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September, 2018

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TRAVEL TO WORLD’S GREATEST GARDENS

South Australian Governor Hieu Van Le and his wife Lan tell their Australian story

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SEPTEMBER, 2018// SENIORS

Spring into September Gail Forrer Seniors Group Editor

30 Money matters

34

Top gardening tips INDEX 4 Cover Story: Hieu Van Le AC 6 Toowoomba Exhibition Gardens 8 Prostate cancer survivors 12 Talk ‘n’ Thoughts 15 Living 17 Wellbeing 20 What’s on 21 Wanderlust 29 Community Group Guide 30 Money 34 Spring gardening tips 35 Puzzles

HELLO readers, welcome to this month’s spring edition. Spring is traditionally a time of renewal and I believe our cover story truly highlights this theme. In many ways the extraordinary life of South Australian Governor Hieu Van Le runs like a movie – but this is no fantasy, it is real life and I think its authenticity gives us all hope for a better future and even renewal, no matter our age or circumstances. I hope you enjoy Tracey Johnstone’s story as much as I did. In celebration of spring, we speak to local gardeners who share their tips for a flourishing and fertile garden and, let’s face it, there is nothing like first-hand advice from people who love their gardens. Speaking of blooming gardens, in terms of travel we take a look at some of the best gardens in the world, featuring vast fields of buds, blooms and breathtaking colours. The bucket list of great world destinations continues, with another list of magnificent places on Earth to explore. But to participate in

gardening and travel we need to enjoy good health and, as always, our Wellbeing section shares an array of tips and hints to keep us good stead. Our Living section also endeavours to reveal fresh ideas to enhance our lifestyles. But here at Seniors News, we recognise the many aspects of life and this month in our Talk ‘n’ Thoughts section we highlight the HILDA report, a survey that has been tracking particular families since 2001, in order to gather social and economic data that may ultimately influence key government decision-makers. It’s not all good news and we stand with National Seniors and The Benevolent Society campaign to improve the pension. I trust you will enjoy our range of stories. Gail

CONTACT US General Manager Geoff Crockett – 07 5430 1006 geoff.crockett@news.com.au Editor Gail Forrer – 07 5435 3203 gail.forrer@seniorsnewspaper.com.au Media Sales Executive Brett Mauger – 07 5435 3203 brett.mauger@seniorsnewspaper.com.au Online Get your news online at www.seniorsnews.com.au Advertising, editorial and distribution enquiries Phone: 1300 880 265 or (07) 5435 3200 Email: advertising@seniorsnewspaper.com.au or editor@seniorsnewspaper.com.au Location: 2 Newspaper Place, Maroochydore 4558 Website: www.seniorsnews.com.au Subscriptions Only $39.90 for one year (12 editions) including GST and postage anywhere in Australia. Please call our circulations services on 1300 361 604 and quote “Brisbane Seniors Newspaper”. The Seniors Newspaper is published monthly and distributed free in southeast Queensland and northern New South Wales. The Seniors newspaper stable includes Toowoomba, Wide Bay, Sunshine Coast, Brisbane, Gold Coast, Northern NSW, Coffs and Clarence and Central Coast publications. Published by News Corp Australia. Printed by News Corp Australia, Yandina. Opinions expressed by contributors to Seniors Newspapers are not necessarily those of the editor or the owner/publisher and publication of advertisements implies no endorsement by the owner/publisher.


SENIORS \\SEPTEMBER, 2018

NEWS

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Heritage shines bright Bold, colourful, fun and fascinating festival on show THE LIT Festival: Stories in Light is something bold, colourful and new, but it’s also shining a spotlight on Toowoomba’s heritage, and festival director Ben Tupas believes it will appeal to over-50s as much as younger generations. Held on September 28 and 29, the free night-time festival will comprise three major commissioned pieces at Bell Street Mall, Grand Central Shopping Centre and Queens Park, as well as a number of mini projects in shop fronts, light projections, lantern parade and sculptures, street theatre and performers. It will involve internationally established, as well as emerging, artists and create a synergy with local businesses and people. Ben said the Toowoomba arts festival differed from Sydney’s

famous Vivid in its underpinning of past, present and future storytelling, unknown heroes and untold histories. “People love nostalgia and remembering the past, and seeing these art works and the city light up will be quite magical,” Ben said. He and other volunteers spent hours poring over archival material to prepare elements of the festival. Ten local artists then produced pieces – either literal or inspired by these segments of history – for local store fronts. “The thing with history is it’s always seen through a lens... and because we are of the internet age, we’ve approached it from a very multi-lens perspective,” Ben said. In some cases, he said, it may simply be the colour palette which is reflected, but each piece will be explained to enable people to “be conscious of the stories that inhabit

HISTORY IN LIGHTS: LIT Festival director Ben Tupas and volunteers spent hours sorting through archival material and images to inspire historic elements of the festival. Image courtesy of local history and Robinson Collections, Toowoomba City Library. Photo: Ben Tupas the place where they live and of stories not told which should be told”. He said while it was definitely a strategic move to time the festival during the Carnival of Flowers, it would also bring a new aspect to the carnival, stretching into the night and encouraging people

to stay and explore what the city has to offer. It’s hoped local restaurants will benefit and other businesses may open longer hours to cater for the new nightlife. “It’s something Toowoomba hasn’t seen before and it’s going to make the centre very

dynamic,” Ben said. It was all part of Toowoomba’s changing face from a regional town to a regional city. “Toowoomba has an enviable lifestyle and this festival seeks to open up the city and entice people and businesses to find a niche with new tourism

Updates from the Toowoomba Region

My Health Record

An online summary of your key health information

Council Meetings

Active Seniors

The next meetings of Council’s Standing Committees will be held on 11 and 12 September commencing at 9am. The next Ordinary Meeting of Council will be held on 18 September commencing at 10am. All meetings are at City Hall, 541 Ruthven Street, Toowoomba.

Milne Bay and Highfields Aquatic and Fitness centres have plenty of options to keep you active. Join us for Aqua Aerobics, Steady Steps, Qigong for Health, Pilates, Yoga, Tai-Chi, Zumba Gold, Senior Citizens group (HFR only) and aquatic walking lanes. Concession rates available, contact MBAC 4688 6330 or HFR 4699 6530 for more information.

Assistive Technology Expo

My Health Record has various safeguards in place to protect your information.

As part of Disability Action Week, we’re hosting our inaugural Disability Assistive Technology Expo on Tuesday 11 September from 10am-3pm at the Civic Precinct. It’s free to attend and there will be exhibits, a free sausage sizzle, disability awareness training and Auslan sign language training. Session times are from 10am – 12noon, and 1pm – 3pm in City Annex and community rooms above the library. For more information call us or visit www.tr.qld.gov.au/events

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This year, you will get a My Health Record unless you tell us you don’t want one by 15 November 2018. For more information go to:

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opportunities,” he said. He stressed this was a festival for Toowoomba to share and take ownership of, and feedback would be collected to ensure the community was getting what it wanted and the festival was sustainable. For more, find the LIT Festival on Facebook.

A range of low-cost opportunities are available in Toowoomba each week to help residents get out and active. For full details and to join visit www.tr.qld.gov.au/change

My Community Directory The My Community Directory lists organisations that provide services that are free or subsidised to the public in thousands of location across Australia. Check it out at www.mycommunitydirectory.com.au

For bookings for all events call 131 872 or visit www.tr.qld.gov.au

Meaningful mulching Spring is soon upon us and your garden is going to want a revamp! All of our waste facilities in the Toowoomba Region have a huge quantity of beautiful free mulch available for collection. Adding mulch not only reduces moisture loss but adds nutrients to the soil. For a list of waste facilities where you can get your free mulch, call us or visit our website.

Council Cabs Our Council Cab service provides affordable transport for seniors and people with a disability. Eligible users can travel from their home to their nearest major shopping centre one day a week. The service allows residents to enjoy greater independence and convenience without relying on friends and family to get out and about, whether for shopping or socialising. For eligibility criteria and locations of the service in your area call 131 872 or visit www.tr.qld.gov.au/councilcabs TRC_0918_SN

Alison Houston


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COVER STORY

SEPTEMBER, 2018// SENIORS

Governor continues the

From a tiny boat to the top job Tracey Johnstone

“G’DAY mate! Welcome to Australia.” The shouted greeting wasn’t anything like what Hieu Van Le AC and his wife Lan expected to hear when they fearfully arrived in Australia. They arrived in 1977 as part of the early wave of Vietnamese refugees, huddled in a 15m wooden fishing boat with 40 other people. The trip was “horrendous”. After weeks at sea and violent rejection by coast guards along the way, the refugees arrived in the pitch dark at Melville Island. In heavy dawn fog of the following day and with grave doubts as to how Australian officialdom would receive them, their tattered boat chugged clumsily into Darwin Harbour, exhausted by the long journey. “All of a sudden,

MUCH APPRECIATED: South Australian Governor, His Excellency Hieu Van Le AC and Mrs Van Le in the grounds of Government House. Photo: AAP / Dean Martin coming towards us was the sound of an outboard motor,” Mr Le said. In the distance was a fast approaching tinnie

with two blokes resplendent in singlets and shorts, hats, white zinc noses, beer cans in hand and fishing rods

perched on the stern. “As they got close to our hull one of them raised his stubbie up, as if proposing a toast, and

shouted out,‘g’day mate! Welcome to Australia’.” Every day for the last 41 years, the 64-year-old reminds himself of that

greeting. “It was the first experience I had with Australian people and it made a deep impression.” he said. “I knew instantly we had arrived in a welcoming country, one where a laconic, easy-going attitude was the promise of a ‘fair go’. “Back then the arrival of boat people like us was considered a significant event.” Mr Le landed in Australia at age 23, armed only with a bright mind and a firm belief in making the best of what was in front of him. His journey has been one of persistence and resilience. His life, both then and now, has had many facets. After escaping the ravages of the Vietnam War, he completed two Adelaide University degrees before working as a senior corporate regulator. Prior to becoming South Australia’s Governor, Mr Le also served for several years as member of the South Australian Multicultural and Ethnic Commission (SAMEAC).

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COVER STORY

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fight for a fair go ‘‘ His personal, long-term, mission through these roles has been to promote Australia’s cultural diversity and harmony. Prior to 1977 Australia was populated largely by people of Anglo-Celtic and European backgrounds. Then in the ’70s came the large waves of immigrants from South East Asia. These immigrants are now ageing into their senior years. In his previous roles with SAMEAC, Mr Le noticed some important challenges ahead for ageing immigrants, particularly where English is not their first language. “Over the years, migrants have come to our shores from all corners of the world,” he said. “Each of these may have its own cultural beliefs, traditions, practices, traditional medicines and circumstances that need to be taken into account in our aged care and health system. “Some people may revert to a place of comfort, returning to their mother tongue or

I knew instantly we had arrived in a welcoming country. — Hieu Van Le AC

preferring their traditional food and customs. “For many cultures, the concept of nursing homes or intensive care, which is given to elders in our society, are quite different experiences to those found in their native countries. “In many cultures, older people stay in their home, in the extended family until they pass away, surrounded by the children, grandchildren and even their great-grandchildren. “The warmth of being surrounded by family members and the ambience of the bustle of daily activities plays an important part in their later lives.” Mr Le points to the busy lifestyles that people lead

today, leaving many time-poor due to pressures of work, or running a business, raising a young family, and the demands of constant and instant news and communications. “People may, in some circumstance, have very little time for themselves let alone for their family and elderly parents,” he said. “This demand on their time, and many other pressures, means that trying to find a way to make it easier for everybody is to place a loved one’s care into someone else’s hands. “The challenge is that their parents and grandparents may in some circumstances feel they are a visitor rather than an integral part of the family at the very time they should be enjoying the fruits of their working life and the happiness that brings.” Mr Le and his wife have two adult sons of whom they are very proud. Having cared for his own mother who lived until her 90s, Mr Le is well aware of the demands that brings both

emotionally and physically in wanting to provide the best support for them. “Having experienced that, as parents we don’t want to impose a burden on our sons,” he said. “We fully understand the pressures they would be under.” He smiles and chuckles when he adds “Lan and I would, of course, one day, love to have some grandchildren; no pressure”. Mr Le has enjoyed every phase of his life and appreciated the many experiences they have brought, even when confronted with adversity. “I believe there is a strength and resilience deep in everybody. It comes to the fore when challenges provide an opportunity for it to shine through,” Mr Le said. He still has a journey ahead in which he hopes to “continue to do the best I can and enjoy a fulfilling life, at every stage of the journey”. And he will follow his passion of helping to make Australia’s egalitarian society even better, fairer and more compassionate.

A FAIR GO FOR ALL: SA Governor Hieu Van Le AC with Tina Wang, Rui Love, Alice Li, Tian Love, Payel Rahman and Kylie Oyama. Photos: Calum Robertson

Mr Le at Proclamation Day in Glenelg North, South Australia.

Queen Elizabeth II receives Mr Le and his wife at Buckingham Palace in 2016. Photo: WPA Pool


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NEWS

SEPTEMBER, 2018// SENIORS

Gardeners share pots of passion

Don’t miss the Toowoomba Exhibition Gardens

‘‘

Alison Houston

COTTAGE COLOUR: Anne O’Brien in her lovely cottage-style garden in Harlaxton, one of four involved in this year’s Toowoomba Exhibition Gardens. Photo: Contributed

SHARING the joy of their gardens and helping the community are the twin goals of participants in the Toowoomba Exhibition Gardens. And they’ve done that in spades (no pun intended), raising $645,000 for charity since the program began back in 1973 as part of the Carnival of Flowers, at the behest of then 10 time garden competition winner Ces Swenson. Committee president of some 35 years, Michael Frainey was just a teen, visiting Toowoomba from “up north”, when he drove down for that first exhibition. Little did he know that he and his parents would move to the area the following year and he would soon exhibit his own garden, never mind joining and then leading the exhibition gardens committee. “I’m a plant-aholic,” Michael admitted with a laugh. “But there are worse things you could be!” Each year, 4-6 gardens are exhibited, and gate takings collected during the event are are shared among specific charities whose volunteers are on hand to sell and collect tickets. This year’s gardens include old favourites as well as the exhibition’s first totally native garden,

I’m a plant-aholic. But there are worse things you could be!

— Michael Frainey

but Michael said even those who have shown previously incorporate something new each year. ■ Adrian and Gail Wockner – 5 Horizon Court, Highfields – are opening their large native garden for the first time, with funds going to LifeFlight. ■ Phillip and Marjorie Martin – 17 Dallang Road, Middle Ridge – have been exhibiting their beautiful, sprawling garden of over .4ha (1 acre) for 23 years, with donations to Anglicare. ■ Val Peachey – 5 Fern Drive, Kearneys Spring – is always adding to her beautiful cottage garden, started with her late husband Ron, with donations going to Life Education. ■ Anne and Mark O’Brien – 79 North Street, Harlaxton – are donating funds from entry to their cottage garden to AEIOU (for children with autism). Michael said while the gardens definitely had the “wow factor”, unlike the competition gardens, exhibitors didn’t have to please judges or anyone but themselves. They are “year-round

gardens”, meaning visitors can see what they can achieve in their own backyards, and chat to the gardeners themselves. Also a weekly volunteer at the Toowoomba Visitor Information Centre, Michael said the regret he heard most was guests had not allowed enough time to see everything the area had to offer – a pretty good complaint. He said the exhibition gardens were a wonderful part of the Carnival of Flowers experience, which continued to progress, adding “the parks have improved 100-fold over the past 20 years or so”. All four exhibition gardens are open 9am-5pm from September 21-30. Entry is $5 to any individual garden, $10 for any three gardens or all four for $12. Morning tea is available at both the Martin and Wockner gardens. For more details go to toowoombaexhibition gardens.com or for more on this year’s Carnival of Flowers – featuring flowers, food and wine, music, art and more go to tcof.com.au.

Turf Club Roses race series gathers momentum IF Toowoomba Turf Club chairman Kent ‘Woody’ Woodford is seeing things through rose-coloured glasses at the moment, you can hardly blame him. The 30-year racing veteran, who took over the top job less than two years ago, is over the moon at the new Toowoomba Roses race series which culminates in the Benchmark 80 Handicap final as part of the Mad Hatter’s Race Day on Sunday, September 23. He has high hopes of it

becoming an annual event, tying in with the Carnival of Flowers. “There’s not a better time to do this than when Toowoomba’s at its best and I hope we can grow this event to be as big as possible,” Woody said. Some readers may recall a Carnival of Flowers Cup many years ago, he said, but the series was a great way for it to be reborn and reinvigorated. With many young punters lured away from the track by the

accessibility of watching and betting online, Woody said actually being there and getting caught up in the colour, atmosphere and excitement of racing was something much closer to the hearts of the older generation. Woody said series and events such as the September 23 race day with its “unexpected” races, including minitrotters, dachshunds, yabbies and pigs, and its other family-friendly activities, as well as the chance to dress up and

ROSY OUTLOOK: Turf Club chairman Kent Woodford gets set for the Roses Series. Photo: Nev Madsen embrace the day’s theme, encouraged more people to discover the enjoyment

of being at the track and made racing a bigger part of the community. With the final of the three-race series worth $25,000 to the winner, and an almost $170,000 pot for the day, which also includes the prestigious Pat O’Shea Plate, Woody said it was a real boon for Toowoomba racing. The high prizemoney has gained a lot of interest from local owners and trainers as well as those from outside, with the preludes having run on August 25 and

September 8. Woody hopes the Roses final will become like the Pat O’Shea Plate (dedicated to the race-caller synonymous with Toowoomba racing and the country’s first two-year-old race of the year), the Weetwood Handicap and Toowoomba Cup, which all hold real kudos and bragging rights for a local win. “I hope people will come out and enjoy the racing and everything we offer, and leave with a smile on their faces.”


SENIORS \\SEPTEMBER, 2018

NEWS

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NEWS

Major federal changes ahead BREAKING NEWS WAITING to 70 to retire is “gone” Prime Minister Scott Morrison has announced. He "no longer" believes it’s a good idea to lift the pension, retirement age Mr Morrison told the Nine Network last Wednesday morning . The decision is due to be ratified with cabinet this week. The policy of lifting the retirement age from 67 to 70 was first adopted under the Abbott government. There is also now a Federal Minister for Senior Australians with MP Ken Wyatt (pictured) appointed to represent and champion seniors’ interests at the highest political level. Mr Wyatt will retain his other portfolios of aged care and indigenous health, senior Australians. The Minister’s focus will be “on taking a broader, whole-of-government approach to advancing the interests of senior Australians”. Seniors News is seeking from Mr Wyatt details of his new portfolio responsibilities and its relationship to senior minister portfolios that impact on seniors.

SEPTEMBER, 2018// SENIORS

Blokes go head-on Survivors urge others to get their prostate checked now

Tracey Johnstone THEY’RE everyday blokes with a confronting story to tell. Chris Warnes and Jon Sayer have survived prostate cancer and they want other men to hear their message – get checked now. The two sailors have been friends for many years since they moved from New Zealand to set up their new lives in Queensland. Life has been about hard work and downtime on the ocean for these blokes. Chris has his own earthmoving business while Jon designs and builds offshore racing yachts and sleek powerboats. What neither gave the slightest thought to was that they could end up a statistic – one in five men are diagnosed with prostate cancer before the age of 85. But, for Chris and Jon, other than being over 50, there was no other risk factors for them – no family history of the disease, no high fat and low vegetables diet, no high testosterone levels, no obesity. So why them? Chris, now 72, was diagnosed with prostate cancer at age 62. “It was the funny thing with me,” Chris said. “I had absolutely no symptoms whatsoever, nothing. It was just because I got checked every six months that they picked it up through blood checks.” Those checks were being done because of his

SURVIVORS: Prostate cancer survivors Chris Warnes and Jon Sayer. age. “Because I was aware of it, I kept doing it.” Jon, 62, was diagnosed “one year, four months, seven days, three hours and two minutes ago”. “I was the same as Chris,” Jon added. He was aware that he was at the age where prostate cancer could be an issue for him. “I even changed to a lady doctor as I thought, no way did I want a man playing with his fingers anywhere around my bottom because I thought that was the only way you could find out.” The GP organised a full blood test. The result apparently showed some elevation of his PSA, but as nothing was said to him he assumed his health was still OK. It was only when three years later he went to another doctor for a check-up that the past blood test, plus the new

one, both showed an elevated PSA. Chris choose a full prostatectomy. “I didn’t even consider radiation,” he said. “At my age, it was the safest and I believe the best thing. I was very lucky as all my cancers were on the outside of my prostate. One had left my prostate and was heading towards my spine. “I would be dead by now had I not been checked regularly.” Jon made the same choice. “A few things I have since learnt that I wish I had been warned about earlier because I went through a fitness regime and certain diets, foods and alkalines to take the sugars and acids out of my diet, and maybe I could have attempted to fight it a different way for a while before I had the full procedure because it is a very slow growing cancer,

nine times out of 10,” Jon said. Jon is calling for more groups where men can openly discuss what they are going through. When he first found out about his diagnosis he turned to Chris and another friend, David Adams, because he knew they had experienced the prostate cancer journey and could him understand about what, when and how it was all going to be dealt with. “I just feel it’s a bit of under the table, taboo subject with men,” Jon said. He then headed to Facebook and revealed his story. “It’s a bit of a male stigma thing attached to it and lot of people don’t talk about it,” Jon said. “I was surprised the number of my friends who had been through it and I didn’t know until I opened up about it. They

Photo: Tracey Johnstone

congratulated me and gave me words of wisdom. “You need to talk about it more and go and get checked. Particularly, ask about family history of it and if that is the case you have got to start doing it at 40, not 60. “The strange thing it wasn’t in any of my relatives and my dad was one of 11 boys, and none had it. I have warned by son already.” Chris is keeping to a healthy eating regime, he keeps up his six-monthly checks and slowed down, a bit, on the beer consumption. “The strongest message I can say to anyone is don’t be frightened to go to your doctor and get your blood tests. And, if there is any doubt, get a digital check. It’s better than dying.” Talk to your GP and go to ausprostatecancer. com.au or prostate.org. au.

If you are over 50, get yourself checked now ALL men over 50 – or over 40 if they have a family history – should talk now with their GP about prostate health. It’s the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Australian men, with 20,000 diagnosed and tragically 3500 lost to the cancer every year. The Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia encourages all men to get better informed about prostate cancer. MYTH 1: If I talk to my GP about my prostate health, it will lead to a

finger exam. BUSTED: You can keep your trousers on. A digital rectal examination (DRE) is no longer the recommended first line test for prostate cancer. Your GP will discuss whether testing is the right course of action for you. If you decide to get tested, then it is likely to be a PSA test. This is a simple blood test. MYTH 2: Prostate cancer isn’t a big deal – no need to bother my GP. BUSTED: Around one in

seven Australian men will get prostate cancer so monitoring your prostate health is essential. Once you are over 50 (or over 40 if you have a family history) you need to talk with your GP about your prostate health. Men often resist going to the doctor, but in this case, having the conversation really could save your life. Your GP is a professional and has heard it all before, there is no need to feel awkward about it.

MYTH 3: If I get a prostate cancer diagnosis, it automatically means I’ll need surgery. BUSTED: Surgery is only one of the treatment options available for localised prostate cancer. Your specialist will talk with you about your treatment options. And remember, the more informed you are the better – it’s always OK to get a second opinion. For more prostate cancer information, go to pcfa.org.au/getchecked.


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NEWS

SEPTEMBER, 2018// SENIORS

Keeping the skills alive Artisans share their secrets to maintain historic crafts Alison Houston HELPING to highlight traditional crafts and craftsmanship, ensure they don’t disappear, and inspire a new generation are the goals of the Lost Trades Fair Queensland. Multi-award-winning leather plaiter Bill Webb pushed for the event, which began successfully last year at Toowoomba’s Cobb & Co Museum, after he attended a similar fair in Victoria. “I said this is the best show I’ve ever seen – the only thing wrong with it is it’s not in Queensland,” Bill laughed. “We need to get the message out there that these trades are alive and that these artisans have extraordinary capabilities.” They did just that, with 8000 people attending the inaugural Toowoomba event and more expected to attend this year on the October 6 and 7 weekend. Dozens of career artisans will demonstrate and share their skills, talent and passion for heritage trades. These include French polishing, glassblowing, spinning, blacksmithing, silversmithing, barrel, tool and spoon-making, book binding, weaving, lacemaking, and making long-bows and penny farthings. Unlike the artisans of the past, who Bill said often wanted to keep the secrets of their trade under wraps to prevent competition, those at the Lost Trades Fair are eager to share their knowledge

TRADES ALIVE: Leather plaiter Bill Webb learned the trade he has been plying for 50-odd years from the legendary RM Williams himself, and happily passes on the tricks and skills to others. Photo: Contributed and experience to ensure their trades survive. He began his own over 50-year journey into leather plaiting at just six years old, with his mum keen to find something to keep his hands and mind busy, and hopefully stop the youngster from

wandering off and getting lost on their large cattle property. That didn’t work so well, according to Bill, but it did get his interest and earned him a good bit of pocket money from school mates who wanted belts.

In Year 7 he wrote to RM Williams... and got an answer, culminating in him spending a couple of weeks training with the man himself, who later opened doors for him to other leather experts. “When I think back on it, it was amazing that he

took the time to write back to a snot-nosed kid,” Bill said. While he has continued to plait leather, and has taught for the past 15 years, it’s only in the past five years that Bill has made his hobby his career, with his pieces

made to order and shipped throughout the country and the world. Students of all ages and backgrounds, from school kids to truck drivers and doctors, also travel to his classes nationwide – the only thing participants have in common being the wish to be creative. “I think a lot of people now are looking for high quality Australian-made goods – they’re sick of getting something on Christmas Day and taking it to the dump on Boxing Day,” he said. “And they’re realising they can create things themselves and that, if they buy something, they have to pay for quality and expertise... artisans have to live and eat too.” Bill said, looking back now, given the consumer interest and the enjoyment he gets from his craft, he should have gone full-time 30 years ago. “You’re only limited in what you make by your imagination,” he said, including everything from belts and whips to key rings, bracelets and necklaces to handbags.” He chooses to use red kangaroo hide, which he said is both strong and workable, and said people are often “gob smacked” with the fine detail of his work, which can involve plaiting anything from four to 64 strands. “You’re never at the top of your game; you always try and make the next one better than the last,” Bill said. To find out more about the Lost Trades Fair on October 6-7 and book, log on to the website cobbandco.qm.qld.gov.au. Adult tickets are $15 online, $18 on the day, with Seniors Card holders $12 and $15.

Ageing disgracefully all part of the fun

TIMELY: Fleur Lind with her new novel Local Time. Photo: Shanelle Thompson

AGEING outrageously and disgracefully sounds like fun to many of us, and sets the scene for Fleur Lind’s book Local Time. A Kiwi, Fleur moved to Warwick with her Aussie-born husband three years ago – about the same time it has taken to make her novel a reality, from first chapter to release. Local Time is a standalone, although it can also be read as part of a trilogy, the first two parts of which Fleur wrote with her older brother,

Lloyd Hopkins. “I know I wrote it, but it seems like it has its own heart,” she said. Approaching 60, and with a background in aged and community care, Fleur said seniors were the heroes of what she described as “a quirky story” across three generations, set in an exclusive rest home on the South Island of New Zealand where residents have stumbled across a way to time travel. And while we might not want to relive our school

or any other years for that matter, she said there are special moments in all our lives it would be nice to revisit if there were no side effects or complications... which of course there are, including stumbling across a crime scene. “It’s a huge amount of fun, and ‘tripping’ (as the residents call travelling back in time) gives them a lot of vim and vigour,” she said. “There’s chaos and confusion and a lot of laughs, but it’s also about

relationships and romance, and I think people will really identify with the characters.” While Fleur has always loved writing, she said she had never thought of writing a book until her children were adults and urged her to do so five years ago. She admits it was a steep learning curve through the first co-authored books – A Timely Dream (she contributed less than half) and No Time for Rules (70%) – and said she has

developed her craft as a member of the Rose City Writers Group. Having found it too difficult as an unknown to break into the traditional publishing world, Fleur chose to “hybrid” publish through London’s Austin Macauley, investing her some of her own money to back Local Time. She is proud Local Time is on sale in Warwick at Hynes Newsagency, Palmerin Street, as well as through Amazon and is currently working to get it into local libraries.


SENIORS \\SEPTEMBER, 2018

NEWS

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SEPTEMBER, 2018// SENIORS

Pension poverty is in the spotlight

Talk 'n' thoughts

Gail Forrer Group Editor

HARDSHIP: National Seniors and The Benevolent Society are calling on all Australians to support the Fix Pension Poverty campaign. Photo: Thinkstock

‘‘

The average time a 60 to 64-year-old spends on Newstart is 187 weeks.

NATIONAL Seniors Association together with The Benevolent Society are conducting a joint Fix Pension Poverty campaign. Last month, the importance of their campaign was further highlighted with the release of the 2018 HILDA Report. Started in 2001, the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey is a household-based panel study that collects valuable information about economic and personal well-being, labour market dynamics and family life. The study surveys the same households and individuals each year. This way it can show how

Friends for Life

Queensland’s Three Tenors

the lives of a cross-section of Australians are changing over time. The survey, a record of how we live, shows researchers many things: for example, how economics affects our lives or how choices made in the past lead to particular life outcomes. The content provides policy-makers with unique insights about Australia, enabling them to make informed decisions across a range of policy areas, including health, education and social services. It is published by the Melbourne Institute and funded by the Australian Government through the Department of Social Services.

NATIONAL Seniors chief advocate Ian Henschke said the recently released HILDA report highlighted inequality and poverty among older Australians. Mr Henschke said the report reflected some key

concerns voiced in last year’s National Seniors Advocacy Survey, including the rising cost of energy and housing stress as growing concerns. The 2018 HILDA Report also highlighted the growing issue of inequality among older Australians. It seems among seniors the gap between the “have a lot” and the “haven’t got much” is growing. The over-65s age group is the only one where inequality has increased significantly over the past 15 years Older single women, older single men and older couples are the three family types most likely to be experiencing income poverty in Australia. Older women have experienced the steepest increase in income poverty since 2015. The latest Department of Social Services data reveals that more people aged 55-64 are on

Newstart than those aged 25-34 and they are on the payment for much longer. They are also spending their retirement savings before they retire because they can’t live on Newstart without experiencing financial hardship. The average time a 60 to 64-year-old spends on Newtstart is 187 weeks (3.6 years). Conversely, the average time a 25 to 29-year-old spends on Newstart is 104 weeks (two years). The number of people aged 55-64 on Newstart is 174,532, compared to 156,664 aged 25-34. According to the OECD, 26 per cent of older Australians are experiencing poverty, compared to the OECD average of 13 per cent. In the run-up to the federal election and beyond, National Seniors and The Benevolent Society are calling on all Australians to support the Fix Pension Poverty campaign.

Queensland filmmakers create age-friendly films EIGHT Queensland filmmakers will be given the chance to turn their bold ideas into age-friendly films thanks to the Palaszczuk Government’s B.OLD short film competition. Minister for Seniors Coralee O’Rourke announced the B.OLD short film competition winners at Parliament House and praised the ideas they put forward. “This inaugural competition has been an overwhelming success so far, with an outstanding 40 entries received from filmmakers across Queensland,” Mrs O’Rourke said. “It’s particularly fitting for us to be making this announcement during Queensland Seniors Week. “These eight winning short film ideas truly embody the aim of this competition, which is to show that older Queenslanders are capable of much more than society sometimes gives them credit for and celebrate their achievements and contributions to our communities.”

ACTION: Queensland filmmakers will turn their B.OLD ideas into age-friendly films. Photo: Acitore The winning films to be developed as part of the B.OLD short film competition include En Pointe – a film about a 72-year-old ballet dancer sharing her life journey and love of dance. There is also The Mantra of Wise John – a film about 90-year-old John Rigby, who took up natural bodybuilding at age 85. The winning B.OLD short film competition entries will debut at a

premiere event in November, before being screened at film festivals across Queensland in late 2018 and 2019. Mrs O’Rourke said the B.OLD short film competition was another example of the Palaszczuk Government’s commitment to the Queensland: An Age-Friendly Community strategy. For more information about the competition, visit communities.qld. gov.au/BOLD2018.


SENIORS \\SEPTEMBER, 2018

NEWS

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FEATURE

SEPTEMBER, 2018// SENIORS

Looking for a Home Care Package Provider? BRAND INSIGHTS QUEENSLAND’S Ozcare is one of several organisations that offer home care services to those approved for home care packages. With so many home care providers, and many more looking to enter the market, it can be difficult to distinguish between them all. Ozcare’s Chief Operating Officer Damian Foley recommends looking into the range of services that can be offered by the provider, and what administration costs will be. “Our point of difference is our care team – each one of our clients has access to a team of nurses, carers, allied health professionals and dementia specialists who work together to look at all aspects of the client’s care,” Mr Foley said. “We also make sure our

clients have consistent carers because we know this is really important to them. It’s critical that they’re comfortable with the person that might be helping them with quite personal activities like taking a shower.” Ozcare has proudly served the Toowoomba community for the past 22 years. They provide expert nursing, mental health and disability services, a diverse range of home care services, specialist dementia advice and support and flexible respite care. In addition, they support the local homeless community with a men’s hostel and health and well-being programs, and operate the Bush Connection program, providing support to urban and remote rural families facing hardship. Ozcare is committed to the Darling Downs region and have expanded their

footprint with a new, state-of-the-art 150-bed aged care facility being built at Glenvale, west of Toowoomba, due to open April 2019. “Our focus is on keeping people well and agile, and helping them to age in the comfort of their own homes,” Mr Foley said. “Increasing our service portfolio in Toowoomba to include an aged care facility means we can continue to bring meaning and purpose to people’s lives when they can no longer stay at home.” The new aged care facility will include: ■ Permanent residential care ■ Secure special wing for people living with Dementia and other challenging behaviours ■ Residential respite care for people needing short-term care ■ A retirement village built next door (co-located for continuum of care)

CARING FOR CLIENTS: Ozcare’s point of difference is its care team.


SENIORS \\SEPTEMBER, 2018

LIVING

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Living

BETTER LIVING: Check out these tips for helping seniors get more enjoyment out of the inside of their home.

Photo: Ruben Ramos

Spring off the couch and try out these tips Tracey Johnstone MOVING into a smaller home doesn’t mean you have to compromise on how you live, but it may mean you need to rethink about better ways to make your home brighter and happier. Swinburne University’s Interior Architecture course director Kirsten Day has some great tips for helping seniors get more enjoyment out of the inside of their home. Surface colours ■ Aim for light colours on

walls and ceilings which will better reflect light. The same can be said for furniture covers and even rugs – light colours will increase the perception of space. “Most paint companies will have a whole range of whites,” Ms Day said. “The pure white is quite stark and monastic. “You can also get ones that have a shade of grey.” The idea is to avoid the starkness of pure white by having a slight shading of grey, white, pink or even blue to the paint.

Position of furniture ■ Instead of facing all your furniture towards the television, utilise the nearest window or balcony which can guide your eye out of the living space. They don’t need to be large areas to create a feeling of more space. ■ Ensure you place the furniture so that you can easily move around it. “There is evidence that having a view to nature enhances the perceived quality of space,” Ms Day said. “You will enjoy being in that space if you can see

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■ Refresh your home layout by changing the location of the living room, study or bedrooms. It might be time to swap a few rooms around to utilise the summer light and warmth. Less may be better ■ Are you really using all the furniture in your home? Spring is a good time to get rid of what you no longer really need, particularly bulky items, which will help free up space around the home. Better lighting ■ Consider replacing

heavy window drapes with a light-weight material which will still give you some privacy, but also let in more light. Rugs ■ Use rug patterns and colour in different ways to impact on the perception of your space. ■ Look at the way you place a rug that has a pattern so that it creates a special effect that suits the size and shape of the room it is in. ■ Don’t forget to weigh down the corners of your rugs to stop them becoming a trip hazard.

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something outside.” Shades of light ■ Consider replacing the upholstered dark furniture with much lighter colours, or putting a light colour throw rug and bright coloured cushions across dark lounges. ■ Place a mirror opposite the window or balcony, or even the entrance to another room, to reflect another view ultimately creating a feeling of more space around you. ■ Use a lamp shade that shares the light around the room rather than forcing light down.

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LIVING

SEPTEMBER, 2018// SENIORS

Cash boost to tackle abuse

AGAINST ABUSE: The Federal Government has boosted the fight against elder abuse after announcing a $2 million package for the Older Persons Advocacy Network. Photo: chameleonseye

THE fight against elder abuse has been given a major boost with the Federal Government announcing a $2 million package for the Older Persons Advocacy Network (OPAN). Minister for Aged Care Ken Wyatt said the funding would be a key weapon in the face of growing concern that elder abuse is becoming rife throughout the community. “Preventing elder abuse is everybody’s business because all older Australians have a fundamental right to expect safe, dignified treatment,” Mr Wyatt said. “Estimates of elder abuse range from 2 to 12 per cent. Whether concerns are raised by older individuals, family members, aged care residents, staff, community visitors or government officials, they must be heard and they must be acted on. “It’s important that we shine a light on any physical, emotional or

financial abuse of our elders.” And the Minister said OPAN – which was established last year to deliver key services throughout the country – was already becoming a powerful ally for victims of elder abuse. “New figures show that OPAN had a combined 1330 information contacts and cases of people at risk of or experiencing elder abuse in its first year of operation and conducted 285 sessions to educate older Australians and service providers on elder abuse protection,” Mr Wyatt said. “The OPAN services report that the more they make their services known, the more people contact them, who often feel they have nowhere to turn to for help. “This new funding builds on the $1 million provided to OPAN to help combat elder abuse over the past year. “OPAN is using the funding to trial a national

elder abuse advocacy and prevention model of information, advocacy and education services, based on successful West Australian and South Australian elder abuse prevention programs.” Key projects include: ■ Developing national elder abuse advocacy response protocols ■ Creating a national decision making system to support older people, especially those living with dementia ■ Implementing a national elder abuse minimum dataset ■ Mapping elder abuse referral and support pathways in each state and territory ■ Researching special needs of rural and remote populations Mr Wyatt said it was imperative any victims or people looking for information sought help as quickly as possible. ■ To find out more about the services on offer go to the OPAN website or phone 1800 700 600.

The Forum For Your Two Cents Join our exclusive online community, where you’ll find other seniors ready to socialise and share. Seniors online - connecting you to an exciting retirement.

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Like us on Facebook! Visit facebook.com/seniorsnews


SENIORS \\SEPTEMBER, 2018

17

My Health Record: a mobile medical diary Wellbeing

BRAND INSIGHTS IF YOU had to describe Bill Hardy’s passions, they would be fitness, health and travel. After completing a Diploma of Fitness five years ago, the 70-year-old Gold Coaster now runs over 50s fitness classes. “I have always been interested in health, which is why I started training mature aged men and women in strength and conditioning. It’s so important that as people get older, they keep active and look after their health.” Bill’s passion for health extends to My Health Record, where he is one of six million Australians who keep a summary of their important health information securely online. “I think My Health Record is a great step forward in healthcare,” he said. “I’m going to India on my next holiday so I will need cholera, diphtheria and typhoid injections. “This information will go on My Health Record, so I know when my immunisations are due again as they can be very hard to remember.” Bill is also having ongoing checks after he was diagnosed for prostate cancer. “I know I can go to a doctor or hospital at any

ESSENTIAL: Fitness expert Bill Hardy believes My Health Record is the way of the future. time, located anywhere, and they will know my health problems and what medications I am taking,” he said. “This makes the whole process much easier and is particularly beneficial when you are travelling. I can even view My Health Record when I am overseas.” Some key things to remember about My Health Record:

■ Your important healthcare information is available in one place and accessible by your doctors, specialists or hospitals. ■ When moving interstate or travelling, your information can be viewed securely online. ■ In emergency situations, treating doctors can view information such as current medications and

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WELLBEING

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SENIORS \\SEPTEMBER, 2018

WELLBEING

PRESENTING LIMITED EDITION LUXURY BEACHSIDE APARTMENTS ON MARGATE BEACH, REDCLIFFE PENINSULA A limited number of 3 bedroom apartments starting from $899,000. Construction commenced. Selling fast.

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WHAT’S ON

SEPTEMBER, 2018// SENIORS minute of silence – a moment of peace – at noon. As United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres said “it is time all nations and all people live up to the words of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which recognises the inherent dignity and equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human race”.

What's on

TOOWOOMBA CARNIVAL OF FLOWERS

AMONGST a host of organised events, you can choose to indulge in local organic food and wine, experience local culture with live music, tour the exhibiting gardens or appreciating classic cars. Each activity is set to enliven the event and add enjoyment for visitors time in the ‘Garden City’. Arguably the highlight of the carnival is the Grand Central Floral Parade with the awe-inspiring floats and displays. But the carnival also includes an awesome program of family-friendly entertainment with everything from amazing parades to kids rides, live entertainment, kids activities, celebrity chef dinners and much more held in multiple sites in Toowoomba. On September 21-30. To find out more about the 2018 Toowoomba Carnival of Flowers, including the full program of events, go to tcof.com.au.

ART, ART, ART

TOOWOOMBA Art Society Members’ Spring Exhibition continues until September 30. It’s the group’s major event of the year at its home in Culliford House, 1 Godsall Street. Normal gallery hours apply (Tuesday to Friday 9am-noon, Saturday and Sunday 10am-2pm) until Carnival of Flowers week when it opens 10am-4pm daily. This is a selected exhibition where members submit up to three recent works which are judged for the top prize of the Fred and Anne Gardiner Award, the runner-up Nancy Culliford Prize and the Harry Hart Award for the best experimental

ANTIQUES AND RETRO

JAZZED UP: Out to Dinner is a blend of diverse individual talents playing together especially for Toowoomba Jazz Club on Friday, September 14. work. Please phone (07) 4632 5725 or go to toowoombaartsociety. com.au.

JAZZ AND BEYOND

OUT to Dinner’s members blend their diverse talents and experience just for Toowoomba, playing everything from jazz to gypsy, French cafe, world music, Brazilian bossa nova to folk, country and blues. Each member (Kay, Peter, Bill, Glenn, Ian, Tony and Chris) plays/sings in other bands, orchestras and ensembles in venues around the world but on Friday, September 14 you can catch them at the home of Toowoomba Jazz Club, North Toowoomba Bowls Club from 7.45pm (Dinner 6-7.15pm). Admission is $20 for visitors and $15 for members. Call the club to book on (07) 4639 2338 or find out more about the jazz club, phone (07) 4635 5728 or email info@toowoomba jazz.com.

SCOPE THEATRE FESTIVAL

I FRANKLY have no idea what this is going to be like – except there is an adult themes and coarse language alert – but then, that’s part of the adventure. The Scope

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COUNTRY MUSIC STAMPEDE

THE Goomburra Country Music Stampede runs from September 14-16 at Clifton Showground. This is its ninth year and performers include Graham Rodger, Owen Blundell, Terry Gordon, Alice Benfer, Rosanna Ruddick, Sharon Smith, Suburban Country and more. The venue is indoors and the cost is low. For details, phone Maggies Stokes on (07) 4666 6062 or 0434 531 768, or go to goomburracountry stampede.com. The event supports Rainbow FM 89.3 Community Radio, Mater Hospital oncology and The Oaks and Clifton Aged Care Facility.

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BONSAI SHOW

TOOWOOMBA Bonsai Group’s annual show is on Friday, September 21-Sunday, September 23 at The Rose Cottage, corner of Holberton/Pottinger Streets, Newtown. Part of the Carnival of Flowers, the show will feature more than 60 trees from 2-50 years old. Young trees will show the starting points for successfully beginning a Bonsai while the older trees display the characteristic thick trunks, gnarled branches and extensive styling. If you want to get started, there will be starter trees, pots, wire, tools, etc for sale and lots of help and advice. Entry is $3 adults. Phone 0410 944 685 or go to toowoomba bonsai.com.

MOMENT OF PEACE

THE International Day of Peace (Peace Day) has been marked around the world each year on September 21 since 1981. This year it is celebrating the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights – the most translated document in the world, available in more than 500 languages. So join people throughout the world for a

ROGER GUARD HILLY HALF

ORGANISED by the Toowoomba Road Runners on Sunday, September 23, the Roger Guard Hilly Half honours the memory of the late Roger Guard, who was an active member of the Toowoomba running community before his death, with wife Jill in the MH17 air disaster. Described as “a beautiful undulating half marathon through the leafy roads of the garden city”, starting at 6.30am at Middle Ridge Park, there are also 10km, 5km and a kids’ 1km event from 7.30am. Registration ($50) closes at 10am on Saturday, September 22 for the half, with the 10km $40, and 5km $20. Late registration from 5.30am on the day adds another $10. Go to trr.org.au.

POTTERS’ PICNIC

THE second instalment of the Potters’ Picnic is on Sunday, September 23 from 8am-4pm at the Darling Downs Potters Club, 145 West Street, Toowoomba. Entry is free and there will be works from local potters and those further afield. Food

180-YEAR REUNION

APPARENTLY there are a lot of Teys in this region, and the family, which started in Murrurundi, in the Upper Hunter region of NSW, is reuniting for the first time in 30 years to celebrate their 180th year in Australia. Organiser Narelle Palmer invites anyone connected with the family to contact her, dust off the memorabilia, and join the fun on Sunday, September 30 at Highfields Cultural Centre. There will be facilities for photocopying and scanning photos and information. Phone 0412 082 903 or email dnpalmer@bigpond.com.

GEHAM CRAFT AND GARDEN SHOW

THIS event is the annual fundraiser for the Geham State School P&C Association. Opening night September 21 from 6-8pm (bookings essential – no tickets at the door) $20 per person includes a light dinner and glass of wine/soft drink and bonus day pass for the weekend events. Main event is Saturday and Sunday, September 22-23. Adults $5, children under 12 yrs free. A huge variety of quality handmade stalls, locally grown plants and produce, arden décor and furniture, delicious food, coffee, live music, demonstrating artists and more. Group discounts (more than 10 people). Entry $4 per person or $10/person. Bookings essential. Geham State School grounds, 9625 New England Highway. Wheelchair friendly and free parking. Phone 0429 941 250 or go to gehamcraftgarden show.com.au.

The Block stars to bloom at Carnival

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Theatre Festival from 6pm on Sunday, September 16 is the brainchild of a USQ third-year student looking to open up more opportunities for emerging artists in Toowoomba. It comprises a series of 10 x 10-minute theatre pieces by current and former locals. Tickets to the event at USQ Toowoomba Concert Hall are free but limited, so find them on Trybooking and give local theatre your support to potentially make this an ongoing event.

IF antiques and all things retro are your thing, then head to Toowoomba Showgrounds on September 22-23 for the Toowoomba Antique and Retro Fair. It runs 9am-4pm Saturday and 9am-2pm Sunday. Admission is $8 for adults. Phone 0427 465 407 for details.

and drinks are available and there will be pottery throwing demonstrations on the wheel throughout the day. Go to toowoombapotter @gmail.com or phone (07) 4632 7021.

Norm Hogan and Jess Eva.

MULTI-award-winning landscaper David Franklin from The Block, along with Queensland contestants Norm and Jess join the line-up at this year’s Carnival of Flowers. Dave is a devoted landscape architect with more than 25 years of experience and will showcase his top landscaping tips and tricks at the Heritage Bank Festival of Food & Wine on Saturday, September 22 at the Toowoomba event.

Knockabout tradie Norm Hogan and his radio personality fiancé Jess Eva, representing Queensland on the current series of The Block, will also make an appearance among the petals on Saturday, September 22. Held from September 21-30, the 2018 Toowoomba Carnival of Flowers will feature a program of more than 60 unique events and experiences, including beautiful garden tours, internationally acclaimed

music acts, some of the region’s best food and wine, and a multitude of cultural and natural adventures. The real stars of the event are the 176,030 seedlings and bulbs that will bloom in the city’s parks and public spaces to create the worldfamous colour that is the ‘Carnival’. ■ Watch The Block, 7pm Sunday and Monday to Wednesday at 7.30pm on Nine, or anytime on 9Now!


21

SENIORS \\SEPTEMBER, 2018

Secret places of extraordinary beauty INSIDE

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• 3 Nights Canberra • 2 Nights Batemans Bay • Cowra Japanese Gardens • Parliament House Tour • Australian War Memorial & Last Post • Canberra Sightseeing • Braidwood Guided Tour • Mogo Zoo • Batemans Bay Cruise • Wray Street Oyster Shed Adult: $3798 Single Supplement: $965

DOWN UNDER COACH TOURS

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• 4 Nights Mudgee • 2 Nights Young • Poppa’s Fudge & Jam Factory • Western Plains Cultural Centre • McFeeters Motor Museum • Ballinclash Orchard • Bluestill Distillery • Lambing Flat Folk Museum • Mudgee Winery Tour • Mudgee Yabbi Farm Tour Adult: $3698 Single Supplement: $642

9 DAY CANBERRA BALLOON FESTIVAL Departs: 10/03/19

• 2 Nights Canberra • Pillaga Pottery • Taronga Western Plains Zoo • Age of Fishes Museum • Anzac Parade Memorial Walk • Australian War Memorial • Parliament House Tour • Goulburn Guided Tour • Darling Harbour Lunch Cruise • Slim Dusty Centre Adult: $3347 Single Supplement: $1314

15 DAY ALPINE AUTUMN EGGSTRAVAGANZA Departs: 19/04/19

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Departs: 11/05/19

• Nundle Woollen Mill • Illawarra Fly Tree Top Walk • Kiama Blowhole • Kosciuszko NP • Macenmist Truffles Adult: $5289 Single Supplement: $1314

• 2 Nights Carnarvon Gorge • Birdsville Pub & Big Red • Min Min Encounter • Longreach Sightseeing • Arcadia Valley Escape Adult: $4880 Single Supplement: $1057

11 DAY ISLANDS IN THE SUN

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Departs: 20/07/19

• Burke & Wills Dig Tree • 1770 LARC Tour • Cameron Corner • Footlights Theatre Restaurant • 4WD Ridge Top Tour, Arkaroola • Whitsunday Cruise • Depot Glen & Milparinka • Magnetic Island Tour • Wilpena Pound • Reef HQ Townsville Adult: $4498 Single Supplement: $1027 Adult: $5898 Single Supplement: $1150

I am interested in receiving your 2018 / 19 Coach Touring Brochure. Please add me to your mailing list: Name: _____________________ Address: ____________________ __________________________ P/code:______Ph: ____________ Email: _____________________ Send to: Down Under Coach Tours, PO Box 149, Maryborough Q 4650 sn0918

SPECIALISING IN SENIOR’S TRAVEL  COMPLIMENTARY DOOR TO DOOR SERVICE (Area Conditions Apply)  FULLY ACCOMMODATED TOURS info@downundercoachtours.com.au  www.downundercoachtours.com.au  www.facebook.com/downundercoachtours  Prices quoted are per person twin share


22

SEPTEMBER, 2018// SENIORS

Glorious garden tours Grand tours across Europe for those with green fingers THE ultimate green thumb’s overseas holiday would have to be travelling by ship, train and coach through European countries visiting iconic and private gardens, and famous garden shows. The grandest tour has to be APT’s Botanica World Discoveries, Grand European. The 43-day tour takes in eight countries. Departing on April 25, 2019, the tour starts in Amsterdam in time to see the glorious spring bulbs. You then sail the Rhine and Moselle rivers to Basel and onto Zurich accompanied by the London Festival Opera. From Zurich you fly to Budapest where the group boards the luxurious Danube Express train over the European Alps viewing Alpine wildflowers before arriving into Venice. Then travel from Venice to Bordeaux visiting iconic gardens and picturesque landscapes on a leisurely tour where you can enjoy unique art inclusions and watercolour tuition from our art guide. Finally, enjoy a relaxing eight day river cruise through Bordeaux visiting gardens, chateaux, art and vineyards of the region. The tour includes free business class fares with Lufthansa, with some conditions applying, if booked before October 15, 2018. The price is $42,990 per person for twin share and $55,990 for solo travellers. Other Botanica 2019 gardening tours are: ❚ Hampton Court Flower Show and Gardens of Sussex Tour, UK – this show is set on the grounds of Hampton Court Palace and is held

during the summer months. Visit this show on the eight day tour which departs on June 17. Tour price is from $5995 per person, twin share. ❚ BBC Gardeners World Live, Birmingham, UK – it’s the ‘garden party of the year’. See British and world leading gardens and garden designers. Visit this show on Botanica’s 12-day Historic Houses and Gardens of the United Kingdom Tour which departs on June 15. Tour price is $8995 per person, twin share. ❚ Dublin in Bloom Festival, Dublin, Ireland – showcasing the best of Ireland’s gardens plants, design, construction, horticulture and gardening as a hobby. You can combine a visit to this event with Chelsea Flower Show. Visit this show on Botanica’s 10-day tour which departs on May 21. Tour price is from $9995 per person, twin share. ❚ Chaumont Garden Festival, Loire Valley, France – set in magnificent castle grounds, see superb displays created by teams of artists, landscape architects and designers. Visit this show on Botanica’s 13-day Loire Valley, Dordogne and Bordeaux Chateaux gardens tour which departs on May 25. Tour price is from $13,995 per person, twin share. ❚ Bohinj Wildflower Festival, Bohinj, Croatia – travel into the hills of Slovenia to see the majestic wildflowers of the region at the Bohinj Wildflower Festival.

BOTANICA BEAUTY: Keukenhof Garden, Amsterdam.

Libourne River and bridge.

Marqueyssac Garden, France.

Dublin Flower Show.

Keukenhof Garden and Lake, Amsterdam.

Chelsea Flower Show.

Visit this show on Botanica’s 14-day Spring Wildflowers of the Italian Lakes, Slovenia and Croatian Islands Cruise which departs May 25. Tour price is from $11,995 per person, twin share. ❚ Art & Gardens in France – hosted by Brian Healey, you will travel from

where you will be accompanied by Brian and visit special art inclusions, including a tour of the famous Beaux Arts Gallery in Bordeaux, a visit to Le-Temple-sur-Lot garden where Monet painted his Les Nymphaea’s series, enjoy lectures aboard as well as opportunities for

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SENIORS \\SEPTEMBER, 2018

10 reasons to add Provence to your hit list Ann Rickard

Canals in L’isle sur la Sorgue. imposing moss-covered water wheels have been toiling since the 1200s when they were used to grind flour. It is now famous for its antique and brocante stores. Best to visit on a Sunday – market day – when the town erupts with a festive atmosphere as hundreds of stalls sell everything from French linen to giant wheels of cheese. 6. Markets. Every village, town and city puts on markets, where lanes, squares and streets become clogged with stalls and people. Even if you don’t buy a thing (you will), just wandering among the crowds with the sights and sounds of food and laughter gives a true sense of Provence. The markets are also a social occasion, to meet friends for coffee or wine, but be warned, in the bigger towns the crowds are so dense it is shoulder-to-shoulder and many locals love to take their dogs, adding to the general crush. 7. Food. Fresh fruit and vegetables, olive oil, garlic, quality meat and sublime seafood, Provence is known all over the world for its superior cuisine. In summer, cherry, peach and apricot orchards burst with fruit so sweet you will find it hard to believe. Traditional dishes include daube (beef stew) and ratatouille (we know that one). Look for the giant slabs of nougat at the markets and don’t go past the rich tapenades, probably made that morning. Green and black olive tapenade are traditional but try the anchovy tapenade for a bang-in-the-mouth hit. 8. Pont du Gard. This mighty aqueduct built by the Romans 2000 years ago to transport water from the town of Uzes to Nimes is reason alone to

visit Provence. One of France’s most popular attractions, the aqueduct crosses the Gardon River. One look and your jaw drops. Best way to see it is to kayak from the nearby town of Collias, picnic on the banks with views to the awesome structure, then kayak under it. Better still, float on your back beneath it. 9. Plane trees, poppies, lavender, sunflowers. Nothing says France more than the rows of plane trees flanking the roads. They create an avenue of leafy shade in summer and make your heart sing. In April and May wild red poppies spring from the ground everywhere and then come August the sunflowers tilt their yellow heads to the sun to create fields of blazing yellow to the horizon. Lavender begins to bloom in June and by July there are mauve carpets stretching all over the region. But no matter what month you visit Provence, the smell of lavender is in the air, with shops, boutiques and markets selling lavender products, from essential oils to little lavender bags to soaps and sprays. 10. Carriers de Lumieres. Below the village of Les Baux is perhaps the most stunning yet low-profile highlight of the region. In a vast, disused bauxite quarry, unique visual shows are projected on to the immense walls to the accompaniment of stirring music. It is usually the works of the world’s most famous artists on display – Van Gogh, Cezanne, Da Vinci in the past, this year it is Picasso. The 45-minute show is continuous, so any time you arrive is a good time. It is a spectacular experience that stays with you long after your visit.

SUPERIOR CUISINE: Enjoy cheese, seafood and meat at the markets in Provence.

Lavender everywhere in Provence.

Castle ruins of Le Baux de Provence.

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LIKE Italy’s Tuscany region, Provence in the South of France has that evocative sound to it. Stony villages, fields of vines, delicious food, copious wine and a feeling of joie-de-vivre in the air. It’s one of those destinations every traveller dreams about. Ann Rickard gives you 10 reasons why you should go as soon as possible. 1. Weather. With more than 300 days of sunshine every year, Provence is France’s sunshine capital. The summer months of June, July and August give you guaranteed sunshine. 2. Hilltop towns. Menerbes and Bonnieux became famous when Peter Mayle wrote so charmingly about them in A Year in Provence. While they are delightful with their stone houses and narrow lanes, there are no museums or galleries and only a sprinkling of cafes. Like most hilltop towns, they are fun to explore and admire but don’t expect to find a lot to do. 3. Les Baux de Provence. In the Alpilles, this village provides plenty of interest. It is a living museum, crowned by castle ruins dating back to the 10th century. Walk over the ruins, climb crumbling towers, go down to the dungeons, be awed by the reproductions of giant medieval weapons, then wander the maze of lanes in the village with their small shops and cafes, and stop in a leafy square for lunch. 4. Avignon. For 70 years during the 14th century, this town was the hub of the Roman Catholic world when the popes moved there from Rome and built the Palais des Papes (Palace of the Popes). The walled old town bustles with more shops and cafes than you could get to. Take a ride on the Petit Train, which rumbles through the town while a commentary gives you all you need to know about Avignon’s rich history. 5. I’isle sur la Sorgue. The name means “Island on the Sorgue River” and it looks so, with canals and water everywhere. Its


24

SEPTEMBER, 2018// SENIORS

‘‘

Your journey spans eight regions ranging from lush forests to craggy deserts.

A MOUNTAIN HIGH: Make hiking the Kilimanjaro in Tanzania one of the holidays on your to do list, and be in awe of nature’s beauty.

Photo: SVaP

Hike your way through Some places can only be dreams while others can become a real experience with the help of these super destination tips.

THIS month we profile destinations and experiences 45 to 41 as we count down the 2018 list of the World’s Best Journeys which we hope will inspire you to live life to the full. The top 50 bucket list has been selected by Flight Network and over 500 top travel journalists, agencies, bloggers and editors. Tighten the seat belt and let’s get you moving by putting some spring back into your forward travel plans.

HIKE THE KILIMANJARO, TANZANIA

THE seven-day Machame route up majestic Mount Kilimanjaro, the tallest mountain in Africa at 20,000 feet, begins at the Mount Kilimanjaro National Park Gate, where you’ll walk through rainforest up a winding trail. The rainforest eventually dissolves into a small valley where you traverse a rocky ridge before reaching the Shira Plateau, a land of deep

valleys and weather worn lava flows. Pass the Lava Tower, nicknamed “Shark’s Tooth” because of its angular shape, before resting at Barranco Camp. Your next stop to help acclimatise is at Karanga Camp. Continue on to Barafu Camp where you’ll prepare your mind, body and soul for the Kilimanjaro summit, which commences between midnight and 2am. This epic trek will take you between the Rebmann and Ratzel glaciers, before you take a rest at Stella Point and get rewarded by a magnificent sunrise. After reaching the highest point at Uhuru Peak, you descend to Mweka Hut and finish the following day in Moshi. Getting there: the trip begins and ends at the Kilimanjaro International Airport in Tanzania which serves Arusha and Moshi. As you must be part of a guided tour for this adventure, your tour company will help advice you about travel arrangements from the airport.

HIKE THE JORDAN TRAIL, JORDAN

GAIN an education in Jordanian terrain, archaeology and religious relevance by embarking on this 650km hike that takes about 40 days. Your journey spans eight regions, ranging from lush forests to craggy deserts. Lace up your hiking shoes in Umm Qais then head south toward your final destination of Aqaba. Along the way you’ll encounter 52 villages allowing you to peel back the layers of this culture by tasting local cuisine, interacting with villagers and even spending the night in homestays. Highlights of the trail include jagged cliffs overlooking the Jordan Rift Valley, the rose-red city of Petra, and the towering sandstone mountains of Wadi Rum. Be sure to pack your bathing suit as you’ll be passing the Red Sea, whose crystal clear waters take on an orange-red hue when seasonal algae blooms. This warm sea is home to the world’s fastest fish,

the solitary sailfish, and has a thriving biodiversity, thanks in large part to its coral reef ecosystem. Significant historical sites, such as the ruins of the ancient church of Mar Elias and the Islamic castle of Ajloun will also be encountered on the route. Getting there: You will to fly into Jodan’s main airport, Queen Alia International Airport. From that airport a taxi is the most direct mode of transport to Umm Qais, which is about 2.5 hours away. The trailhead is located at the basalt ruins of the Decapolis of Um Qais. Be sure to plan your hike ahead of time, or hire one of the many local guide companies who can help you make the most of this trail, or check out the volunteer run Jordan Trail Association which offers an annual through-hike.

HIKE THE FRANCIGENA WAY, EUROPE SPANNING centuries of history and endless kilometres of

mountainscapes, the Francigena Way hike covers over 2000km from Canterbury to Rome and takes anywhere from 100-200 days, depending on how quickly you travel. This pilgrimage will carry you through England, France, Switzerland and Italy, with famous stop points such as Dover Castle, Notre Dame, Piazza del Campo Siena and Cathedral of Saints Peter and Francis. You journey through soft grass, stone stairways carved into mountain sides and thriving vineyards interspersed with time in grand cities such as Reims (France), Lausanne (Switzerland) and Rome (Italy). You can pause at any time to savour a special village or flower-covered field. At the end you can celebrate completing this hike-of-a-lifetime by tossing a coin into Rome’s Trevi Fountain and enjoying a Pizza Bianca from one of the city’s many bakeries. Getting there: You need to get to Canterbury by bus or train once arriving


25

SENIORS \\SEPTEMBER, 2018

Hike the Jordan Trail, Jordan and experience bedouin camels as they rest near the treasury Al Khazneh carved into the rock at Petra, Jordan.

Photo: DeSid

The Ancient Franceta Gate in the medieval town of Sutri.

Photo: davidf

Photo: Crisfotolux

Bushwalk in the spectacular Australian Blue Mountains.

this healthy bucket list in London. The Francigena Way starts beside the south porch of Canterbury Cathedral, at the kilometre zero stone. From the Cathedral, turn left onto Burgate and walk along Church Street and Longport, beside St Augustine’s Abbey. After passing North Holmes Road and St Martin’s Church, turn right onto Pilgrim’s Way and begin to follow the signs for the North Downs Way. Now, keep putting one foot in front of the other, allowing a trusty guidebook to support you the rest of the way.

BUSHWALK THE BLUE MOUNTAINS, AUSTRALIA A CAPTIVATING 3861 square miles of towering eucalyptus trees, sandstone cliffs and native bushland are waiting to be explored. Because of its intricate beauty, the best way to journey through this land is on foot. The seven day hike starts in Mount Victoria where you can spend the day in a historical pub or an art gallery.

Relax on board the Shinkansen Bullet Train, Japan. A few highlights of the trek include the secret grotto and rhododendron gardens at Mount Piddington, the cascading Bridal Veil Falls and Pulpit Rock lookout at Popes Glen, and the curious rock formation of Ruined Castle in the Jamison Valley. Aboriginal legend is mixed into your trip when you lay eyes on Three Sisters, a massive trilogy of rocky peaks that are said to have been three

sisters that were turned to stone. To reach the Three Sisters you’ll need to ascend Giant Stairway. Once your well-worked legs have descended the stairs you get to spend the night in the quaint village of Leura. Your last walk in the Blue Mountains will be National Pass walk, which leads into a mystical rainforest gorge. Getting there: The closest major airport to

Photo: blanscape

Mount Victoria is Sydney. From there you can reach Mount Victoria by taking a 2.5 hour train ride from Sydney’s Central Station, or rent a car and follow the M4 highway.

RELAX ON BOARD THE SHINKANSEN BULLET TRAIN, JAPAN

Reaching a maximum speed of 320km/h, the lightning-fast Shinkansen Bullet Train offers travelers a ride of a

lifetime. With the ability to tilt on turns, the needle-nosed Shinkansen is a thrilling way to travel. Known for its aerodynamic design and sleek rails providing ultra-smooth rides, the bullet train’s innovative, wing-shaped form helps to reduce wind resistance at high speeds. Boarding the train in Tokyo, after exploring everything from the modern glittering skyscrapers to its historic

temples, adventurers can take the Shinkansen to the popular city of Kyoto for a picturesque journey along towering mountains and flower-drenched valleys. Departing from the train, visitors can explore Kyoto’s timeless, island culture and a region draped in Japanese tradition. Peruse Kyoto’s Buddhist temples, imperial palaces and Shinto shrines before hopping on the Shinkansen and rambling on to your next destination. Getting there: With countless airlines serving Asia it’s easy to get to Tokyo. Once at Narita Airport the most cost effective way to get the city, which is 66km away, is to go by limousine bus which departs four times an hour and the fastest way is by boarding the Narita Express. Make your way to the Shinkansen by taking the Keikyu Rail Line to Shinagawa when you’re ready for your trip on the Bullet Train.


26

SEPTEMBER, 2018// SENIORS

Floriade adopts pop theme RETRO inspired flowerbeds will part of the annual colourful spring Floriade festival to be held in Canberra from September 15 to October 14. Marilyn Monroe and Michael Jackson will star alongside the likes of Grug and Where’s Wally, the Rubik’s Cube and even Ken Done, as visitors go on a trip down memory lane through the pop culture. Floriade each year focuses on exciting, diverse and innovative programs. This year will be no different with a line-up that is nothing short of blooming wonderful. Visitors will be treated to an exciting array of flowerbeds showcasing some of the 20th Century’s most iconic figures in music, film, literature and social media. Food, glorious food to tantalise the tastebuds with produce from Canberra and the surrounding region will have visitors coming back for more than one visit. During school holidays, there will be lots of

SPRING TRAVEL: Canberra’s Floriade will burst to life this month. activities for the grandkids. Imagine enjoying your visit on a Sunday afternoon, picnicking at Jazz in the Park with special guests including the uber-talented Emma Pask.

For the aspiring or avid green thumbs there are many workshops at The Greenhouse interactive venue. The fun doesn’t stop when the sun goes down. NightFest, Floriade’s ticketed after-dark

experience, returns for five nights from September 26 until September 30. Commonwealth Park will come to life after dark with illuminated flowerbeds, a line-up of local and drink food stalls,

Photo: Floriade Australia

nightly entertainment and dazzling lighting installations making NightFest an absolute must in 2018. On the Wednesday night, Stage 88 transforms into an open-air cinema, while

Thursday and Friday nights see musicians hit the stage as the music flows through the flowerbeds including Caiti Baker, Bowie Unzipped featuring Jeff Duff and Kate Miller-Heidke. Saturday night will be time to don the dance shoes for Party NightFest. The park switches to party mode with Cell Block 69. Finishing off this weekend will be a night of laughs as MA15+ Comedy NightFest returns with Arj Barker, Akmal Saleh, The Stevenson Experience, Chris Ryan and Matt Okine. Floriade wraps up on October 14 with Dogs’ Day Out, featuring a superhero dress up pop culture theme. All pups, big and small, are invited to soak up the sunshine and explore Floriade with special pup-friendly activities and entertainment throughout the day. Dress up with your best friend to go in the draw to win the Best Dressed Award. For more, go to floriadeaustralia.com.

Discover a hidden gem on the Sunshine Coast Geoff Crockett WHEN it comes to choosing a great place to stay in Australia that’s by the beach, close to a regional airport, and offers great access to all the comforts of home and more, Alexandra Headlands on the Sunshine Coast is well worth a look. Just south of the growing Sunshine Coast CBD at Maroochydore, Alexandra Headlands is home to a great surf club with ocean views and an amazing stretch of uninterrupted sand that lets you hit the beach and walk for miles. Ideally located for families of all shapes and sizes looking to enjoy the mix of sand, surf, shopping and dining along the coastal strip the area has a wide range of accommodation options including Oaks Seaforth Resort which has a tropical holiday feel all year around. As a father, with two primary school children under the age of 10, the resort ticked the boxes on the entertainment front and is now on the list as a potential Christmas holiday venue, where in

COAST GETAWAY: Oaks Seaforth Alexandra Headlands. our family it’s not unusual for grandparents, aunts and uncles to all converge from around the country at one resort for a couple of weeks during the holiday season. While it’s fair to say that in early August the lagoon pools were a little chilly for my 6 and 10-year-old girls, they still tried them out and posed underneath the waterfall before heading across to the heated lap pool and

bath-like spa for a good few hours of fun. Give it a month and we’d never get them out of there. And the pool came after a few hours at the beach making sandcastles, collecting shells and enjoying the 24 degree day that is winter on the Sunshine Coast. The Oaks Seaforth Resort grounds offer plenty of break outs and barbecue areas which

Photo: Contributed

would be great for a longer stay – not to mention a well-appointed gym and easy access to a wide variety of restaurants, a pub, and a convenience store on the same block. Inside there’s plenty to like about the selfcontained apartments. We stayed in two bedroom apartment, with ocean views, and one of the first things that jumped out was the

generosity of the spaces on offer. The two bathrooms are giant, with a spa being a welcome added bonus in the ensuite. The kitchen was well appointed and the storage space available in the walk-in robe and wardrobes made it easy to imagine moving in for a few weeks, unpacking the bags and being able to treat the space like home – without tripping over the

suitcases. The Oaks Seaforth Resort offers a total of 87 apartments across one, two and three bedroom apartment configurations. There’s free parking underneath the building, air-conditioning in all rooms and it’s just 7km to Sunshine Coast Airport. For a beachside holiday, it offers the best of both worlds. Relaxation and access to all the mod cons if needed. Leave the car at home and walk across the road and you’re on the sand. If it’s raining the movies and shopping at Sunshine Coast Plaza are only 3km away – not to mentioned the trendy dining options on Ocean Street, Maroochydore. Noosa’s a 35 minute drive to the north, and Australia Zoo, made famous by Steve Irwin, is even closer than that to the west. Oaks operates 48 hotels across Australia and its handy website at www.oakshotels.com has pages full of deals every day. Phone 13 62 57 for more information. The writer spent a night as a guest of Oaks Seaforth.


THE GHAN EXPERIENCE 6 DAYS, 13th April 2019

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Experience the 3 Day GHAN Adelaide to Darwin. Regarded as one of the world’s greatest rail journeys, The Ghan delivers so much more than an extended train ride. It promises access to parts of Australia no other holiday can come close to - the perfect balance of comfort and adventure culminating in a once in a life time experience.

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TOTAL TASMANIA 11 DAYS, 20th March & 26th Oct 2019

This amazing tour covers all the highlights of Tasmania including Hobart, Port Arthur, Queenstown, Dove Lake, Cradle Mountain, Gordon River, Stanley, Davenport, Launceston, Tamar Valley, St Helens, Bicheno, Frycinet National Park, Richmond, plus much more !!!!

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Yamba & Byron Bay Short Break - 4 Days, Departs 3rd / 10th March 2019

Travel to Cabarita Beach through to Bangalow before arriving at Yamba. Then visiting the seaside village of Iluka and then Cruising the Clarence River. Traveling then down to picturesque village of Brooms Head, Maclean then onto Angourie. Then through Evans Head,Woodburn and finish at Bryon Bay before heading back to Brisbane

Uluru - Field of Light Olgas & Alice Springs $3790* 7 Days - 29 May & 14 Aug 2019 *PP Twin Share, Single $550 Visiting ULURU Cultural Including Flights ex BNE Centre, Ranger-Guided Mala Walk. Heading to Kata Tjuta National Park & The Olgas Field Of Light Experience is spectacular. Touring Alice Springs. Exploring MacDonnell Ranges & Simpsons Gap

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Majestic River Murray, 10 Days, 23rd Apr 2019 A Wonderful 10 day Tour of the Murray River by Coach Albury to Adelaide including 5 Paddle Steamers & Cruises Yarrawonga, Echuca, Euston Swan Hill, Mildura, Renmark Loxton, Goolwa, Victor Harbour The Kimberly & Beyond 11 Days, 18th July 2019 Darwin Discovery Tour Dinner Cruise Katherine Gorge Cruise, Lake Argyle, Zebra Mine Tour, Bungle Bungles Hidden Valley, Ord River Cruise & Geikie Gorge Cruise, Halls Creek, Chamberlain Gorge, Fitzroy Crossing, Broome Discovery Tours Cable Beach Eccentric Lightining Ridge 5 days - 6 May & 16 Sept 2019 Fossick for your own treasure on lands that 100 million years ago were inhabited by dinosaurs and ancient forests, a stone’s throw from the discovery one of the world’s most large and valuable uncut black opals. This is, Lightning Ridge.

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$1540 P/P-TS* Single Supp + $400 *Plus Discount Rail

$1490 P/P-TS* Single Supp + $390

This unique tour visits lots of amazing places and attractions. Cowboys at Texas Longhorn Ranch, Historical Charters Towers, Caves at the incredible Undara Lava Tubes and Castle Ruins of Paronella Park.

Hunter Valley Rose Spectacular & Xmas Lights, 8 Days, 1st November. Enjoy the Hunter Valley Rose Spectacular, the beautiful Jacaranda Festival & the famous HVG Christmas Lights.

Cairns Xmas Capers, 8 Days, 21st December. Cairns, Kuranda, Port Douglas, Mossman Gorge, Daintree River Cruise, Sky Rail, Reef Casino Xmas Lunch, Dundess Restaurant, Harbour Cruise

A Golden Coast Xmas, 5 Days, 23rd December. Gold Coast, Broadwater Cruise, Mermaid Beach, Tweed River Cruise, Xmas Day Lunch at The Star Casino, Coolangatta, Byron Bay, Mt Tambourine, Lunch at St Bernards with magical views over the Gold Coast.

CALL NOW: (07) 5510 8958 www.greatvalueholidays.com.au info@greatvalueholidays.com.au 6711937ai


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SEPTEMBER, 2018// SENIORS

Blossom into Japan spring

BLOSSOMING ADVENTURE: Experiencing a sea of trees showing off bright pink flowers is well worth adding to the list. Photo: Contributed

NOWHERE on the planet do the modern and the ancient co-exist more harmoniously than in Japan. Kimono-clad ladies chatter on futuristic phones while blurring by on the fastest trains in the world; thousandyear-old Zen temples are dwarfed by seas of skyscrapers; and neon signs are reflected in flooded rice paddies. This fascinating country provides a sensory cultural overload, delivered in the most gracious and polite manner. The arrival of cherry blossoms, locally known as Sakura, are an important part of

Japanese culture. Symbolising new beginnings and hope, their fleeting beauty is also a key characteristic representing human life, transience and nobleness. Adding to their magic and mystique, the Sakura are usually only in full bloom for a short time in spring. According to text from the 8th century, the tradition of Hanami, or flower viewing parties, have been held since at least the 3rd century, and is still an event of important cultural significance for Japanese people today. It is common to see people having picnics

under the cherry blossom trees during the day or admiring the blossoms by lantern light at night, which is a magical sight. If Japan is on your bucket list, spring is a great time of year to visit. HANDY HINT: Next year Go See Touring will host an 11-day escorted tour to Japan for the Cherry Blossoms, departing Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne March 31, 2019. The tour price is $7650 per person share twin, including return airfares. For full tour details, go to goseetouring.com or contact one of their friendly staff on info@ goseetouring.com or phone 1300 551 997.

Let’s spring into a flowerful adventure local street food and fine dining, but also new and innovative dining concepts at all price ranges. From savoury carrot cake to Hainan chicken rice and knock-your-socks- off curries, Singapore’s hawker centres are cheap, cheerful and unforgettable. A melting pot of ethnic diversity, the many centres – Maxwell Road, Newton and Lau Pa Sat are reliably good – are always buzzing with locals swarming around stalls selling steaming bowls of noodles and ocean-fresh seafood. Fans chug overhead, plastic plates clatter, Tiger beer bottles clink and fizz – now that’s fine dining.

NATURAL ART: Visit the stunning Gardens by the Bay in Singapore on your next trip. For retail therapy, the GSS, Great Singapore Sale, happens yearly between June and August and offers plenty of shopping opportunities. One of the newest kids on the shopping block is ION Orchard, about 400 retail outlets sprawling

over numerous levels and underground passages. Go See Touring has two very special escorted tours to Singapore in 2019. Join Australian musicians Rodney Vincent, Graeme Hugo and Fortunato Isgro on an eight day

Singapore Showcase Tour depart- ing March 2, 2019. This tour features two fabulous concerts by these entertainers. Price $3999 per person share twin (Ex Bne, Syd, Mel). For food lovers the eight day Singapore Food

Photo: Tilt Pte Ltd

Festival Tour (departing Bne, Syd, Mel) on July 21, 2019 is sure impress. For a full itinerary, go to goseetouring.com or contact one of the friendly staff via email info@ goseetouring.com or phone 1300 551 997.

Congratulations to our Winners

Congratulations to the winners of our July Book Club Giveaway. Elva Bell

Jennifer Mangan

Kerry Fenton

Gail Sloan

Jerry Patterson

Sue Dade

Ian Newberry

Jo-Anne Chapman

Susan Cheung

Stay tuned to the paper and our website for the latest Seniors News Giveaways Visit seniorsnews.com.au/competitions 6865582aa

A FLOWER Dome, Supertrees, Dragonfly Lake and Cloud Forests. No, it’s not the set of Ridley Scott’s next film, but rather Singapore’s freshly minted Gardens by the Bay. Spanning 101 hectares, the gardens are a showcase for horticultural artistry. Living plants aside, all 700,000 of them, the waterfront park features man-made trees stretching 50m into the sky with steel trunks and illuminated wire rods for branches providing nightly sound and light shows with plenty of drama. Today, Singapore is widely acclaimed as a global capital for culinary innovation, encompassing not only


SENIORS \\SEPTEMBER, 2018

29

Community group guide

Community notes

TO ALLOW for readers’ requests for the publication of more neighbourhood news, please keep notices short and to the point (100 word maximum). If you would like to submit a photo ensure it is at least 180dpi or 500kb to 1mb in size and of faces, in a nice bright setting. Email editor@seniorsnewspaper.com.au.

Garden City – Toowoomba Branch WE WILL meet on Monday, September 17 at Drayton Bowls Club, corner of Ball and Gipps Streets at 9.30am. Cost $7, Visitors welcome. Guest speaker will be Jeff Powell from the Cobb & Co Museum Our monthly bus trip will be to the Boggo Road Gaol and a River Cat Ride on Tuesday, September 25. For more information, phone Hazel on (07) 4635 4519. Toowoomba OUR Branch meets for morning tea on the first Thursday of the month at All Seasons Function Centre, corner of North and Tor Streets, Wilsonton from 9.30am. Lucky door and raffle prizes to be won. October 4 we are having a rep from the Bone Clinic. We have a bus trip on the third Thursday of the month, regrettably our September trip is full. Our next trip on the October 18 is to the Queensland Tennis Centre. For information, phone Desma on (07) 4613 6750 or Yvonne (07) 4638 5252.

SPRING FAIR

OUR Saviour’s Spring Fair will be held on Saturday, October 20 from 7am-1pm, corner of West and Alderley Streets, Harristown. Cakes, goodies, preserves, sweets, craft, second-hand clothes and books, garage sale items, plants, ice blocks and drinks. Browse and buy while you enjoy morning tea and/or a sausage. For

more information, phone Shirl on (07) 4630 1104.

TOOWOOMBA PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP

THE October meeting will be at 11.30am in the Community Meeting Rooms, Level 3, Toowoomba Regional Library, Victoria Street on Thursday, October 4. Our guest speaker for the meeting will be Rachel Jeffrey. Rachel holds the position of Member Services Officer at Parkinson’s Queensland Incorporated. She will be able to inform us of PQI’s latest activities and what will be of interest to us as a support group in the future. Rachel will also give us some first-hand insights into the Cambodian Odyssey 11-day cycle adventure challenge from Siem Reap to Phnom Penh last year which raised funds for Parkinson’s Queensland to continue its important work. A shared lunch will be available as usual. Phone Jan Barrett (07) 4635 4844 or Patricia Stevens (07) 4564 9353 for any further information.

DANCE FOR PARKINSON’S

THREE years of determined effort has at last paid off for the Toowoomba Parkinson’s Support Group. The group is thrilled to have finally achieved regular Dance for Parkinson’s sessions in Toowoomba. A local ballet teacher has trained as a specialist Dance for Parkinson’s teacher and in July commenced sessions weekly at the Radiance

WEdnEsday 17th OctObEr

SPRING TIME: Toowoomba Clivia Society club members (from left) Graham Cottee, Felix Loh, Chief Operating Officer of Gardens by the Bay in Singapore with club members Greg Anderson and Ray Robinson. Dance Academy. To date, 20 people have attended the classes regularly and are surprised just how much they are getting from the sessions. Joe Chalmers, who was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease nine years ago, says he is amazed just how much the dance works his body. Another dance regular, June Whelan, has said how the dancing also gives her mind a workout. “Remembering the order of moves is a real challenge and I think that it is great exercise for the brain – not only for People with Parkinson’s but also for anyone as they get older!” Participants have found that the classes are structured to cater for those with a range of mobility issues. Movements can be performed seated, progressing to supported or free movement options across the dance floor.

CAR BOOT SALE

ST STEPHENS & Middle

Ridge Uniting Church Combined Mission Committee will hold a car boot sale on Saturday, October 6 from 7-11.30am at 264 Stenner Street. Proceeds will go to Buy a Bale to help our struggling farmers. Come and browse a variety of stalls, have a sizzled sausage, or de-clutter and have your own site for $15. Phone Sandra on (07) 4636 9814.

COBB+CO MUSEUM

HANGING Basket display on Friday, September 21 to Sunday, September 30. Surround yourself with a spectacular display of 60 hanging baskets in the Museum Show ring. Each basket was lovingly created in an Alice in Wonderland theme by community members as part of design competition. Supported by Yates. The museum is located at 27 Lindsay Street, Toowoomba and open 9.30am-4pm daily.

TOOWOOMBA CLIVIA SOCIETY INC.

THE Clivia show is on at the TAFE horticultural pavilion (behind the Cobb & Co museum). Entrance via Campbell Street, opposite the botanical gardens. It will be held during the Carnival of Flowers week from Friday, September 21 – Wednesday, September 26 at 9am-5pm daily. Admission by gold coin. Inquiries with Kerry on 0437 533 982 or Gary on 0407 336 940 or go to toowoombaclivia society.com.au. Mr Felix Loh led a delegate of dignitaries to Toowoomba and was hosted by the Toowoomba Regional Council. They were impressed by our clivias and purchased some very special ones to plant in their gardens in Singapore.

56TH ANNUAL ROSE FESTIVAL

THE St. Mark’s Women’s Guild’s 56th

Annual Rose Festival is on Friday, October 12 in St Mark’s Parish Hall off Grafton Street, Warwick. The Guild celebrates its 70th birthday, having been reformed in March 1948 following the war years, and our Parish Church of St Mark, celebrates 150 years since the laying of its foundation stone. Competition schedules detailing the five competition sections with cash prizes and five perpetual trophies are available from St Mark’s Church or Office, warwickanglican.org.au or email sue.nalder@ gmail.com. No charge to enter competition with entries to be submitted between 8.30-10.30am. The Trophy and Prize Presentation commences at 1.30pm with entertainment, raffle, cent sale and delicious afternoon tea and a lucky door prize all for $10 entry. Phone Joyce on (07) 4661 1938 or Sue 0427 962 281.

Win Tickets to A Special Screening Thanks to Event Cinemas, we’re giving away 10 double passes for readers to attend the Seniors Morning Tea and Screening of the new film ‘First Man’ from 10am on Wednesday 17th October.^

On the heels of their six-time Academy Award®-winning smash, La La Land, Oscar®-winning director Damien Chazelle and star Ryan Gosling reteam for Universal Pictures’ First Man, the riveting story of NASA’s mission to land a man on the moon, focusing on Neil Armstrong and the years 1961-1969. A visceral, first-person account, based on the book by James R. Hansen, the Tickets $10* for Cinebuzz for Seniors Members. movie will explore the sacrifices and the cost—on Armstrong and on the nation—of one of the most dangerous missions in history. Sign up to be a member for free online at

eventcinemas.com.au Tickets for this screening on sale now!

Enter online at seniorsnews.com.au/competitions

*Online booking fees apply. ^Visit seniorsnews.com.au/competitionterms for full competition terms and conditions. Promoter is ARM Specialist Media Pty Ltd of 2 Newspaper Place, Maroochydore Qld 4558. Promotional period 03/09/18-28/09/18. Competition drawn 10am 01/10/18 at Cnr Mayne Rd and Campbell St, Bowen Hills, Qld 4006. Winners announced in Seniors November Editions 2018. Total prize value $200.00 (including GST). Entry is open to all permanent residents of Queensland, residing in the Gold Coast, Sunshine Coast, Brisbane and Toowoomba Seniors distribution areas and NSW in the Northern NSW, Central Coast and Coffs & Clarence Seniors distribution areas. NSW Permit Number LTPM/18/03133

6865286aa

NATIONAL SENIORS AUSTRALIA


30

SEPTEMBER, 2018// SENIORS

The more we age, the more we save

Money

Tony Kaye MOVING from employment into retirement is one of the most stressful financial stages in life, but it may be surprising to learn that the older we get the more we tend to save. That’s one of the findings from actuarial services provider Milliman in a new report, which suggests that retirees’ age is just as strong an indicator of behaviour as income levels. It casts doubt on common benchmarks, such as using a percentage of one’s final salary as a retirement savings target, which makes little allowance for lifestyle changes. Of course, some of us will spend more in retirement and others less. Some will run out of superannuation money and need to rely on the Age Pension. Yet, the Milliman Retirement Expectations and Spending Profiles (ESP) report shows that the median retired couple’s expenditure falls by more than one-third (36.7 per cent) as they move from early retirement (age 65-69) and into older age (85 years and beyond). Interestingly, this new analysis includes the latest census income data and shows that poor, middle-income and high-income retirees all show similar declines in expenditure throughout retirement. The research tracks personal income (using census data) against

RETIREMENT SAVING: The older we get, the more we tend to save. expenditure (using the Milliman Retirement ESP) for low-income retirees (annual income below $33,800). While expenditure briefly peaks above income just before retirement in their early 60s, it quickly tapers off into older age. These low-income earners actually earn their highest lifetime incomes through retirement, earning more as they age. This is largely due to the support of the government Age Pension.

Middle-income retirees (annual income between $33,800 and $91,000) also show similar declining expenditure (although their expenditure never exceeds income). Their peak spending – as a proportion of their income – is reached in their late 60s. At this point, average incomes are sitting at around $54,000, and spending is at a little over $30,000. Similarly, high-income earners (annual income

above $91,000) are also saving money into retirement. Their spending drops from a peak figure of around $80,000 a year at about age 50, to around $65,000 in the late 60s, to around $38,000 once they hit age 85. The Milliman research shows that while wealthier retirees spend more in absolute terms, all three groups are saving money in retirement to greater and lesser degrees. The Milliman Retirement ESP provides

Photo: Wavebreakmedia

the most accurate possible picture of retiree behaviour by tracking changes in the real-world expenditure of more than 300,000 older Australians. It shows that the average proportion of income spent on housing, food, energy, leisure, goods and services, travel and insurance either declines slightly, or remains the same, regardless of income levels, through retirement. Only expenditure on healthcare increases.

Travel is the biggest loser as we age and lose mobility, falling from about eight per cent of spending to below four per cent. Yet, while overall spending declines, there are still significant variations between the lowest and highest earners in terms of how money is spent. There are also important expenditure trends under way, with home ownership levels declining in Sydney and Melbourne while energy prices are escalating quickly. Milliman consultant Jeff Gebler said although energy represents a small proportion of overall household expenditure, the amount spent is significantly correlated to income levels: higher income households have more expensive (and energy-consuming) lifestyles. Energy expenditure increases until about age 65 and then stabilises before rising from age 80 (this may be because elderly Australians spend more time at home and want to feel more comfortable rather than moving into aged care accommodation). All this data is interesting, but it has some practical implications as well. For one thing, superannuation funds and other financial product groups should be using it to design products to better meet the long-term income needs of retirees. Tony Kaye is the Editor of Eureka Report, which is owned by InvestSMART. www.investsmart.com.au.

Wills Estate Planning Enduring Powers of Attorney Expert Legal Advice WITH THE PERSONAL TOUCH Looking for legal assistance? Turn to James Madden of Madden & Co, Solicitors of Toowoomba. With extensive experience in all areas of practice, he’ll work with you to help you get the outcome you want.

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admin@maddenco.com.au

BOOK YOUR FREE CONSULTATION TODAY. CR118370AA

516 RUTHVEN STREET, TOOWOOMBA 4639 4488 0402 807 230


SENIORS \\SEPTEMBER, 2018

CLASSIFIEDS

31

To advertise, call 1300 136 181 or visit finda.com.au to view more ads online. Tributes

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Buy & Sell

Trades & Services

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Health - Professional Practitioners

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Briese Lawyers is a dynamic firm based in Toowoomba offering a wealth of legal experience to its valued clients.

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Food & Beverage Indoor Vogue Walker

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Southern Cross

C101 Riser Recliner

(CHP197050)

Awnings & Blinds

Be wary if the number in the ad is disconnected. If the buyer/seller says the number is disconnected because they are overseas, ask for a landline phone number at their current location as well as a mobile phone number. All contact details of the person buying or selling the car should be verified to ensure they are genuine.

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Buyers should be cautious when dealing with car sellers that are overseas and should always arrange to view the vehicle prior to the transfer of any money.

Dr med dent (Berne, Switzerland), Phd, Specialist SSRD

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Baby Naming Renewal of Vows Funerals Commitments Presentations

RH

All caravans wanted We come to you All areas, Cash today!

BEWARE OF SCAMS

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Public Notices

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Why Pay More?


32

CLASSIFIEDS

SEPTEMBER, 2018// SENIORS

Trades & Services

Right at Home Darling Downs Suite 3, 475 Ruthven St, Toowoomba PO Box 7107, Toowoomba South, Qld 4350

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finda Bargain!

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Ph: Craig: 0401 502 679

10% Discount for Seniors

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Rural Services Suppliers of: • All rural needs • Pet Food • Stock feed • Hay and Chaff • Seed, chemical and fertilizer

• Animal supplements and medications • Agronomic and nutritional services • Fencing supplies • Horse rugs, dog coats and much more...

Olsens Produce

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106 Mulgowie Road

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Member: Master Builders - Fully Insured

PHONE

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• Licenced Water Proofer

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• General property maintenance and services

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QBCC 15012144

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www.serviceandrepairwastewatersystems.com

0449 662 959

Call us today on 07 4616 3100 to discuss your tailored home care services.

• $695 Supervised pump-out

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Phone, Text or Book Online!

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SENIORS \\SEPTEMBER, 2018

BETTER DRIVING

33

GET THERE SAFELY: Taking a moment to learn about being a safer driver can help seniors stay in their cars for longer.

Top driving tips for seniors

Tracey Johnstone EVEN though you have probably been driving for countless years, taking a moment to learn what you could do to be a safer driver could save a life – and that life could be yours. University of the Sunshine Coast senior research fellow Dr Bridie Scott-Parker offers some top tips for better driving. Drivers: ■ Keep your distance by staying at least four seconds behind the vehicle in front of you. “It gives us time to stop if

the person in front suddenly stops and it gives you extra space to stop if there is someone right behind your car,” Dr Scott-Parker said. ■ Retain the four-second gap even when you are driving around town. ■ Recognise and be aware of road hazards, such as roundabouts, weather conditions, a variety of road users such as motorcycles or trucks, and the rules around merging, overtaking and tailgating. ■ Always look behind before you reverse. ■ If you struggle to see behind your car when

reversing or when you are changing lanes, find out what you can do to modify your car so you can see clearly, such as bigger mirrors. ■ Be conspicuous by ensuring your driving lights are on when driving at night. Just because your dashboard automatically lights up when you start your car doesn’t mean your headlights have come on as well. ■ If you have cataracts, don’t drive at night as headlights can make it difficult to see. ■ Take the time to plan your day carefully so you

aren’t feeling pressured to speed to get to an appointment. Also plan for roadwork delays and traffic, and slow down. ■ Stay up to date on the road rules. ■ Ask yourself – do you need to drive or could you catch a bus or car pool. Pedestrians: If you prefer to walk somewhere you still need to know the road rules. “Look left and right before you cross the road,” Dr Scott-Parker said. “If you are a pedestrian, never cross the road until you have made contact with the driver, such as

eye contact, smiling or a little wave. Don’t assume because the driver has looked at you that they have actually seen you. “Their brain might be on something completely different. Keep looking left and right as you are crossing the road and when you get to the other side, hopefully the driver is there waiting for you. “Again, give a little smile, a little wave and have that eye contact.” When walking at dusk or at night, wear a reflective vest or top so drivers can see you. Passengers: Seniors should delegate some

co-driving tasks to their passengers. “It’s not nagging, it’s co-driving,” Dr Scott-Parker said. “Look left and right if the car is pulling up to a stop sign. Don’t just let the driver be responsible, they might miss something. “It can be a little tricky though if you have a husband who for 50 years has ignored everything you have said and doesn’t want you to contribute. “That’s when our wonderful ladies can say, ‘I’m not nagging. Dr Bridie said I am co-driving’.”

Teach yourself to store car keys safely

HIDE THEM: Thieves have discovered retirement villages are a fertile ground for finding unlocked cars, garage openers and keys in plain view. Photo: Photobac

DON’T assume that living in a retirement village means your car will be safe from thieves. There was a time when you could park and leave your car unlocked and it would safe. Not any more, says detective Senior Sergeant Daren Edwards, of Queensland Police Service. Thieves have discovered retirement villages are a fertile ground for finding unlocked cars, garage openers and keys in plain view inside a house. “They can go into those

communities and it’s generally not a place where you have police circling around or a lot of people movement,” Sen Sgt Edwards said. “People also leave their remotes in the car and then the crooks use it to unlock the garage and then they are in the house. “And everyone used to have a key rack for their keys. Offenders just look through the window and see the keys sitting there. “We recently had a chap lose his vehicle while it was parked in his

retirement village in Noosa. He had left both the fob keys on the floor of the car.” Sen Sgt Edwards also wants seniors living in rural areas or on acreage to stop being lax about their car’s and potentially their own security. He recommends to all seniors it’s time to change their habits: ■ Park your car inside the garage, rather than on the driveway. ■ Lock your car when parked inside your garage or the carport, or on the street.

■ Leave the car keys in a safe place and out of sight, not in the car. ■ Put a message in your mobile phone, such as a phone contact called Car, with the location of where you have stored your car keys. ■ Tell a friend, family member or neighbour where you are safely storing your car keys, in case you forget their hiding place. ■ Put your keys at the back of a drawer, not at the front where a thief can easily see them.


34

NEWS

SEPTEMBER, 2018// SENIORS

Super spring tips from our local gardeners

Thanks to our passionate local gardeners, this month we share just a few of their top spring planting tips... GWEN BARNES, 66, TWEED HEADS

SPRINGTIME for roses means feeding, says Gwen. She recommends before you start that you remove all the mulch you put on in winter to protect the plants. Gwen says if you leave it on they could end up with root rot or with little nasties crawling around that you don’t want. Then create air flow around the base of the plants. If you find your roses

have developed scale, spray them with eco oil. This is the time when roses are on their way to fabulous blooming and need lots of nutritional

GRAHAM RUSHTON, 75, BUNDABERG

IT’S time to compost to boost the efficiency of the garden, before starting your spring planting. Graham’s compost has leaves from trees in his garden, dead headed flowers and any other plants around the garden that need to be recycled. To make it Graham uses his lawnmower. He

spreads everything out on a small patch of grass and then uses the lawnmower to cut it up to make the compost. Because he has chickens he also adds

KAY NESBITT, 71, GOLD COAST

KAY’S succulents are her passion. They are easy to grow, fairly hardy and produce glorious colours. At the start of spring, the first job for her is trim the plants. She then has a very close look at all her plants, moving those that will benefit more from the summer sun and moving others than can sit happily in the shadier areas.

Some of her plants will be moved into a new pot and given a boost with a half succulent and half potting mix refresher, or

PAT ROSER, 87, COFFS HARBOUR

IT’S time to prepare the ground for spring annuals – primulas, marigolds and pansies, Pat says. She digs quickly over the soil, digging in the mulch that has been sitting there during winter. Then Pat gets the fertiliser ready for when she starts planting. Pat will pop in the fertiliser and the garden

compost she has been making before putting in the plants.

things to get them on their way. A good general all-purpose feed will keep them happy. Gwen says give them some Epsom Salts and a little bone meal mixed up in about a quarter of a cup. Doing this may well boost them. Gwen encourages seniors to enjoy the spring and look forward to awesome blooms. Her’s will be on display at the Annual Flower & Garden Show on September 29. some of the soil from their yard. Graham also adds good quality potting mix and Rooster Booster. He spreads this over the vegetable garden and around the flowers. If you live in an apartment, he suggests you hand cut your dead headed flowers, add potting mix and very little Rooster Booster as it is quite strong – maybe 10-12 pellets. she uses that mix to top up her pots and garden plants. Kay will cut a few pieces off some of her succulents, wash off the soil and put them in a vase that is about half full of water, where they can sit inside her house as a beautiful display for several months. In later months, she will replant those cuttings in her garden. She also swaps cuttings with like-minded friends. Once that is done, Pat will put on a layer of lucerne just to protect the plants. For the fertiliser Pat uses dynamic lifter, but during summer she uses Osmocote granules or Seasol. Living in a retirement village, her gardens are on display for the residents and they have open days and a Coffs Harbour gardening competition.

ROBERT JANETZKI, 72, TOOWOOMBA

JUST in time for the Toowoomba Garden Festival which runs from September 21-30, Robert recommends for bromeliad enthusiasts the following spring tips. Start with removing all dead leaves, particularly from the vase as the debris can rot the plant if it’s not flushed out. Next is to fertilise with

a slow release product with no copper in it, an organic fertiliser or a seaweed like Seasol or Organic Extra.

CHRIS O’DEMPSEY, 73, SUNSHINE COAST

WHILE Chris’ various orchid plants will flower at most times of the year, spring is when they are at their most magnificent. To prepare them for his annual open garden and to keep them in good health for the hot months ahead, Chris is busy nurturing his prized plants. He targets the warmer part of the day to spray the all each plant with a

mild fertiliser diluted into about two or more litres water. It is made up of 15ml of

JEAN TYLER, 77, CENTRAL COAST

JEAN says it’s time for her gloriously colourful selection of pansies, violas and impatients, with winter greens among them, in the hanging and ground-level pots, to be refreshed. She firstly removes the plants as they end their winter blooming. Then Jean takes out about a quarter of the soil and puts it in the

garden, replacing it with fresh potting mix and everlasting fertiliser. Once planted up, she waters the pots with Seasol. Jean is planting

BERENICE CORVI, 86, BRISBANE

EVEN after 54 years of sharing her gardening skills to her fellow Mitchelton and Districts Garden Club members, Berenice still looks for something special for each month’s meeting. Berenice plans for spring to have ready some bulbous flowers. She starts with testing the soil to ensure the acid in the garden reads no less than 6.5, and then she uses her old lawn

composted clippings to mulch around the plants to protect against evaporation. Her trick to help fast track the growth of her spring seedlings is to hold them in a little hole and then water them in with

A good check for disease such as scale or mealybug is worthwhile doing. The pups, or new growth, can then be removed from the mother. But, before they are planted in pots or in the garden, Robert recommends letting them sit somewhere dry for 24 hours to help avoid disease or rot getting into the root of the pup. Carbaryl, a teaspoon of trace element, four or five teaspoons of orchid bloom booster and orchid fertiliser, when then needs stirring. On Australia’s east coast, Chris said the easiest orchid to start growing in spring, indoor or outdoor, are the soft cane dendrobiums which have a beautiful perfume, and in protected areas of the garden, the phalaenopsis which can flower for up to three months. snapdragon and marigold seeds which she has stored during the winter in an envelope and kept in a kitchen draw, plus geranium cuttings, verbena and petunia plants. Jean tries to use small plants so she can get lots of them in a pot, leaving room to add in each pot a few summer edibles plants such as frilly lettuce and Chinese greens. Seasol. Berenice’s other clever spring tip is to put a clay pot on top of each planting and spread mulch around the pot’s edge. They are left like that for a few days. Then for about five days she takes the pots off each morning, so the plants get some sun, before replacing them at night. Finally, if the sun is very strong, Berenice places garden cuttings around the edge of each planting to create some shade.


SENIORS \\SEPTEMBER, 2018

PUZZLES

JIGGERED

10/9

The challenge is to rearrange a crossword which has been broken into 25 sections. One letter has been given to get you started. Work out which s uare ts in with that letter and write in the letters. ou can also shade the black s uares i you nd it hel ul. ter co leting the rst area work out which s uare oins on to it and continue until you have ade a co lete crossword.

O L O A U N D

R G E I X N T

T T H A N

R U E E S

R E E H A Y R

A R E T E I L

N A S G H C A

G U E N R E D

A B S

H

R K N E A

A X I R B C I E

D T G E E R

P E A N C A V

R V I E M U R

M O N E H

L E R O A C G

S U X E A

T Y L

A P D E R

A A T E L N

A I C D D

C O U

D

I G N A L R

N P T E E I

I

E L O

S T

T D N T S P

QUICK CROSSWORD Across 7. A country’s people (6) 8. Silenced (6) 10. Wild (7) 11. Throw out (5) 12. Bring in money (4) 13. Boasts (5) 17. Unpleasant (5) 18. Costly (4) 22. Cheeky (5) 23. Former (7) 24. Adrift (6) 25. Hat (6)

1

Down 1. Makes certain (7) 2. Standing height (7) 3. Punctuation mark (5) 4. Make an attempt (4,1,2) 5. Concur (5) 6. Redacts (5) 9. Worship (9) 14. Looked after someone else’s child (7) 15. Degenerate (7) 16. Inhumane treatment (7) 19. Habitual (5) 20. Religious song (5) 21. Underneath (5)

TRIO

2

3

4

7

35

5

6

15

16

8 9

10

11

12

13 14 17

18

20

19

21

22

23

24

25

Can you complete these four words, using the same three-letter sequence in each?

SUDOKU

Fill the grid so every column, every row and 3x3 box contains the digits 1 to 9.

X

Across: 7. Nation 8. Gagged 10. Untamed 11. Eject 12. Earn 13. Brags 17. Nasty 18. Dear 22. Sassy 23. Onetime 24. Afloat 25. Bonnet. Down: 1. Ensures 2. Stature 3. Comma 4. Have a go 5. Agree 6. Edits 9. Adoration 14. Babysat 15. Deviant 16. Cruelty 19. Usual 20. Psalm 21. Below.

QUICK CROSSWORD

QUIZ 1. When was GST (goods and services tax) introduced in Australia? 2. From what language does the word “ketchup” come: German, Hindi or Chinese? 3. Titania, Oberon, Miranda, Umbria and Ariel are all moons of which planet? 4. Who country music star, who died in 2017, played rhythm guitar on Frank Sinatra’s classic “Strangers in The Night”? 5. Which elephants have bigger ears, indian or African? 6. What was Gene Roddenberry’s most famous creation? 7. What was the nationality of Henri Dunant, founder of the Red Cross? 8. Which Latin word, meaning “so” or “thus” is used in brackets after a printed word or passage to indicate that it exactly reproduces the original?

M I D G E

O D O U R S

R E G I M E

N S O U P R D O S C K S O K E L I T O N S L T U T A R I N E E K S I C E C A P D E V I L S R O T A

WORDFIT

R E B R A E G N E R W A A P L I D S

E B I D D I T O R A N A N A M L A G B I T E F A C E D A L T E R Y D E E D P G A Y E S I R E WO O N S S U N S

QUIZ

1. July 1, 2000, 2. Chinese, 3. Uranus, 4. Glen Campbell, 5. African, 6. Star Trek, 7. Swiss, 8. Sic.

6 LETTERS BANANA DESIRE DEVILS DONATE EDITOR ERMINE GUITAR

7 LETTERS LITERAL RENEWAL

JIGGERED

4 LETTERS ALAS BITE DEED DINS DYES EDAM IDES PEWS ROTA SUDS

5 LETTERS BALED FACED LURES MIDGE MORON RAGED REBAG REBID SCRAM SEEKS SOLOS TULIP

ICECAP ITALIC ODOURS OVERDO POCKET RAPIDS RECOUP REGIME REGION SPOKEN SWOONS WATERY YEARNS

TRIO: RiA

Solution opposite

SUNS TANK

SUDOKU

Fit the words into the grid to create a nished crossword

3 LETTERS BIN DOG FAT GAY KEG KIN LAG LAP NOR SOU TIC TIE

ALPHAGRAMS

WORDFIT

SCRUB, TAGGED, UGLiEST, VOLATiLE, WHiSTLiNG.

Good 14 Very Good 17 Excellent 21+

G E X T U E N E D A T E N E R A G R E

S O

I L

578

S U R X E I A N O L O G A U N D R T D A N T L R U L E E O S C S P A T A B S E

TODAY

R

M O

CURBS GADGET USE GILT A LIVE LOT SLIGHT WIN

D I G R E E N H A R A L R Y A M O N I C E D D H T A X I T H R B A N C I E H R T Y K N S T L E A A D T P G E D E R E R

K O

T C

How many words of four letters or more can you make? Each letter must be used only once and all words must contain the centre letter. There is at least one nine-letter word. No words starting with a capital are allowed, no plurals ending in s unless the word is also a verb, e.g. he burns with anger.

P E N A C A V E C O I L O U P N T E E I N A S H G C A V R E I M U R

WORD GO ROUND

WORD GO ROUND

Solve the anagrams. Each solution is a one-word anagram of the letters beside it, and the ve solutions are sequential. For example, if the ve-letter solution starts with J, the six-letter solution starts with K, and so on.

cork corks corm crook crooks moor moors mort motor motors rock rocks rook rooks room rooms roost root rots sort STOCKROOM stork storm torc torso

ALPHAGRAMS


36

SEPTEMBER, 2018// SENIORS

D P

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Y LA

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IS

O

H

M

O E

–S

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