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April Celebrates Earth Day, Volunteers and Spring!!

Free

A p r il 2014

Senior Review

A Senior Magazine for Living a Healthier, Smarter and More Active Life in Wausau

Doing Good Feels Good and is Good for You!

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hroughout our local communities and across the country, older adults are increasingly using their talents, skills and experiences to make a real difference through their volunteer service. In fact, older adults comprise a large part of the volunteer work force of many nonprofit agencies. As volunteers do good by helping others and helping build a better community, they are also doing good for themselves. In fact, volunteering as part of a plan for good health is being recommended by more and more physicians to their older adult patients. In the past two decades research has shown that volunteering has many proven health benefits. A report by the Corporation for National and Community Service, The Health Benefits of Volunteering: A Review of Recent Research shows that volunteers have “greater longevity, higher functional ability, lower rates of

depression and less incidence of heart disease.” Those who volunteer report an increased sense of accomplishment and purpose in their lives. Studies have shown that volunteers over age 60 reported lower disability and higher levels of well-being compared to non-volunteers. The studies repeatedly found that volunteering leads to improved physical and mental health. In fact, it only takes about 100 hours per year, or about two hours a week to enjoy significant health

benefits of volunteering. The data has also shown that older adults reap the greatest health benefits. This is attributed to the sense of purpose and social role which volunteering provides. For individuals over 70 who volunteer 100 hours a year, the data shows less decline in health and functioning levels, less depression and increased longevity. So while your giving of your time and talents to help others, you’re also helping to improve your own health. United Way RSVP of Marathon County is a free volunteer service for adults 55 and older who are interested in either getting started or already are volunteering. RSVP (Retired and Senior Volunteer Program) is a nationwide program that provides personalized help matching individual talents, skills and experience with critical community needs. This free program makes it easy and convenient for older adults to

get connected with a volunteer experience that is a good fit for them. In addition to the personalized placement service, RSVP provides additional benefits that support the volunteer experience such as accidental medical coverage, auto and volunteer liability insurance, and optional mileage reimbursement are some of the helpful benefits RSVP members receive. In addition RSVP members enjoy monthly coffee hours, educational programs and social events to enjoy if they choose. In 2013, 275 United Way RSVP members provided over 33,000 hours of volunteer service doing 81 different jobs to help 43 nonprofit agencies within Marathon County. For more information on United Way RSVP of Marathon County, contact Tony Omernik, at United Way RSVP of Marathon County by calling: 715-298-5721 or email: tomernik@unitedwaymc.org. Senior Review ‌| 1


Balanced Living Control Ants Naturally

Coffee Car, Awesome! Did you know that coffee grounds do so much more than deliver a delicious brew and enrich our compost piles? They also help power electronics. In early 2011, an engineer in England found a way to convert old coffee grounds collected from local shops into fuel to power a car. The coffee car sped up to 66.5 mph and broke a Guinness World Record for vehicles run on organic waste, beating out 2010’s record of 47.7 mph by a woodburning car. To modify the car to run on coffee grounds, the coffee car team equipped the vehicle with a gasifier that burns organic materials at high temperatures. When the coffee grounds are burned, they produce combustible gases, which, after cleaning and cooling, are used to fuel an adapted combustion engine. Super cool! Adapted from Earth911.com

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nts are pests, whether indoors or out. Fortunately, they’re easy to control, once you’ve figured out who you’re dealing with. Different ants are drawn to and repelled by different foods. Carpenter ants are the most destructive variety and destroy support beams much like termites. Brown Argentine ants, which nest outdoors and are drawn to sweets. Pharaoh ants, yellow and

25 Cancer-fighting Foods to Add to Your Grocery List: • Green tea • Red wine • Dark chocolate • Walnuts • Pumpkin seeds • Whole grains • Fish • Grapefruit • Lemons • Oranges • Strawberries • Raspberries

• Blueberries • Onions • Chives • Leeks • Garlic • Shallots

red, nest inside of buildings and aren’t picky foodies. Reddish thief ants, attracted to meats and grease Pavement ants, which are black and brown, nest in foundations.

Prevent them from entering your home.

Easiest preventions is to cut them off. Seal food, wipe crumbs, wash dishes right away, keep garbage controlled and sealed. Water is also an attractant,

Tips and ideas for a healthy and balanced life

so make sure your faucets are in good shape. When you do find them, follow them to the entry point and try to seal them out. If you can’t seal them out, light helps confuse their patterns, so a night light can throw them off after a while. Finally vacuum. Add some cornstarch to the vacuum bag to suffocate them, and make sure you are using a HEPA filter. Dispose of the bag immediately to prevent living ants from finding their way out.

At home recipe:

• Mix a half teaspoon each of honey, borax and aspartame in small bottles. Make your own ant Place bottles on their bait. sides, with lids off. Ants There are lots of ordinary will carry the bait back to foods that ants won’t their colonies. Important: come close to, so use use indoors only; must be these to create your barrier kept away from pets and naturally. children. Citrus oil (can be

Protection from the Ground Up

• Broccoli • Brussels sprouts • Cauliflower • Kale • Soybeans • Tofu • Soy milk

soaked into a piece of string), lemon juice, coffee grounds, cucumber peels, mint tea bags or dried mint leaves, cloves, cinnamon or cayenne pepper. To kill and drive away ants that you see, mix a teaspoon of dish soap with water in a spray bottle; this will also clean up the scent trails they leave for others to follow. Citrus oil and water or plain white vinegar is equally effective.

You should expect more from your bug repellent. Most people think to get effective protection you have to settle for chemical sprays, or worse, clip expensive units to your pocket and try not to inhale the fumes. And to find a good smelling repellent; well, there isn’t any. Nature Barrier® is for the outdoor lover who wants to sit and enjoy the sunset. We’re the original granular repellent for ground application using pure essential oils for 95 percent repellency and a gentle fragrance. So when you’re ready to

relax and soak up the great outdoors, sprinkle Nature Barrier® first and expect more from your outdoor experience. ▪ Amazingly sweet soothing scent ▪ Long lasting – Up to 24 hours ▪ EPA exempt – Surpasses EPA standards ▪ No clean up required – 100 percent biodegradable ▪ Safe around free range chickens ▪ Safe around free range children ▪ Use on any dry ground surface, including sand ▪ Made and sold locally in Cornell, Wisconsin. www.naturebarrier.com

Smart Tips Tired of sweeping out the soot in your fireplace? Add ½ cup of salt to natural wood every time you burn; the sodium chloride forms a weak acid that dissolves the creosote (black soot) that is left after a fire. Editor/Publisher: Arwen Rasmussen Offices: 3315 Nimitz Ave, Eau Claire, WI 54701 P: 715-831-0325 F: 715-831-7051 E: seniorreviewnewspapers@gmail.com

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Distrbution: The Senior Review distributes throughout the Greater Wausau area every month. Advertising: 715-831-0325 Disclaimer: The Senior Review Publications assumes no responsibility for the advertising content of the Senior Review nor for any mistakes or omissions there in. No endorsements of any products or services is made and noneshould be inferred. The terms and conditions under which the advertisement will be

honored are the sole responsibility of all the advertisers and not Senior Review Publications. A telephone call to the advertising merchant may eliminate confusion to any exceptions in the advertisements. Senior Review is owned by AKRE Enterprises, © Copyright 2014. For more information call Senior Reivew at 715-831-0325 or email us at seniorreviewnewspapers@gmail.com


What’s Happening Calendar Educational & Fitness Programs Arthritis Foundation Walk with Ease Wausau Center Mall, Food Court area, 2nd and Forest St.; Cost: FREE, 60+; under 60, $10; Tuesdays, April 1 – May 8, 8:30 am – 9:30 am; Register early. Space is limited. Call the ADRC-CW at 715-261-6070 Preplanning-What's Your Next Piece? A free seminar with three pleanning team speakers on Tuesday, April 22, 2014 10-12:30 pm OR 5-7:30 pm at Howard Johnson Inn and Conference Center 2102 N. Mountain Dr, Wausau Complimentary meal and door prizes Call 715-842-3993 to register or email Helke@helke.com Arthritis Foundation Walk with Ease Tuesdays, April 1 – May 8 8:30 am – 9:30 am Wausau Center Mall, Food Court area, 2nd and Forest St.; Cost: FREE, 60+; under 60, $10; Register early. Space is limited. Call the ADRC-CW at 715-261-6070 SPARK! Third Sunday each month 1-2:30 pm Call 715.845.7010 to register. Bring a friend or loved one with memory loss for a social outing in soothing surroundings. Magic-themed artwork sparks one-on-one interaction between participants and an accompanying friend or family member. After gallery time, led by a trained docent, participants create a mystery box for treasured possessions. Leigh Yawkee Woodson Art Museum, 715.845.7010

10th Annual Alzheimer’s Association Rhythm and Brews Attend a fabulous evening of beer and wine-tasting at the Alzheimer’s Association’s 10th Annual Rhythm and Brews, Friday, April 11 at Dale’s Weston Lanes. More than 20 breweries will be on hand to showcase over 100 different beers to sample, with a small selection of wines as well! Music provided by String Cheese. Endless appetizers, tasty desserts, raffles, silent auction items and plenty of fun complete the evening. Hosted by Chad Franzen of WSAW. Tickets are $30.00 before April 11th or $35.00 at the door. Doors open at 7:00 pm. Rhythm and Brews tickets are available at Crossroads County Market, Dale’s Weston Lanes and the Alzheimer’s Association Office, 300 N 3rd St, Suite L04. Tickets can also be purchased online by visiting www.alz.org/gwwi and clicking on ‘Special Events’. Proceeds help programs of care, service, training, education and support for those with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. Brought to you by Ale Partner - Bartelt Insurance Services, Lager Partner - Kindred Colonial Manor and Music Partner - Ministry Health Care. Media Partners include Midwest Communications and WSAW.

Tai Chi Feb 20 – March 27 Thursdays, 10:30 am – 11:30 am Wausau ADRC-CW Wellness Room, 1000 Lakeview Drive; Cost: $3/class. Register early. Space is limited. Call the ADRCCW at 715-261-6070 Therapeutic/Gentle Yoga & Chair Yoga March 31 –April 28 Mondays; 8:30 am – 9:30 am 1 hour class, positions done standing & on the floor; Wausau ADRC-CW Wellness Room 1000 Lakeview Drive; Cost: $8/class; Register early. Space is limited. Call the ADRC-CW at 715-2616070

• Suicide Grief Support Group: A place to go when your life has been changed by the suicide of a loved one. Second Tuesday of each month; 6:30-8:30 p.m. St. Marks Lutheran Church, 600 Stevens Drive, Wausau Sara or Heather at 715.539.9818. • The Compassionate Friends: A self-help support group for parents, grandparents and adult siblings. Third Wednesday of each month; 7-9 p.m. Medallion Room, Aspirus Wausau Hospital. Beth Anne at 715.921.2425

Free Blood Pressure Screenings from United Way RSVP of Marathon County Held monthly at each site at the following times: 1st Sunday: Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 930 Edgewood Rd., Wausau; 9:15-10:15am 1st Tuesday: Mount. of the Lord Lutheran Church, 5506 Bittersweet Rd., Wausau, 10:00 -11:00am 1st Thursday: Riverview Towers, 500 Grand Ave., Wausau; 8:309:30am Sturgeon Bluffs, 1320 Grand Ave., Wausau; 10:00-11:00am 2nd Sunday: St. John Catholic Church, 103 N. Fourth Ave., Edgar; 9:15-10:45am 2nd Tuesday: The Neighbors’ Place, 745 Scott St., Wausau; 10:0011:00am 3rd Sunday: Saint Mary’s Church, 712 Market St., Marathon; 9:0010:00am 3rd Monday: Island Place Apartments, 400 River Dr., Wausau; 9:00-10:00am City Walk Apartments, 120 Grand Ave., Wausau; 10:15-11:15am 3rd Wednesday: Randlin Homes, 529 McClellan St, Wausau; 6:007:00pm 4th Wednesday: Kannenberg Plaza, 1240 Merrill Ave, Wausau; 9:0010:00am The Salvation Army, 202 Callon St., Wausau; 10:30-11:30am Services are provided by United Way RSVP volunteer nurses. 715-8482927 for more information.

Ministry Saint Clare’s Hospital Grief Support Groups are monthly adult gatherings for individuals and Grief Group at Helke Funeral families who have experienced the Home death of a loved one. . The group 302 Spruce St, Wausau, on the 2nd meets on the second Thursday and 4th Tuesdays of each month of each month, 1:30-3:00pm at from 1-2 pm. Ministry Saint Clare’s Hospital (Chapel area), 3400 Ministry Free Monthly Grief Programs Parkway in Weston Available Through Aspirus Strong Bones Remember Your Loved Ones This Comfort Care and Hospice March 17 – May 21 Services Memorial Day with a Mondays & Wednesdays, • Good Grief – Living with Loss: 10:30 am – 11:30 am Unique Cemetery Memorial. Monthly grief support group for Wausau ADRC-CW Wellness Room 1000 Lakeview Drive; Cost: adults who have experienced the death of a loved one. Second $3/class. Register early. Space is Monday of each month; 4-5 limited. p.m. First Universalist Unitarian Call the ADRC-CW at Church, 504 Grant St., Wausau; 1602 Grand Ave., Wausau, WI 54403 715-261-6070 715-842-4696 The Grief Center, 715.847.2703.

Senior Review ‌| 3


Healthy Living

Fitness Over 50

endurance, strength building, balance and flexibility exercises will give you the most benefit. Some exercises to try that incorporate multiple components of fitness include yoga, tai chi, Pilates, swimming and dance classes.  The key is to find activities you enjoy.  At Benedictine Living Community of Wausau, we feel very strongly about the fitness of our residents. Our wellness department has implemented the BESTAge (www.bestage.co) Quality of Life Program.  Assessed long-term residents have the opportunity to be involved in structured and monitored wellness classes lead by trained wellness coaches.  The classes accommodate nearly all levels of ability and focus on assisting residents to increase and/or maintain higher levels of functional capacity. The goal is keeping residents more healthy, independent and happy. If you have any questions about this innovative and exciting wellness program, please feel free to contact Nicole Lokken, Benedictine Living Community of Wausau wellness director at 715-675-9451. 

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s you grow older, exercising and staying fit becomes more important than ever. A regular fitness routine can help combat health conditions and diseases, improve sleep, control weight, boost energy, improve mood, enhance memory and reduce falls. Whether you are generally healthy or are managing an illness, there are numerous ways to get more active and incorporate fitness into your daily routine.  Some pocketbook friendly suggestions include: raking leaves, climbing stairs, using food cans as weights, doing stretches while watching TV or walking at your local mall.  As a general goal, aim for at least 30 minutes of physical activity every day.  Remember to check with your doctor before starting a new fitness program.  It is best to choose a program that is within your physical abilities. If you have had knee or hip replacement, running may be out of the question, but walking could be a great alternative. Perhaps your mobility is limited or you use a wheelchair. Look for a fitness program that is low impact and can be done from a chair or wheelchair.  Be sure to check your local Aging and Disability Resource

Center or YMCA for a listing of classes. Participating in a combination of

Written by Nicole Lokken, Benedictine Living Community of Wausau wellness director, 715-6759451 or Nicole.lokken@bhshealth.org.

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Senior Review |‌ 4

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Healthy Living

Yoga for Healthy Aging — Body, Mind and Mood By Mary Hilliker, RD, RYT 500

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re you interested in better balance, improved reaction time, sound memory, and emotional calmness? Through body-mind practices such as yoga, we strengthen all of these aspects of a healthy aging brain. The physical practice of yoga, known as asana, helps strengthen muscles that are weak (remember, we lose muscle mass as we age so we have to use it or lose it!) and improves flexibility. Even more powerful is how we practice yoga postures. Combining the flow of the breath with movement strengthens the connection between the body and mind, trains attention and improves mental focus, all of these key to better balance. Yoga “lights up” the brain. Studies done at UW-Madison on meditating monks provided some of the initial evidence that these ancient practices activate and change the brain. There is a lot of interest in the research community about how yoga may improve cognitive functions in seniors such as improving reaction time and short-term memory. In my experience with teaching seniors, some of the most helpful aspects of yoga include adaptations of the physical practice and breathing techniques to utilize the right and left hemispheres of the brain, use of sound to train memory, and

breathing and meditative practices to promote mental focus. Emotional intelligence and calmness tend to improve with age. We can stabilize mood and lift spirits with yoga. A variety of yoga techniques typically provide the best results for improving mood, including yoga postures combined with breath adaptation, seated breathing practices, sound, and meditation. One of the most powerful practices for mood is what is called “right association or relationship”. This includes the people you associate with, the activities you engage in and how you live the values that are most important to you. While many people often come to yoga initially for the exercise, they often leave with a stronger body-mind connection, better balance, a “sharper” brain and improved mood. Yoga is a powerful practice for healthy aging!

Mid-Day Yoga Break – Engage Your Brain Urdhva Prasarita Padasana Adaptation in a Chair Sit in a chair forward of the back of the chair. Rest hands on your thighs. Take a few deep breaths, cultivating a smooth flow to your inhalation and

exhalation. As you inhale, move your left arm/hand forward and up and spread your fingers on the left hand as you simultaneously straighten your right leg and press through the right heel and spread the toes on the right foot. On exhale, slowly lower the left hand/arm and right leg/foot. On your next inhale, do the opposite side – right arm/hand and left leg/foot. Exhale and lower slowly back to the starting position. Continue to do this for 5 more rounds (10 breaths total). Rest and take a few more minutes to breath smoothly and deeply, making your inhale and exhale equal in length. Mary Hilliker, RD, RYT 500, is a Certified Viniyoga Teacher and Yoga Therapist with River Flow Yoga, Wausau, WI, www. riverflowyoga.net, where she offers private yoga therapy, teaches group classes, workshops and yoga teacher training.

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Senior Review ‌| 5


Good Earth

“It’s Not Work, It’s Fun”

County, Wausau; Wausau Area Metro Ride Buses, Wausau. All 25 vehicles carry our posters on the inside of every bus. Wausau Spring & Alignment, Wausau; Vicor Security; Audio and Visual, Wausau; WNRB radio, FM 93.3, wnrblp.org on the web. Like the Fraser Family Foundation on Facebook.

By Master Gardener Bernie De Lonay, is under the umbrella of the Fraser Family Foundation, based out of Wausau, WI. With Beauty Aid tips from Bobbie Bud’s For Life, Barbara Fraser-Hererra

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his is another edition of “IT’S NOT WORK, IT’S FUN” brought to you by the Fraser Family Foundation (FFF) based out of Wausau Wisconsin. It is also brought to you by Mount View Mobil, Rib Mountain. Mount View Mobil, a terrific sponsor, on 51 and NN in Rib Mountain, is where our canister is located to drop in your pennies for the Veterans Gas Cards. FFF buys gas cards for our vets to get back and forth to the medical clinic or the hospital. Are you starting your plants for the summer? If you are starting them now let me give you a few tips for a successful start. Give your seeds a warm place to germinate. If you place them in an area where the temperatures fluctuate too much you won’t get good germination. When seeds are developing they will have stunted growth with too many temperature swings. The best way too avoid this is to find a place in your home where the temperature doesn’t get too high or low during the day. This will slow and stunt cell structure and growth. Do not place seeds or seedlings in direct bright sunlite because when the sun goes down the temperature may drop too rapidly for the seeds to deal with effectively. Once the seeds start to come up, place them into more direct sunlite. Even temperature and light swings are best for the little buggers. Be sure to check them for disease, fungus and insects. Brainard Funeral Home and Cremation Center, Weston and Senior Review |‌ 6

And now… Bobbie Bud’s for Life

Wausau, WI, has been one of our fine sponsors from the beginning. If your seedlings are getting leggy and straggly looking, this is an indication that they are not getting enough CO2. Carbon dioxide is what all plants take in. Short of releasing a tiny bit spray from a fire extinguisher (P.S. this is NOT advised), increasing the air circulation with an oscillating fan is a great solution. Carbon dioxide is what plants take in to survive and give off O2, oxygen, so that we can survive. Using a fire extinguisher for anything other than putting out a fire is NOT a good idea and is NOT recommended. Another great advertiser from the very start is Peterson/Kraimer Funeral Homes & Crematory Inc, Wausau, (2 locations). WE HAVE A BRAND NEW RADIO PROGRAM on 1230 AM WXCO every Saturday morning from 9-10 AM. It is a live call-in program, 715-2989888 and 1230wxco.com on the internet. ASK ME YOUR GARDENING QUESTION!!!. We are still doing FM 93.3 on Friday mornings as well. Crossroads County Market Wausau, has been behind us from nearly the beginning as well. Treat yourself and go see the ARISTA Dinner Theater Plays when they perform at area restaurants throughout the Spring season. Call 715-571-9272 for Arista’s info. Last but not least water your started fruits and vegetables with as much room temperature melted snow as possible. Notice I said

room temperature. Don’t pour cold freshly melted snow on any of your plants because this will damage them. The colder the temperature means that a bigger chance of shock will set in. This is akin to human beings jumping into frozen water, with nothing more than a swimsuit on, in the middle of Winter. Why? Any form of moisture from the good Lord, i.e. rain, snow, dew, fog, is Natural Nitrogen and this is what plants crave. ALL PLANTS. Other fine sponsors for FFF are: Associated Banks of Marathon

For bad breath stick with sugar free options such as Dentine or Tri-Dent sugar free gum. Sweetened mints or gum can add to bad breath. Chew the gum for at least twenty minutes after eating. End under arm odor with Milk of Magnesia. Find it in drug stores or the grocery store drug departments. Dab it on freshly washed armpits once a day preferably at bedtime. The odor will be gone within three days and kept away for quite some time. I’m Master Gardener Bernie De Lonay, Until Next Time... Be Green and Remember “IT’S NOT WORK, IT’S FUN.”

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Aging News

Your Hearing Loss Can Be Helped!!

system (ototoxic drugs). • Have diabetes, heart, circulation or thyroid problems. • Have been exposed to very loud sounds over a long period or single exposure to explosive noise. Hearing Aids Work!!!

By, Jim Ogurek, National Board Certified Hearing Instrument Specialist, Owner Beltone Hearing Solutions serving all of Central Wisconsin:

Hearing Aids

How many people suffer from hearing loss?

Here are some general guidelines regarding the incidence of hearing loss: • 3 in 10 people over age 60 have hearing loss; • 1 in 6 baby boomers (ages 41-59), or 14.6%, have a hearing problem; • 1 in 14 Generation Xers (ages 29-40), or 7.4%, already have hearing loss; • At least 1.4 million children (18 or younger) have hearing problems; • It is estimated that 3 in 1,000 infants are born with serious to profound hearing loss.

How do you know if you have a hearing loss?

Socially: • Require frequent repetition. • Have difficulty following conversations involving more than 2 people. • Think that other people sound muffled or like they’re mumbling. • Have difficulty hearing in noisy situations, like conferences, restaurants, malls, or crowded meeting rooms.

• Have trouble hearing children and women. • Have your TV or radio turned up to a high volume. • Answer or respond inappropriately in conversations. • Have ringing in your ears. • Read lips or more intently watch people’s faces when they speak with you. Emotionally: • Feel stressed out from straining to hear what others are saying. • Feel annoyed at other people because you can’t hear or understand them. • Feel embarrassed to meet new people or from misunderstanding what others are saying. • Feel nervous about trying to hear and understand. • Withdraw from social situations that you once enjoyed because of difficulty hearing. Medically: • Have a family history of hearing loss. • Take medications that can harm the hearing

Research by the National Council on the Aging on more than 2,000 people with hearing loss as well as their significant others demonstrated that hearing aids clearly are associated with impressive improvements in the social, emotional, psychological, and physical well-being of people with hearing loss in all hearing loss categories from mild to severe. Specifically, hearing aid usage is positively related to the following quality of life issues. Hearing loss treatment was shown to improve: • Earning power • Communication in relationships • Intimacy and warmth in family relationships • Ease in communication • Emotional stability • Sense of control over life events • Perception of mental functioning • Physical health

What to Do?

Have a complete hearing evaluation by a licensed provider, Beltone offers these free at several locations throughout Central and Northern Wisconsin and even makes house calls. Simply call 1-800-236-4060 for an appointment.

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Peace of Mind for You Eileen Coonen with daughter Cory Coonen

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“ e are so happy that mom is here in Call (715) 536-5575 today to schedule a personal her beautiful apartment. We don’t have appointment to learn more about our exceptional to worry about her being alone in her own assisted living services.

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e are so happy that mom is here in her beautiful apartment. We don’t have to worry about her being alone in her own home anymore. She gets so much enjoyment socializing with her family and friends, these moments are a gift to us all. The staff has become part of our family and we couldn’t ask for anything more.” CORY COONEN, DAUGHTER OF RESIDENT EILEEN COONEN

home anymore. She gets so much enjoyment socializing with her family and friends, these moments are a gift to us all. The staff has become part of our family and we couldn’t 1500 O’Day St., Merrill, WI 54452 ” ask for anything more.

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CORY COONEN, DAUGHTER OF RESIDENT EILEEN COONEN

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Aging News

Ways to Help Wandering By Eve Montgomery, Director of Community Relations for Azura Memory Care

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andering is one of the most common symptoms exhibited by those living with memory loss. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, 6 out of 10 people with memory loss will wander outside of the home and become lost. If not found within 24 hours, up to half of those who wander risk serious injury or death. In some, episodes of wandering can last for a few days, while in others it can go on for months or even years. After this long, snowy, cold winter most people crave to be outside. Therefore, it is no wonder that the warmer Spring breezes bring on an increase in wandering for those with memory loss. Wandering can be brought on by a feeling of anxiety or signal a change in the progression of the disease or an infection. It is can be one of the most frustrating, scary and draining times for the caregiver, as they feel the need to always be on high alert. However, if you take a step back and look at wandering as simply the disease trying to speak for your loved one, it may help you understand and provide the patience needed to enter into their wandering world. For example, every afternoon your eighty year old mother begins pacing and trying to leave the house. She says that she needs to meet the kids at the bus. Our first reaction may be to explain to

Mom that her kids are grown and that she doesn’t need to meet the bus anymore, but this may further confuse and upset her. In reality what the disease is actually expressing for her is that she has the desire to be needed and valued. Our job is to meet that need. Our job is to use her personal history and try to relate to her feelings of anxiety. In addition, we need to enter her reality and possibly engage her in a conversation about her kids, then slowly refocus the conversation towards other topics. You could also consider going with her for a walk to help release her anxiety or find something else she enjoys like listening to her favorite song. You could also bring Mom a chair so that she can sit and wait for the bus, again providing her with another activity to do while she waits and thereby changing her focus naturally to another activity. However, if your loved one is exiting outdoors, please consider investing in alarms for all of the doors for your home, enrolling them in the Medic Alert + Safe Return program offered by the Alzheimer’s Association and investigate secure homes in your area, like Azura Memory Care, that specialize in caring for those with memory loss. In addition, we are asking for everyone’s support in advocating for the Silver Alert law recently passed by the State of Wisconsin House of Representatives that would build upon the success of

it’s more than a job … it’s a mission. Home Health 800.397.0270 Hospice 800.397.4216 IV Therapy 800.648.8055 Home Medical Equipment & Respiratory Therapy

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Keeping you at home with home health, hospice, infusion therapy, respiratory therapy and quality home medical equipment.

Wisconsin’s Amber Alert system and allow for its use in finding missing at-risk elderly adults. Currently this law is still waiting to be heard in the State Senate. Please take a minute to call to your State Senator and that they help push this important legislation to the floor and to our communities. Together we can ensure that all in our community remain safe throughout their disease process! Eve Montgomery is the Director of

Community Relations for Azura Memory Care, which offers a unique model of memory care services and programs for those suffering from dementia and Alzheimer’s. Azura believes in the importance of transforming the culture of care through transformational programming and educational outreach. If you would like to learn more about these FREE educational programs for caregivers, professionals and the community, please contact Eve at 715-491-0882 or via e-mail at eve. montgomery@azuramemory.com.

The Choice is Yours The AseraCare Hospice team’s goal is to help you and your family make the most of your time together. We pride ourselves in focusing on the entire family, not just the individual. We focus on dignity and quality of life with unparalleled support, truly individualized care plans and dedicated clinical teams.

This is our life’s work. This is our promise. For more information on our services, please call ...

AseraCare Hospice North Central WI 4107 Barbican Ave., Ste. 220, Weston, WI 54476 Phone 715-355-4797 or 877-234-8571

THE CHOICE IS YOURS ministryhomecare.org

Senior Review |‌ 8

of NCWI (877) 234-8571 (715) 842-2805 www.AseraCare.com

Equal opportunity provider of healthcare services. AHS-06833-11-EI


Aging News

What is WisPACT? By Mark D. Munson and Shanna N. Yonke, Ruder Ware, L.L.S.C., Wausau, Wisconsin.

I

n order to be eligible for federal and state means-tested public benefits, you must have assets worth $2,000 or less. If you have more than $2,000 worth of assets, you will not qualify for public benefits programs like Medicaid and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). There are various exemptions from this asset limitation. For instance, prepaid funeral arrangements and household goods are not included in the asset calculation. These are called exempt assets. All other assets are not exempt. The asset limitations for means-tested public benefits leaves you with two options: (1) spend down your non-exempt assets until you have $2,000 or less, or (2) put your nonexempt assets in a Special Needs Trust (SNT). A SNT is an irrevocable trust, which means that you cannot terminate the trust after you have created it. You are the only beneficiary of the SNT, and distributions from the SNT may only be made to you or for your benefit. Distributions cannot be made to or for the benefit of anyone other than you, including your spouse, children, and other family members. Assets in a SNT are not counted against you for the purpose of qualifying for means-tested public benefits. By putting your assets into a SNT, you can receive public benefits while preserving your assets for future use on expenses that will improve your quality of life or to pay for expenses that may not be covered by a particular public benefits program. Wisconsin Pooled and Community Trusts, Inc., more commonly known as WisPACT, is a Wisconsin nonprofit organization that manages SNTs for people with disabilities. WisPACT SNTs are pre-approved by the federal and state agencies that oversee means-tested public benefits programs. You can create your own WisPACT SNT by working with an attorney to complete and submit a WisPACT application form. The money in your WisPACT SNT can be used to improve your quality of life without disqualifying you from means-tested public benefits programs that help you pay for basic living expenses. When you want to use the money in your SNT to pay for an expense, you will submit a request to WisPACT, and then WisPACT will determine whether the distribution will interfere with your ability to receive public benefits. If the distribution will not interfere with your public benefits,

The money in your WisPACT SNT (Special Needs Trust) can be used to improve your quality of life without disqualifying you from means-tested public benefits programs that help you pay for basic living expenses.

WisPACT will make the distribution to pay for the expense. In most cases, WisPACT will pay the provider or creditor directly on your behalf. Common examples of distributions from WisPACT SNTs include: travel expenses for vacations and holidays, uncovered medical and dental costs, appliances and furniture, home and vehicle repairs and purchases, accounting and legal fees, and television,

telephone, and Internet expenses. WisPACT cannot make distributions in cash or in reimbursement of an expense already paid by you, and it cannot make distributions for the purposes of making gifts or paying for utilities or food, if those expenses are covered by your public benefits. If you are over 65 years of age, your WisPACT SNT will be a sub-account of a pooled WisPACT trust account, meaning that all people over 65 years of age who create WisPACT SNTs for their own benefit combine their money in a single trust account. Even though your assets are pooled together with the assets of other individuals, your assets are separately accounted for within your subaccount. Upon your death, if the amount of money remaining in your sub-account is greater than the value of the public benefits you received during your lifetime, your money will first be used to reimburse the State of Wisconsin for any public benefits it has paid on your behalf and then the balance will be distributed according to your wishes. However, if the amount of money remaining in your sub-account is less than the value of the public benefits you received during your lifetime, your money will continue to be held by WisPACT and will be used to benefit other elderly and disabled individuals in Wisconsin. If you have questions about how you can create a WisPACT SNT to preserve your non-exempt assets while qualifying for means-tested public benefits, please contact Mark D. Munson or Shanna N. Yonke, the authors of this article, or any of the attorneys in the Elder Law Practice Group at Ruder Ware.

At Harmony Living Centers, we strive to provide each of our residents a caring, nurturing environment with dignified and respectful services at a special place that they are proud to call “home”.

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Add Phone

Lexie Schremp 301 Main Street, Suite 105, Mosinee 715-693-3777 Fax 715-693-3771 Surrounding Add LicenseArea Info Here877-955-8777 or Delete lschremp@visitingangels.com

Senior Review ‌| 9


Let's Be Honest

Why Have a Funeral?

H

ave you ever lost someone through death? At that time did you receive the love and support of friends and family?  If you have, then you already know how grateful you were for every person who came to express their support at the time of a funeral service/visitation.  There is a reason why throughout the centuries people have planned and made time for funerals. Recently a friend commented to me that her work supervisor died rather unexpectedly at home.  The workers were told of the death the next morning and the supervisor’s desk was cleared. The grief-stricken husband planned no service.  My friend was devastated because she had no formal way to express her words of loss to the husband and family or acknowledge what the supervisor meant to her.  My friend had no time to pause with others, or place to go with her grief. She had no public way to honor the life of the supervisor.  And, for the next several weeks she went to work to view the empty desk where her supervisor sat feeling sad and empty.  Many of the workers felt awkward and wondered how to handle their emotions and they all felt a need for expression.  Dr. Allen Wolfelt, PhD. in his writing, Why is the Funeral Ritual Important, refers to six needs of mourning: 1)  Acknowledge the reality of the death.  Funerals teach us that someone we loved is now dead.  We witness death’s finality.

Essay Contest Submit a typed essay of 250-500 words to Helke Funeral Home, 302 Spruce St., Wausau, WI 54401 or email to Helke@helke.com entitled “Why I Believe It’s Important To Always Have A Funeral”. Essays must be received at Helke Funeral Home by noon May 1st. We will have two winning contest categories: Adult (ages 28 and up) and Young Adult/student (ages 13-27). First prize is $100 each for adult and young adult; second prize is $50 each for adult and young adult. Entries must include your name, address, phone, email (if any) and birthdate.

2) Move toward the pain of the loss. Funerals force us to concentrate on the fact of the death and our feelings, often excruciatingly painful, about the death.  A funeral is the only time and place in which we as a society condone such openly outward expression of our sadness.

Hospice — A Choice for Living. We provide a special kind of care for people that supports families, respects the person and preserves dignity at end of life. Covered by Medicare and most insurance. Call toll free:

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3) Remember the person who died.  A funeral highlights the major events in the life of the deceased and the characteristics he or she most prominently displayed.  The sharing of memories at the funeral affirms the worth we have placed on the person who died. 4)  Develop a new self-identity.  The funeral helps us begin the difficult process of developing a new self-identity.  Who you are has now changed.

5)  Search for meaning.  When someone dies, we naturally question the meaning of life and death. Funerals help us convey our beliefs and values about life and death.  A funeral reinforces one central fact of our existence — we will die.  Each funeral serves as a sort of dress rehearsal for our own. 6) Receive ongoing support from others. Funerals are a public means of expression for offering support to others and being supported in grief.  Funerals make a social statement — come support me.  Without a funeral, whether we realize it or not, we are saying don’t come support me. At funerals, we are allowed to embrace, to touch, to comfort.  Words are inadequate, so we non-verbally demonstrate our support.  This physical show of support is one of the most important healing aspects of funeral ceremonies. We know many of you have attended funerals of your friends and loved ones. Now it is your turn to tell us why you think a funeral is important and someone will win a prize in an essay contest! Submitted by Mary Machmueller Gunther, Preneed Specialist, Helke Funeral Home


Healthy Living

When You Crave THIS, Eat THIS Instead

seafood, dairy, and nuts; avenin in granola and oatmeal; calcium in mustard and turnip greens, kale, legumes, and milk products; glutamine found in raw cabbage juice; or potassium found in sun-dried black olives, potato peel broth, seaweed, and bitter greens.

I

f you’d prefer to make healthy choices when you crave things that aren’t so healthy for you, just clip out this article and tape it to your refrigerator door for future reference. ► Craving chocolate? You probably really need magnesium, which is abundant in raw nuts and seeds, legumes, and fruits.

► Are you on a mission for something salty? Maybe you need the

chloride found in sea salt, raw goat milk, and fish.

► That sweet tooth driving you crazy? Your body could be telling you it

needs chromium, found in broccoli, grapes, cheese, dried beans, calves liver, and chicken. Or it might mean you need the carbon found in fresh fruits. Or, maybe sulfur, available in cranberries, horseradish, cruciferous vegetables, kale, and cabbage. A craving for sweets could mean a lack of phosphorous, found in chicken, beef, liver, fish, eggs, dairy, nuts, legumes, and grains. Or, you might be short on tryptophan, commonly found in cheese, liver, lamb, raisins, sweet potato, spinach.

► Are you dreaming of a cool drink? Lack of manganese might be the

culprit. You can find it in walnuts, almonds, pecans, pineapple, and blueberries.

► To curb overeating in general,

probably could use some calcium, common in mustard and turnip greens, broccoli, kale, legumes, cheese, and sesame.

► Do you want coffee or tea and you want it now? It could be that your

body really wants phosphorous or sulfur (see under “Sweets”), or maybe you need salt from sea salt or apple cider vinegar, or possibly iron ► Are you mad for bread or toast? from meat, fish, poultry, seaweed, and black You maybe really need some nitrogen, and you cherries. can find it in high-protein foods like fish, meat, ► Even cravings for alcohol and nuts, and beans. recreational drugs might indicate ► Craving oily, fatty foods? You nutrients you need, such as protein from meat,

silicon, found in nuts and seeds might help, as well as tryptophan (see under “Sweets”) and tyrosine, common in Vitamin C supplements and orange, green, red fruits and veggies. ► A lack of appetite, might indicate a need for Vitamin B1 (tuna, seeds, beans, liver and other organ meats), Vitamin B3 (tuna, halibut, beef, chicken, turkey, pork, seeds, and legumes), manganese (see under “Cool drinks”), or chloride (see under “Salty foods”).

► To help fight tobacco cravings,

try some silicon or tyrosine (see under “Overeating” for both).

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Senior Review Newpaper  

Wausau, WI April 2014