y C L E S KAWASAKI Z1-900 (197275), KZ900, KZ1000 (19761982), Z1R, KZ 1000MK2 (1979,80), W1-650, H1-500 (1969-72), H2-750 (19721975), S1-250, S2-350, S3-400, KH250, KH400, SUZUKI-GS400, GT380, HONDA-CB750K (19691976), CBX1000 (1979,80) CASH!! 1-800-772-1142 1-310-721-0726 usa@classicrunners.com Cash for unexpired DIABETIC TEST STRIPS! Free Shipping, Best Prices & 24 hr payment! Call 1-855-440-4001 www. TestStripSearch.com. Habla Espanol. CASH PAID- up to $25/ Box for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS. 1-DAY PAYMENT. 1-800-371-1136 Wants to purchase minerals and other oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201 Cash for unexpired DIABETIC TEST STRIPS! Free shipping. Best Prices & 24 hr payment! Call 1-855-378-1147 www. TestStripSearch.com Habla Espanol WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201 OCEAN CORPORATION, new career, commercial diver, under water construction, NDT weld inspector, 30 weeks of training, job placement, financial assistance, employment, welding, education, inspection, job, 10840 Rockley Road, H o uston, 77099, 800321-0298, Victoria, Texas, 77904, www.oceancorp. com

seniortimesmagazine.com


Like our Facebook page to see last month’s correct puzzle and winner!

www.facebook.com/seniortimesmagazine CORRECTLY COMPLETE THE CROSSWORD PUZZLE AND MAIL IT TO US FOR YOUR CHANCE TO $

Win a 50 Gift Card you can use anywhere that accepts Visa! One Prize awarded per month through random drawing of a correct and complete entry. Winners will be contacted by Tower Publications and should receive their prize within 30 days of being chosen. Please do not call or email to request winner information.

Submit completed entries to: Senior Times Mailbag 4400 N.W. 36th Avenue • Gainesville, Florida 32606

Name:

Phone:

Address:

City, State, Zip:

October 2016

49 49


50

TERRI SCHLICHENMEYER

Best. State. Ever. DAVE BARRY c.2016, Putnam $27.00 / $36.00 Canada, 230 pages

O

h, how you need a vacation. Sure, you’ve already had one but aren’t they always too short? Plus, your list of Things To Do was so long that you never really felt like you vacated any part of normal life. So next year, get serious about fun with the new book “Best. State. Ever.” Author Dave Barry has some great ideas for you. As someone who’s lived there for years and years, Dave Barry gets calls all the time from people who want to know about Florida. Mostly, he says,

50

October 2016

they want to know “What the… is wrong with Florida?” Nothing, says Barry. And other states shouldn’t be pointing fingers, either. Look at Illinois, for example. California. Or New Jersey. But noooo, he says, even “Mississippi is laughing” though there’s a scientific reason for why there are “stupid people” in Florida. It’s because “people come down here all the time” and “the stupid ones can’t figure out how to” leave. Furthermore, “The Stupid Factor” and the random “Weirdness Factor” both, um, factor in. And yet, “people keep coming here,” maybe because, says Barry, the weather is appealing, taxes aren’t too high, “the women are amazing,” and “it’s not boring.” Really, it never was. Barry says “The first humans arrived in Florida twenty thousand years ago … in search of Spring Break,” a restless quest that sometimes led to war — for about 15 minutes, “because of the humidity.” Today, Florida is “a modern and dynamic state… except during presidential elections.” It’s home to the Skunk Ape, for which Barry went in search. He didn’t see the creature but he bought his wife a Skunk Ape t-shirt because “The ladies love a romantic gesture.” It’s home to mermaids and a charming place where “the fifties never ended…” It features pink dinosaurs, a sponge museum, a town filled with psychics, a dancing senior village, a machine gun shop, Key West, and

PHOTO CREDIT: MICHELLE KAUFMAN

BOOK REVIEW BY

alligators. Lots of alligators. “I love this crazy state,” says Barry, and “now, having traveled around … I love it even more.” Here’s a little something to remember for your next vacation: travel guides don’t have to contain maps or websites, and they don’t have to be serious. Take a look at “Best. State. Ever.” and you’ll see that a good travel guide can actually be funny. And yet, this book isn’t really a travel guide. It’s true that author Dave Barry darts from here to there to report on Florida sites you can visit, but you won’t find stuffy museums or anyone famous in this book. Instead, you’ll read about the kind of places and people you’d encounter on a whim, or on a beer-fueled

Friends-Only Weekend (which, not-socoincidentally, is what one of Barry’s chapters is about). You’ll also find a love letter to a state full of “weird” people. Did I mention that you’ll laugh? Yeah, you’ll do that, too, because it’s Dave Barry, for heaven’s sake — and like his other books, once you start “Best. State. Ever” you’ll have a hard time vacating your seat. s Terri Schlichenmeyer has been reading since she was 3 years old and she never goes anywhere without a book. She lives with her two dogs and 11,000 books.

seniortimesmagazine.com


AD VERTISEMEN T

Living Independently

with Diabetes CARETENDERS TEACHES PATIENTS TO TAKE CHARGE

A

re you newly diagnosed with diabetes? Has your medicine been changed? Do you or your caregiver need training on how to deal with your disease process? If so, Caretenders could be the answer for you. “We provide care for a lot of Seniors with diabetes, especially Type 2 diabetes,” said Angela Jackson, RN and patient care liaison with Caretenders. “It is one of the main diagnoses that we treat.” Jackson explains that the primary weapon in the fight against diabetes is education, both for the patient and for the caregiver. “We address the patient as a whole,” she said. “We identify what they need to know and what they already know about the disease process, and we teach them how to take care of themselves.” Clients and their caregivers are taught many aspects of diabetic care including blood glucose monitoring; insulin preparation, injection and storage; medication interactions and side effects; proper diet, and warning signs of trouble or complications from the disease. Jackson believes one of the toughest adjustments for Seniors to make is how to maintain a diabetic diet, explaining that long-standing

habits and lack of portion control can be obstacles in proper care. “They don’t really understand just how big a half cup of carbohydrates is.” To assist with meals, Caretenders can provide plates that are proportioned to help Seniors easily figure out how much of each food group they should have without the inconvenience of measuring. The plate is divided into sections labeled for each food group, allowing the client to see a “border” around each food portion that can’t be exceeded. Jackson also encourages her clients and caregivers to exercise regularly, noting that getting up and moving around can not only reduce blood sugar but also helps maintain overall good health. Occupational and physical therapists can also be brought in for Seniors with neuropathy who have lost sensation in their fingers and feet. Diabetes puts Seniors at greater risk of kidney damage, heart disease, stroke and other ailments, which in turn puts in jeopardy their ability to live independent lives. Through comprehensive education and thoughtful attention Caretenders is committed to helping Seniors avoid those risks and live their lives with greater joy!

“I wondered if my family could manage all the care I needed after leaving the hospital.”

A Special Kind of Caring... That’s The Caretenders Tradition A dedicated team of compassionate, highly skilled healthcare professionals who treat their patients like family is our hallmark. • SKILLED NURSING • PHYSICAL THERAPY • OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY • CERTIFIED HOME HEALTH AID • CARDIAC CARE • DIABETIC CARE • ORTHOPEDIC REHAB • UROLOGY CARE • SPEECH THERAPY • OUTPATIENT RECOVERY

Committed To The Highest Quality Home Care Services. SERVING ALACHUA COUNTY AND SURROUNDING AREAS

4923 NW 43rd Street, Suite A Gainesville, Florida 32606

352-379-6217 Call For More Information About How Caretenders Can Help You.

LIC# HHA299991306

October 2016

51 51


52

Make a grand trip... Grander!

With a low rate home equity line of credit from SunState. Your journey starts here and it’s about to get GRAND!

Proudly serving our members and our community since 1957

877-786-7828 352-381-5200 52

October 2016

www.sunstatefcu.org

SUNSTATE FCU IS FEDERALLY INSURED BY NCUA.

seniortimesmagazine.com


October 2016  

http://www.seniortimesmagazine.com/_issues/seniortimes_1016.pdf

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you