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Cover story - Australia’s newest PhD What’s on Community group guide Wanderlust Wellbeing Money Puzzles

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Good health & wellbeing at a price

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Try travelling solo but not single

MARCH, 2019// SENIORS

Longevity: debits/credits Gail Forrer Seniors Group Editor THIS month we honour Dr David Bottomley’s life-long learning journey. Regardless of age, his curiosity to know, learn and contribute to society seems unabated, and they’re the qualities I’m sure we would all like to keep intact. However, besides academic learning, we, as elders, have a good deal to share with other generations. Personally, I love a day at the river with my granddaughter just chatting about everything we see around us – there’s so much to explore, explain and enjoy as we share our lives. As we know, one of the key factors changing the world today is increased longevity. The same as everything else, these extra years have their debits and credits. This month, our regular double-page feature investigates how authorities are dealing with ageing prisoners. For instance, people in wheelchairs need wider corridors, dementia patients require alternative caring and, ultimately, the big question: should the needs of ageing prisoners be facilitated within the prison system or should they be settled in nursing homes?

And if you don’t think this particular issue has relevance to you, then consider Japan. According to WHO figures (2015), this is the place humans live the longest. Japan ranks number one in life expectancy for women (90.1 years) and men (85.1 years). However, Japan also has the world’s largest ageing prison population – and it seems much of this can be due to social isolation. Since Australians too are living longer, I see a clear message here on the importance of community relations in our older lives. Our Wellbeing and Living pages have a wide range of tips on how to lead our best senior lives - from including sunscreen in our morning routine to better sleep habits and yes, if you have the space, how to grow grapes and of course, we always end with our whopper puzzle. Enjoy.

CONTACT US General Manager Geoff Crockett – 07 5430 1006 geoff.crockett@news.com.au Editor Gail Forrer – 07 5435 3203 gail.forrer@seniorsnewspaper.com.au Media Sales Executive Brett Mauger – 07 5435 3203 brett.mauger@seniorsnewspaper.com.au Online Get your news online at www.seniorsnews.com.au Advertising, editorial and distribution enquiries Phone: 1300 880 265 or (07) 5435 3200 Email: advertising@seniorsnewspaper.com.au or editor@seniorsnewspaper.com.au Location: 2 Newspaper Place, Maroochydore 4558 Website: www.seniorsnews.com.au Subscriptions Only $39.90 for one year (12 editions) including GST and postage anywhere in Australia. Please call our circulations services on 1300 361 604 and quote “Brisbane Seniors Newspaper”. The Seniors Newspaper is published monthly and distributed free in southeast Queensland and northern New South Wales. The Seniors newspaper stable includes Toowoomba, Wide Bay, Sunshine Coast, Brisbane, Gold Coast, Northern NSW, Coffs and Clarence and Central Coast publications. Published by News Corp Australia. Printed by News Corp Australia, Yandina. Opinions expressed by contributors to Seniors Newspapers are not necessarily those of the editor or the owner/publisher and publication of advertisements implies no endorsement by the owner/publisher.


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Great Australian learner DAVID Bottomley AM is Australia’s newest and oldest PhD graduate after completing his study of ancient school education methods that he believes have relevance to today’s school teachers. The 94-year-old said his wife, Anne, joked with him that he was a bit slow in getting a PhD, but after seven years of study he finished one year ahead of schedule. Dr Bottomley finished his first degree in 1948, took up teaching science and maths before moving into working in and studying social and market research. In 2008, 60 years after his first degree, he completed a Masters in Education. His love of study and of stretching his mind beyond the norm is in his blood. His father was a minister who welcomed his children to his library. “I worked my way up from the lowest shelf that I could reach,” he said. That experience instilled in him an

enthusiasm to question everything. “It’s just a normal process where whatever you are placed in, you want to understand it and question it,” the scholar said. He cited the Royal Society of London’s motto that a science person should question, never just accept, and look for correlation. His brother Bob, who has a PhD in enzymatic chemistry, worked with the local flour millers during WWII to transform the protein level of Victorians. He has a daughter, aged in her 60s, studying for a PhD in music and a granddaughter finishing a degree in medicine. Dr Bottomley’s Doctor of Philosophy was achieved through West Australia’s Curtin University and under the guidance of Distinguished Professor David Treagust. “I took five headmasters of equal positions in the 19th century, who were quite well known in the field of history of science, and I looked for the similarities

HARD WORK: Australia's oldest PhD graduate, Curtin University's Dr David Bottomley AM. Photo: Jaimi Joy and differences within these five,” he said. Each teacher created within the school curriculum situations which Dr Bottomley’s described as “leading to students fitting in and running within a stimulating environment to higher learning for themselves”.

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Not surprisingly, about half his small home in Melbourne is taken up with his study materials which have grown to almost 80 lever-arch files full of his research. “It’s a rather crowded one,” Dr Bottomley says with a chuckle. “I am now redistributing the files with ideas for the

next step.” The idea of stopping vigorously exercising his mind is all but a brief lapse in this exceptional man’s thinking. He jokes he is in “great need of a haircut”, and since finishing his PhD, feeling “bored stiff”. But that is doubtful. While he might, for a brief moment, have wondered what he would do with himself each day, it’s taken no time for his curiosity to reassert itself. While Dr Bottomley addresses his need to get more active by heading out the door, pushing his walker around and studying his world, his mind is actively considering his next intellectual challenge. He has already identified as an outcome of his PhD thesis the subject of his next area of study; “exploring the concomitance of creativity in schools”. He wants to find some area of interest from this research that will be valuable to current school teachers. Also on the radar is the wellbeing of his wife of 68

years. Anne lives in an aged care facility close-by. Dr Bottomley visits her three or four times a week and has keenly observed the environment she is living in. “We can change our focus by changing one letter,” he said. Care to cure is what he is talking about. “The challenge today is cure. What I hope to explore is people with different skills, crossfertilising with each other,” he said. “I would love to be in the position to make a presentation to this Royal Commission about nursing homes because what I want to say is, ‘heaven’s sake, change the idea of care to cure and you change the whole axis of your thinking about one of the huge problems of today’. “There is an enormous amount here I don’t know, but I hope to explore. “I wonder how many vested interests are going to resist me?” The learning journey is ongoing for this scholar, who happily describes life as “really exciting”.

Updates from the Toowoomba Region

18 MAY 2019 2:30 & 7:30pm

Discover your celtic roots with live music from the Celtic nations

with a dynamic cast of over 200 Special guest artists: Gregory Moore and Sarah Calderwood Voices of Birralee Kevin Higgins BBC Pipes and Drums OzScot Oz Highland Dancers Watkins Academy Irish Dance

Update to medium level water restrictions Water restriction levels vary depending on where you live. As a Region we’re aiming to reduce our water consumption to 200 litres/person/day. For more information on your community’s restriction levels, visit www.tr.qld.gov.au/waterrestrictionsbytown

Council Meetings

CHANGE Project

The next meetings of Council’s Standing Committees will be held on 12 and 13 March 2019 commencing at 9am. The next Ordinary Meeting of Council will be held on 19 March commencing at 10am. All meetings are at City Hall, 541 Ruthven Street, Toowoomba.

A range of low-cost opportunities are available in the Toowoomba Region each week to help residents get out and active. For full details and to join visit www.tr.qld. gov.au/change

Crows Nest Art Gallery volunteers We want you! We’re on the lookout for volunteers who are passionate about our Region and art. To register your interest in volunteering at the Crows Nest Regional Art Gallery, phone the Gallery Officer on 07 4698 1687 or email crowsnestart@tr.qld.gov.au

Online services Use our online services to do business with us, at a time that is convenient for you. You can pay your rates, register your dog, report problems, apply for a licence, lodge an application and complete many other types of Council business online. Go to www.tr.qld.gov. au/onlineservices

Book today www.qpac.com.au or phone 136 246

qldpops.com

Parks Week 2019 Parks Week 2019 is almost here! From 9-17 March, residents can participate in a great range of activities throughout the Region to get active and enjoy our outdoors. For a full list of Parks Week activities, go to www.tr.qld.gov.au/ parksweek

Keep your weeds in check As residents of our beautiful region, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that any plants on your premises do not pose a health, environmental or biosecurity risk to the community. For further information or advice, give us a call and ask to speak to our Conservation & Pest Management team.

Choose the right bin Confused about where to put your rubbish? Head to www.tr.qld.gov.au/recycling for handy hints and information on what can be recycled. Let’s recycle right!

For bookings for all events call 131 872 or visit www.tr.qld.gov.au

TRC_0319_SN

Tracey Johnstone


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NEWS

MARCH, 2019// SENIORS

Highland fling to health Scottish dances add zing to your social life Alison Houston MARG Bond may not be dancing the highland fling anymore, but at 66 she has just passed the prestigious Royal Scottish Country Dancing Society exams, qualifying her to teach. The Toowoomba Caledonian Society and Pipe Band vice-president and publicity officer said she had always wanted to be a teacher and was keen to pass on skills to the next generation so the traditional dances were not lost. “And I wanted to prove to myself that I could do it – move it or lose it they say,” she laughed. As well as theory, Marg had to show her skills in four selected jigs, four reels and four strathspeys, judged by two examiners, one of whom had travelled from Scotland. She explained that although she had

competed in highland dancing as a girl, highland and sword dancing, for which the Scottish are best known, were more a young person’s sport, being very hard on the legs. Country dancing, on the other hand, was for everyone, Scottish or not, and there were about 18,000 dances to choose from, performed in various sets. The more common are danced at relaxed social gatherings called ceilidhs (pronounced kaylees), which the Toowoomba Caledonian Society and Pipe Band runs twice a year at Drayton Hall in May and August. With a history in mental health work, Marg was keen to point out the many health benefits of Scottish country dancing, including improved memory and brain function, socialisation and community spirit, as well as bone health and overall fitness.

KEEPING UP TRADITIONS: Past chieftain Mal Lesley, president Col McKay, first female chieftain Irene Batzloff, patron Carl Hinds and past chieftan Kym Flehr at the recent Toowoomba Caledonian Society and Pipe Band's Burns Supper, celebrating poet Robert Burns. “And the music’s great,” she added. “With the ceilidh, the emphasis is on fun … and if you don’t have a partner, no problem, I’ll find you one, even if I take them from the band – I’ve done it before.” Dances are called, so everyone can follow the moves after a quick run-through, no experience necessary.

While the society, formed in 1871 and one of the oldest in Australia, is predominantly Scottish focussed, an Irish ensemble will play at the May ceilidh, while the August event has a “come as a favourite character” theme. “They’re for everyone, young or old, and there’s a real family atmosphere,” Marg said.

And at just $10 per dance, she says it’s an inexpensive night out, with supper, a licensed bar and raffles all available. As well as the ceilidhs, the society holds the Burns Supper, honouring acclaimed Scottish poet Robert Burns around his birth date of January 25, and St Andrew’s Night on the last Saturday in

November. The pipe band also participates in various community events, including Australia Day, St Patrick’s Day and Anzac Day, as well as the Carnival of Flowers. To find out more about any of the society’s activities, including band practices, phone Marg on 0429 700 217.

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NEWS

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Take time to connect Alison Houston ON ANY given day one in 10 people will feel lonely – perhaps you’re one of them, or know someone you suspect is lonely. Loneliness: What Neighbours Can Do to Create Connections is the theme of this year’s Neighbour Day on Sunday, March 31 – aimed at building better relationships with the people who live around us, especially the elderly and vulnerable. Neighbour Day campaign manager Sam Robinson is encouraging Toowoomba district residents to take the challenge and reach out to people around them with one simple action a week. It could be a few friendly words across the back fence, inviting an elderly neighbour in for a cuppa, seeing if they need help in the garden or something from the shops, organising a walking group, sharing some baking or home-grown vegies, or stopping for a chat when you’re out with

the dog, or at the shops. Each day in March, the Neighbourhood Day campaign will post Very Neighbourly Tips on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram with ideas about how to reach out to neighbours, especially single parents, those who have lost a partner, people with health concerns and the elderly. “We will be encouraging you to take the initiative and think about those who live around you who might not be able to get out, or have friends or relatives close by, those who could do with some companionship or help,” she said. The first Neighbour Day was held in Melbourne in 2003, based around community activist Andrew Heslop’s idea to encourage people to check on their neighbours after the story emerged of an elderly woman’s body found inside her suburban home more than two years after her death. Since then, Neighbour Day has progressed from a reminder to connect with elderly neighbours to an annual celebration of

DONT BE LONELY: Neighbour Day encourages us to reach out and make a difference to the elderly and vulnerable by simple gestures like stopping for a chat. communities and friendly streets involving people of all ages. A Relationships Australia survey last year found that almost 1.5 million Australians report having been lonely for a decade or more. Research also shows

that 82% of us believe loneliness is becoming more common. And it can be deadly, with loneliness associated with social anxiety, poor mental health, an increased risk of coronary heart disease and stroke, high blood

pressure and the onset of disability. It actually increases the likelihood of mortality by 26% – similar to the effect of smoking 15 cigarettes a day. Relationships Australia says we all need meaningful relationships

in our lives to celebrate the good times and help us through difficult times. Neighbour Day ambassador and social researcher Hugh Mackay talks about the importance of being socially connected to others. “… Communities don’t just happen. We have to create them and build them,” he said. There are a host of community groups and volunteer opportunities around Toowoomba. Find out more at Toowoomba Regional Council, go to tr.qld.gov.au/aboutcouncil/jobs-at-council/ volunteering; Volunteering Queensland, go to volunteeringqld. org.au or My Community Directory, go to mycommunity directory.com.au/ Queensland/Toowoomba. For more information on Neighbour Day and how you can get involved, including free easy-to-use resources such as posters, selfie signs and calling cards, go to neighbourday.org.

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MARCH, 2019// SENIORS

Clifton’s caring service

Lifestyle co-ordinator explains how to maximise opportunities Alison Houston LIFESTYLE co-ordinator is a career many may not have heard of, but for Jade Gilchrist it means making sure that everyone in Clifton Community Health Service’s aged care gets the most out of life. “For me, working here has been like hitting the jackpot; it’s such a positive, nurturing environment, a great team, and management that always puts residents’ needs first,” Jade said. Established in 1949, so celebrating 70 years, Clifton Community Health Services is a community owned and run, not-forprofit co-operative that operates a small private hospital, bulk-billing medical practice, nursing home, hostel, and independent living villas, and recently added a diversional therapy centre and the 12-bed Memory Support Unit, Sunflower

Lodge. Jade has been at the service for nine months, but has a background in diversional therapy of more than 20 years in aged care, disability, community care and education. She has already introduced a number of new initiatives – ones producing significant enough results to have prompted a call to Seniors from a community member saying we “really need to talk to Jade and her diversional therapy team”. And she has some pretty exciting plans for the future involving a potential first in aged care … watch this space. Jade’s emphasis in everything she does is on maximising people’s abilities and opportunities, breaking down divides, increasing the feeling of community between staff and residents, and giving 110 per cent. “We look at people’s strengths, not their

ONE COMMUNITY: Clifton Community Health Service lifestyle co-ordinator Jade Gilchrist and resident representative Anne Kersley. weaknesses, and identify what people can do, and build activities around that,” Jade said. With an increased push towards people staying at home longer, and more services making it possible to do so, Jade said nursing home residents had changed greatly over the past 20 years, with most now having high-care needs,

including for many, elements of dementia. “But dementia affects everyone in a different way, so our diversional therapists work with each person in the moment so they have what they need to engage them,” she said. For some, that may mean looking at farm machinery online, latest models or farming

techniques, for others dancing, music, and reminiscing, for another doing some housework, so they feel they are achieving something. “It’s so important that people feel needed and that they still have a role to play,” Jade said. She is open to taking on residents’ ideas, with monthly meetings as well as creating a Resident

Representative role, so residents have one of their own with whom they feel happy to share comments, praise and complaints to be passed on. “This is the silent generation we are talking about – they don’t like to make a fuss,” Jade said. The Baby Boomers coming through in the next generation, she believes, will be much happier to stand up and advocate for themselves – something that, as a trained anthropologist as well, she has written a paper about, identifying how demands on aged care will change. Other activities include Games Tuesday, trivia sessions, happy hour, spiritual services for different faiths, entertainment and activities marking special events. And being a community co-op, many activities are also open to the public. To find out more about Clifton Community Health Services, go to cliftonhospital.org or phone 07 4697 3735.


SENIORS \\MARCH, 2019

NEWS

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MARCH, 2019// SENIORS


SENIORS \\MARCH, 2019 floriculture, woodwork, home cookery, handicraft, art, fashion and the ute muster. Go to oakeyshow.com. Alison Houston

SISTER CITY PHOTOGRAPY

TOOWOOMBA Regional Art Gallery will celebrate the city’s Sister City relationship with Takatsuki by hosting a joint photographic exhibition until March 31. There will be 24 works displayed; 12 from Takatsuki and 12 from Toowoomba. Mayor Paul Antonio said the exhibition showed the diversity and unique perspectives of the artists, highlighting a wide range of photographic styles and content.

OAKEY SHOW

THE 111th annual Oakey Show is on March 16. It’s a chance for the whole community to celebrate by showcasing livestock, produce, cookery, handcrafts and enjoying the entertainment day and night. Here’s a little of what you can enjoy: horses, cattle, goats, poultry, caged birds, dog championships and jumping, chainsaw events, farm produce and field crops, fruit and veg,

CANCER SUPPORT GROUP

IF YOU are coping with cancer or its affects and need friendship and support, the Cancer Support Group meets from 2pm on the third Tuesday each month (including March 19) at 2pm at Toowoomba’s Engine Room Cafe. The group is for current and previous cancer patients, family and friends. Phone Georgina Hart on 0437 383 380.

SPACE TALK

FROM Australia to the World: The Lost Apollo Moments is on at the Empire Church Theatre from 7- 8.30pm on March 22. You will learn the untold story of Australia’s early contributions to the space race and hear first-hand from the unsung Aussies who worked tirelessly to transmit the first signals from the moon to the world. Cost is adults $15, concession $10. Go to worldscience festival.com.au.

STARGAZING

WHILE you are thinking about space, how about a little stargazing on

9 Saturday, March 23, at Cobb + Co Museum? Go along for a free night under the stars, and explore Toowoomba’s beautiful night sky, with Toowoomba Astronomy Group providing telescopes. Go to worldscience festival.com.au.

What's on

FRIDAY AT THE FLICKS

FRIDAY at the Flicks is back, giving classic movie-lovers the chance to see and dissect film history while sipping on bubbles at USQ Toowoomba. Become a Friday at the Flicks club member and enjoy the full season of 2019 films for just $40. First up is The Day of the Jackal, starring Edward Fox. It’s on March 29 from 6.30pm at USQ Artsworx Arts Theatre. Phone 4631 1111.

RIDE THE RANGE

OVER eight years, more than 2500 people have taken the challenge to Ride the Range, raising more than $200,000 for charity. This year it’s on March 31 with four rides for different ages and abilities. They are the 100 Mile (164km) Challenge, with over 1825 metres of climbing and an expected lead pace of 30-plus km/h; the Classic 112k,

TOUGH CHALLENGE: Ride the Range is on March 31, and it’s up to you just how far you think you can push yourself with four different lengths on offer from 58km to 164km. Photo: Rotary Ride the Range

with 1500m climbing and an expected pace of 25-30km/h; the 85 Climb the Range or the 79 Without the Climb (plus or minus the climb back up to Picnic Point), and the Nifty Fifty (59km), in which you ride the downhill and enjoy the backroads before a bus picks you up from Helidon State School to take you back to the top without the muscle strain. Go to ridetherange.org.au.

ANIMAL WATERCOLOUR

ALWAYS wanted to be

able to make your animal or bird pictures seem more lifelike? Alex Stalling, from Tinker, is teaching how to draw any animal from a photograph and finish it off with traditional and modern watercolour techniques from 6-9pm on April 5. Places are limited and $70 per session, includes three hours guidance with an artist, quality art supplies and refreshments. Email create@tinker toowoomba.com or phone 0407 000 808.

DAY ON THE PLAIN

HERE’S one to mark on your calendar and get tickets for now, with the Big Skies festival running April 27-May 5 and incorporating everything from foodie feasts to tours, outdoor movies and the Dalby Picnic Races to the Day on the Plain rock concert. This year it features a host of favourites from the 1970s-’90s, including Jon Stevens, John Paul Young, Ross Wilson, Deni Hines and Pseudo Echo at Jimbour Station. Go to bigskiesevents.com.au.


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COMMUNITY NOTES

MARCH, 2019// SENIORS

Community group guide

WE welcome your community notices. Please keep them short (100 word maximum). If you would like to submit a photo, ensure it is at least 180dpi or 500KB to 1MB in size and of faces, in a nice bright setting. Email editor@seniorsnewspaper.com.au.

TOOWOOMBA NATIONAL SENIORS

WE HOLD our monthly morning teas on the first Thursday of each month at the All Seasons Function Centre, corner North and Tor streets, Wilsonton, commencing at 9.30am. Lucky door and raffles to be won. Visitors welcome. Our March morning tea was on March 7 and our guest speaker was local author and historian Don Talbot. Our next monthly meeting will be held on April 4. We also have a monthly bus trip on the third Thursday of each month. For more, phone Desma (07) 4613 6750 or Yvonne (07) 4638 5252.

EASTER CONCERT

ARS Cantorum presents The Easter Story on Friday, April 12, at 6.30pm at St James Anglican Church, corner Russell and Mort streets, Toowoomba. The concert will feature verse and sacred music, telling the story from Palm Sunday to Easter and beyond. The program includes extracts from Handel’s Messiah, Stainer’s Crucifixion and features other composers including Michael Haydn, William Byrd, J.S. Bach and Kenneth Leighton. Tickets are available at the door: adults $20; concession/uni students $15; accompanied schoolage children $10. The concert will be followed by cheese and wine for the audience and performers in the Parish Centre.

NSA

Garden City GARDEN City Branch of

National Seniors Australia meets on the third Monday of the month at Drayton Bowls Club, corner Ball and Gipps streets, at 9.30am. Visitors welcome. Cost $7. Next meeting on Monday, March 18. We will celebrate St Patrick’s Day. Rae Blinco will play some Irish tunes on keyboard. There will be a competition for the best dressed in green and some Irish jokes. During the morning we will be making our annual donation to the Toowoomba Hospice. For more information, phone Hazel on (07) 4635 4519.

TOOWOOMBA QUILTERS CLUB

A MILESTONE to celebrate – Fay Suley joined the Toowoomba Quilters Club 18 years ago. Fay has taken an active part in the club’s management and activities over that time, especially with Community Quilting Group and the club’s annual quilt exhibition held in September during the Carnival of Flowers in Toowoomba. So when Fay celebrated her significant milestone birthday in January, Toowoomba Quilters president Lyn Lloyd presented her with flowers and a beautiful handmade card made by another Toowoomba Quilters member, Verna Hall. Club members joined for morning tea to help her celebrate. Congratulations Fay. Anna Warby of Toowoomba’s Hear and Say Centre received a striking quilt from Toowoomba Quilters Club

BIRTHDAY CELEBRATIONS: Fay Suley received flowers from Toowoomba Quilters club president Lyn Lloyd in early January. Photos: Contributed member Janice Becker. The Community Quilting Group of the club produced the quilt. Ms Warby says the quilt will be used in fundraising to further develop Toowoomba’s Hear & Say Centre to improve its services to deaf and hearing impaired children on the Downs and in regional Queensland. At the Hear & Say Centre, staff teach children to listen and speak with the use of amazing technology such as cochlear implants. Toowoomba Quilters Club Community Quilters Group enjoy their craft while assisting worthy community groups such as Hear & Say. Toowoomba Quilters meet every Tuesday and on the first and third Saturdays from 9.30am at TCBC, 100 Glenvale Rd. Here is a fine example of a community club working together to help others in our community.

Toowoomba Golden West Caravan Club recently joined Toowoomba Hospice for morning tea, when they popped in to make their annual donation.

COBB & CO MUSEUM

THE World Science Festival Brisbane Regional Program is on from March 22-23 – and it’s coming to Toowoomba, with several fantastic events for the whole family to enjoy. Here’s your chance to learn about Australia’s early contributions to the space race with From Australia to the World: The Lost Apollo Moments, learn about our night sky with Stargazing, and watch the museum transform into a science playground with Street Science. The museum is located at 27 Lindsay St, Toowoomba. Phone (07) 4659 4914 or go to cobbandco.qm.qld.gov.au.

COMMUNITY FUN FAMILY DAY

GLENGALA Day will be held on Saturday, April 6, at 10am-2pm. This is a fun and friendly family day

for everyone in the community. The event will feature market stalls, Devonshire tea, white elephant stall, sausage sizzle, classic cars, displays and demonstrations. There will be village tours and much more. Children’s fun includes a jumping castle, fire truck, face painting, balloon art and a colouring-in competition. There will also be live entertainment, performing art schools, Radio FIVE O Plus broadcast, specialist advice on fitness and lifestyle, health and wellness, home and care services, and a sporting arena with bowls and table tennis competitions. Everyone is welcome to come to Glengara Retirement Village, 220 Hansens Rd, Tumbi Umbi. For information, phone 13006 87 738 or visit the website at retireaustralia.com.au /glengara.

GARDEN CITY COUNTRY MUSIC ASSOCIATION

COUNTRY Music Rush, sponsored by Neils Parts Australia, will be held on March 23-24 and begins at 8.30am each day at the Oakey Cultural Centre. It’s a country music competition for amateur contestants of all ages, with 18 sections and a concert on the Saturday night featuring champion yodeller Laura Downing, supported by Tony Wagner. General admission $10 adults/$8 age pensioner. Concert admission is $10 if paid with general admission. Patrons arriving after 5pm for the concert will pay $15. Roast meal will be available on the Saturday night for $15. Entries for the competition have now closed. For information on the event, phone Dell on 0417 728 182 or go to www.gardencitycountry music.com.

Residents and friends of Glenfield Grange Retirement Village Middle Ridge Toowoomba enjoyed morning tea together recently at Kingfisher Cafe. Seated: Don Purcell, Joy Purcell, Patricia Grassie, Helen Chambers, Glenda Taylor, June Adams, Sue McEvoy, Daphne McCallum, Shirley Cormack, Betty Sanderson, Margaret Corbett, June Kearsley. Standing: Denise Beauchamp and Hilary Darmody.


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The new, true costs of Tracey Johnstone PHIL Goulding stopped talking. It was only for a few moments, but the silence was noticeable. Up until then our conversation had been flowing freely. You see, we were talking about the face of ageing prisoners in Australia and it was quickly evident there is a lot of sensitivity around the subject. Mr Goulding is the deputy general manager of operations at Melbourne’s Wintringham, a specialist aged care provider for the homeless and disadvantaged. He is a member of a growing cohort of professionals across Australia gradually peeling back the layers to reveal the challenges for ageing prisoners who are in custody, rehabilitation or on release from prison, and for the corrective and justice health care workers managing these people. The professionals are focused on people aged 50 and over; in the prison system they are considered ‘ageing’. Many of them have entered the system with chronic health issues brought on by drug and alcohol use, poor nutrition, lack of medical care and, for some, after spending a lot of their life in both prison and juvenile detention. All of this escalates age-related illnesses. Australian Institute of Criminology (AIC) researcher Matthew Willis said these factors often resulted in high levels of physical, mental health and cognitive impairment, and higher vulnerability to victimisation within the general prison population. These ageing prisoners fall loosely into four categories – recidivists,

AGEING JUSTICE: A snapshot of life inside the NSW Justice Health and Forensic Mental Health Network at Long Bay Correctional Centre. Photo: NSW Justice Health first-time prisoners incarcerated at an older age, inmates who are growing old in prison due to long sentences, and those who commit crime as a result of cognitive damage or decline.

GOING UP

The number of senior prisioners is increasing and so too is the cost of providing appropriate aged care health support and facilities which they have a right to access as stipulated under the UN Human Rights Committee in its International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights . In particular, this states the right of a prisoner to be treated with humanity, dignity and respect while in detention. At June 30, 2018 there were 5,554 prisoners aged 50 years and over – 94.3 per cent male and 5.7 per cent female – adding to Australia’s burgeoning prison

population. This is an increase of 81.6 per cent between 2001 and 2010, and another increase of 67 per cent from 2010 to 2018. At the same June date there were 1,156 prisoners aged 65 years and over – 97.2 per cent male and 2.7 per cent female. Between 2001 and 2010 there was an increase of about 128 per cent, and a further increase of 119.4 per cent during the years to 2018. The ABS in its Prisoners in Australia Report 2018 noted 62 per cent of the prisoners aged 65 and over have a “serious offence/charge of sexual assault and related offences”. The increase in numbers isn’t due solely to an ageing Australian population. “Another part of it is some of the changes we have had to sentencing laws and parole laws,” Mr

Willis said. Parole is now harder to get, which can result in people staying in prison for longer. There has also been improvements in DNA technology, investigative techniques and information handling which have all impacted on prosecuting old offences, including sex offences which can carry long life sentences. The consequence of the growth in older prisoners is an increase in remand costs due to specialist service delivery and facilities, changes to prison activities and upskilling correction and health services staff to cater for this cohort. In 2013-14 it was costing about $292 per prisoner per day according to the Report on Government Services 2015. The 1999 AIC report Elderly inmates: issues for Australia calculated that cost increases

three-fold for ageing prisoners.

WHO’S IN CHARGE

Currently eight jurisdictions look after prisoner welfare in Australia, each with its own ageing prisoner management approach. UNSW Kirby Institute researcher Dr Natasha Ginnivan suggests it’s time for a national policy approach to deal with accelerated ageing. “Because there isn’t a management plan in place for dementia, cognitive impairment or frailty, or pre-frailty which is a measure that has been used in population ageing, we don’t know the prevalence of some of the muscular-skeletal and mild cognitive concerns within this population,” Dr Ginnivan said. “We know that when they get to a certain stage it becomes very expensive to house them when they are frail, not withstanding the human rights issues

around providing appropriate care.” NSW, then Queensland and Victoria have the greatest number of ageing prisoners. In NSW, a Correction Services spokesperson reports most of the state’s older inmates are in mainstream facilities and their medical or disability concerns are considered, including placement in bottom bunks or ground floor placement. “The infrastructure at some facilities has also been modified with hand-rails above beds and in bathrooms, easy-to-use taps and ramps in yards,” the spokesperson said. Elderly and frail inmates are located in the Long Bay Aged Care Rehabilitation Unit and the Kevin Waller Unit. Old-age and neuro psychiatrist Dr Sharon Reutens said NSW had speciality psychiatrists and geriatricians, and speciality units to address the problems around dementia in ageing prisoners. Corrections Victoria (CV) developed a framework for 2015-2020 which identifies actions around designing and managing its correction services to meet the needs of its ageing prisoners. Subsequently, CV last month entered a contract with Wintringham. Mr Goulding said: “We’ve been asked to provide advice on older prisoners and assessing them for their care needs.” “It’s a really positive step. It’s the first time there is an acknowledgement that there is a gap.” Over the next three years they will look at two prisons to identify aged care needs, including where some prisoners

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ageing prisoners

Gail Forrer

Acacia Prison in West Australia which has speciality aged care facilities included its design. Photo: Russell Barton

CRITICAL CHALLENGES

In most states correctional facilities are cognisant of, or acting on, providing some facilities for ageing prisoners. But Dr Reutens questions how will justice health not only identify, but also cater for the complexities of dementia. “We need a societal discussion about it,” she said. “I think it has to stem from what is the purpose of prison and does incarcerating cognitively impaired people fulfil the purpose of the prison which is to deter and rehabilitate. “Can that be adequately addressed by imprisonment in a culturally impaired population? “It’s really hard in prison because everything is done for you. “You don’t make your breakfast, you have no household chores; all your activities for living are taken over so it can be really hard to identify. Someone can slip under the radar until they are

A world grappling with longevity issues

Long Bay Correctional Centre staff help elderly inmates tend to their bonsai plants.

Photo: Corrective Services NSW

quite demented.” When it comes to leaving prison at the end of a sentence or when parole is available, the options are limited if the person has aged care needs. “Where do you put a sex offender?” Mr Goulding asked. “In a good world, once you have done your time, everything is fine.” Mr Willis said: “In the case of older people, you are potentially releasing people who have

completed their sentence at quite an advanced age and needing specialist care and specialist type of accommodation, and in a lot of cases not having family and people who can provide that kind of support for them.” Under 65 the choice is NDIS. Over 65, it’s My Aged Care. But the wait times can be up to two years. “There can be a hiatus on release for some older prisoners and then they will probably end up with a

GP or in a hospital and the system will pick them up,” Mr Willis said. The QCS said on release it connects eligible prisoners to the NDIS and aged care services. In Melbourne, Wintringham has an accommodation facility. In Sydney there is a new HammondCare venue. “HammondCare does not discriminate based on the criminal history of any potential residents,” residential care general manager Angela Raguz said. “When the Darlinghurst aged care venue for homelessness people is open, entry will be based on several factors including the physical, psychological and social needs of potential residents, as well as the safety of staff and other residents.” There is the opportunity for the issues around the health and wellbeing of ageing prisoners, which currently seems to be bubbling away under the surface of the community, to be addressed through the Aged Care Royal Commission. A spokesperson for the Commission said it may accept submissions on prison aged care and other services offered in prisons

FORETOLD forewarned: Increased longevity is a fact of life in many parts of the planet, but it is Japan that boasts the world’s best longevity rates, with 27.3 per cent of its citizens 65 years or older. However, on the flip side of the coin, complaints and arrests involving elderly Japanese people, and women in particular, are taking place at rates above those of any other demographic in the country. Almost one in five women in a Japanese prison is a senior. Their crimes are usually minor – nine in 10 senior women who’ve been convicted were

‘‘

Almost one in five women in a Japanese prison is a senior. found guilty of shoplifting. As social policies are formed to serve increasing longevity in the Australian population, reasons behind the imprisonment rate of Japanese seniors for minor crimes is something that should be kept in mind. The minor nature of the crimes appears to be a cry for help in a

world where the social position of a very old (in numbers), yet healthy and active person has not yet been established long enough to have attained associated community institutions, structures and societal relations. In some cases these seniors are the first of three or four generations of family but are unable to access help from busy younger family members, or perhaps they are coping as the first and only generation. While we live longer lives, adjustments need to be made to social, emotional and/or financial resources available. Japanese statistics show that from 1980 to 2015, the number of seniors living alone increased more than sixfold, to almost six million. And a 2017 survey by Tokyo’s government found that more than half of the seniors caught shoplifting lived alone, while 40 per cent either don’t have family or rarely speak with relatives. These people often say they have no one to turn to when they need help. Further research by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and the International Women’s Media Foundation identified women as suffering not only financial strain, but loneliness and a lack of purpose. Sadly, prison was where they found a roof over their head and regular meals, along with companionship. Source: Various associated stories including Bloomberg Report

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won’t admit their needs as they don’t want to be transferred. “At the end of the project, then further planning will be done.” Many of Victoria’s ageing prisoners are in a handful of centres such as Port Phillip Prison and the Hopkins Correctional Centre, which has recently been refurbished specifically to cater for prisoners needing aged care support. The Queensland Corrective Services (QCS) spokesperson said “while prison can be a challenging environment for older prisoners, every reasonable effort is made to support them while in our custody”.

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Early test for new boss Improved standards of aged care top of agenda

THE new Aged Care Quality and Safety Commissioner has a big job ahead of her, keeping watch over a rapidly changing sector as it provides vital services for older Australians, writes Jennifer Hullick. After the dire challenges faced by aged care service recipients and providers in recent years – with the Oakden nursing home tragedy at the forefront – the sector is undergoing major change across Australia, says new federal Aged Care Quality and Safety Commissioner Janet Anderson. Anderson took up her position on January 2, at the head of the new national commission which replaces the Aged Care Complaints Commissioner and the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency. The commission’s purpose is to hold aged care service providers to account and to attend to recipients’ complaints. “Under our Act, we are required to ... enhance the safety, health, quality of life and wellbeing of aged care recipients,” Anderson said. “It’s making sure that aged care providers receiving Commonwealth subsidies are doing the job that is expected of them. “Those standards – which are about to change – set out as clearly as possible the way in which services need to be delivered, but more particularly the outcome being sought from the delivery of care.

AGED CARE ROYAL COMMISSION ❚ It’s been a baptism of fire for new Aged Care Quality and Safety Commissioner Janet Anderson, with The Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety opening in Adelaide on January 18 just two weeks after she started in the job ❚ Senior Counsel Assisting Peter Gray told the preliminary hearing that 54 per cent of submissions raised issues about unsafe care, while 59 per cent aired concerns about staffing ratios ❚ The first formal hearings of the Royal Commission were held in mid-February

The new Aged Care Quality and Safety Commissioner, Janet Anderson, is determined to ensure that aged care providers receiving government subsidies are meeting the standards expected of them. Photo: Britta Campion “My audit teams go into nursing homes and look at the home care services and make an assessment of the extent to which those services are compliant with the standards. “That’s a core function.” Aged Care Minister Ken Wyatt said the new commission would better target substandard care and work to ensure the safety of older Australians.

“A single commissioner overseeing compliance monitoring, complaints and customer service means no more silos,” Wyatt said. “For the first time, senior Australians and their loved ones have one place to go when they need help, want to raise a concern or access information about an aged care service. “The commission will also be empowered by the

new aged care Charter of Rights and will implement the new, stronger set of Aged Care Quality Standards, the first upgrade of standards in 20 years.” Speaking soon after taking on the new role, Anderson said she was optimistic about the future of the sector, with ongoing changes aimed at improving outcomes for older people. “We are also looking to

develop Consumer Experience Reports by home care recipients,” she said. The report system is an innovation recently introduced in nursing homes, which is revealing a raft of additional information previously unavailable to watchdog agencies or consumers. “If you go on our website, you can search by nursing home and find what the residents are

saying and their feedback on the care they are receiving,” Anderson said. “We haven’t yet introduced that for home care recipients but we are looking at the design ... so we can get the voice of the home care consumer as richly as we’ve now managed it for nursing home recipients.” Anderson said, in more than 90 per cent of cases, the commission had been able to achieve a resolution of consumer complaints to the agency. To fulfil its role, the commission has regional offices in every jurisdiction except the Northern Territory, which is serviced from Adelaide, with auditors making local visits to nursing homes and checking the standard of services from home care and home support providers.

Growing a fresh following at Toowoomba Show AS THE newest stewards at Toowoomba Royal Show, Robert and Sue Janetzki are determined to see things germinate, grow, blossom and bear fruit. And it’s not just because they have taken charge of the floriculture section. The long-time gardening enthusiast husband and wife duo, who only became involved in the show three years ago, have witnessed its improvement in that time and want to see entry numbers, quality and

appeal expand further. “We asked the exhibitors how we could improve things and they gave us a lot of different ideas,” Mrs Janetzki explained. That has included changing the schedule and the display to encourage younger visitors to see what can be grown on the Downs, with a water feature, lights and a soundtrack of birds and nature, as well as creating a better defined junior competition section.

New display tables and sponsorship have been gained, sausages sizzled for funds, and Sue said they had already told show CEO Damon Phillips they will need more room next year. They have about 40 entrants this year across cut flowers, potted plants (including their absolute love, bromeliads), natives, proteas and roses, and are keen to double that number. With many of the entrants like themselves

in the over-60s category, Mr Janetzki said it was important to get the next generation interested in horticulture so that species didn’t die out. Mr Phillips said about 15,000 entries were expected across the show’s 35 categories and, still focussing on horticulture, he was pleased to bring the ABC’s Costa Georgiadis of Gardening Australia and Paul West of River Cottage fame back to this year’s show. Horse and beef cattle numbers, he said, were

surprisingly well up again, despite Queensland’s extremes of drought and flood conditions. You will also find goats, show and working dogs, pigs, sheep, dairy cattle and poultry. While for those more interested in inside pursuits, there’s cooking, handicraft, art, mapping, photography, home-grown produce, crops and bread. Details and ticketing at toowoombashow.com.au /royal-show or phone (07) 4634 7400.

SHOW BUSINESS: Robert and Sue Janetzki are the newest stewards at Toowoomba Royal Show. Photo: Contributed


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Living

Living in an aged care facility Personalised care plans that take your needs into account BRAND INSIGHTS

‘‘

Ozcare’s new state-ofthe-art 150-bed facility in Glenvale is due to open in April.

IF YOU’RE an older person and you are finding it hard to manage at home with the support of services, you may want to consider moving into an aged care facility. Aged care facilities, also known as nursing homes or aged care homes, are vibrant places, full of activities and people. There may be adjustment period as you get used to a new environment and living with others, but you will have all the help you need which will make daily living activities easier. There will be a calendar of activities for you to choose from, but the day is yours to do as you

STRIVING FOR QUALITY: Ozcare’s Toowoomba on Greenwattle St, Glenvale, will be a new state-of-the-art facility. please. You can have visitors just as you would at home, and go for outings with friends or family as long as you are well enough to do so. You’ll be provided with fresh, nutritious meals each day including breakfast, morning tea, lunch, afternoon tea, and dinner, and all of your dietary requirements can be catered for. When you first move in, your provider will work with you to create a personalised care plan that takes into account your specific needs and preferences. This plan will be adjusted during your stay as your needs change. Ozcare’s new state-of-the-art 150-bed facility in Glenvale is due to open in April. Facility Manager Libby Klein will be ensuring residents feel safe and secure from the onset. “Our facilities are the residents’ home and we are guests in their home,” Ms Klein said.

An Ozcare resident and staff member. “We strive to deliver outstanding quality of care and we continuously adapt our approach to aged care by listening to our residents and their families. “Listening to our residents tells us what they would like and how they would like to live their

lives, this allows us to deliver care and support that is really ‘spot on’ for that person.” Features: ■ 150-bed facility. ■ Two secure dementia wings (15 beds each). ■ Residential respite care for people needing

short-term care. ■ Retirement village to be built next door (co-located for continuum of care). Address: 631-651 Greenwattle St, Glenvale. For more information, go to ozcare.org.au or phone 1800 692 273.

Make yourself feel good with these top tips for decluttering INSTEAD of sending your unwanted household items to the tip as you try to declutter your home after the Christmas holidays, the alternative could be rehoming them. The latest rage for dealing with decluttering is KonMari. Sustainability Victoria acting CEO Stephanie Ziersch said the rush of affection for this method was a positive thing but highlighted the risk of items being discarded instead of consciously rehomed. The six KonMari steps

are: commit yourself to tidying up, imagine your ideal lifestyle, finish discarding first, tidy by category not by location, follow the right order (clothes, books, paper, miscellaneous items, sentimental items) and ask yourself ‘does it spark joy?’ Ms Ziersch suggests adding in a seventh step – reflect on waste and take action to reduce, reuse, recycle and respect. “While we’re encouraged to hear households en masse are busy clearing out the

just disappear once you’ve given it a kiss and thanked it for its service.”

CLEAN UP: Clutter doesn't just disappear once you've given it a kiss and thanked it for its service. clutter, the question remains: where are we sending all those bags of joyless garments and items once we’re done with them?” she said. “All that clutter doesn’t

SUSTAINABILITY VICTORIA SUGGESTS THESE SEVEN TIPS WHEN EMBARKING ON THE KONMARI JOURNEY: 1. Consider selling unloved items on sites like eBay, Gumtree or Facebook. 2. Contact your local charity group to see if they are willing to pick up your unwanted furniture. 3. Gift your once-loved items to friends or family. 4. Take your old TVs and

computers to drop-off points where they are recycled as part of the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme. 5. Drop your mobile phones and tablets off for recycling at MobileMuster collection points found at phone shops and post offices. 6. Offer your good-quality clothes to charities that will resell them for fundraising purposes, or potentially give them to disadvantaged people. 7. Contact your local council to find out how

your items can be recycled locally. “While the concept of tidying your home and letting go of objects that serve no purpose is important, waste avoidance is just as pressing,” Ms Ziersch said. “For example, Australians are the world’s second-largest consumers of textiles, buying on average 27kg of new clothing and other textiles each year, of which $500 million worth of clothing is sent to landfill.”


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Tracey defeats abuse

Never write your story in someone else’s handwriting Alison Houston LIFE started out difficult for Tracey Horton, with horrendous ongoing mental, physical and sexual abuse by the time she was 12. But in the 1960s, no one spoke about such things. Which is why at 55, Tracey embraces with such gusto the chance to help others who have faced domestic violence and trauma to “find their voice”, and her success in doing so. The self-published Gold Coaster, motivational speaker and life coach was recently recognised with the Exceptional Woman of Excellence Award at the Women’s Economic Forum in New Delhi, India – the largest global gathering of female entrepreneurs and leaders. The turnaround wasn’t easy, with a crossroads when her boss caught her drinking at work aged just 18, and a psychologist told her the trajectory she was on. “So I set about finding out what ‘normal’ people knew that I didn’t,” Tracey said. She discovered what she calls nine keys to “overcoming” or breaking free, and it is these that she shares in The Unhappy Smile. Her philosophy is based on recognising the things no one can change, the things you can overcome such as grief and anger, and how to let go and move on.

But even she has been surprised by the reception the book has received. “I’m a really strong believer in giving back to the world, which is why I wanted to write this, but people are hungrier for answers than I first imagined,” Tracey said. As part of “giving back”, for every book she sells, Tracey gives one to a woman in crisis. The book, which she began writing at age 50, is full of insights to help people understand themselves and others, with clear references to her own abusive experiences, without becoming graphic. “I didn’t leave anywhere to hide … but it’s written very conversationally, so it’s something you can pick up and put down, and maybe make notes in and answer a few questions at the end of each chapter,” she said. And it’s a book which has already gone far, with her friend and country music star Adam Brand’s testimonial and contacts helping it find its way into gift bags for the Emmys and Golden Globes. But it is the ordinary women’s and men’s lives it has also touched which mean the most to Tracey, including an 89-year-old New Zealand woman who finally realised she needed to forgive her husband and herself for the years of domestic violence she had suffered. The woman wrote to Tracey marvelling that her adult children had seen such a difference in her, a

FIND YOUR VOICE: Tracey Horton's book The Unhappy Smile tells how she overcame mental, physical and sexual abuse in her childhood to become a strong advocate for people's rights. Photos: Contributed new light, since she had done so. Tracey, now also a happy wife, mother and grandmother, said writing her story had been cathartic for her, although she had long forgiven the abusers, and felt no grief or shame. “I’ve made peace with it – I am able to be in the story but not of the story,” she said. With statistics showing one in four women has been abused, she believes it is an important story to let others know they don’t have to be defined by what has happened to them. Her mantra is “never write your story in someone else’s handwriting” and she believes it’s relevant to

Action on aged care for LGBTI Seniors

THE Morrison Government is committed to ensuring equal access to high-quality, culturally appropriate aged care for all Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Gender Diverse and Intersex (LGBTI) people. More than one in 10 senior Australians have diverse sexual orientation, gender identity or intersex characteristics. The federal Government has released the Aged Care Diversity Action Plan for

senior LGBTI Australians to help address the specific barriers and challenges they face in accessing aged care services. The plan will help guide providers to ensure their services are inclusive and culturally safe for all consumers in their care. The plan is also intended to help senior LGBTI people express their needs when speaking with aged care providers. This plan has been

informed by a broad consultation process with consumers, carers, providers and peak bodies to capture the voice and experiences of senior LGBTI people. The Aged Care Diversity Framework and the Aged Care Diversity LGBTI Action Plan is available on the Department of Health’s website, go to agedcare.health.gov.au/ older-people-theirfamilies-and-carers /people-from -diverse-backgrounds.

women of all ages, as well as to men. “When I think of this book, I imagine people young and old, men and women, all reading it,” she said, adding she

hoped it prompted conversations and helped people set and reach goals to become “the best version of themselves”. To order The Unhappy

Smile, find out more about Tracey, her coming book The Reason to Smile, and her mentoring and speaking roles, go to traceyhorton.com or phone 0420 447 474.

Tracey as a child and copies of her book.

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Travelling solo, not single Tracey Johnstone TRAVELLING solo or travelling single – there is a difference. Dropping the reference to marital status and looking at yourself as a solo adventurer can help you get on the road. But where do you start? Encounter Travel’s Justine Waddington has put together a guide book, The Solo Traveller’s Compass, for anyone wanting to set off on solo travel experiences. It has over 200 practical tips. “It’s suited to someone who is a first-time solo traveller or maybe hasn’t travelled for a long time on their own and wants a bit of refresher of things to keep in mind when you are travelling solo,” Justine said. “And before you travel, what you need to prepare for.” The book is split into three sections – getting started, before you go and on your trip. Justine talks about what is stopping people from doing solo travel and how you can unblock those things that they

SINGULAR IMPORTANCE: Encounter Travel’s Norway solo traveller group celebrate Cape Nord and the Midnight Sun experiences. INSET: Justine Waddington. consider barriers to starting a new adventure. “The book is set around, you don’t have to be alone when you travel solo,” Justine said. “It talks about joining groups and how to choose the right group as a solo

traveller so you feel like you are going to be joining one that is more suited to you. “It talks about choosing the right tour and about what to look for when you are flicking through brochures and thinking

about which kind of trip you want to join.” The book also covers sharing; would you make a good room sharer and what to consider before committing to sharing. Justine’s travel agency caters for solo travellers

many of whom are aged 60 and over. Each tour is a small group with soft adventure experiences high on the agenda. The alternative type is the “flop and drop” tour to resorts which includes both group activities and

time to chill out individually. For all tours, rooms can be shared or booked for solo occupation. During the year Justine also organises traveller events in Sydney, Brisbane, Gold Coast and Melbourne where tour guests reunite and where first-timer guests can meet other solo travellers and learn more about what it is like to head off alone in company. “Our travellers come from all over Australia,” Justine said. For copies of The Solo Traveller’s Compass which costs $29 including postage, go to justinewaddington.com. For more details on solo bookings, take a look at encountertravel.com.au.

Stopover for art lovers

1300 551 997 | (07) 5513 1086

6885061ao

E: info@goseetouring.com www.goseetouring.com

DELIGHT your senses and satisfy your artistic curiosity by joining in Margaret River Region Open Studios. From April 27 through to May 12 over 100 painters, sculptors, illustrators, jewellers, printmakers, glassblowers, ceramicists, photographers and furniture makers will participate in the sixth annual event which is free to attend and doesn’t require bookings. For the first time, 24 artists from Busselton to Augusta will also open their studio doors. Visitors will meet the artists in their home towns and off the beaten track for a unique behind the scenes creative experience. Margaret River Region Open Studios chairman Jim Davies said the 16-day event ticked many boxes in providing art lovers with a memorable experience. “This year’s artistic line-up includes many old (and young) favourites, plus a number of artists new to the event, so it’s perfect for both first time and regular visitors,” he said. “There really is something for everyone,

Artist Emily Jackson. whether it be learning about creative intentions and techniques, sharing ideas, admiring art, exploring out-of-the-way back roads, or owning a piece of art created by an artist you have had the opportunity to meet.” Local artists are the stars of the show and talent this year includes recognisable and respected names: ❚ Leon Pericles will give print demonstrations and sign his new 50-year retrospective book. ❚ Interactive artist Britta Sorensen invites visitors to immerse themselves in colour and watch or join in her interactive experiential recycled textiles installation. ❚ Ceramicist Dariya Gratte will demonstrate fine porcelain techniques.

Photo: Gordon Becker

You can attend a learn how to paint workshop by Heidi Mullender or other painting demonstrations with many of the Open Studios artists. ❚ Glass guru Gerry Reilly will provide glassmaking experiences and show how to ‘blow your own bauble’. ❚ At Ian Mutch’s home studio you can watch a film of his public artworks and flip through his artist sketchbooks. ❚ Ian Thwaites will give woodworking demos and Nalda Hoskins will share how she makes her stunning glass beads and jewellery. Info: mrropenstudios. com.au or on Facebook (mrropenstudios) and Instagram (@margaret riverregionopenstudios).


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SENIORS \\MARCH, 2019

TRAVEL BRIEFS

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ng Of feri rs Senio or nts f Discou ravel il T QR Ra rs Tou

VOTED NO1 BEST VALUE SeniorS Tour Company

REAL DEALS: The Cruise and Maritime Voyages ship, Columbus.

LAST MINUTE ESCAPES

Cruise and Maritime Voyages is offering guests up to 75 per cent off a range of last-minute escapes departing this March and April. The offer gives travellers the chance to experience Western Australia’s epic coastlines, the world-class local produce of South Australia, the wild splendour of Tasmania and iconic landmarks of New Zealand and the East Coast of Australia. A little further afield, guests can experience the best of Asia on both short and long voyages, some departing from Sydney and Auckland. For more details, go to CMVAustralia.com or phone 1300 307 934.

HIGH COUNTRY WALKS

Victoria’s High Country has launched a website – walkhighcountry.com.au – which showcases more than 100 walks around the spectacular region. From short village strolls to multi-day mountain hikes for the more adventurous, Walk High Country is a one-stop place for visitors looking to explore the unique beauty of Victoria’s North East the slow way. Guide yourself or choose from a suite of new guided walk experiences around the region.

GET ENLIGHTEN(ED) IN CANBERRA

The nation’s capital will be transformed in March for the annual Enlighten Festival. Over 17 days the city will host free and ticketed events celebrating culture and creativity. ❚ Enlighten Illuminations, March 1-11 The Parliamentary Triangle and city precinct come to life after dark with large-scale projections on some of the capital’s most loved and iconic buildings. Visit the food offerings at Enlighten Alley, enjoy roving entertainers, art installations, live music and enchanting performances or try new tastes at the Canberra Night Noodle Markets in

Reconciliation Place. ❚ Canberra Balloon Spectacular, March 9-17 View hot air balloons floating across the city during the Canberra Balloon Spectacular. The Canberra skyline will be full of hot air balloons from across the globe. ❚ Canberra Day, March 11 Canberra turns 106 this year. Join in the celebrations with a program bursting to the seams with live music and entertainment for all. There’s something for everyone this Canberra Day. For more festival information, to to www. enlightencanberra.com.

EXPERIENCE SUNSHINE COAST OUTDOORS

❚ Paddle powered by sun Go solar-powered on your canoe tour. Eco River Rides are harnessing the sun to help you fuel your adventure. In an Australian first, the company is using solar-powered canoes to take visitors on an unforgettable journey through the Maroochy River Wetlands. For more details, go to www.eco riverrides.com.au. ❚ Pedal green EcoTekk Electric Bikes offers Sunshine Coast visitors a chance to explore the region without working up a sweat. With no shortage of tracks to choose from, it’s a great way to discover the Sunshine Coast. E-Bike comes to you, at your resort, your hotel, your house or friend’s house. For more details, go www.ecotekk.com.au/ home/sunshine-coast.

NEW QUEENSLAND FOOD FESTIVAL

It’s new and it’s on August 8-11 on the Sunshine Coast, The Curated Plate. The festival aims to feature chefs from Australia and the world. Guests will get to immerse themselves in the flavours foraged from organic and sustainable practices and enjoy once-in-a-lifetime dining experiences. The Curated Plate program will burst with exclusive culinary events that will span the region,

bringing to life the unique local artisan culture. Pre-sale tickets are available from March 12. For more details, go to hecuratedplate.com.au/ sunshine-coast.

MONGOLIA BY MOTORBIKE

Save 10 per cent on a ride across one of the world’s most remote places – Mongolia, the world’s emptiest country. Experience the vast expanse of Mongolia’s striking landscapes on the back of a classic Royal Enfield motorbike on some of the world’s most open roads with this special offer from Extreme Bike Tours. Extreme Bike Tours’ 11-day Mongolian Adventure tour starts in the capital city of Ulaanbaatar, home to almost half of Mongolia’s total population. The tour gives thrillseekers the opportunity to open throttle on the open roads and rarely visited, vast countryside of Mongolia, the world’s emptiest country, on the back of a 500cc Royal Enfield Bullet. The 11-day guided Mongolian tour begins in Ulaanbaatar on August 2, 2019. Extreme Bike Tours is one of the world’s leading motorcycle tour companies, offering tours in the Himalayas, Bhutan, Mongolia, Madagascar, India, Sri Lanka and Cuba. For more information, visit the website extremebiketours.com/ package/mongolia-tour.

TAHITI WHALE SWIM CRUISES

New week-long whale swim cruises have been launched in Tahiti by Australian eco-experience company, Majestic Whales Encounters. The unique cruises will see guests spend six nights aboard a brand new 16m catamaran as they sail the turquoise waters off the island of Moorea and swim with wild humpback whales. The cruise departs on September 16 or 22, 2019. Phone Majestic Whale Encounters on 0405 594 253 or visit the website majesticwhale encounters.com.au.

EdINBURGH MIlITARY TATTOO, SYdNEY 2019 / INclUdING THE BlUE MOUNTAINS The acclaimed spectacular, the *Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo, *will return to Sydney at ANZ Stadium in October 2019. One of the greatest shows on earth at ANZ Stadium in October, will featuring more than 1200 performers from around the world. The Sydney show, which is set against the backdrop of a full-size replica of Edinburgh Castle, will blend a thrilling mix of music, ceremony, military tradition, theatre and dance from the world’s best-massed pipes and drums. Combined with a 2 night visit to the Blue Mountains including Jenolan Caves, this tour will be a highlight for 2019!!! 5 Days, Departing 14th Oct, including return flights to Sydney $2395pp T/S, Single add $450 Save $100pp when booking a September Departure.

cOOkTOwN

Save $100pp when booking an October Departures

ExpERIENcE lONGREAcH & wINTON

Cooktown is known for is its well documented Longreach is in the geographical heart of history after Captain Cook ran aground. Queensland. There are some fascinating Later it became a bustling port, exporting gold things to see and do in this part of the world. and had 47 licensed pubs So, step back in time and enjoy the living history paying homage to an Winton has a rich history as the birthplace of Waltzing Matilda and links to the Great era of great hardship. 8 Days from $1490* Plus Pension Rail Fare when travelling by QR Rail* Shearers’ Strike of 1891. 7 Days from $1,340

cOwBOYS / cAvES

This unique tour visits Cowboys at Texas Longhorn Ranch, Historical Charters Towers, Caves at the incredible Undara Lava Tubes and Castle Ruins of Paronella Park. 8 Days from $1390* Plus Pension Rail Fare when travelling by QR Rail*

UlURU – FIEld OF lIGHTS

Welcome to our special Uluru and Alice Springs tour. The Field of Light is a global phenomenon created by internationally acclaimed artist Bruce Munro which comes to life under a sky brilliant with stars. 7 Days from $3690. *Free Flights

Save $100pp when booking before the end of March

GUlFlANdER AdvENTURE

The Gulflander is an Australian passenger train operated by Queensland Rail on the isolated Normanton to Croydon line in the Gulf Country of northern Queensland. 10 Days from $2,490

*To the value of $320

TOTAl TASMANIA

Come and enjoy Tasmania, “the Island of Inspiration” is an island of dramatic coastlines, quaint villages, convict-built heritage and magnificent food and wine. 11 Days, $3,490. Departure Dates: 26th October 2019

MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY / HISTORY ON THE HIGH SEAS

Our timing could not be more perfect for this cruise as we will experience warm days around the 28-30deg and kind spring seas. Highlights of this cruise include visiting the locations where Mutiny on the Bounty took place in 1789. You’ll travel past Nomuka Island where Blight visited the day before the Mutiny occurs. You will also cruise past Tofua Island where Bligh and his loyalists landed. Plus Norfolk Is were the mutineers ended up. 18 Days Departing 16th October from $3,450

Discover our great deals & destinations visit www.greatvalueholidays.com.au or phone 1300 722 661 Terms and conditions apply: See website for details.

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MARCH, 2019// SENIORS

‘‘

I have always enjoyed the company of the Irish, easily warming to their humour and yarns.

STUNNING: Blackrock Castle on the River Lee, Cork, Ireland.

Photo: catherine_jones

Ireland... it’s just like Peter Chapman

From the amazing views to the wonderful people, the impression you get from the flicks is even better in real life

IT MIGHT seem a little strange, but my decision to do a self-drive tour of Ireland was inspired from watching movies centred on the shamrock isle. They always revealed beautiful scenery, picturesque boutique hotels and friendly Irish pubs. As I watched I envisaged myself joining in on a song or two while downing a pint of Guinness at McMurphy’s corner pub. Adding to my views of Ireland was the fact that I have always enjoyed the company of the Irish, easily warming to their humour and yarns. The chance to make the trip finally came up via a decision to book a 14-day Baltic Sea cruise out of Southampton. The wife rightly said we can’t go all the way to England and just jump on a cruise ship, we need to combine something with it. So the decision was made that we’d spend a week touring Ireland and

we’d hire a small car for the trek. Now if you know nothing about Ireland – and to tell the absolute truth I didn’t – it’s best not to just look at a map and say to yourself it doesn’t look that far from town to town. At first the idea was to stay in Dublin for a few nights then head north taking in the likes of Glasgow, the Giant’s Causeway and then slide down the coast coming across through Kilkenny and back to where we started. All this was planned for just seven days. Fortunately sanity prevailed and instead we decided to only concentrate on the southern parts of Ireland. We didn’t want to just drive around looking out the car window. After arriving at Dublin Airport we picked up our hire car and headed towards our accommodation in the city. Mistake one was that we didn’t choose a car with a GPS instead deciding to wait a few days and get a SIM for the

phone to use as our guidance system. That decision cost us a frustrating three hours as we circled Dublin’s maze of one way streets searching for our hotel. I don’t like admitting it, but it was my decision not to go with the car GPS, a fact I was reminded of more than a few times during the trip. We stayed at the Dawson Hotel and Spa in Dawson Street which we found a convenient location from which to walk around the city. The room was small, but clean and the only issue was that we were on the second floor and there was no lift, just a strong doorman to carry your bags upstairs. A TripAdvisor tip to take the free walking tour in Dublin proved a winner the next day. A young university student with a wonderful knowledge of the city was our guide and for almost four hours he told us some fascinating stories about the history of the city. To go on the tour all you need to do is to turn up at

Dublin Town Square before noon and join a group. The guides make their money from tips and there were plenty who reached into their pockets at the end of the walk. My mother taught me the famous Irish song In Dublin’s Fair City when I was just five years old and I have been bringing it out as part of my entertainment repertoire ever since. Mind you, it’s a very small and limited repertoire. So I was delighted to see our final stop on the walking tour was in front of the Molly Malone statue. Of course as any Aussie knows you never let a chance go by, so I launched into the song and to my pleasant surprise had the entire street singing along with me. I loved it and even the wife joined in for the chorus. There are plenty of bars and restaurants in Dublin, ranging from Michelin Star credentialed to the cheap bistros at the many local

pubs. We found Marco Pierre White’s Steakhouse and Grill just down the road from our hotel and enjoyed a special night out. Unfortunately the budget didn’t allow us to return, but if you spoil yourself every night it doesn’t seem so special when you do. Day one on the road took us across Ireland to the seaport of Doolin. We booked in at a recently built B&B, Egan’s Wild Atlantic View. The host, who happened to be the Ireland Fly Fishing Champion, was great, the room was first class and the breakfast made to perfection. It’s a big recommendation from us. We chose Doolin because from there it’s a short drive to one of Ireland’s premier tourist spots, the Cliffs of Moher. It was a windy day on the cliffs, but worth the climb for a spectacular view. From Doolin we wound our way through to Killarney were again we


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SENIORS \\MARCH, 2019

Aerial view of the scenic Cliffs of Moher in Ireland. This popular tourist attraction is situated in County Clare along the Wild Atlantic Way. Photo: miroslav_1 Long exposure of Temple bar in Dublin with people drinking and walking by during night in autumn.

Photo: Marc Dufresne

Doolin.

Dawson.

Muckross House.

the movies, but better

picked our accommodation well with a stay at Muckross Park Hotel. It sits opposite the national park and in the morning we grabbed a free bike from the hotel and went for a pleasant slow two-hour cycle. The only dampener on this stop was the pub food next to the hotel was a meal we should have missed. Stay at the hotel by all means, but find a good restaurant in town to dine out at is our advice. My wife had one wish for our Ireland tour, and that was to stay one night in a castle. That’s why we booked our next stop at the Waterford Castle. Unfortunately the castle has only a few rooms and we were shovelled off to a block of units on the estate. The unit was good, but it wasn’t a castle. As a keen punter I found a steeple chase meeting at Wexford to call in before we said goodbye to Ireland. Fortunately the luck of the Irish prevailed and a

10/1 winner helped pay for all our petrol and a few pints of Guinness. To sum it up, the few disappointments we had on our whistle stop self-drive tour were overshadowed by many highlights and if we had our time over again we’d do the same, except this time we’d find a real castle to stay in, ghosts and all.

IRELAND

APPROX COSTS: Self-drive car hire: $350, five days Dawson Hotel Dublin: $250 per night Rating: 7/10 Egan’s Wild Atlantic B&B, Doolin: $150 per night Rating: 9/10 Muckross Park Hotel, Killarney: $350 per night Rating: 8/10 Waterford Castle: $400 per night Rating: 7/10 BEST TIP: Take your time while driving around and go online early to book your accommodation and you will save hundreds by doing it.

MUST-SEE: Bunratty castle at dusk with reflection in the river in Ireland.

Photo: Mustang_79


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MARCH, 2019// SENIORS

OLD TIME BEAUTY: The paddlewheeler PS Murray Princess.

Photo: Heidi Linehan

Musical cruise on Murray SPEND an August night or three with the music of Neil Diamond while gently cruising along the Murray on the paddlewheeler PS Murray Princess. Entertainer and storyteller Dave Freeman will over three nights take you on an intimate journey into the music of Neil Diamond. The journey starts on Friday, August 23 with a three-course dinner and dance to the live tunes of gifted keyboard artist Paul Gill. On Saturday night, Freeman will perform his OMG Neil Diamond Sounds Like Me Show including storytelling, songs, dancing and music from Neil Diamond’s famous Hot August Night album. On the final night, dance the night away as Dave and Paul provide live entertainment, singing everyone’s favourite songs during the Captain’s Dinner and Dance. By day the paddlewheeler will travel along the Murray River visiting historic towns and passing by the ever-changing and picturesque river scenery.

Go wild in absolute comfort of Stonestreets fleet

ULTIMATE COMFORT: The pride of the Stonestreets fleet of tour coaches are the mighty 4x4. There are several stops along the way starting with the Captain’s walk in Mannum, exploring the Murray Bridge township and its historic Round House, stopping at Salt Bush Flat to learn about the thriving ecology of the river and its flora and fauna on a guided nature walk, at River View Lodge get up close to the 20 million-year-old cliffs and amazing birdlife.

Onboard the Murray Princess check out the wheelhouse, join in a music quiz with Paul Gill or play some bocce on the riverbank with Dave Freeman. Start each morning onboard with a hot buffet breakfast and indulge in a two-course or buffet lunch each day. As night falls watch the sunset and enjoy a delicious cocktail before savouring a

SOME of Australia’s most spectacular destinations are often found in our most rugged and inhospitable regions. Locations like Cape York, the Kimberley, Outback South Australia and Central Australia, each unique, striking and shaped by centuries of harsh conditions have become dream travel destinations and bucket-list items for many Australians. For many would-be adventurers though, the task of tackling the unforgiving conditions that make these regions so beautiful, is daunting. Thankfully there is a way of experiencing the wonders of Australia’s most unspoiled natural wilderness in luxury and

three-course meal or buffet dinner. The three-night Hot August Night Music Cruise departs Mannum at 4.30pm on Friday, August 23. Early Booking Saver fares start from $944 per person twin share. The cost includes accommodation, all meals, guided nature walks, eco-excursions, onboard presentations,

gentle adventure. Stonestreets Travel is a Queensland-based tour operator, which has been co-ordinating bucket-list worthy, escorted group tours to a host of destinations for more than 20 years. The pride of the Stonestreets fleet of tour coaches are the mighty 4x4 coaches, which make tackling the rutted roads and creek crossings of the Australian Outback a breeze for travellers. Contact Stonestreets Travel’s friendly team for a list of 2019 tours or free tour brochures, or view our range of tours online, go to stonestreetstravel.com.au or phone Stonestreets Coaches on (07) 4687 5566.

onboard Wi-Fi, the Captain’s Dinner and Cocktail Party, the OMG Neil Diamond Sounds Like Me Show, entertainment by Dave Freeman and Paul Gill, use of ship’s facilities including a sun deck, bar, two lounges, restaurant and a mini gymnasium. Complimentary scenic coach transfers from Adelaide, or secure car-parking in and Mannum post cruise

coach transfers to Adelaide CBD or Adelaide Airport, are also included. Private car transfers for up to four people are also available from and to Adelaide CBD to Mannum and return to Adelaide Airport for $150 per person each way, based on two people travelling. For more information, go to murrayprincess.com.au


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SENIORS SENIORS \\MARCH, \\MARCH, 2019 2019

Fishing South Coast NSW ‘‘ Each season provides a fresh and wide range of options

Nige Webster

ONE OF the most picturesque areas I have travelled and fished is the south coast of New South Wales. The stretch of coast I fell in love with many years ago, includes that between Bateman’s Bay and Mallacoota. You’ll travel through townships such as Moruya, Broulee, Tuross, Merimbula, Narooma and more. I love the climate here and the huge range of fishing options that are available. The estuaries are great places to target bread and butter species such as bream, flathead, whiting, luderick and tailor. The deeper waters of these estuaries often produce some really big flathead and mulloway. Waters such as those found at Mallacoota on the border are renowned for having massive flathead. Light to medium weight

spin rods and reels with six to 20lb breaking strain lines should be packed when travelling here. Jigging soft plastics on the bottom, ‘walking’ small surface lures on the top, high speed spinning with small metal lures or jigging vibe style plastics and metals are all great ways of enticing the estuary species you will encounter along the way. The rock and beach fishing along this coastline is very good. Safety must always be the foremost consideration when fishing these areas. The sand and stones will provide fishing for the likes of salmon, tailor, trevally, luderick, rock blackfish and snapper. Surf rods and threadline and Alvey reels are perfect for these waters. Twenty to 40lb monofilament fishing line with suitable weights (or floats) and baits of gang-rigged pilchards, mullet, abalone, prawns, cunjevoi and weed will

Merimbula Beach at sunset, Merimbula.

The estuaries are great places to target bread and butter species

ALL SEASONS: Fishing near the Princes Highway bridge at Bateman’s Bay, South Coast.

Photo: James Pipino, Destination NSW

have you in with a good chance of a fish. Accommodation is plentiful along this route, with caravan parks,

Photo: Dee Kramer Photography

motels and B&B stays everywhere. The area is a year round fishing option, but I just love winter and spring in

these parts and the fishing options these seasons provide. ❚ Nige Webster works for AFN Fishing &

Outdoors and presents and produces The Fishing Show on channel 7Mate. Facebook: AFN The Fishing Show.

Quiet moment of early fishing at Glasshouse Rocks, Narooma.

Freecall: 1800 072 535 DOWN UNDER COACH TOURS Ph: 07 4123 1733

5 DAY EDINBURGH MILITARY TATTOO SYDNEY - Tour 2 Departs: 16/10/19

Don’t miss one of the greatest shows on earth, featuring more than 1200 performers from around the world. • 2 Nights Sydney • Edinburgh Military Tattoo Premium Seats & Britannia Dinner • World Heritage Parramatta Park • Rumsey Rose Gardens • Free Time Darling Harbour • Sydney Sightseeing Adult: $2594 Single Supplement: $555

12 DAY BIRDSVILLE & CARNARVON GORGE

Departs: 11/05/19

11 DAY ISLANDS IN THE SUN Departs: 07/06/19

• 2 Nights Carnarvon Gorge • 2 Nights Longreach • Birdsville Pub & Big Red Sand Dune • Min Min Encounter • New Waltzing Matilda Centre • Longways Station Tour • Stockmans Hall of Fame & Outback Show • Thomson River Cruise & Camp Dinner • Qantas Founders Museum • Arcadia Valley Escape

• 2 Nights Airlie Beach, 1770 & Townsville • 1770 Distillery • Butterfly Walk • Port of Gladstone Harbour Cruise • 1770 LARC Tour • Footlights Theatre Restaurant • Capricorn Caves • Whitsunday Cruise • Magnetic Island Tour • Reef HQ Townsville

Adult: $4880 Single Supplement: $1057

Adult: $4498 Single Supplement: $1027

SPECIALISING IN SENIOR’S TRAVEL info@downundercoachtours.com.au

16 DAY CORNER COUNTRY & THE FLINDERS RANGES

Departs: 20/07/19

42 DAY GREAT WESTERN ADVENTURE

Departs: 15/08/19

• Burke & Wills Dig Tree • Great Central Road • Cameron Corner • Kings Canyon • 4WD Ridge Top Tour, Arkaroola • Uluru & Kata Tjuta • Depot Glen & Milparinka • Cape Leeuwin & Jewel Cave • Wilpena Pound • Monkey Mia Adult: $5898 Single Supplement: $1150 Adult: $15348 Single Supplement: $4430

15 DAY OUTBACK WAY AUSTRALIA’S WILD HEART

Coach/Fly

Departs: 15/08/19

• Great Central Road • Kings Canyon • Uluru & Kata Tjuta NP • Giles Weather Station • Lake Ballard Sculptures Adult: $6611 Single Supplement: $1864

14 DAY WA SOUTH WEST, WILDFLOWERS & MONKEY MIA

Departs: 29/08/19 Fly/Coach/Fly • Rottnest Island Tour • Jewel Cave • Wave Rock • Hamelin Pools Stromatolites • Monkey Mia Dolphins Adult: $5912 Single Supplement: $1274

COMPLIMENTARY DOOR TO DOOR SERVICE (Area Conditions Apply) www.downundercoachtours.com.au

www.facebook.com/downundercoachtours

I am interested in receiving your 2019 Coach Touring Brochure. Please add me to your mailing list: Name: _____________________ Address: ____________________ __________________________ P/code:______Ph: ____________ Email: _____________________ Send to: Down Under Coach Tours, PO Box 149, Maryborough Q 4650 sn0319

FULLY ACCOMMODATED TOURS

Prices quoted are per person twin share


28

WELLBEING

MARCH, 2019// SENIORS

Good health at a price Part of cure is subsidy Gail Forrer A NEW drug to combat incontinence has been labelled a “game changer”, but for some sufferers the price is too much to pay. Approximately 6.3 million Australians experience bladder or bowel control problems. A report released in 2011 by Deloitte Access Economics revealed that in 2010, total health system expenditure on incontinence in the Australian population was estimated at $271 million or $57 per person with incontinence. This figure was projected to rise to $450 million by 2020. But one 76-year-old Queensland woman believes she will not be included in those statistics after being prescribed the incontinence drug Betmiga. In an email to Seniors News (2017,she wrote: “I have been battling incontinence for the past 10 years (as do so many of my friends). I have been down the road of physio, surgery and as a last-ditch effort I saw another urologist who after tests prescribed

Betmiga (25mg). “It has made an enormous difference to my life, all but preventing the symptoms, but unfortunately the cost of each prescription is quite prohibitive. It started out this year at $48 per prescription but after August the cost leapt to $64.95. Who knows what the future cost will be. “I realise that the PBS (Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme) is always under strain, but with our ageing population and the government spending so much money on keeping we oldies in our own home (all good), surely instead of making people use padded pants or diapers, both expensive and they end up in landfill, to subsidise Betmiga is in the government’s interest as it truly works and as my urologist assured me has the fewest side-effects of comparable drugs.” Spokesperson for the Urological Society of Australian and New Zealand Urologist Dr Caroline Dowling, has praised the efficacy of Betmiga (also known as Mirabegron). “It’s a game changer,” Dr Dowling said. However, she warned

CURES COSTS: In Australia, around 6.3 million Australians experience bladder or bowel control problems.

Photo: PeopleImages

there were several causes behind incontinence and it would not suit everyone. “But it definitely works for some,” she said. She advised the first step in finding an appropriate treatment entailed acknowledging the condition to your GP. “Have the cause diagnosed and from there ascertain suitable treatments,” she said. Betmiga is manufactured by the Astellas company. In response to questions from Senior News. Astellas stated it has thoroughly investigated requesting PBS reimbursement. However, the company found that: “After reviewing the body of clinical, epidemiological and economic data, Astellas

Smile with confidence Prof Matthias Bickel

Dr med dent (Berne, Switzerland), Phd, Specialist SSRD

Dentist/Prosthodontist

OPEN SATURDAYS

Increased funding for Continence Aids Payment Scheme The Continence Aids Payment Scheme (CAPS) is an Australian Government scheme that provides a payment to assist eligible people who have permanent and severe incontinence to meet some of the cost of their continence products. In July 2018, the Continence Aids Payment Scheme contribution amount was increased in line with the Consumer Price Index. The current payment is $596.60 for the financial year 2018-2019. Clients can choose one full payment in July, or two half payments in July and January each year. ❚ If you would like a CAPS application form, phone the National Continence Helpline on 1800 330 066. You can also request the CAPS application form from the Australian Government’s Bladder Bowel website. ❚ If you require assistance in completing the CAPS application, phone the National Continence Helpline on 1800 330 066. ❚ If you have changed your bank or address details, notify the CAPS Team on 1800 239 309. Only the person receiving the benefit, or their nominated representative, can call the CAPS Team to change/update details. was uncertain that the value offered by the unique mechanism of action and different tolerability profile of the Betmiga can be accurately captured and quantified”. “Furthermore, one of the Pharmaceutical

Benefits Advisory Committee’s key criteria for reimbursement is affordability in the absence of PBS subsidisation. While Astellas acknowledge the difficulty some patients face in

affording Betmiga as a private prescription, at its current price Astellas believes it is unlikely to meet this criterion.” Astellas said it would continue to reassess this decision on a regular basis.

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WELLBEING

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Five tips for spinal health SUFFERING from back pain is a burden that affects all aspects of one’s health. As the body is controlled by the central nervous system, the spine must be able to support it in order for people to function at their full potential. The spine should be recognised as a priority when it comes to maintaining good health. Back pain is an increasingly common problem many people face, with 70-90 per cent of Australians experiencing back pain at some point in their life. Between 2014-2015 alone, 3.7 million people reported back pain, equivalent to one in six people, according to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. There are a number of simple lifestyle changes individuals can make daily to improve their spinal health and reduce the risks associated with back pain. Leading spinal surgeon

Dr Michael Wong shares five ways to improve spinal health.

1. REDUCE SITTING TIME TO 45 MINUTE INCREMENTS

“If you’ve got an office job, you’ll notice that your daily routine tends to lead you from bed, to the car, to a chair and finally the couch. Whether you partake in exercise or not, sitting for prolonged periods of time causes the brain to recognise that position as one to hold, allowing your muscles to shorten and locking your posture. It’s even been claimed that ‘sitting is the new smoking’, with long bouts of uninterrupted sitting increasing our risk of death. It’s important to take a break from the sitting position at least every hour if your job or lifestyle keeps you at a desk. Keep an eye on the time or set a timer to stand and walk around the room every 30-45 minutes to give your body and

mind a quick break to refresh. You can also do jumping jacks, callisthenics, sit-ups or whatever option works best for you. Standing desks are also a good alternative.”

2. CONSCIOUSLY CORRECT YOUR POSTURE

WAYS TO COPE: Back pain is an increasingly common problem many people face, with 70-90 per cent of Australians experiencing back pain at some point in their life.

3. SLEEP ON YOUR BACK

positions usually aren’t beneficial for spinal health. Sleeping on your stomach offers no support to the back and the pull of gravity causes the spine to bow. The most supportive position for your alignment is sleeping on your back. Although this may be uncomfortable initially, it is a good habit to get used to. For more support, sleep on your side with a pillow between your legs. Invest in a supportive mattress and pillow that promotes proper alignment of the neck.”

“Sitting for long periods of time causes the back to tense up and lock, which is even worse when sitting with bad posture. A good way of correcting this is to get into the habit of noticing and fixing your posture to sit up with a straightened back. The more you correct yourself, the more you will unconsciously sit in this position. Mobile phones also cause posture issues. When in use, keep the device at eye level to decrease the stress to the back and neck.”

“In terms of sleeping, the most comfortable

4. STRETCH YOUR

MUSCLES

“It is important to stay flexible through stretching to avoid back problems or potential injuries. The core muscles, particularly the lower back and abdominal muscles need to be strong and supple to support the spine and take pressure off the lower back. Core muscles are rarely used in everyday activities, so have specific, targeted exercise to strengthen core muscles. Also make sure to stretch before doing heavy lifting or exercising and add it to your daily routine just before bed. Stretches can be as simple and as quick

as bending forward, bending back, and bending side to side.”

5. FOCUS ON A HEALTHY DIET

“Be conscious of any excess fat, especially on the central abdomen which puts extra weight on the lumbar spine. When you have a healthy diet, it is more likely you will have more energy to do exercise regularly. Nutrients in anti-flammatory food have properties that can help relieve pain and assist in reducing osteoarthritis of joints.” For more information, go to drmwong.com.

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WELLBEING

MARCH, 2019// SENIORS

Cataract tips and choices before surgery Tracey Johnstone BEFORE you make a decision on whether to have cataract surgery there are several issues you should become familiar with. Because you have cataracts doesn’t mean you have to have surgery, says cataract and retinal surgeon Dr Simon Chen from Vision Eye Institute. He suggests glasses may be a solution, to start, but once the cataracts reach a certain point where you no longer have the quality of vision that you want, then it’s probably time you have surgery to remove them. An eye specialist will talk you through the pre-surgery steps. They will look at what level of vision you have and your lifestyle to determine if you need to have cataract surgery. You will also be assessed for suitability based on your general health, whether you have other issues with your eyes and what is the cause of the cataracts. “Most cataracts are typically related to age,” Dr Chen said. But sometimes they can be related to underlying health conditions which will influence the treatment choice.

PRE-SURGERY EYE HEALTH

If you have the common problem of dry eyes, the accuracy of the critical measurements being taken pre-surgery can be affected, so a specialist is likely to treat that condition firstly. “When you have cataract surgery we take a range of measurements and they are used to calculate the power of lens that is going to be put in your eye, like a pair of glasses, but it goes inside the eye permanently,” Dr Chen said.

SURGICAL OPTIONS

There are two choices of surgery – manual or laser-assisted. With the commonly used manual operation the surgeon uses a scalpel to make an incision into the eye and then uses other devices to remove the cataract.

SLEEP APNOEA: Left untreated, people with this condition were found to have problems recalling specific details about their lives.

EYE TIPS: Cataract surgery is a very common and for many seniors, it’s almost inevitable the surgery will be needed. Photo: wathanyu “Even the best surgeon in the world when they have a blade in their hand, not every operation is going to be exactly the same,” Dr Chen said. “So, there is a little element of unpredictability in surgery no matter how good the surgeon is.” In laser-assisted surgery the first few key steps are performed by computer guided laser. “It removes some element of human error,” Dr Chen said. It also increases the predictability of the surgery outcomes. The choice of this laser surgery is often limited by cost and availability. Many seniors have both cataracts and macular degeneration. “If you have macular degeneration, that will limit the improvement you get (from surgery),” Dr Chen said. “Even if you have a perfectly performed operation, you will probably see a lot better, but you may not see perfectly afterwards. It’s important to ask your surgeon what sort of outcome you are expecting.” “For a lot of people who have additional eye conditions such as glaucoma or macular degeneration, there is increasingly a wide range of different procedures we can do at the same time as cataract surgery.”

LENS CHOICES

There is no one size

when it comes to lens choices. It comes down to what is your lifestyle. The most common choice is long distance vision with glasses worn for reading. Or you can choose a reading lens and then wear glasses for long distance. The third choice is a multifocal lens so no glasses are required, but there are limitations with your sight at night when driving.

NON-SURGICAL CHOICES

“Not any good ones,” Dr Chen said. He adds those on offer can’t reverse the cataract nor stop them getting worse. It may be possible to delay cataract surgery and choose to update your glasses and change your lifestyle such as stop driving or stop working. “Once it starts to deteriorate and it starts to have a negative impact on your quality of life, then you should consider surgery,” Dr Chen said. “The longer you leave it, the more advanced the cataract becomes and so the higher the risk of complications during surgery.” Dr Chen said cataract surgery is a very common and for many seniors, it’s almost inevitable the surgery will be needed. He believes after surgery a person’s quality of life improves, there is less likelihood of falls and the opportunity to maintain an independent lifestyle increases.

Memory could be being lost during apnoea episodes SLEEP apnoea is not just about suffering through poor sleep and breathing problems, it’s now been found to affect people’s memories. A new study led by RMIT University looked at how obstructive sleep apnoea affected autobiographical memory. It found that people with the condition, when untreated, had problems recalling specific details about their lives. Lead investigator Dr Melinda Jackson said the research built on the known links between depression and memory. “We know that overly general autobiographical memories – where people don’t remember many specific details of life events – are associated with the development of persistent depression,” Dr Jackson said. “Our study suggests sleep apnoea may impair the brain’s capacity to either encode or consolidate certain types of life memories, which makes it hard for people to recall details from the past. “OSA is increasingly common, affecting up to 30 per cent of elderly people and around one in four Australian men aged over 30. “Sleep apnoea is also a significant risk factor for depression so if we can better understand the neurobiological mechanisms at work, we

have a chance to improve the mental health of millions of people.” About five per cent of Australians suffer from sleep apnoea. The BetterHealth Channel describes it as when a person’s breathing stops for a period of time, generally between 10 seconds and up to one minute, until the brain registers the lack of breathing or a drop in oxygen levels and sends a small wake-up call.

nasal CPAP, mouthguards or surgical correction of upper airway obstruction. Dr Jackson said the use of CPAP machines to treat sleep apnoea had improved some of the cognitive impairments related to the condition. “An important next step will be to determine whether successful treatment of sleep apnoea can also help counter some of these memory issues or even restore the memories

‘‘

Our study suggests sleep apnoea may impair the brain’s capacity to either encode or consolidate certain types of life memories, which makes it hard for people to recall details from the past. The sleeper rouses slightly, opens the upper airway, typically snorts and gasps, then drifts back to sleep almost immediately. This pattern can repeat itself hundreds of times a night, causing fragmented sleep. The recommended treatment for OSA includes weight loss and cutting back on alcohol. Active treatment of the condition includes

that have been lost,” she added. The study was conducted in collaboration with the Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, and University of Melbourne and published in Journal of the International Neuropsychology Society.


SENIORS \\MARCH, 2019

31

Plan for longterm results Paul Clitheroe WE LIVE in a world of change. Technology is driving big shifts in what we do and how we do it. Interest rates are at historic lows. And after many years of significant growth, home values in some of our largest cities are on the decline. Against this backdrop of upheaval, is long-term investing still relevant? I think so. History tells us just how effective a buy-and-hold approach can be. Over the past year, for example, Australian shares dished up total returns (including dividends) of 3.45 per cent. Extend that timeframe out to five years, and returns have averaged 8.12 per cent annually. But an investor with a 10-year horizon could have pocketed average annual gains of 11.79 per cent. It’s a compelling case for thinking long-term. But giving sharemarket

investments years – not just weeks or months – to grow calls for more than patience. Success with long-term investing demands a diversified portfolio. Today’s rooster can quickly become tomorrow’s feather duster. By way of example, if you’d bought the minimum parcel of 400 Commonwealth Bank shares back when it first listed in 1991, you’d have paid $2160. That same parcel of shares today would be worth $28,908, and this doesn’t include the value of annual dividends (Commbank has a dividend yield of 5.98 per cent). The challenge is that not every company is around long enough to make it as a long-term investment. Former sharemarket darlings like Pasminco and Babcock and Brown are testimony to this. It explains why investment guru Warren Buffett, who is a fan of long-term investing, looks for companies that will

Money

still be in business in 10 or 20 years. This highlights the need for diversity, something that can be hard for direct investors to achieve. An easy and potentially low cost way to diversify is through a managed share fund, which can offer access to dozens of listed companies. That said, don’t expect your investments to do all the heavy lifting. Making regular contributions can be the thing that really sees the value of your investments skyrocket. Rather than focusing on what you can’t control, embrace what is within your reach – the fees you pay on investments, the choice of investments at your fingertips, and your ability to add to your portfolio when you have the funds to do so.

Paul Clitheroe is Chairman of InvestSMART, Chairman of the Australian Government Financial Literacy Board and chief commentator for Money Magazine.

GOOD ADVICE: Today’s rooster can quickly become tomorrow’s feather duster.

Photo: dane_mark

Track it down and tidy up - Super easy super. Finding lost money always feels good, and there’s a mammoth $17.5 billion pool of forgotten super gathering dust and waiting to be claimed. More than a third of Australians hold two or more super accounts, so there’s every chance some of it could belong to you. The remarkable thing about these unclaimed accounts is that some are worth a small fortune. One NSW account has a balance of $2.2 million. Tracking down lost

super is getting easier all the time. Just link your myGov account to the Tax Office’s online services, and you can view all your superannuation accounts including any you may have lost track of. If it turns out you have some unclaimed super, it makes sense to roll the balance into your main fund. Just check if you could be up for exit fees (these will be banned from July 1, 2019), or whether the fund includes any insurance cover that you want to hold on to.

A different type of “lost” super could affect a far greater number of Australians. I’m talking about money that can be lost to high fees being siphoned from your super year after year. You could be paying well below one per cent annually in fund fees. Or you could be forking out over two per cent. The difference really stacks up over time. A 30-year-old could lose $200,000 of their total retirement savings to fees if their super is invested in a high-fee fund.

SUPER ADVICE: It’s worth channelling some energy into sorting out your super. Photo: hidesy Don’t wait for your annual super statement to arrive. Jump on to your fund’s website and get to know what you’re paying in fees. There’s a handy online super calculator on the MoneySmart website that

shows the long-term impact of fees on your super balance. If you don’t like what you see, think about switching to a lower-fee fund. It’s as easy as filling out some paperwork.

Win a double pass to Event Cinemas’ Hotel Mumbai Seniors screening Watch the astonishing movie that uncovers the major incident that took place in 2008, when the Taj Hotel in Mumbai became the target of a deadly terrorist attack. A story which fearlessly tackles the defining global issues of our time. A story about ordinary people. Real people. People of all races, all colours, all creeds, binding together in a gruelling fight for survival.

See a special Seniors Screening of ‘Hotel Mumbai’ at BCC and Event Cinemas that includes a complimentary morning tea on Wednesday 20th March. Book now at eventcinemas.com.au

Want to watch what happens in the movie? We have four double passes to giveaway for the Seniors screening on the 20th of March. To be in the draw, just fill in our form online at seniorsnews.com.au/competitions

^Visit seniorsnews.com.au/competitionterms for full competition terms and conditions. Promoter is ARM Specialist Media Pty Ltd of 2 Newspaper Place, Maroochydore Qld 4558. Promotional period 18/02/2019 - 11/03/2019. Competition drawn 2pm 11/03/2019 at Cnr Mayne Rd and Campbell St, Bowen Hills, Qld 4006. Winners announced in Seniors April Edition 2019. Total prize value $128 (including GST). Entry is open to all permanent residents of Queensland living in the regions of Brisbane, Sunshine Coast, Gold Coast and Toowoomba and New South Wales living in the regions of Northern NSW, Central Coast and Coffs and Clarence.

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JAPANESE organisational expert Marie Kondo has made tidying up a hot topic, and it could be filtering through to our finances. In the last quarter of 2018, 66,000 Australians tidied up their super, and they’re collectively $860million better off. Kondo’s central maxim is that we should only hang on to things that spark joy. But before spending time re-organising your sock drawer, it’s worth channelling some energy into sorting out your


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REVIEWS

MARCH, 2019// SENIORS

The dangerous desire for fame

In the Closet of the Vatican

Tracey Johnstone THE handsome, intelligent and outwardly suave, aspiring novelist Maurice Swift wants fame and will pursue it at any cost. He chases every possible opportunity to take what he can and from whoever he can – he doesn’t discriminate – all for the one goal of getting published not once, but many, many times. If there is a story, and even if it’s not his, he will try to make it his own.

Big hearts in battle

‘‘

Swift moves forward while Ackerman pays the price of his lust. The setting is a hotel in the old West Berlin. Young Swift unexpectedly becomes acquainted with the award-winning author Erich Ackerman. Both want something from each other, but not the same. Swift sees opportunity, Ackerman sees a chance to share his devastatingly disturbing past in the hope of gaining connection. Swift moves forward while Ackerman pays the price of his lust. Once Swift has made his name he goes looking for new ideas; much in the same way as he has started. Mentors, friends and family fall by the wayside

in Swift’s pursuit of fame. We meet some interesting people during Swift’s journey. A sister called Rebecca is extraordinary. A strangely familiar Theo is unsettling. Ladder to the Sky is quickly captivating. It’s a dark tale that may be

confronting for some senior readers, but once you take the journey with its author John Boyne, it’s becomes easier to see how the start has so much importance in the costly end. There are light moments to balance the dark, and even an ending that leaves you

looking up rather than down. Is the book about an evil tale or a clever writer? Perhaps if you are an aspiring author you might find yourself sitting back and rethinking your ambition once you have read this tale. Published by Penguin. RRP $32.99.

BATTLEFIELDS such as Gallipoli, Fromelles, Pozières, Bullecourt and Passchendaele are burnt into the Australian Great War psyche. Unfortunately, the sheer guts, fortitude and sacrifice of the diggers in those battles had often been wasted by poor leadership and planning. From an Australian perspective, such sacrifice engendered bitterness and frustration, which resulted in an emergent sense of Australian nationalism. In this authoritative account of the 100 days, Peter Brune traces the painstaking BEF (British Expeditionary Force) acquisition of its tactical doctrine with regard to its artillery, tanks and its air force. And the consequence of this knowledge was a sophisticated interlocking all arms approach to war: incorporating coordinated firepower rather than the futile expenditure of manpower. However, it is Brune’s use of participants’ diaries that brings an immediacy to his story. The reader will be taken to the bloody interface of battle, hear the voices of some of the Australians involved, and gain a sense of the cost of ultimate victory. Hardcover: $49.99.

THIS explosive new book, which is being published simultaneously in 20 countries, reveals the Vatican secrets and penetrates its enigma. It’s being called a startlingly revealing and detailed account of corruption and hypocrisy at the heart of this institution. In the Closet of the Vatican exposes the rot at the heart of the Vatican and the Roman Catholic Church today. This investigative writing is based on four years’ authoritative research, including extensive interviews with those in power. It starts in junior seminaries and continues right up to the Vatican itself. It’s based on the double lives of priests and on extreme homophobia. The resulting schizophrenia in the Church is hard to fathom. But the more a prelate is homophobic, the more likely it is that he is himself gay. In the Closet of the Vatican reveals a truth that is extraordinary and disturbing. The author, Dr Frédéric Martel, is a French writer and researcher. Published by Bloomsbury, In the Closet of the Vatican is available now. $34.99.

Look back at the good ol’ days

BUSH YARN: Alex Nicol’s newly released book Old Days, Old Ways.

JOIN author Alex Nicol as he takes you back to the old days in the bush, when booking into a country pub was likely to turn into an adventure, and when radio was the glue that held far flung communities together. In his new book Old Days, Old Ways, the former ABC Radio presenter brings back to life the voices and stories of regional Australia before television and the internet. When it comes to a bush yarn, it’s about the way you tell it.

As the voice of rural Australia for over two decades on ABC Radio, Nicol can tell a yarn with a punchline that will keep you grinning for the rest of the day. His book is full of colourful characters and making do with what’s at hand, these stories are classically Australian. There are the wartime mates who helped each other build farms on their soldier settler blocks, and the Adelady keeping the farm running after her husband died. There is the young woman who ran

down water buffalo in the Northern Territory, and Possum, the legendary bush hermit who lived off the land on his own for 60 years, quietly doing jobs for farmers without being asked. There is the neighbour caught ‘fishing’ in the chookyard with a long line and a small hook baited with bread, and the little girl who swallowed a sapphire she found on the side of the road. Published by Allen & Unwin, Old Days, Old Ways is available in bookshops. RRP $29.99.


SENIORS \\MARCH, 2019

PUZZLES

JIGGERED

4/3

The challenge is to rearrange a crossword which has been broken into 25 sections. One letter has been given to get you started. Work out which 3x3 square fits in with that letter and write in the letters. You can also shade the black squares if you find it helpful. After completing the first 3x3 area, work out which square joins on to it, and continue until you have made a complete crossword.

A N S A T H

R M E O O O R

N T T O R

I S O M T

U S M

R D G V R R A

O M E

E Y V E M A

R M A E W Y

C H A A D N D

F U M L I A B S

E E T N

G S T T

O G A O R T I C

S

M E N E L

D I E D W A Y

T H E E F R E

T B R E D

I R O N A

M P E Y

A L F A S T

L L R E S

E S W T A I

H

N C E

I

E R

A L Y

QUICK CROSSWORD Across 1. On land (6) 5. Renowned (6) 9. Entangle (6) 10. Hurry (6) 11. Daring (4) 12. Drink (8) 14. State categorically (6) 16. Loud, shrill laugh (6) 19. Bullfighter (8) 21. Close (4) 22. Actually (6) 23. Honestly (6) 24. Cease (6) 25. Divisions (6)

Down 2. Curving, snake-like (7) 3. Not paid on time (7) 4. Showed (9) 6. Lessen (5) 7. Proceeding as planned (2,5) 8. Open and honest (7) 13. Indirect (9) 14. Changed (7) 15. Outdo (7) 17. Hide (7) 18. Pamphlet (7) 20. Geographical book (5)

1

2

3

4

5

9

6

35

7

8

10

11

12

14

15

13

16

19

17

20

18

21

22

23

24

25

TRIO

Can you complete these four words, using the same three-letter sequence in each?

SUDOKU

Fill the grid so every column, every row and 3x3 box contains the digits 1 to 9.

A L M F I F U N

V

JIGGERED

Across: 1. Ashore 5. Famous 9. Enmesh 10. Hasten 11. Bold 12. Beverage 14. Assert 16. Cackle 19. Toreador 21. Near 22. Really 23. Openly 24. Desist 25. Splits. Down: 2. Sinuous 3. Overdue 4. Exhibited 6. Abate 7. On track 8. Sincere 13. Vicarious 14. Altered 15. Surpass 17. Conceal 18. Leaflet 20. Atlas.

QUICK CROSSWORD

QUIZ 1. The 1996 Oscar-winning film Shine was based on the life of which Australian? 2. What does a margarita cocktail consist of? 3. In which city is the headquarters of the United Nations? 4. What colour is the 10 on the door of 10 Downing Street, London? 5. Which cartoon character is the “fastest mouse in Mexico”? 6. What does an ombrophobe fear: umbrellas, vegetables or rain? 7. What is the title of the 1981 Eurovision Song Contest winner for Bucks Fizz? 8. What is the medication acetylsalicylic acid known as?

A R S O N

B O O T E E

L A T T E R

E P R A P R D O S P E P S T E T A D E R R I O R AW A D E D O D E T W E N T Y S E V E N S R O T A

WORDFIT

A S I L A I N M P O I R N N G A T E

H E A D U L L E N N M A T E T S AW S K I S I T A L Y L E K I N G N E A R N G N U I R A D E L A T E D EW E R

QUIZ

1. David Helfgott, 2 Tequila and citrus fruit juice, 3. New York, 4. White, 5. Speedy Gonzales, 6. Rain, 7. “Making Your Mind Up”, 8. Aspirin.

6 LETTERS ALASKA BOOTEE DETAIL ELATED GANDER INMATE IRKING

7 LETTERS LIMPING TADPOLE

TRIO: VAS

R A W

4 LETTERS ANTE EWER HUNT NEAR NILE OWED PADS ROAR ROTA RUED

SUDOKU

Solution opposite

5 LETTERS ABLER AHEAD ARSON ASIAN ERODE ESTER IRADE ITALY NEWSY ORGAN SPLAT STEIN

LATTER NEEDED NEGATE ORNATE OTTAWA OVERDO POPPED REWRAP SEVENS SULLEN SYSTEM TIRADE TWENTY

ALPHAGRAMS

Fit the words into the grid to create a finished crossword

SKIS STEP

NURSE, OPTICS, PATRONS, QUARTETS, REALITIES.

3 LETTERS ADO ELM ERR GNU ILK INN PIN RAW SAW SOT TAR TEN

WORDFIT

D I E D W A Y L A L L F O O T

Good 35 Very Good 34 Excellent 54+

T

S I

G A R I C N T O R O M E

628

H

TODAY

P

O R

RUNES PICOTS NO TRAPS SQUATTER ISRAELITE

C H A R M E A D O D O O R I N A R U E S M E S T S M A N S E Y E A V T H E M A L T I R D E R O G V D N A R R A A E N L E T C N E

I E

UM

How many words of four letters or more can you make? Each letter must be used only once and all words must contain the centre letter. There is at least one nine-letter word. No words starting with a capital are allowed, no plurals ending in s unless the word is also a verb, e.g. he burns with anger.

A Y

WORD GO ROUND

F U M E S I W L A B S T A E M G S T R I P Y T A L M S I F F U N N E I S O M B R T T H E R M E A F R E E W

Solve the anagrams. Each solution is a one-word anagram of the letters beside it, and the five solutions are sequential. For example, if the five-letter solution starts with J, the six-letter solution starts with K, and so on.

WORD GO ROUND: IMPERIOUS impious impose imposer impure mope moper mopes mops opium opus peri perm peso pier pious pismire poem poise pome pore pores pose poser poseur pour pours pries prim prime primes primo prims primus prise prism proem prom promise prose pure purism purse ripe rips romp romps rope ropes rump simper soup soupier sperm spire spore sprue spume spur sump super supremo umpire umpires uprise uprose

ALPHAGRAMS


36

TOOWOOMBA

MARCH, 2019// SENIORS

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Profile for seniors

Toowoomba March 2019  

Seniors News Toowoomba is a monthly newspaper for residents of Toowoomba and it's surrounds in Queensland, Australia.

Toowoomba March 2019  

Seniors News Toowoomba is a monthly newspaper for residents of Toowoomba and it's surrounds in Queensland, Australia.

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