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2 Seniors Wide Bay

In this edition

Cover Story: Gabriel Poole .....................................Page 3 Feature: Housing & Finance .............................Pages 8-9 Travel ................................................................Pages 11-14 Wellbeing .........................................................Pages 15-16 What’s On................................................................Page 18 Puzzles ....................................................................Page 23

Contact us Editor Gail Forrer gail.forrer@seniorsnewspaper.com.au Media Sales Manager Kristie Waite kristie.waite@seniorsnewspaper.com.au Now online Get your news online at www.seniorsnews.com.au Advertising, editorial and distribution enquiries Phone: 1300 880 265 or (07) 5435 3200 Email: advertising@seniorsnewspaper.com.au or editor@seniorsnewspaper.com.au Location: 2 Newspaper Place, Maroochydore 4558 Website: www.seniorsnews.com.au Subscriptions Only $39.90 for one year (12 editions) including GST and postage anywhere in Australia. Please call our circulations services on 1300 361 604 and quote “Wide Bay Seniors Newspaper”. The Seniors Newspaper is published monthly and distributed free in south-east Queensland and northern New South Wales. The Seniors newspaper stable includes Toowoomba, Wide Bay, Sunshine Coast, Brisbane, Gold Coast, Northern NSW, Coffs and Clarence and Central Coast publications. Published by News Corp Australia Printed by News Corp Australia, Yandina. Opinions expressed by contributors to Seniors Newspapers are not necessarily those of the editor or the owner/publisher and publication of advertisements implies no endoresement by the owner/publisher.

seniorsnews.com.au Monday, July 17, 2017

Our world revealed in Census figures

EVERY four years, my natural curiosity is piqued by the publication of Census results. Look here, these figures say, these are the real facts, figures and trends shaping our Australian lifestyle. Did you think you were just imagining a more diverse population, more older people and less people attending the local church? Perhaps, you wondered if these changes just happened in your neighbourhood rather than as a nationwide trend. Wonder no more, the 2016 census figures have made available the statistical information to back up your thoughtful observation. For instance, the marriages of my adult children and a number of their cousins to spouses born overseas has significantly increased the cultural diversity of our family. So when statistics highlighted the rich diversity of Australian society, I felt that our family was more or less

FROM THE EDITOR’S DESK GAIL FORRER Group editor Seniors Newspapers network

conforming to the norm. Census figures revealed more than a quarter of our residents (26.3 per cent) are now born overseas, and for the first time in our history, the majority of people born abroad are from Asia, not Europe. Just over 6,150,000 people were born overseas in census 2016, compared to 5,280,802 in 2011. More than one-fifth (21 per cent) of Australians spoke a language other than English at home. After English, the next most common languages spoken at home were Mandarin, Arabic, Cantonese, and Vietnamese. Another statistic that bears out what what we see in our neighbourhood is the increased number

of older adults. This observation reminds me of a comment made by my late mother to the effect of: "When I was growing up you hardly saw old people." My, how times have changed. These days, one in six people is over the age of 65 (compared to one in seven in 2011 and only one in 25 in 1911) and there are now 84,000 more people aged 85 years and older than in 2011. The results have been identified as the success of modern, medicine, improved diet and a greater public health system. Indeed, the number of folk celebrating 100th birthday and beyond, grew to 3500. This month, our publication’s theme is, "Housing Options" and after Census figures noted a huge change in our style of homes, I reckon we are right on the money. In terms of housing, the Census counted

10 million dwellings (a dwelling is defined as any structure which is intended to have people in it and is habitable on Census night). While separate houses account for 72%, there’s been a large increase in other forms of dwelling, such as flats, apartments, semi-detached, row housing or town housing. Of the 8.3 million occupied private dwellings, seven in 10 housed families (69% by one family and 1.9% by multiple families). In 2020, I’ll place a bet these alternative housing numbers will increase, but we need information to make informed decisions. I hope our article on Gabriel Poole’s multigenerational living, along with various other ideas will provide this for you. Also, good news for country music lovers Check out advertisements advising how you can win a Troy Cassar-Daley CD (latest release). Cheers, Gail

Inter-age mentoring Tracey Johnstone

RETIRING from your workplace doesn’t mean that you have to put your skills and knowledge away in a drawer when they can be used to benefit a younger generation. For the last year 67-year-old Howard*, who still works full time in manufacturing, has volunteered with The Smith Family in its national iTrack program. After school Howard didn’t know what to do so while in a part-time technical college degree he met a man, John, who mentored Howard into more study. He qualified for university and went on to complete a degree. “It was my encounter with John that steered me into my career path,” Howard said. “Not all kids are lucky enough to have a mentor like John that stimulate and inspire them. “That’s why I took on the iTrack mentoring role. I got help in my career and it was invaluable.” The Smith Family welcomes retirees, and seniors still working, who want to connect with and mentor high school

students. It has found mentoring is an effective way to engage with youth who may not have positive role models. Called iTrack, it’s an online mentoring program which works with high school students from disadvantaged communities and families, supporting them through their schooling. “iTrack pairs a school student with a mentor who is able to offer guidance and support about career options available to them, or post-school planning,” The Smith Family’s Ms Economou said. ■ The program is run online via a keyboard conversation. ■ It’s anonymous with the mentor and mentee knowing only each other’s first name, and each other’s interests and hobbies. ■ New mentors are provided with training. ■ Mentors talk to a student for about 60 minutes, on the same day each week during supervised school hours, for an 18-week period. The program runs twice a year, from May to September, and July to November. The type of mentors

they are looking for are people: ■ With life and work experiences which they want to share with students to help inform their decisions. ■ That can empower the student to find their own way and guide them towards available resources. ■ The student will provide the iTrack team details of what interests and hobbies they have, and if they have a gender preference for their mentor so that the team can find a suitable mentor. MENTORING : iTrack school students participating in the online mentoring program. “We really want PHOTO: MARNYA ROTHE someone who can help a amazing thirst and unbiased, listening adult, outcomes to be positive student explore a variety interest in what is out who is willing to give the and enhance their of pathways,” Ms there”. student a dedicated hour knowledge and their Economou said. “It’s been a really per week to listen to confidence. We also want For some of the strong, two-way them, to give them our mentors to have a mentors, it’s a way to gain interaction. The proof of encouragement and positive experience and an insight into the that is when we finish advice about education give back to the teenage world so that they after so many weeks, we and career options. community,” Ms can develop an exchange cards and I find “And, to give the Economou added. understanding of how the in reading the card the students a pat on the In 2017 there are 1500 generation is thinking, student seems so back, talk to them about students across all states and then apply that grateful,” Howard added. their school work and and in the ACT. knowledge to the No matter what a assignments,” Ms For more details on relationship with their person’s work experience Economou said. iTrack volunteering, go to grandchildren. is, Howard advises, “The “It’s a way in which they www.thesmithfamily.com. “It’s sharpened my right person can bring a can have a two-way au/programs/ listening skills,” Howard lot of experience to a conversation outside of mentoring/itrack. said of his experience. young person”. the parent and teacher *Howard chose to keep He has also found the For the students, the realm.” his full name confidential. students have “an mentors are seen as an “We want student


Monday, July 17, 2017 seniorsnews.com.au

Cover Story: Gabriel Poole

DESIGNING DUO: Gabriel relaxing with his wife Interior designer and artist Elizabeth Poole.

Re-imagining your home Gail Forrer

AT A time when large brick homes were popping up all across the suburbs, Gabriel Poole’s architectural vision of small, affordable and sustainable housing was a challenging proposition. Now, as house and land prices soar and care of the environment becomes paramount, his vision has become much more than relevant, for many it provides the practical and necessary guidelines for 21st century living. Along with other distinguished accolades the Queensland-born architect has received the Robin Boyd Award and in 1998 the Royal Australian Institute of Architecture Gold Medal for lifetime contribution to Australian Architects. This year, looking forward to his 83rd birthday with absolutely no plans for retiring, Poole is still devising and implementing architectural answers to social conundrums. These days, he is espousing, multigenerational living as a practical solution to the dearth of affordable property, the need for care for both aged and younger family members and as a means of keeping the

GABRIEL POOLE DESIGN: The Shed House 2007.

human footprint as light as possible upon the earth. Speaking of the need for extended family living, he says: "There’s really not much choice. "The government can’t afford to keep providing nursing homes and the young people can’t afford to buy homes." In 2014, he exhibited his ideas in a Queensland architectural show at Mt Tamborine. His design adhered to low-cost, modular principles with private areas for grandparents, parents and children. He included aged care facilities including rails, non-slip floors and wheelchair access across the home. This sort of optional housing struck the interest of academic Dr Edgar Lui who has researched the pattern of

multi-generational housing in Brisbane and Sydney and says the trend is on the increase. KPMG demographer Bernard Salt believes multi-generational living will see Baby Boomers disposing of the big family home and setting up financial arrangements with their children to ensure a future home and care for all. Since one in four Australians will be over 65 by 2050, he has praised the living style as a creative solution to the ageing population. Finally, Gabriel Poole has often talked about the spiritual dimension of housing and as he moves forward designing housing for the inhabitants, rather than just following fashion, he insists that his designs must also ‘lift the spirits’.

Wide Bay

Seniors 3


4 Seniors Wide Bay

Profile: Troy Cassar-Daley

seniorsnews.com.au Monday, July 17, 2017 PHOTO: MIK MCCARTIN

Getting honest with Troy

By Alison Houston

IT’S AN odd sensation getting off the phone after interviewing Troy Cassar-Daley – it feels like I’ve been talking to a mate I haven’t seen for a long time rather than a complete stranger, never mind a Country icon. As with his music, there’s an ease, an honesty and humility which you can’t help but like. Over the past year he’s invited us into his life more than ever through his autobiography Things I Carry Around and the album by the same name. He has been touring the album for six months and says he’s excited to finish at home this month in south-east Queensland where he has spent the past 28 years of his life. "It’s very special because this album is so personal and such an emotional thing," Troy said. To capture that intimacy, the stage is set like a lounge room which he’s inviting audiences into for a chat, and he said at times "you can hear a pin drop, it’s so emotional". Troy said many of the songs had been sitting in the background for years because he felt they were "too personal to record". They are joined by songs inspired by the at-times painful task of delving back through his own history for the autobiography, which included coming to terms as a youngster with living

The acclaimed country music singer confronts his past as he releases his autobiography

YOUNG TALENT: Troy Cassar-Daley as a teenager.

in two worlds and embracing both his mother’s Aboriginal heritage and his father’s Maltese. "The book was the hardest thing I’ve ever written," Troy admitted. It took about two years to complete, partly because he found it so confronting to look backwards "for someone who has always just wanted to move forward in life". In contrast, the music, he said, was "quite a relief … to tell a story in 3-4 minutes" But it wasn’t always like that.

"In the old days starting out I was playing a lot of other people’s music. You have to make yourself familiar to people," Troy said. "But my end goal was always to play my own music and tell my own stories." And tell them he has, through 10 solo albums which have sold in excess of 450,000 copies and won him an array of awards, including 35 Golden Guitars across his 30-year career. Not bad for a bloke who hasn’t hit 50 yet! Things I Carry Around won Troy the coveted

Album of the Year at this year’s Country Music Awards, where his legacy was also recognised by his induction as the 50th and youngest artist on the Australasian Country Music Roll of Renown. His name now sits on a plaque on a granite bolder beside that he touched as a kid of Slim Dusty. "It was a bit mind-blowing really," Troy said of the moment, which he adds was made all the more special by the presence of wife Laurel Edwards and kids Clay and Jem. "If you strip back the layers of paint, I’m still

SEE TROY IN CONCERT Thursday, July 20 – Kedron Wavell Services Club 8pm. Tickets (adults from $42) at ticketmaster or the club on 07 3359 9122. Friday, July 21 – Nambour RSL Club Dinner from 6pm; Show from 8.40pm: Tickets ($69 dinner & show) on 07 5441 2366. Go to www.nambourrsl.com.au Saturday, July 22 – Ipswich Civic Theatre 7.30pm. Tickets (adults $45) on 3810 6100 or at www.ipswichciviccentre.com.au Sunday, July 23 – City Golf Club Toowoomba 2pm. Tickets (adult $35) on 07 4636 9000 and online at www.citygolf.com.au. ★If you are on the Gold Coast, you can also catch Troy in a completely different sort of gig at the Broadbeach Country Music Festival on July 28-29. that kid lined up to get Slim Dusty’s autograph." His autobiography began, appropriately, by talking to Slim’s wife Joy, with whom he indulges in a cuppa and sandwiches each Tamworth festival. When he told her how much he had enjoyed her book, she planted the seed that he should write his own story. Despite some hesitancy, he said the autobiography captured the truth and emotion he wanted it to – swearing and all – with readers telling him they feel like he’s sitting across the table talking to them. And perhaps it’s that honesty which best sums up Troy’s approach to his music and his life. On his Roll of Renown plaque it says that he "embodies the spirit of Australian Country music". And when asked what that means to him, his answer is "honesty – being who you really are". "When I heard Slim Dusty sing, I knew he was

singing about him and about me, and that’s what it’s about." In today’s world, filled with so much tragedy and confusion, Troy said he hoped music would remain an escape for many, as it was for him as a kid and continues to be. In his opening track, Funny How Things Change, he sings of a simpler time when people talked and shared more of themselves one-to-one, but Troy said having looked back on his life, he wouldn’t change a thing. "Even when I was broke, I was happy. I was able to continue loving music. I never had a plan B," he said. And while the Gympie Muster, where he first met Laurel, will always have a special place in his heart, Troy said every audience had a life and a character of its own. "To be truthful, any time I can step on stage and make my music it’s a special gig."


Monday, July 17, 2017 seniorsnews.com.au

News

Wide Bay

Seniors 5

Truly vintage protest Belinda Scott & Gail Forrer

AUSTRALIAN mature aged people are galvanising forces to provide a gutsy voice in the fight against climate change. Going gently into that good night is not an option for Queensland grandparents in their protest action against the coal mine in the Galilee Basin and the proposed expansion of the Abbots Point coal loader, which opponents say will contribute to destroying the Great Barrier Reef. In March this year, Queensland grandparents occupied the foyer of Labor's state headquarters in Brisbane in a bid to stop taxpayer funds being loaned to the controversial Adani coal mine. About 10 people from The Grandparents for the Galilee group marched with pillows and air beds into the South Brisbane building on a Monday afternoon. Spokeswoman Miree Le Roy said more than 2000 grandparents had signed up to the group "to stand up to Adani to take direct

action". These Queenslanders are supported by a NSW group of senior climate change warriors from the Coffs Coast. This group of upstanding citizens in their 60s and 70s are politely but firmly storming the barricades of the establishment, holding demonstrations and sit-ins, occupying politicians’ offices, blocking access to mine sites; locking themselves to gates and bulldozers and flooding the in-boxes of banking executives and investors with their objections to funding environmentally-damaging projects. They are united in their opposition to what they see as decisions which will be disastrous for the environment they cherish and for the future of their descendants. Included in their number are Coffs Coast Climate Action Group members Ron Ryan, Russell Chiffey, John Ross and Susan Doyle. The four senior Coffs Coast residents were among activists who refused to leave Federal

MP Luke Hartsuyker’s office on June 5, until they were given an appointment with the National Party politician to discuss Indian company Adani’s proposal for a giant new coal mine in Queensland. The rally ended in the arrest of several of the activists, including grandmother and foundation action group member Susan Doyle, who was given an infringement notice and fined $350. “I’m concerned for the future of the planet,” Susan said. “I’ve got grandchildren and things will start to become difficult for them. “How could they consider building the world’s biggest coal mine – and near the Barrier Reef? “I’m very concerned about the lack of action from the government (on climate change). “I’ve worked in the solar industry and I know how easy (renewable energy) is. “With jobs, it is common sense that

CLIMATE CHANGE WARRIORS: Senior citizens unite to protest.

people working on one industry can be retrained in another and I feel the same about the car industry. “We need industry and I see people queuing up for expensive electric cars from overseas. “Instead of sitting and crying I took action. “I went to non-violent direct action training. “The video of us being arrested went viral and the photos have been widely shared. “I don’t want personal publicity but I feel so strongly about it, that it’s fine.” Nurseryman, bookshop owner and long-time Landcare volunteer John Ross said he had been reading about climate change and its damaging

effects for 40 years. John was among activists at the Maules Creek coal mine site who locked themselves on to gates and machinery to protest the mine and the destruction of bushland involved. “Taking action stops me from boiling over in anger about what is happening,” John said.” “We seem to be ignoring massive changes. “The (political) devotion to digging things up and selling them is mental. “There would be three to seven times as many jobs in deploying solar and wind, for the same investment.” John said the politicians’ figure of 10,000 future jobs at

Adani’s proposed Carmichael Mine was wildly exaggerated and Adani’s own consultant had suggested less than 1500 jobs, many of which would probably be pulled from existing Hunter Valley coal mining workforces. “When the climate goes crazy we are all in trouble,” retired teacher Russell Chiffey said. “Natural disasters like the Victorian bushfires tend to draw attention, but of course people forget. “You have to make people take notice. “If people sit by and do nothing you lose your democracy. “”I’m a pretty slacko member and I don’t do too much,” Rod Ryan, self-described ‘eccentric old bastard’, said.


6 Seniors Wide Bay

Future Vision

seniorsnews.com.au Monday, July 17, 2017

Taking positive action towards cultural change The future relies on generational collaboration Tracey Johnstone

THERE are three very important quality of life issues that are on the table for older Australians according to National Seniors Australia founding director and ageing advocate Everald Compton. The articulate and passionate 85 year old and his Longevity Innovation Hub group want key changes – an independent tribunal to determine the aged pension, affordable housing issues resolved and intergenerational partnerships prosper. Compton, a respected voice for a better deal for older Australians for more than 40 years, isn’t backing away from finding ways to achieve these changes which he believes will meet the big cultural changes happening across the

community. “There is a growing feeling among younger Australians that they are going to be paying heavy taxes to keep older people alive, and not just with the

their taxes. “We want to see a situation where we see younger and older people work together to take any intergenerational warfare out of it.

The government can give air space above government buildings to put up accommodation towers and have older, younger and handicap, all in the one building so you don’t have retirement villages that become ghettos for older people. pension, but also with the cost of health. And they feel that they have an unfair tax burden,” Mr Compton said. “There are a certain amount of people who are angry about the cost of ageing and that they are paying too much out of

“The government seems to be blithely unaware that there is a lot of younger people out there angry about the costs of ageing. “The best way to get over that is for young and old to work together for a better Australia,” he added. Mr Compton provided detail on what each recommended change should look like.

INDEPENDENT TRIBUNAL

Linking seniors with community information across Queensland 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday

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A government-organised tribunal would be responsible for determining the size of the aged pension every year. “Instead of it being a political decision,” Mr Compton said. “We want it done by an independent tribunal because the pension has been around for a 100 years and it will be around for another 100. “We have drafted legislation which we think should go to the government and which we are trying to get going.” He believes that anyone other than a politician should at the tribunal table. “In the draft legislation we have drawn up, no member of parliament, no former member of parliament, no person who has been a member of a political party can be on it (the tribunal),” Mr Compton said. Instead he wants to see eminent citizens who have completed a lot of community service, an economist, a social work expert and others that can make an independent decision based on the

CHANGING THE RULES: Longevity Innovation Hub's Everald Compton.

economics of the day with the knowledge of what older Australians need to keep them above the poverty line and one which parliament will respect. Mr Compton reports he has met with 51 members and senators from all parties and is making some progress on this issue.

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Mr Compton said there was very little supply for seniors wanting to downsize, but not live in a retirement village. His group is pushing the government to make available either land or air space available free-ofcharge. This is so that, “the land component, which is the highest component, can come out of the whole issue of housing and its price can drop considerably,” Mr Compton said. It’s the cost of housing that is the biggest barrier for older Australians. “In Australia it is ridiculous,” Mr Compton added. “The government can give air space above government buildings to put up accommodation towers and have older, younger and handicap, all in the one building so you don’t have retirement villages that become ghettos for older people.” His vision would see cross-generational living made available above railway stations, for example, with the cost of the land below taken out

Mr Compton wants to see younger and older people work together for a better future. PHOTO: BEV LACEY

of the picture.

INTER GENERATIONAL PARTNERSHIPS

Mr Compton’s group has formed a company, Wise Young, to help deal with a social need. Its mission is to bring together older people who want to engage with a working environment, with younger people leaving university and wanting a new career. “We are putting them in small companies where they work together to achieve something,” Mr

Compton said. “It’s a mixture of wisdom and modern know-how. “There are dozens of issues that need to be worked on, but these are three that we are working on at the moment,” he added. Ultimately Mr Compton wants to see the perception of older Australians as a burden on future generations disappear. He would also dearly like to see a good economic result for the younger generation. For more info: www. everaldcompton.com


Monday, July 17, 2017 seniorsnews.com.au

Local News

FINANCIAL SUPPORT: Act for Kids practice supervisor Angelita Healy, with Act for Kids Fraser Coast & North Burnett intensive family support officer Caterina Schulz, and Quota International of Maryborough president Val Harvey, thanking Quota for the donation.

Quota fundraiser

THE Maryborough Quota Club has donated $1500 to Maryborough Act for Kids. This money is half the proceeds of the club’s recent Pre-Easter Tombola. Caterina Schulz, from Act for Kids, said that she was overwhelmed with such a large donation, which would be used for equipment for the playgroup the organisation runs.

Quota choose to donate to Act for Kids, because they provide prevention, early intervention, and therapeutic programs to children who have been abused or are at risk of abuse or neglect. Quota feels that there is a real need for this service in Maryborough, and wants to do all that they can to protect the

lives of our precious children. Act for Kids operates from their premises at 111 Cheapside St, Maryborough. Quota is a women’s service club that has been helping the community of this area for 54 years. If you wish to know more about Quota , please phone Gladys on 4121 4363.

Wide Bay

Seniors 7

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Foretold is forewarned BE AWARE of people claiming to be from recognised businesses and government departments and trying to con you out of your personal information and money. The ACCC issued a warning to unsuspecting victims to stay alert to phishing scammers. Already this year the ACCC’s Scamwatch has received more than 11,000 reports of this scam, with nearly $260,000 lost. Phishing scams are the most common scam reported to Scamwatch – reports are 63% higher than the next most popular category. Statistics also show that older Australians, aged 65 and over, are particularly vulnerable to this scam and that email or the phone are the scammers’ preferred tool of the trade for contacting potential victims. “Scammers use phishing to trick their victims into giving out valuable personal information such as their bank account numbers, passwords, credit card numbers or even their online passwords for their

PayPal, Apple or social media accounts,” acting chair Delia Rickard said. “Any personal information you have is potentially valuable to a scammer and they will try to get it off you in a variety of ways. “The vast majority come either via the phone or email. The scammers will pretend to be representatives of well-known organisations, like a bank, phone company or government department like Centrelink or the Australian Tax Office to give them the air of legitimacy. “The scammer may say that the bank or organisation is verifying customer records due to a technical error that wiped out customer data. Or, they may ask you to fill out a customer survey and offer a prize for participating. These are all part of a scammer’s bag of tricks they use to get you to give up your valuable personal data.” Scammers can use their victims’ personal information to carry out fraudulent activities, such as using their credit cards, stealing their

identity or scamming friends and family of the victim. Many victim reports to Scamwatch, for example, say they noticed a large increase in spam emails after phishing scammers obtained some of their personal information. “We’re so used to providing our personal information when we sign up for services over the phone or shop online that sometimes we don’t think twice about giving it out. “However, it’s very important you closely guard your personal information. “Delete any email or hang up on a phone call that you receive out of the blue that is asking for your personal information – even if it purports to be from a well-known business or government organisation that you have previously dealt with and trust. “If you think your information has been stolen by a scammer, report it to the relevant institution immediately.” Details, go to www.scamwatch.gov.au to learn more about the warning signs.

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8 Seniors Wide Bay

seniorsnews.com.au Monday, July 17, 2017

Housing and Finance Feature

The pressure for affordable housing Tracey Johnstone

AT the age of almost 74, Peter Montgomery believes his age cohort are the forerunners to a major affordable housing crisis in Australia. “The government are talking about the demographics of the ageing population but they don’t appear to be addressing any of the related issues that are starting to emerge,” Peter said. “At our age, we are the frontrunners. But what about the ones that are coming behind? They’re not all going to be financially independent.” Peter is living his own crisis now. He and his wife Barbara exist on a part-pension, plus he runs a small business that helps pay for the house they have to rent, plus food and “spiralling utility costs”. “Renting is hugely expensive. If we were on the aged pension only, we would be paying around 70% of it on rent,” Peter said.

He is also caught in the middle of a family health crisis and without funds to buy a home, it’s a daily battle to keep his and his wife’s heads above the tideline.

Renting is hugely expensive. If we were on the aged pension only, we would be paying around 70% of it on rent. In his early 60s and with his wife diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s, Peter decided to sell the family home in Queensland, which gave him enough money to pay out all his debts, including a mortgage, and buy a caravan which he and his wife could live in. “We had a huge back-debt on the mortgage, which I cleared, but having cleared it, it meant that we were cleaned out. Then we did the sums and worked out

we no longer could afford to keep it,” Peter said. Peter and Barbara then moved to Victoria, where most of his family lived, and spent 18 months in the caravan. The proud former farmer struggled with the confined environment so the couple settled into a rented house for a year. When it came time to renew the lease, he discovered how insecure renting can be. The owner wanted the house back to demolish and build units on the site. “So we had to move again,” he said. The next house he rented for just more than 12 years, until the owner died and the family took possession and promptly told Peter to move out. He calls it “investor determination”. “People buy a property, lease it out for a while and renters think they are secure. But no they’re not because the lease isn’t going to be renewed because the owners are going to demolish the house and put units on it.”

When pursuing another rental property, Peter said he experienced overt age discrimination. While the agent wouldn’t say it out loud, Peter voiced it for her. “I said there is no way in God’s earth that we can be that bad a tenant, so can I say to you it’s got a lot to do with our age?” His other accommodation choice is public housing, but he expects to wait at least six years for it to become available. “I suggest that it’s been at least 20 years since there was in any state a major building project for community housing that met specific needs,” Peter said. “I am doing all right because I am working and I am reasonably healthy, but what about the poor people who may have been in a house as long as us, are older than us and that get the same notice to vacate? “They might not have a family that can help them or they might not be able to raise a bond , where do they go? They’re the forgotten people.”

AFFORDABLE HOUSING: We are the frontrunners for the crisis in affordable housing, but what about the people who are coming behind us?

Tackling elder abuse is a State Govt priority MINISTER’S MESSAGE CORALEE O’ROURKE difficulties around being able to stay in their own homes for one reason or another, they can mean there are barriers to accessing their community and engaging

meaningfully. And sadly, seniors can experience abuse by those closest to them. I knew how important it was to be able to address these issues in the budget and am pleased the Palaszczuk Government has again shown their commitment to our older Queenslanders. I’m pleased we will spend more in the 2017/18

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year than any other year – $12 million. We are committed to tackling elder abuse by continuing to raise awareness of the types of abuse seniors can experience, in particular emotional and financial abuse. We have so far seen this campaign working and have further funded the Seniors Enquiry Line so that we can offer

more support. Cost of living can be a considerable issue for our older Queenslanders and to assist with this we have increased our funding for concessions, including electricity, gas, water and rates. I want Queensland seniors to be able to spend time with their families in their local communities and this budget should help

make that happen. This budget is a budget for all Queenslanders – regardless of age, ability or where you live. We are delivering opportunities to live well for longer through our spending on hospitals, housing and community safety. Elder Abuse Hotline: 1300 651 192. Seniors Enquiry Line: 1300 135 500.

Read past editions and the latest Seniors News on our website – embracing ageing. Visit www.seniorsnews.com.au

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WE OWE so much to those who built our communities, raised us and guided us. Here in Queensland, it’s our seniors that make it truly special. Throughout life we can be faced with challenges and for our older Queenslanders these can cause issues that impact on their way of life. They can cause


Wide Bay

Monday, July 17, 2017 seniorsnews.com.au

Seniors 9

Housing and Finance Feature

Affordable Housing: Your share Home Equity release Tracey Johnstone

THERE are three main options for older Australians wanting to release equity in their home; reverse mortgages, the Pension Loans Scheme and shared sales proceeds arrangements. The most commonly used option is a reverse mortgage.

REVERSE MORTGAGE

■ A person, generally aged 60 and over, can access their home equity. ■ The lender takes a mortgage over the property. ■ The minimum amount is usually $10,000, and a maximum is set usually based on the lender’s age. ■ The loan can be received as a lump sum, a regular payment or sit ready to be drawn down when required. ■ It only needs to be repaid once a trigger event occurs, such as the sale of the house, the breach in the contract or the death of the borrower. ■ Interest is charged and compounded monthly, over the period of the loan. ■ Loans can have either fixed or variable interest rates. ■ A No Negative Equity Guarantee is in place so that the loan, regardless of its length or the movement in interest rates, will not exceed the value of the home. ■ If the loan is taken out by a couple and one of them dies, it will stay with the surviving partner. ■ Most providers will allow for top up amounts or further borrowing,

depending on the lenders borrowing margins. ■ Some providers will allow for the loan to be used for the payment of an aged care accommodation deposit. National Seniors Financial Information Desk manager, Craig Hall, explained the concept behind this type of loan is to give people who own a house, but are income poor, help to get them through costs such as daily living expenses or cover a major one-off expense. “It’s important for the borrower to understand how much of the asset will likely be passed onto the provider upon repayment,” Mr Hall said. “Projections must be given to the borrower to give them an understanding about what equity will remain after so many years (of the loan), and they have to use the MoneySmart calculator on the ASIC website.” Mr Hall said legal advice was mandatory to ensure the borrower knew the terms and conditions of the loan. “We also suggest a person seeks independent financial advice as they can advise on whether the loan will affect a person’s Aged Pension and will it impact on provisions for aged care, for example.” There is also one provider that has launched a loan product which, subject to the retirement village allowing for it, means a person could take out a reverse mortgage on their village contract.

PENSION LOANS SCHEME

■ This is a government scheme. ■ It’s available for people who aren’t on an Aged Pension or are on a part-pension. ■ It’s based on the what amount of equity is offered, how much is to be kept back and the age of the borrower. ■ The government takes out security over the home. ■ It will then top up the aged pension to the maximum amount per fortnight. ■ That amount, which becomes the loan amount, and with interest, would accrue. ■ The current interest rate is 5.25%. ■ The full loan amount would then be repaid at the time of a trigger event. It can also be repaid, in part or in full, at any time prior to a trigger event. “For example, if the full pension is $500 per week and if I am eligible for an Aged Pension at $300 per week, I could say I want the full pension.,” Mr Hall said. “The $200 difference forms part of the Pension Loans Scheme and that’s the part that accrues interest over time.” A borrower should note that they can access the loan if they are of age person age and because they aren’t eligible for a payment or only for reduced payment rate because of the assets or income tests, but not both. Full details on the loans are available from www.humanservices.gov. au/customer/services/ centrelink/pension-loans-

scheme. The advantage of a reverse mortgage is that it’s likely more money can be borrowed or a lump sum borrowed for a major expense.

SHARED SALES PROCEEDS ARRANGEMENTS

■ It’s called Homesafe and is only offered by Bendigo Bank. ■ Contracts can only be made for properties located in metropolitan Sydney and Melbourne. ■ There is no interest charged on the loan. ■ A home owner can access a lump sum by selling a share of the future sale proceeds of their home. So, when the property is sold, the owner forfeits some of the home equity as the loan provider takes an agreed percentage of the sale proceeds. ■ There are eligibility requirements such as the minimum age is 60. Of these three equity release options, the reverse mortgage has the most flexibility. “The reverse mortgage has been around for the longest,” Mr Hall said. “They had a bit of a bad name in the late 2000s until the industry started to clean itself up a bit. Since then they are more user friendly and quite flexible. “If you have other resources such as term deposits, it’s generally a no-brainer that you would be better off using those first. “For those who don’t have other resources behind them, their house is something they can tap into.”

EVERYDAY MATTERS CAROLYN DEVRIES CEO of New Way Lawyers

WE ARE excited to continue with Part 4 of our series which focuses on debunking some of the common myths about separation, divorce and property settlement. This month we look at what is probably the most common myth that is shared with people who have recently separated or divorced and trying to resolve property matters.

MYTH NUMBER 4: EVERYTHING IS SPLIT 50 / 50

Ever since we were children, we have always been told to share and our instincts seem to tell us that the fairest way to share is equally. A very common myth about property settlement is that assets and debts are automatically divided 50/50 following separation or divorce. While this may be the case for some relationships, it does not apply across the board. There is no legal presumption that the court will equally divide the assets and liabilities of your relationship. Although there have been some very interesting recent cases coming from the courts regarding property settlement it is still generally accepted that when determining the division of assets and liabilities the following four-step approach should be followed: ■ 1. All the assets and liabilities held by the individuals to the

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relationship are identified and valued; ■ 2. The contributions that each party made to the assets and liabilities to the relationship are considered. Contributions are defined broadly and include initial contributions, contributions during the relationship and contributions following separation. Contributions may take the form of financial and also non-financial contributions which include contributions in the role of homemaker and parent. ■ 3. The future needs of both the parties to the relationship are then considered, such as the age of the parties, the health of the parties, the income and earning capacity of the parties and care arrangements for any children of the relationship. ■ 4. The outcome is then further considered and if necessary adjusted to ensure that it is fair and just. After following this approach, the entitlement of each party to the assets and liabilities can be ascertained.

■ PRACTICAL POINTER:

Following separation or divorce you may be able to reach an agreement with your partner or spouse about how the assets and liabilities to be divided. While it is positive if you can reach an agreement amicably with your partner or spouse, you may benefit from receiving legal advice about your entitlements and rights prior to reaching any agreement. - New Way Lawyers


10 Seniors Wide Bay

seniorsnews.com.au Monday, July 17, 2017

Talk ‘n’ thoughts Hurdles, highjumps and solutions

An end-of-life conversation with society Tracey Johnstone

GOOD Life to the End educates us on what happens when an older person nearing the end of their life goes to hospital, and about alternative choices. “The way older people are dying at the moment, you really don’t have a choice,” the author of the ground-breaking book, Professor Ken Hillman said. “It’s because we don’t allow our society to think about the choices.” Prof Hillman has been an intensive care specialist for long enough to have seen some important changes in how older patients in ICU are treated. “Our patients are getting older and older. That isn’t a problem, but it’s just that older people have got many chronic conditions and they are being medicalised with age-related deterioration,” Prof Hillman said. “There’s hardly a ward round goes by without one of us saying, ‘please don’t

ever let this happen to me’. So, one has to ask why we are doing this to others?,” he added. Through his book Prof Hillman wants older and younger people to understand what actually happens when older people are admitted to hospital. “Hospitals can do really great things, but they don’t do very good things when you are very old; when you are 80 plus and have no reversible, agerelated deterioration in

the body, and there are no machines or drugs that can make you better,” he said. “We are trying new systems to talk to older people in a far more honest and empathetic way and then trying to empower them to make their own choices about life. “You can’t do this in an academic way, you really need to talk to society.” This book is a step forward in the conversation. It is for everyone no matter what role they have in caring for older Australians; families, carers, aged care staff and clinicians. We are all know someone who knows someone who is dealing with frail, older Australians. “When they get sick, they go into hospital and get put on his conveyor belt. They suffer enormously in the last few days and weeks of life,” Prof Hillman. “It’s for everyone to start thinking about it and make choices, including having an Advanced Care Directive.”

Vets join to care for ageing pets OVER several months, the lives of the elderly and near-homeless Mary* and her little, fluffy dog were turned around through the work of volunteer veterinarians working in a park in Frankston, Melbourne. Each month, she bought her companion to the park for treatment and advice by the charity group Pets in the Park. The vets helped the little dog back to good health by clipping its overgrown nails and treating both ear and skin infections. “She was so grateful for the support we gave her,” PITP’s director Dr Mark Kelman said. “She saw her dog walk better and its ears treated. Those simple things made such a difference. “Talking to her at the event she brightened up. It’s really what we are there for; it’s not just the pets, we help the people as well. “One of the reasons we run these events monthly is there is a lot of camaraderie and community as a result of people getting together. “Partly it’s about helping people realise there are there who want to help and love them as well.” PITP started in a Parramatta park in

PETS IN THE PARK: Founder and volunteer, veterinarian Dr Mark Kelman with one of his patients. :

Sydney in 2009 by Dr Kelman. Since then he has also recruited volunteer veterinary specialists and supporters in Sydney city, central Melbourne and Frankston, Brisbane and Canberra, with more locations to start clinics in the next six months. He said they dealt with a mix of people, “which certainly reflects what’s going on in society”. “We definitely have a population of senior people who are in need of our help, and those people are either homeless or at risk of homelessness,” Dr Kelman said. The volunteers offer full veterinary services at the pop-up clinics in parks, with an undercover area to

cater for cats. “In a lot of cases, if they didn’t have us, they would spend every last dollar they have on their pet and then leave little to look after themselves,” Dr Kelman added. “That’s why this service is so important as we are trying to give them a hand so they can live a bit easier and hopefully help them get out the situation they are in if that’s what they want to do.” All services are free and funded purely by donations. For more details of Pets in the Park and to support their work, go to www. petsinthepark.org.au. *Not her real name.

HAVE YOUR SAY: Email editor@seniorsnewspaper.com.au or go online to www.seniorsnews.com.au.

Win a Copy of ‘Troy Cassar-Daley – Things I Carry Around!’ This month we chatted to Troy Cassar-Daley to get his take on ageing. To celebrate, we are giving you the chance to win one of three copies of Troy’s latest album, “Things I Carry Around”. To be in the running, simply email communitynotes@seniorsnewspaper.com.au. Make sure you tell us your name (first and last), contact number, email, postal address and Seniors Newspapers region, then answer this question Have you or a family member considered a retirement or lifestyle village, now or in the future? Good luck!

Visit seniorsnews.com.au/competitions for full competition terms and conditions. Promoter is ARM Specialist Media Pty Ltd of 2 Newspaper Place, Maroochydore Qld 4558. Promotional period 03/07/17 – 26/07/17. Competition drawn 9am 27/07/17 at Cnr Mayne Rd and Campbell St, Bowen Hills, Qld 4006. Winners announced in Seniors Newspapers August 2017. Total prize value $60.00 (including GST).

Wellbeing + Travel + living + Money

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Visit www.seniorsnews.com.au for more information.


Wide Bay

Monday, July 17, 2017 seniorsnews.com.au

Seniors 11

Travel ANN RICKARD hopped on board the luxury hotel barge Panache in France and glided slowly from Pont-L’Eveque to Paris. She offers her 10 top reasons to go barging, beginning with the obvious: it’s perfect for seniors in no hurry. 1. Because it is slow. Just the dawdling pace of a luxury barge makes you wind down. It travels only a few kilometres a day and floats so slowly you can disembark after breakfast, walk or cycle along the towpath and embark for lunch (or morning tea if you like a short walk.) 2. You are spoilt: Panache has a crew of six: captain, pilot, chef, stewards and deckhand. As it takes only 12 guests that means plenty of attention and lots of indulgence. You lift not a finger. 3. Food: With an onboard chef sourcing the best local produce, every meal is a gourmet adventure. Our chef Oli presented us with salads that ranged from beetroot and goat cheese to duck with artichoke and capers. Main courses of stuffed pork fillet, rack of lamb, seared pigeon, scallops with crayfish and beef bourgignon, delighted all of us. Desserts defied any attempt at restraint, from triple chocolate terrine to apple tart tatin. Cheeses we’d not encountered before (Morbier, Saint Nectaire, Munster) came with each meal and a charming story of their origins. 4. Wine: Local wines are chosen with meticulous care and offered with engaging information. It’s wine education at each meal. Just saying a few of the wine names we enjoyed on Panache stirs the palate: Pouilly Fuisse; Sancerre; Chassagne Montrachet…more please.

10 points to to show you the best of barging 5. Accommodation: Panache has spacious cabins with gleaming bathrooms stocked with L’Oicctane products. Cabins are serviced daily, showers and loos work very well. Evening turn-down and a little chocolate on the pillow…who doesn’t love that? 6. Le Bar. European Waterways who operate a fleet of barges in France, Scotland, the UK, and Holland, has an open-bar policy. Help yourself any time from well-stocked shelves or ask one of the stewards to make you a cocktail. French Martinis before lunch, Sidecars before dinner, Brandy after dinner (usually refused but nice to know it was there.) No nasty bar-bill surprises at the end of the cruise. 7. Excursions: European Waterways puts as much thought into its shore

excursions as it does to ensure your comfort and gastronomy fulfilment. A mini-van waits at each anchorage and you are comfortably driven into the countryside to experience famous landmarks, renowned cultural and historic sites…each time to return to the comforting arms of the crew waiting with a new-to-you cocktail. 8. Friends: Most European Waterways barges take eight guests, some 12, so the atmosphere is more like a house party on a private vessel. Guests’ ages usually range in figures mature folks like (about 45 upwards). Full charters mean you can get the gang or the family together and have the barge to yourselves. 9. Style and elegance: Panache is all teak and leather and fresh flower displays. Beautiful china

and glassware adorn the table at every meal. Service is intimate, friendly with a “nothing is too hard” approach. The crew speaks English. 10. Adventure and scenery: Going through the many locks along the waterways provides lively entertainment. Watching deckhand Judy jump on and off the barge with the deftness of a mountain goat to do nautical things with ropes and bollards was part of the experience. Then there are all those bridges to go under and the slow-passing French countryside stretching to the horizon. Barging provides more than ten reasons to go…it’s all about leisure, indulgence and discovery. Details: visit website: gobarging.com The writer was a guest on board Panache.

ABOVE, FROM THE TOP: Sitting out on the sundeck is the way to watch the action; chef Oli in the kitchen on board Panache; and Panache’s salon is elegant and relaxed at the same time. TOP PHOTO: MARIE-GEORGE STAVELOT


12 Seniors Wide Bay

Travel

seniorsnews.com.au Monday, July 17, 2017

Monet’s Gardens by barge

Pleasure planted in a stunning art garden

SNAPSHOTS OF LIFE ANN RICKARD ann.rickard@apn.com.au

MONET’S Gardens in Giverny, not far from Paris, must surely be on the bucket list of every traveller in the world. That was my first thought as I looked at the long queues outside the gardens. Thousands of people flock to Giverny every day in summer to see where Claude Monet lived for 40 years, developed and grew his gardens and painted them so famously. Although you must share the glorious gardens with the hordes and squash into the house with hundreds of others – the experience is still strangely serene. Who could not feel peace in these extensive gardens that Monet cultivated, loved and painted? Despite the

crowds all you seem to hear is the sound of birdsong, the buzz of bees. The beauty of a Monet painting comes to life as you stand by the ponds and gaze at the lilies. It is surreal to stroll through the Japanese garden, sit a moment in the bamboo section, gaze at the roses or brush slowly past graceful weeping willows – all meticulously maintained and now a living museum of scenes so many of us have admired on canvas and in myriad prints. Our visit was on a shore excursion from the luxury hotel barge Panache, a most pleasant way to see the gardens rather than driving from Paris and all its chaos. Our captain on board Panache had gone to the gardens the day before while we were at anchorage, purchased the tickets, so we would not have to wait in line. Service way above the call of duty, and one we

Touring Travel & Cruise Specialists

PRETTY AS A PICTURE: The crowds flock to Monet's bridge, but it is still serene.

appreciated as we slipped past the long queues. It is not just art lovers and ardent fans who flock to the gardens: gardeners, landscapers,

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trained to paint their subjects in the controlled lighting of studios. Monet loved to paint everyday things: lily ponds, landscapes, ladies strolling the gardens with parasols, families picnicking. A visit to these beautiful gardens brings the works to life and gives a connection to the impressionist artist. Once you have strolled through the gardens you will look on a Monet painting through new and

insightful eyes. You can arrange all manner of visits to the gardens, half day tours, full days, out of Paris, or just book online. We believe the most comfortable and convenient way to see them is as we did, from a shore excursion on board luxury barge Panache. More information on the itinerary that incorporates the gardens at the website gobarging.com.

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NATURAL BEAUTY: The real life Monet lily ponds visited by thousands of people every day in the summer at Giverny.

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The beauty of Claude Monet’s famous lily ponds.


Travel

Monday, July 17, 2017 seniorsnews.com.au

Wide Bay

Seniors 13

Unique long weekend escape to the Riverina A FIRST for Cruise Express – a cruise tour with no cruise Australian cruise agency, Cruise Express, is offering its first escorted cruise tour without a cruise – a unique, new, four-day trip by heritage train to the NSW Riverina region over the October long weekend. Timed to coincide with the Taste Riverina Festival, which celebrates the region’s fine wines and abundant produce harvest, the Long Weekend Rail Adventure starts in Sydney on Friday, September 29, when the privately chartered heritage train departs Central Station, complete with buffet and compartment cars from the 1930s. Hauled by the 62-year-old, 4204 ‘Streamliner’ locomotive, the train will stop for

lunch at the 139-year-old Junee Railway Station Café and for afternoon tea in Narrandera – the gateway to the fertile Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area – before arriving early evening in the Italian foodie haven of Griffith. The next day brings a visit to Corynnia Station, a working sheep and cotton farm where the group will enjoy lunch sourced from local produce. After free time in Griffith, an exclusive, wine-paired dinner follows at the iconic McWilliams Winery, with the event co-hosted by Princes Cruises. Day three will offer a morning sightseeing tour of Griffith followed by a special ‘farm to fork’ lunch at Piccolo Farm where guests will take part in a farm forage and a cooking demonstration

INDULGE YOURSELF: De Bortoli Winery wine tastings.

and enjoy lunch featuring paired wines and fresh local ingredients harvested by hand on the farm. An indulgent afternoon of wine tasting follows at Calabria Wines and De Bortoli Winery – both pioneered by Italian migrants. Griffith’s Italian origins will be savoured at dinner with a sumptuous, private dining experience at Zecca Handmade Italian which offers seasonal and authentic, regional Italian food, using fresh, locally sourced produce and wines. The final day of the tour on the public holiday,

Monday, October 2, will see guests rejoin the heritage train for the daytrip back to Sydney, with a stop to visit the Temora Aviation Museum for a barbecue and private aerial display of ex-military aircraft. Including seven meals, two with local wines, and daily sightseeing, the three-night Long Weekend Rail Adventure is available from $1790 per person, twin-share, or $1990 for solo travellers, representing a low, 11% supplement. Call Cruise Express on 1300 764 509 or visit www.cruiseexpress.com. au.

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14 Seniors Wide Bay

Australian Travel

seniorsnews.com.au Monday, July 17, 2017

Come out and help out AUSTRALIA’S most iconic outback bucket-list experience, the Birdsville Races, are calling on volunteers nationwide to help deliver its historic 135th edition as the countdown to the ‘Melbourne Cup of the Outback’ hits the two-month mark. Not just a dusty good-time in the bush, the races present an opportunity to give back to the community, with the event raising funds for the Royal Flying Doctor Service of Australia – a vital charity that provides help to remote areas often cut off from medical services, as well as inter-hospital transfer services between metropolitan areas. Volunteer registrations are now live at www. birdsvilleraces.com/ Volunteer with all volunteers required to be 18 years-of-age or over. Volunteers can nominate to complete their shift with friends and family, and in line with a particular skill-set or area of interest.

Depending on the team, volunteer timecommitments start from as little as nine hours. In return, volunteers receive an exclusive souvenir volunteer polo shirt and complementary two-day racing pass, granting them access to all of the exhilarating action at Birdsville’s iconic dirt race track – from punting and celebrating to trackside dining and Fashions on the Field. Before and after shifts, volunteers can participate in an array of one-of-a-kind experiences as Birdsville transforms into a buzzing hive of activity with film, live music, cocktail parties and travelling boxing tents. Along with 7000 visitors, volunteers of all ages flock hundreds of thousands of kilometres to Birdsville every year to help deliver a two-day, 13-race program, and a jam-packed schedule of outback entertainment and activities. Many volunteers begin their journey from the beginning of August – travelling with friends,

‘I want to take the expedition of a lifetime.’

family and partners – and setting up camp early to enjoy the region’s yabby races, street parties and various other events that lead into the big Friday and Saturday race days. Others choose to take a more direct route, exploring and detouring via the Simpson Desert and Lake Eyre on their way home once the Races have finished. At last year’s Birdsville Races, volunteers spanned a wide age-range and geographic spread, with the youngest volunteer being a teenage girl from Tully who road-tripped with a friend to celebrate her 19th birthday. At the other end of the spectrum was a 79 year-old retiree who drove from South Australia. WHEN: Friday and Saturday, September 1–2. Tick off the bucket-list while supporting The Royal Flying Doctor Service. Volunteers: www. birdsvilleraces.com/ volunteer

SPECTACULAR: The Birdsville Races bring people from far and wide once a year for racing.

Take the trek to Birdsville

NOW in its 135th year, the 13-race program offers up a combined $200,000 prize-purse, plus a further $12,500 in Queensland Thoroughbred Incentive Scheme bonuses – making it one of the most lucrative and unique outback thoroughbred race experiences in Australia. The iconic green starters’ gates, synonymous with the Birdsville Races, will roll out on September 1&2 as more than 7000 racegoers flock to

Birdsville for what many have billed the Melbourne Cup of the Outback. A number of race program changes this year, with several races moving from class-based handicaps to benchmark races, as well as the introduction of a second 1600m race – the $12,500 Benchmark 55 Handicap. Traditionally, the 1600m distance has been reserved solely for the Birdsville Cup. Each year, owners, trainers, jockeys and

horses make the long haul trek to Birdsville, 10,000 kilometres collectively, from places as far away as Darwin, Tamworth and the Sunshine Coast, as well as surrounding towns and regions and attracts a broad range of trainers and racing identities. Proudly supported by Tourism and Events Queensland’s It’s Live! in Queensland major events calendar. Two day packages start from AU$62.75. For details: www.birdsvilleraces. com/RaceProgram.

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* Please ask us for further details. Itinerary subject to change with the release of APT’s 2019 Antarctica brochure. ~ 60+ Discount: Offer valid until 31 Dec 17. New bookings only, limited to one $100 discount per senior. Minimum booking value of $2500 per person consisting of air & land/cruise arrangements, or a land/cruise only booking over the value of $2500 per person. Valid State/Territory accredited seniors card must be presented to consultant at time of quotation. ^INTEREST FREE: Approved applicants only on a Lombard 180 Visa card. Terms, conditions, fees and charges apply including a $99 Annual Fee charged on the account open date and annually on the anniversary of the account open date. Minimum finance amount applies and is valid on holidays over $999. Interest, currently 22.99% p.a., is payable on any balance outstanding after the 12 month Interest Free period. Ask in store for details. Offer ends 31 Dec 17. Credit provided by Lombard Finance Pty Limited ABN 31 099 651 877, Australian Credit Licence number 247415. Lombard® is brought to you by FlexiGroup ® Flight Centre Travel Group Limited (ABN 25 003 377 188) trading as Escape Travel. ATAS Accreditation No. A10412. ETCAL77563


Wide Bay

Monday, July 17, 2017 seniorsnews.com.au

Seniors 15

Wellbeing

The hard road less travelled Brand Insight

THERE isn’t any doubt that life can be challenging, particularly as you get older and need some help with daily tasks and taking care of yourself. But what if you could get help to turn your life around and avoid the need to move into a nursing home? Imagine feeling more relaxed, healthier. And happier. And getting help with medication or house hold duties; someone to prepare meals; or personal care like bathing if that’s a challenge? Or to drive you to doctors’ appointments or the shops? Feros Care is on your team. And here to help you get

back to living a better life. How, you ask? For a start, as a senior living in your own home you may be eligible for a government-subsidised Home Care package to create your affordable solution. A Home Care package comprises services designed to help seniors live a healthy, active, and connected life - at home. Partnering equally with Feros Care, you’ll be involved in developing a plan and choosing services that suit your needs and lifestyle. We’ll discuss your health goals and your priorities and ask you about the things that are important for you to stay living independently at home. Sounds good?

As we know, the only constant in life is change, so the services provided can change to reflect this. As frequently as you need. So, you’ll never be stuck with a service you don’t need or want. We can also help you with nursing care such as pain management, skin management; mobility/ safety aids; and continence management. Then there’s social and exercise programs; pet care and helping with lawns and gardening. Or a Home Care package may include innovative services such as remote health monitoring; smart home technology; and computer training. Feros Care can help you turn your life around. Just call on 1300 763 583.

HERE TO HELP: Feros Care can help with daily tasks.

Handy tips for a better night’s sleep SLEEP, blessed deep sleep can be harder to get as we grow older, so where do you turn to for some simple, inexpensive ideas to improve your sleep pattern? As we celebrate this week Sleep Awareness Week, health psychologist Moira Junge from the Sleep Health Foundation offers tips on how to slip into a better night’s sleep. Keep a regular sleep pattern ■ Try to go to bed and wake up at about the same time each day.

Aim for seven to nine hours sleep ■ On average, adults benefit from seven to eight hours sleep each night. ■ People who sleep less than six hours regularly or more than nine or 10, are associated with illnesses. Keep technology out of the bedroom ■ The blue component of light suppresses melatonin which is the hormone which is needed to regulate and instigate sleep. ■ Avoid too much stimulation from about

8pm and onwards when the melatonin is meant to be naturally rising. ■ Turn it off so your brain can think about sleeping at this time. Relax for at least an hour before going to bed ■ Reading, talking with partner, listening to quiet music, doing yoga, meditation and stretching are all good ways to relax. ■ Watching TV across the room is better than a TV that is right up in front of your eyes. And, try to avoid stimulating viewing. Be comfortable in bed ■ Ensure your bedroom

has a comfortable temperature, you are going to sleep on a good mattress and you are feeling safe in your environment. Avoid caffeine, cigarettes and alcohol just before bed ■ Avoid consuming stimulants before going to bed. ■ Moderate your caffeine drinks and try not to drink coffee after lunchtime. ■ Drinking alcohol close to bedtime can be stimulating and consequently fragment your sleep.

■ Nicotine is also considered a big stimulant for sleep disturbance. Limit the amount fluids you consume before bed ■ It’s very individual as to a person’s bladder capacity, but as a helpful tip, avoid drinking a large amount of fluids close to bed time, no matter what age. ■ Calming drinks are not bad for you, but they are not strong agents for anxiety and sleeplessness. Don’t eat just before going to bed ■ Try to avoid a large

amount of food for up to three hours before going to bed. ■ Eating can wake you up as your stomach works on digesting a meal. Enjoy natural light during the day ■ During the day time, try to get as much natural light as possible, to suppress melatonin which you don’t want during the day. You only want it at night to help you get to sleep. If these tips don’t help with your sleep pattern, then see your GP for further assistance.

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16 Seniors Wide Bay

Wellbeing

seniorsnews.com.au Monday, July 17, 2017

Easy health tips for 70 year olds & beyond YOUR lifestyle is directly affected by your health and it is vital to do all you can to maximise your wellbeing. Walks, tennis or gardening. They’re all investments in your long-term mobility and energy levels. It is possible to increase the number of years you live beyond 70 and equally possible to be more productive and energetic across these years. The great benefit of this is the increased opportunity to stay involved with family, friends, your community and your favourite activities. So keep moving at least 30 minutes a day with a brisk walk, a game of golf or bowls, gardening – they’re all investments in your long-term mobility and energy levels. The range of opportunities open to you is far broader if you are in good health. By now you will know

MEN'S HEALTH: Investment in long-term health by keeping active, engaged and happy.

there is a significant link between your health and your lifestyle, so try to follow some of the following tips: ■ Keeping fit and well, both physically and

mentally, is essential. ■ Have an annual health check! ■ Keep your weight down to a healthy level. ■ Keep your activity levels as high as you are safely

able to. ■ Eat nutritious food with plenty of fruit and vegetables. ■ Many men in their 70s are affected by depression and emotional

problems as they lose some independence. Speak to your family, your mates or your GP if you are feeling depressed. ■ Remember; it’s never too late to improve your diet, get fitter, energise and find new interests and friends. Next up is using the following 70s health check when talking with your GP: ■ Weight and waist measurement. ■ Blood pressure. ■ Cholesterol and glucose levels (diabetes). ■ Eye checks. ■ Bowel cancer screening. ■ Flu and pneumonia shots. ■ Blood test for kidney and liver function, and iron levels. ■ Bone density. ■ Mental health – talk about any issues or concerns with your GP or a counsellor. Put the following

Foundation 49 DIY tips into action to keep enjoying your life and good health. ■ Keep moving, walk daily and do any other activities that keep you fit and well. ■ Stay connected – keep in touch with friends and family, socialise and get out and about as much as possible. ■ Keep your brain active – Do Sudoku puzzles, crossword puzzles, play cards and other games that engage you. ■ Moderate your alcohol – have three alcohol-free days each week. ■ Talk it over – talk to your GP or a counsellor for assistance and advice. ■ Laugh lots and loud. ■ Discuss prostate health with your GP. ■ Have a problem? Talk about it – your GP or counsellor will be able to assist you. Next month; Your 80s.

A brighter life for men with a good food diet NUTRITION and Dietetics students from the University of the Sunshine Coast are working with men to make them more aware of the important connection between diet and mental health. Ricki-Lee Driver and her partner, Courtney Lynch, have found many men are unaware that making small changes to their diet could boost not only physical health, but also their mental and emotional state.

“If a person isn’t getting the right nutrients in their diet, they’re more susceptible to conditions like depression and anxiety,” Ms Driver said. “We want to teach the public about the different components of food and how each component links back to the brain. “Research has shown that men tend to have poorer diets than women, and are less likely to talk about their mental well-being, so it’s particularly important to

reach them.” To achieve good mental health through diet, Ms Driver explains men need have a balanced diet which is varied and contains foods from each of the five food groups – fruit, vegetables, grains, meats or alternatives, and diary. The daily recommended consumption of the five food groups are: For men aged 51 to 70: ■ 6 grains, 2 fruit, at least 5 vegetables and

legumes, at least 2 meats or alternatives, at least 2 dairy and up to 2 unsaturated fats and oils. For men aged 70 and older: ■ At least 4 grains, 2 fruit, five vegetables and legumes, at least 2 meats or alternatives, at least 3 dairy and up to 2 unsaturated fats and oils. Men should be aware that various food nutrients influence the health of the brain and ultimately a person’s mood state. Deficiencies

in any of these has been linked to lower mood states, and increased risk of depression and anxiety. Other tips for a good diet are: ■ Protein is another key component in good brain health. “If we don’t have enough protein in our diet, our body isn’t able to produce enough of the hormones which promote feelings of well-being and help with our concentration,” Ms Driver

said. ■ Carbohydrates are a key provider of energy for the brain. Consuming sustained release carbohydrates and getting enough of them is important to achieving feelings of well-being. ■ Eating unsaturated fats, such as fatty fish such as salmon and sardines, olive oil and nuts, is linked with increased brain function. Full story at: seniorsnews.com.au

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Wide Bay

Monday, July 17, 2017 seniorsnews.com.au

Seniors 17

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18 Seniors Wide Bay

Entertainment

seniorsnews.com.au Monday, July 17, 2017

What’s on

HERVEY BAY SEAFOOD FESTIVAL

LOVE seafood? Then join us at the only seafood festival in Australia managed by the men and women who catch it for you. Celebrate, relax and feast with the seafood industry in Fishermens Park Urangan. Sunday, August 13 from 10am to 4pm. Gates open 9.30am. Admission adults $5 (no concessions) under 18 free. All paying festival goers receive tickets in the lucky gate draw. Prize courtesy Haigh’s Jewellers. Parking available at Urangan Point School with connecting festival shuttle. Disabled parking near festival. No dogs, no BYO food or drinks, no glass, BYO chair or picnic rug. Go to herveybayseafood festival.com.au for details.

COOL ROCKS ROCKFEST 2017

EVERY August, collectors, fossickers, friends and families gather for the our very popular ‘Rockfest’ near Gympie. This is three days of fun for all those interested in our great hobby. There will be displays, sales and lots of demonstrations. Camping on site or at nearby caravan parks or motels. A weekend of food, fun and friendship! The next Rock and Mineral fest is on August 4 to 6. Please book your site early. Located at 1 Lobwein Rd, Kybong. To book your site or any inquiries call 07 5483 5252 or email info@coolrocks.com.au.

ZINC RACE DAY

THE annual Zinc Race Day

COMPILED BY CHRISTINE PERKIN at Gympie Turf Club is one of the biggest race days of the year and it’s happening on Saturday, July 22 at the Gympie Turf Club. Admission to the races is $10 for adults, $5 for pensioners. Phone 5482 1584 or email admin@gympieturfclub. com.au The Gympie Racecourse is located at Exhibition Rd, Gympie.

MARYBOROUGH CEMETERY WALK

COME and see if you can find the ghosts of Maryborough on a Night Walk tour of the Maryborough Cemetery on Friday, July 21 and meet at the Maryborough Cemetery from 6.30 to 8.30pm. Cost 10 adults and $5 primary-age children (this includes insurance). Details phone 4123 1842 or email maryboroughfamilyhistory @gmail.com. If you do not book that’s ok just turn up at the cemetery.

OLD TOOLS LUNCH

BRING an old or new tool to donate to our local men sheds and join the mayor at the “Old Tools” lunch on Friday, July 21, 12 to 3pm at the Bundaberg Multiplex Facility, 1 Civic Ave. Enjoy a two-course lunch and help raise much-needed funds for men’s health organisations in the Bundaberg region. Queensland and Australian rugby league champion Wendell Sailor is the guest speaker. This is a fundraising lunch where men can get together in a fun

environment whilst shedding light on an important underlying message. Cost $55 includes two-course lunch. Details contact Kim Ovens kim.ovens@ bundaberg.qld.gov.au or phone 4130 4264 or 0438 474 816.

CHILDERS FESTIVAL

THE festival is back this year, bigger and better, than ever! Festivities start on Saturday, July 29 at 2pm with Stage One in Crescent St playing until late. Stalls and food vendors will add to the street party atmosphere. Then on Sunday, July 30 Festival Day will see an exciting blend of more than 400 stalls, five stages of nonstop multicultural entertainment and mouth-watering cuisine from all parts of the globe, take over the leopard tree-lined main street from 9am to 3.30pm. Make the journey and enjoy the fantastic entertainment, delicious cuisine and amazing stalls.

OPERA BY THE LAKE

JOIN Opera Queensland for an afternoon outdoor concert set against the stunning backdrop of Lake Redbrook. The concert will be a special presentation of opera favourites performed by some of Opera Queensland’s finest artists. Local wines and refreshments will be available to purchase at this spectacular event. See www.lakeredbrook. com.au for directions to Lake Redbrook (10 kilometres north of Childers). Car parking available on site. A coach

EXPERIENCE: A first-hand the journey of sugarcane from field to raw sugar on this visually informative tour at the Isis Central Sugar Mill, as part of the Childers Festival.

will offer complimentary transfers from Childers departing at 2.40pm from the QCWA Building on the corner of Lord and Crescent Sts. Saturday, July 29, at 3pm. Tickets: adult $30, children U12 $10. For more details, call 4130 4100 or go to www. moncrieff-bundaberg.com. au.

ISIS CENTRAL SUGAR MILL AND CANE FIRE TOUR: A CHILDERS FESTIVAL EVENT

EXPERIENCE first-hand the journey of sugarcane from field to raw sugar on this visually informative tour. Enjoy the spectacle of modern harvesting with a visit to a cane farm using “green cane harvesting”, before proceeding to the Isis Central Sugar Mill site. Here the process of crushing of the cane and the transformation from juice to sugar crystals will be explained at various locations around the mill. The tour will also include the exciting spectacle of a “cane fire”, the once traditional process used for pre-harvesting of the cane. The fully commentated tour will conclude in Childers with

a barbecue dinner. Please note, the cane fire is dependent on weather conditions at the time of the tour. Due to workplace, health and safety regulations, the tour will visit selected locations around the Isis Central Sugar Mill. Departure Points: ■ ex Childers: Crescent Street Car Park, Childers at 3.30pm; ■ ex Bundaberg : Riverside Parklands, Bundaberg at 2.45pm. Duration: 4 hours (ex Childers). Tour departs from Crescent Street Car Park, Thursday, July 27 at 3.30pm and Friday, July 28 at 3.30pm. Admission: $40 per person; $18 per child (under 12 years). Details call 4130 4176 or email events.admin@ bundaberg.qld.gov.au or go to www.childers festival.com.au.

CUPPA AND CUDDLES AT CAMELOT

NEXT Cuppa and Cuddles Sunday, August 13 from from 10am at Camelot Dairies, Waugh Rd, Scrubby Creek. Get up and close with the Camelot Dairies Camels. Take some photos and talk to the farmers and

enjoy a morning tea and sample the produce. Produce available on the day for purchase. Enclosed shoes required. Tickets $15 adult, under 15 $10, under $5 free. BOOKINGS: Limited places and bookings essential. Bookings close the Sunday prior to the event. Payment at time of booking via website. Phone 0407 631 682 or visit www.camelotcamel dairies.com.au.

SUITCASE MARKET AT THE GYMPIE GALLERY

A POP-UP style market bursting with local creative wares selling from suitcases. A fabulous opportunity for local crafters to sell their products direct to the public. The atmosphere is buzzy and chatty with marketeers swapping ideas and comparing notes. Live entertainment adds to the unique vibrancy. Free entry. Located at 39 Nash St, Gympie on July 29 from 11am to 3pm. Details call 5481 0733 or go to www.gympie.qld.gov.au/ gallery or email gallery@ gympie.qld.gov.au.

Maryborough markets and events ■ Heritage City Market Held in the CBD every Thursday in Adelaide and Ellena Sts. Entertainment is enjoyed on the Town Hall Green. ■ Fraser Coast Wildlife Park Country Markets 79 Mungar Rd, Maryborough West. Held on the third Sunday of every month

from 7am–1pm. Enjoy a variety of stalls as well as pet grooming. Sausage sizzle and cold drinks available. ■ Angel Flight Markets Woolworths Car Park, Lennox St, Maryborough Second and fourth Sunday 7am–12pm ■ Sunday Riverside First Sunday of the month from 3–8pm.

Live entertainment showcasing local and visiting artists on the Riverstage. Sit at a table in the Riverside Restaurant or under the River Terrace, or bring a rug for a picnic on the lawn. ■ Sunday in the Park Held on public holidays and the last Sunday of each month in

Queen's Park. ■ Tinana Twilight Markets Friday's from 4–8pm. Beside the Mary River at the Tinana Hotel. Family friendly, fundraising for the Tinana Rural Fire Brigade. Fairy floss, jumping castle, handmade furniture, massages,

plants, pet treats, fresh fruit and veg locally grown, jewellery, makeup, lighting, solar batteries, kids toys and games, collectables, trash and treasure and kids karaoke! A great family fun Friday evening. ■ Gatakers by Night Saturday evening of the last full weekend of the month at Gatakers

Artspace, Wharf St. Live music, local art and delicious food. The night begins at 5pm through to 9pm. Light refreshments available for purchase. ■ Poona's Monthly Markets Morning market on the second Saturday of each month. At Boronia Dr, adjacent to Poona Hall.


Monday, July 17, 2017 seniorsnews.com.au

Neighbourhood News

Wide Bay

Seniors 19

Community HOW TO SUBMIT NOTICES

TO ALLOW for readers’ requests for the publication of more neighbourhood news, please keep notices short and to the point (100 word maximum). If you would like to submit a photo, please ensure it is at least 180dpi and of faces in a nice and bright setting. The deadline for the August issue is August 9. Email Nicky or Chris at communitynotes@seniors newspaper.com.au

Botanical Gardens on Thursday, June 8.

■ HERVEY BAY

LETS GET ACTIVE: Hervey Bay VIEW Club June social Walk for View at Scarness.

QUOTA NEEDS YOUR UNWANTED BOOKS

ARE your bookshelves groaning under the weight of all those books? Well Quota can help. Quota is asking the public of the Fraser Coast for donations of good clean books for their annual Bookfest, which will be held at the Maryborough City Hall on September 20–22. Any types of book are required with the exception of Encyclopaedia sets and condensed Readers Digest novels. Magazines are welcome, but only recent editions. Quota will again be donating part of the proceeds to cancer research, with the remainder to needy causes in the local area, with special emphasis on disadvantaged children. Donations of books can be dropped off at Maryborough Undercar, 120 Richmond St, Maryborough, and in Hervey Bay at 175 Cypress St, Urangan.

BUNDABERG PCYC MARKET

THE Bundaberg PCYC

The Fabulous Fountain with Fraser Coast VIEW members at the Hervey Bay Botanical Gardens in June.

Markets are held on the second Sunday of each month with the next market on August 13. The market runs from 8am with the canteen open from 7.30am. There are new stalls each month and there are always great bargains. Browse the stalls, grab a cuppa and enjoy the great atmosphere. Details or to book a site phone Irene 0437 645 941 or email irene.petretic@pcyc. org.au.

MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

THE Hervey Bay and Maryborough Multiple Sclerosis Support Group

meet on the first Friday of each month on the deck at the Hervey Bay RSL at 10am for a coffee and a chat. We gained three new members from our May MS workshop and it is hoped they attend our meetings and become part of our MS family. With new and regular members we continue to embrace our individual MS experiences and it is very therapeutic for us all to share problems with other like-minded people. We are always welcoming of anyone with MS and newly diagnosed are most welcome to sit in on a meeting to discuss their own situation and ask

Hervey Bay VIEW Club guest speaker Jessie with Jen and Mary at our June meeting.

questions. Details phone Bev on 4128 2692 or email bev_cornwell@ hotmail.com.

VIEW CLUBS ■ FRASER COAST

THE club meets on the first Thursday of each month at The Clubhouse (formerly Hervey Bay Golf Club), cnr Tooth St & Old Maryborough Rd, Pialba. at 11am for 11.30am start. Details call Gilllian Ryan on 4129 4977. In June we had the club's 'photoshoot' for the Fabulous Fountain Photo taken at Hervey Bay

THE Hervey Bay VIEW Club (Voice, Interest, and Education of Woman) meetings and luncheon are always the second Monday of each month at the club house, Tooth St, Pialba from 10.30am and usually includes a guest speaker. Monthly socials are on the forth Monday at various venues from 9.30am. Jessie was our lovely guest speaker for June and spoke of her personal experience with domestic violence and we all shared her pain as her voice broke with emotion during her address. Our June social included the Walk for VIEW and our ladies with red and blue balloons did a short stroll along the Scarness foreshore followed by lunch at the Beach House Hotel. Details phone Kerry 0409 479 152 or email herveybay.viewclub95@ gmail.com.

FEROS CARE

EARLIER this month, a group of people from Hervey Bay were taken on a bus trip to Maryborough for "Mary's History of Maryborough", which coincided with Mary Poppins' week. We started off with morning tea at A Spoon Full of Sugar Cafe, then met up with Mary Poppins (Carmel) for a bus tour discovering unique connections to the town's beautiful riverside parks and colonial architecture. Followed by free time for shopping/lunch. The day cost whatever you spent for meals and shopping and $15 each for the bus, which picked you up from

and delivered back to your front door. A wonderful informative day with many thanks to Clare our hostess and Rob our driver. Then later in July we're off to Cruising for Christmas in July, Noosaville. Again the cost was $40 each for cruise and two-course lunch, and $15 each for the bus. Others went to Christmas in July at Goody's on the Beach cost $23 for two-course lunch and $15 each for the bus, per person.

WINE AND DINE TOASTMASTERS

ON JUNE 7, the incoming president for 2017/18 of the Wine and Dine Toastmasters Club, Toastmaster Debbie Hawes took the gavel from outgoing president Peter Leney at a ceremony held in conjunction with the Fraser Coast Toastmasters Club at the Beaches Hotel Scarness. In president Debbie’s inaugural address to her club members, she announced her manifesto for the forthcoming Toastmaster year, with emphasis on speaking in public and the confidence that the members achieve with the support of the club’s mentoring program, where all members receive mentoring support from another club member. The first meeting for the 2017/18 fiscal year will be held at the Post Office Hotel, Maryborough on July 5 with 6.30pm welcoming and sit down for a meal at 7pm. If you wish to a member of this fantastic public speaking forum, please contact Joy on 4125 5489.

Its tIme for senIors Week thIs August!

Be sure to check back in with Seniors in August for all of our Seniors Week coverage. From events to promotions and everything in between, Seniors Newspaper has got you covered.

Pick up your free copy of the August edition at your local stockist or read online at seniorsnews.com.au LiViNG + MONEY + WELLBEiNG + TraVEL

6513898ao

Have a Seniors Week event that you want to let readers know about? Get in touch! Email communitynotes@seniorsnewspaper.com.au


20 Seniors Wide Bay

seniorsnews.com.au Monday, July 17, 2017

Grandbabies BONNIE BABIES: We would love to publish your photo too.

Yum: Harry contributes his style to cake making.

All smiles: Cooper responds to the brighter side of life.

Hatted and Plaited: Mary in cafe mode.

If you would like to see your grandbaby on this page, email your photo or 200 word story to

editor@seniorsnewspaper.com.au

Sheer bliss for baby Cooper.

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The grandkids and me THE fast pace of my three year old grand-daughter Mary slowed right down when she came across Santa in the shopping centre. The big white bearded figure was her man of the moment and she wasn’t going to miss a chance to get up close and personal with the fellow who was about to deliver a truckload of presents. She immediately declared she was going to talk with him, no matter how long she would have to wait. And lucky she did. Because that evening a situation arose that demanded solid evidence of a ‘real’ Santa. Mary was happily climbing over a giant Santa sculpture placed in an outdoor arcade when a young girl around 8-years-old joined in the fun . This older girl climbed high onto Santa’s shoulders, while Mary stayed around knee height.

Suddenly she dropped down to Mary’s level, and before running away, I watched as she stopped for a moment to whisper something directly into Mary’s ear. Before I knew it, Mary had dropped a level and with all the speed and determination a slightly tubby three-year-old could muster, chased after this girl. When it became apparent she couldn’t catch up, she stopped, took a big breath and called out in a loud voice, full of conviction. "Hey big girl, I saw a talking Santa today.” I wondered what she meant, though I assumed it was somehow in response to the whisper. Later on, I gently asked Mary what it was the ‘big girl’ had whispered. Mary stood straight, put her hand on her hips and pronounced. "She said Santa wasn’t real.” - Gail Forrer.


Wide Bay

Monday, July 17, 2017 seniorsnews.com.au

Live and let’s save

Go ahead and try a DIY project

Centrelink: Retirement 132 300 Disability, Sickness & Carers 132 717 Employment Services 132 850 Department of Veteran Affairs 133 254 or 1800 555 254 (Regional) National Information Centre on Retirement Investments (NICRI) 1800 020 110

BE THRIFTY AND THRIVE NICKY NORMAN

National Aged Care Information

1800 200 422

www.agedcareaustralia.gov.au DIY projects give you the chance to recycle or upcycle products to create something of your own.

own for individuality. Cons: ■ The most common one is having an unfinished DIY project due to lack of time, expertise or access to the right materials. ■ There is always the chance of failure and wasting your money, materials and time. ■ It can be easy to

help with the choices you can make when trying to think of what to cook. You can always use canned veggies to add to casseroles and soups for extra convenience and flavour. Enjoy 2-3 serves of fish a week either baked or make a fish pie but try to use low fat pastry or filo as an alternative. Frittata’s are also a great option for a pastry free pie or quiche. Lots of fresh or canned fruit and vegetables are very important for a balanced diet. Eating with the seasons means more money in your pocket and better tasting ingredients on your plate. So shop with that in mind when you go to the green grocers or supermarket next time.

6285791aa

develop creativity. ■ Simply painting or refinishing old furniture can give it a new look and a new lease on life. ■ DIY projects often give you a chance to design your own furniture or other home decor items. ■ You get to choose colours, materials and sizes, giving you a greater sense of control. ■ You get a sense of satisfaction from making something yourself. ■ It’s a chance to recycle or upcycle products to create something of your

underestimate the complexity of a project. ■ Make sure you have the right safety equipment and working conditions to avoid injury. Overall, a DIY project is a great way to spend your spare time during the cooler weather. www.thespruce.com

Are you raising Grandchildren?

Do you need information?

Call us! 1300 135 500

Also ask about Time for Grandparents, a program providing time out for eligible grandparents, activities for grandchildren, grandfamily camps and support with school camps.

DELICIOUS: Ken’s smashed avocado and egg.

KEN’S SMASHED AVOCADO AND EGG

■ 1 ripe avocado ■ 2 slices sourdough bread ■ 1 poached egg ■ Squeeze of lime juice Toast sourdough bread while cooking poached egg, spread avocado over

toast then add a squeeze of lime juice and top with egg. Sliced tomato is a also a nice addition Season to taste. Tip: Keep the stone in the leftover avocado and splash with lemon or lime juice then cover to stop avocado browning.

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WINTER is here and healthy eating is always a challenge so here are a few ideas to help stay on track. A good healthy breakfast makes a great start to the day. Porridge with a serve of fruit or eggs and tomato and what about sourdough toast with avocado, sliced tomato and a poached egg, my favourite! Be prepared and stock your cupboards with canned goods such as baked beans, tinned fruit and veggies; which can

Seniors Card 137 468 or 1800 175 500 (free call outside Brisbane)

Seniors Enquiry Line 1300 135 500

Your health and vitality in winter HOME COOKING CHRISTINE PERKIN

Who do you call...

www.grandparentsqld.com.au

What’s

Going On? Are there exciting things happening in your local senior community? Share your story online. Look for the ‘share your event or story’ box on our home page. Visit www.seniorsnews.com.au

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BEFORE you jump into a ‘do it yourself’ project, make sure you have enough time, the right materials and understand that you might need plenty of patience. Things don’t always go as you first planned out, so be aware of unexpected costs. It might be a good idea to start small if you are a beginner. You can visit your local Bunnings or hardware store for DIY classes. Construct simple pieces if you are unsure of your skills. If you like a challenge, here are some pros and cons to help you decide on a DIY project is for you. Pros: ■ It is a great way to

Seniors 21


22 Seniors Wide Bay

seniorsnews.com.au Monday, July 17, 2017

Reviews

Crime Mystery Health Wellbeing Recipes

Oz gangsters in US history

AUSTRALIAN Desperadoes is Terry Smyth’s incredible story of how Australian gangsters terrorised California. They were the Australians who made American history. In the roaring days of the 1850s California gold rush, San Francisco was the most dangerous town in America, made so by a notorious criminal gang known as the Sydney Coves. The Coves – San Francisco’s first organised crime gang – were Australians: men and women with criminal careers in Australia who had come to the US, mostly illegally, during the gold rush. The Coves had come not to dig for gold but to unleash a crime wave the likes of which America had never seen. Robbery, murder, arson and extortion were the Coves’ stock-in-trade, and it was said that the leader of the gang, Jim Stuart, had killed more men than any man in California.

The gang’s base in the waterfront district came to be known as Sydney Town. The area was a no-go zone for police – many of whom were in Stuart’s pocket anyway. So just as Capone would one day rule Chicago, the Coves ruled San Francisco. And more than once, just to make sure there was no doubt that Frisco was their town, they burnt it down. The Coves were hated and feared by the respectable citizens of San Francisco – who derisively called them ‘Sydney Ducks’ but never to their faces – and, realising the forces of the law could not or would not take them on, they decided lynch law was the only solution and formed a vigilante group. The streets of San Francisco became a battlefield as the Coves and the vigilantes fought for control of the city, with gunfights and lynchings almost daily spectacles as the police stood idly by. Jim Stewart was

Here’s some healthy and easy recipes QUICK and achievable recipes for fresh, healthy and wholesome food are on offer in this new book. Callum Hann of Masterchef fame and Themis Chryssidis, an accredited practising dietitian, present over 70 simple, quick and convenient recipes for fresh, healthy, flavoursome food. The dishes use easy to find, seasonal ingredients, that represent good value for money and which require minimal preparation and clean-up time. Valuable nutritional information is given for every recipe. The book is divided into four seasonal

chapters, each with a collection of recipes using readily available ingredients in season, with suggestions for variations and substitute ingredients. The Quick. Easy. Healthy. Good Food Every Day book is available to purchase online from Nutrition Australia, http://www.nutrition australia.org. RRP $39.99.

arrested in Sacramento for killing a sheriff but escaped to be involved in one the most celebrated cases of mistaken identity in the annals of American crime. When the smoke cleared, the Coves’ reign of terror was over. Some were strung up from storefronts in the street, some fell in a deadly gunfight with Jonathan R. Davis, one of the fastest guns in the west, others escaped capture and returned to Australia. The story of the Sydney Coves is little-known, fascinating and well worth telling. Terry Smyth’s Australian Desperadoes is published by Penguin Random House and available in July at bookshops. RRP hardback $34.99.

A piece of crime and mystery IT’S the story of a nineteenth century court case involving Thomas Guthrie Carr, a notorious, larger-than-life character who made his living as a mesmerist, phrenologist, public speaker and some say charlatan. Thomas Guthrie Carr is charged by Eliza Gray with mesmerising her and raping her while she was under his influence. But if mesmerism and Mr Carr are shams, was Eliza raped? In the tradition of The Suspicions of Mr Whicher, Charlatan is the story of a notorious nineteenth-century court case involving a larger-than-life character.

Learn about brain health & dementia

With a driving narrative and novelistic pacing, this scrupulously researched account of the life of Thomas Guthrie Carr, stage mesmerist – who lied, fought and sleazed his way around Australia and New Zealand between 1865 and 1886 – is more than just a fascinating piece of social history. Catherine Jinks’ Charlatan is published by Penguin Random House. RRP $32.99.

GROUNDBREAKING publication on the hot topic of brain health and dementia prevention plus over 70 recipes to keep your brain healthy. On average we can expect to live 10-20 years longer than our grandparents’ generation. These extra years are a bonus but also impose challenges to our bodies and brains. Recent scientific investigations have uncovered foods and ingredients that can help protect brain cells from damage by oxidation and inflammation and keep the systems that support them working

as well as possible. An international authority on nutrition for aged care, dietitian Ngaire Hobbins presents a compelling argument that the food you eat can make a big difference to your quality of life. * Published by Allen & Unwin. * Better Brain Food is available in August from book stores.


Puzzles

Monday, July 17, 2017 seniorsnews.com.au

B E B U G L

T A I L R O T

D

W E I E N D O E

R E P E E A T E

G H Y A R

E

L L

Y

21

TRIO

Can you complete these four words, using the same three-letter sequence in each?

SUDOKU

23

Fill the grid so every column, every row and 3x3 box contains the digits 1 to 9.

alpHaGRaMS Solve the anagrams. Each solution is a one-word anagram of the letters beside it, and the five solutions are sequential. For example, if the five-letter solution starts with J, the six-letter solution starts with K, and so on.

woRD Go RoUND

H L TODAY

E I

K 454

KM

S A

How many words of four letters or more can you make? Each letter must be used only once and all words must contain the centre letter. There is at least one nine-letter word. No words starting with a capital are allowed, no plurals ending in s unless the word is also a verb, e.g. he burns with anger.

JIGGERED

SUDOKU

CORKS HUSTLE ATTUNED NUDE ROCK TUNE LOVER

ROCKS, SLEUTH, TAUNTED, UNCORKED, VOLUNTEER.

H

22

Good 12 Very Good 16 Excellent 20+

4 lEttERS AJAR ASIA AVER AVOW

BUOY DOVE EDGY EWES GATE IDEA INNS LEWD MOAT MOOR MOTH NAME NINE NOUS ODES ONTO PUMA RAPT RARE ROLL SNUG STAR TEEN TERM VIAL

WEEP

QUIZ

5 lEttERS DEWEY GERMS MITRE SEWER

1. What was Darling Harbour called before a NSW Governor named it after himself? 2. Spice Girl Mel C joined which artist on the hit “When You’re Gone”? 3. In which country was tennis player Monica Seles born – France, Yugoslavia, or Germany? 4. Which middle name did Winston Churchill share with Charlie Chaplin? 5. Who starred in the film Evita as Eva? 6. Which former four-star general was US Secretary of State from 2001-05? 7. If your luggage label on an international flight says TUN, where are you going? 8. Which band had hits with Don’t Dream It’s Over, Something So Strong and Weather With You?

6 lEttERS ABUSER ALTARS ANGLER GALLOP IMPUGN REGIME 8 lEttERS CLEANSER EYESIGHT HANGOVER MULTIPLE RESONATE REVEREND

QUIZ

I M P U G N

Solution opposite

3 lEttERS ACT ARM AWL DUD GAS GOD HOG ICE ILL JEW LAG NOW OWL ROC SOU TEE TRY YOU

1 Long Cove, 2 Bryan Adams, 3 Yugoslavia, 4 Spencer, 5 Madonna, 6 Colin Powell, 8 Fiordland, 7 Tunis, in Tunisia, 8 Crowded House

Fit the words into the grid to create a finished crossword

ALPHAGRAMS

woRDFIt

G H T O O R D G Y

E S T W T E R

20

alike hake hike hikes kale kame khaki lake leak leaks like likes make makes mask milk milks MILKSHAKE sake saki shake silk skim slake

N C S A Y N

19

WORD GO ROUND

I

18

T E EW R E M S

D E S A C R A

17

A J A R

A N D W A F E N

16

R E G I M E

Y E A B R K V

15

S T A R

U D L A Y C

14

N A M E

A R A B Y

13

N O U S

D E T T S I S

I

12

R O C AW L I P L E C T A B S N U E R E S O D EW E Y O V E R V E R G L A E R E Y E S N OW D U D

Z E P

11

A S I A R O L L M U L T A M I T R O D E S T E E H A N G A A N G L V I A L O N T O W E E P

R K E A S S

10

WORDFIT

I

9

K A Y A K

E M S S C

5

8

TRIO: KIL

V L E B I

O A D O

C H S E I

7

N D A E N D A Y C E S C A S T W E R R V E R

L

I

R V H E R

4

6

R I M A S W L F E M U S S L C A R A D B A Y R D E T E T S I S T T A I L R O T H

P O E L E Y B

S I O C

I M S L

3

R E P E E A T E L V L E B I C H S E I N C S A Y N P O E L E Y B

R

Down 1. Hire (5) 2. Every other year (8) 3. Amend (6) 4. Unfeeling (4) 5. Prostitutes (colloq) (7) 6. The lowest point (4,6) 9. Took place (10) 12. Compatibility (8) 14. Playhouse (7) 16. Implant (6) 19. Pried (5) 20. Manage (4)

2

I R I S E I S S O C I E B R O A D V O B E D L E L G L Y A Z I A T E R P E I G H N Y A O E R

R A R A T O R

Across 1. Mazes (10) 7. Egg-shaped (5) 8. Leave suddenly (colloq) (7) 10. Enthusiasm (8) 11. Greenstone club (4) 13. Fugitive (6) 15. Counterbalance (6) 17. Level (4) 18. Badge (8) 21. Dispense (4,3) 22. Distribute (5) 23. Moved to a new position (10)

1

B U R R O W E D

The challenge is to rearrange a crossword which has been broken into 25 sections. One letter has been given to get you started. Work out which 3x3 square fits in with that letter and write in the letters. You can also shade the black squares if you find it helpful. After completing the first 3x3 area, work out which square joins on to it, and continue until you have made a complete crossword.

QUICK CRoSSwoRD

QUICK CROSSWORD

3/7

Seniors 23

Across: 1. Labyrinths 7. Ovate 8. Vamoose 10. Keenness 11. Mere 13. Outlaw 15. Offset 17. Tier 18. Insignia 21. Mete out 22. Issue 23. Redeployed. Down: 1. Lease 2. Biennial 3. Revise 4. Numb 5. Hookers 6. Rock bottom 9. Eventuated 12. Affinity 14. Theatre 16. Instil 19. Nosed 20. Cope.

JIGGERED

Wide Bay


24 Seniors Wide Bay

seniorsnews.com.au Monday, July 17, 2017

Get your copy today! Seniors Wide Bay 2017 promises to be an exciting year for our publication, and we look forward to bringing our readers 12 editions jam-packed with news, reviews and ideas to help make life as enjoyable as possible! We’d also like to thank our many distributors for their support in 2016. See below for a complete list of where to find your Seniors Newspaper in 2017, available around the 20th of every month. BUNDABERG

CRAIGNISH

• •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

ARGYLE GARDENS RETIREMENT VILLAGE BLOOMS: THE CHEMIST BROTHERS SPORTS CLUB BUNDABERG AND DISTRICT MIXED PROBUS CLUB BUNDABERG AND DISTRICT SENIOR CITIZENS ASSOCIATION BUNDABERG CENTRAL MEN’S SHED ASSOCIATION BUNDABERG GOLF CLUB BUNDABERG LAWN BOWLS CLUB BUNDABERG AND DISTRICT MEALS ON WHEELS BUNDABERG SERVICES CLUB BUNDABERG DISCOUNT DRUG STORE RSL CARE FAIRWAYS RETIREMENT COMMUNITY FRIENDLY SOCIETY PHARMACY BUNDABERG MALOUF PHARMACY PRICELINE PHARMACY BUNDABERG CHURCH PHARMACY CORAL COAST PLAZA PHARMACY CORAL COAST WEST BUNDABERG PHARMACY SOUTHSIDE CENTRAL NEWS SUGARLANDS GARDEN RETIREMENT VILLAGE SUNNYSIDE CROQUET CLUB INC. THE LAKES RETIREMENT VILLAGE UNIVERSITY OF THE THIRD AGE (U3A) CORAL COAST PHARMACY LIBERTY VILLAS

BARGARA • • • • •

BARGARA BOWLS CARLYLE GARDENS RETIREMENT VILLAGE PALM LAKE RESORT PHARMACY CENTRAL SANDHILLS SPORTS CLUB

BIGGENDEN • •

FOODWORKS BIGGENDEN NEWSAGENCY

BURNETT HEADS • • •

BURNETT HEADS OVER 50S SOCIAL CLUB INC BURNETT HEAD PHARMACIES BURNETT SENIOR CITIZENS ASSOCIATION

CRAIGNISH COUNTRY CLUB CRAIGNISH VILLAGE PHARMACY

CHILDERS • • • • •

CHILDERS NEIGHBOURHOOD CENTRE FOOTES PHARMACY FOREST VIEW AGED CARE FACILITY FRIENDLIES PHARMACY ISIS CLUB INC

GYMPIE • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

CENTRAL PARK MALL FRESHWATER VILLAS GOLDFIELDS FULLIFE PHARMACY GOLDFIELDS PLAZA GOOD PRICE PHARMACY GYMPIE BOWLS CLUB FRIENDLIES PHARMACY GYMPIE NATIONAL SENIORS INC GYMPIE PINES GOLF CLUB THE GYMPIE SENIOR CITIZENS CENTRE GYMPIE VIEW CLUB LIBRARY MALOUF PHARMACIES PRICELINE PHARMACY

HERVEY BAY • • • • • • • • •

DOMAIN RETIREMENT VILLAGE ELI WATERS SHOPPING CENTRE FRASER COAST CHRONICLE OFFICE HERVEY BAY BOAT CLUB AUSTRALIAN PENSIONERS AND SUPERANNUANTS FEDERATION MCWILLIAM`S PHARMACY THE FRIENDLIES DISCOUNT PHARMACY UNITED DISCOUNT CHEMIST WOOLWORTHS

MARYBOROUGH • • • • • • • • •

MARYBOROUGH SPORTS CLUB STATION ST SHOPPING CENTRE PRESCARE YARALLA PLACE MARYBOROUGH RSL MARYBOROUGH GOLF AND BOWLS CLUB MARYBOROUGH SENIOR CITIZENS CENTRE MARYBOROUGH SERVICES MEMORIAL BOWLS CLUB AMCAL PHARMACY RSL CARE CHELSEA RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

• • • • • • •

CHEMIST WAREHOUSE FAIR HAVEN RETIREMENT VILLAGE FRASER COAST CHRONICLE OFFICE FRASER COAST REGIONAL COUNCIL LIBRARY FRIENDLIES PHARMACY GOOD PRICE PHARMACY INFORMATION CENTRE

URRAWEEN • • • •

FAIRHAVEN RETIREMENT VILLAGE FRASER SHORES RETIREMENT VILLAGE GOLDEN SHORES STOCKLAND SHOPPING CENTRE

URANGAN PIALBA • • • • • • • • • •

CARERS QUEENSLAND HERVEY BAY GOLF CLUB HERVEY BAY PUBLIC LIBRARY HERVEY BAY RSL IGA FRASER SHORES SHOPPING CENTRE NOVA DISCOUNT PHARMACY PIALBA DISCOUNT DRUG STORE PIALBA PLACE SHOPPING CENTRE SCOOTERS & MOBILITY FRASER COAST SENIORS IN FOCUS

RAINBOW BEACH • • •

OVER 60S SHELL SERVO INFORMATION CENTRE RAINBOW BEACH SPORTS CLUB

SCARNESS • •

BEACHSIDE PHARMACY HERVEY BAY BOWLS CLUB

• • • • • •

WOODGATE • •

• • • • • • •

• • •

• • • • • • •

TORQUAY • • • •

HERVEY BAY & DISTRICT SENIOR CITIZENS CLUB OPTIMAL PHARMACY PLUS TORBAY LIFESTYLES AND CARE UMIMBIRRA RETIREMENT VILLAGE

WOODGATE BOWLS CLUB WOODGATE MEN’S SHED

OTHER LOCATIONS

TIN CAN BAY BARNACLES CAFÉ COOLOOLA COAST BOWLS CLUB COOLOOLA WATERS RETIREMENT RESORT MEALS ON WHEELS COOLOOLA PHARMACY TIN CAN BAY CRAFT CLUB TIN CAN BAY RSL SUB BRANCH TIN CAN BAY YACHT CLUB THE SANDS CENTRE PHARMACY TIN CAN BAY COUNTRY CLUB

OPTIMAL PHARMACY PLUS PARKLANDS RETIREMENT HAVEN SANCTUARY LAKES FAUNA RETREAT SUGAR COAST VILLAGE URANGAN BOWLS CLUB URANGAN MARINA PHARMACY

• • • • • • • •

ELLIOT HEADS: ELLIOT HEADS BOWLS CLUB KEPNOCK GROVE: CARINITY AGED CARE MOORE PARK: MOORE PARK BEACH BOWLS AND SPORTS CLUB AVOCA: STOCKLAND SUGARLAND SHOPPING TOWN BURRUM HEADS: BURRUM HEADS PHARMACY DUNDOWRAN: FRASER LAKES GOLF CLUB KAWUNGAN: KAWUNGAN CHEMART PHARMACY POINT VERNON: TERRY WHITE CHEMISTS TOOGOOM: TOOGOOM PHARMACY KYBONG: GYMPIE VISITOR INFORMATION CENTRE GOOMBOORIAN: MATILDA SERVICE STATION (INFORMATION CENTRE), TINANA: FRIENDLIES PHARMACY GRANVILLE: PRESCARE GROUNDWATER LODGE SOUTH TINANA: LYCHEE DIVINE EAST TINANA: QUEENSLAND LIFESTYLE VILLAGE OVER 50S RESORT TIARO: TIARO PHARMACY

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