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VOLUME 27, NUMBER 4, AUGUST 2018

Happy

BC

Day

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Made in B.C. bucket list By Teresa the Traveler

When I was asked to write a bucket list for British Columbia I thought how could I possibly reduce all the incredible things to see in B.C. into a short list? Finding a hidden gem in B.C. is like finding a needle in a stack of needles. Our entire province is a hidden gem. B.C. must be experienced not just seen, so here are the top ten experiences on my B.C. Bucket List. Take a Dam Tour With the abundance of water in B.C., it’s no surprise that our main source of electricity comes from hydro. B.C. Hydro operates 32 hydroelectric facilities that generate 95 percent of our province’s electricity. A number of large hydroelectric dams are located on the Columbia and Peace Rivers including Mica Dam, Revelstoke Dam, Keenlyside Dam, WAC Bennett Dam, and the Duncan Dam. Many of the dams offer selfguided dam tours that start in a museum and end on a viewing platform.

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Photo submitted

Teresa Cline has made a business out of sharing her travels. The Connector asked her to compile a B.C. bucket list pointing to a number of must-see and must-do’s to help us celebrate our beautiful province this B.C. Day. Her top ten list could keep us busy for a couple of summers. Teresa the Traveler’s guide books are available at Chapters.

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Wine Your Way through B.C. British Columbia is quickly gaining a reputation for producing some of the world’s best wines. Our mild, dry

climate is perfect for growing grapes. Our wineries are spread throughout the Okanagan Valley, Similkameen Valley, Fraser Valley, Vancouver Island,

the Gulf Islands, the Kootenays, Prince George, Thompson/ Shuswap, and Lillooet. Visiting B.C. wineries is not just about sampling wine. Each winery offers

a unique experience. Some of my favourites include: Dirty Laundry – Located on the Summerland wine trail, this winery was built on

the site of a historical laundry that catered to railway workers in the early 1900s. While waiting for their laundry clients could hang out in a secret room on the second floor where they could play cards, drink whiskey and enjoy the company of a woman. Summerhill Winery – Located on the Kelowna wine trail, this winery offers pyramidaged wine. They age their wine in a 4-storey replica of the Great Pyramid. The pyramid was built from marble imported from Egypt and follows the rules of sacred geometry. In a taste test, 90 percent of people preferred pyramid-aged wines to regular wine. Mission Hill– Located on the Westside Wine trail near Kelowna, this winery has an outdoor amphitheatre. During the summer months they have outdoor concerts featuring artists like the Gypsy Kings and Chris Isaak. Grey Monk – Located on the Lake Country wine trail, the Grey Monk winery is one of B.C.’s first and most prominent

See "Top ten experiences in B.C.” page 12

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August 2018

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August 2018

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Polling the pollinators How citizen science informs beneficial garden planning e, Cosmetic v ti ra to s e R , e v Preventati

y r t s i t n e D y l i Fam

IONS SEDATION OPT

By Elaine Sedgman, KFPC Guest Writer I peer into a rose blossom to see whether there might be a hairy belly or a pollen pants bee foraging on the pollen. Ah! It’s a honeybee, a non-native bee to North America. In July, you might have seen other citizen scientists with clipboards peering into flowers in Riverside Park. They were all counting pollinators. How does a person count tiny, flying insects? We are trained as citizen scientists to use a standardized North American protocol. We learn to recognize insects in certain pollinator guilds: honeybees, bumblebees, pollen pants bees, hairy belly bees, flies, wasps and

others such as beetles, butterflies and perhaps, if lucky, a hummingbird. We only count those insects that are actually pollinating, pausing to collect pollen or nectar from flowers. Reddish-brown honeybees are what most people think of when asked about bees. Or worse, they think of wasps, hornets and yellow jackets and painful stings. In fact, our native bees are colorful, diverse and rarely sting. We have over 500 bee species in British Columbia. Seventy percent of them nest in the ground in tunnels carefully excavated and prepared by each female. These bees tend to collect pollen

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In-Home Care Services Bumblebee visits some preferred flowers while doing the rounds. on their legs. Hence the herself: finding a nesting name “Pollen Pants Bee.” site, laying her eggs, The remaining species foraging for food for are cavity nesters. They her eggs and creating will nest in any sort of chambers to protect her protected space such as a eggs. Most bees fly only keyhole or a snail shell or 2-4 weeks depending under a shake roof. But on species, weather and they will also nest quite flowers. And they fly, happily in a ready-made at most, the length of purchased bee-nesting a football field looking box. These bees tend to for food. Exceptions collect pollen on their are bumblebees and abdomen, hence the honeybees and a few name “Hairy Belly Bee”. other semi-social bees. Most bee species are Let’s return to Riverside solitary, meaning that Park. In July of 2017, the female does See “Community garden” page 6 everything by

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Wide plank flooring Pondering the

One of the great trends we are seeing a lot more of in the flooring industry is wide plank flooring. Once only found in older farmhouses and cottages, wide plank flooring is making a serious comeback. With so many options in product, colour, design and species, wide plank flooring looks great in all types of homes. Here are some of the options to

consider when looking at wide plank flooring. Firstly, you will want to determine what type of floor is best for your lifestyle. Do you have big dogs or kids? If so a wide plank luxury vinyl may be the best option for you because of durability and it is waterproof. Are you looking to increase the value of your home or just love the feeling of real wood? If so a wide plank hardwood may be right for you. Going over your needs and lifestyle will be the determining factors in making a flooring decision. After you determine which flooring type best suits your lifestyle it is time to express yourself. Wide plank flooring routinely comes in board/plank widths from

5” to 10” wide and 6 plus feet long. We always encourage clients to take some samples home and live with them for a day or two. Doing so makes it possible to see the sample in different lights and in actual surroundings. You may be surprised by which samples turn out to be the favourites after seeing them in your home. Next time you’re looking for some flooring inspiration make sure to check out wide plank flooring. The wide planks give your home a great look and with so many options you’re really able to customize how rustic or modern a look you’d like. As always if you have any further questions be sure to stop by.

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HEALTHY LANDSCAPES, HEALTHY LIVING

Here are some tips for a healthy landscape

Learn to xeriscape.

Invite friendly insects as helpers into your garden.

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To learn how to maintain a healthy landscape while complying with the City of Kamloops Bylaw No. 26-4 visit kamloops.ca/ipm. For more information, please call 250-828-3888.

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lists of all lists

To accomplish great things, we must not only act, but also dream; not only plan, but also believe. ~ Anatole France Despite being a bit of a list maker, I have yet to make that ultimate list of lists — namely a bucket list. I think I have been avoiding it mostly because I don’t want to feel disappointed when I don’t consider, let alone realize, many of the things that should sterotypically be on such a list, i.e., traveling to distant locations, jumping out of planes, finding true love or perhaps writing a book. I do try to be content with what I already have and what I have already accomplished and experienced. Nevertheless, because I do believe in the power of goal setting, making a bucket list is actually on my list of things to do. How silly is that? Much like my vision boards that I create every new year, I suspect my bucket list will include some easily attainable goals and a few pie-inthe-sky options. That balance is important as its bound to be rather depressing if nothing on the list actually comes to pass and, well, as for the crazier items, it’s just fun to dream big. I will say though that I am no thrill-seeker or adrenalin junkie so my list is bound to be rather tame by most standards. When I came up with the idea of the B.C. Bucket List to celebrate B.C. Day in this edition of The Connector, it was a no-brainer to ask Teresa the Traveler to share some ideas with us for exploring our beautiful province. I was so pleased when she agreed to write the cover story. Between looming trade wars, controversial politics and escalating living costs, staying home might be the most realistic and palatable option for many of us right now. Most of Cline’s suggestions will be feasible for many of us and will help flesh out our bucket lists quite nicely, especially if international travel is not in the cards. Fortunately, we do live in one of the most amazing places on earth and it makes sense to not take it for granted. When I was in my late 20s and early 30s, I used to love spending my weekends making day trips around B.C. For a variety of reasons I let this practice lapse and I am quite sorry for that. It is something I really should resume and thanks to Teresa, I now have a handful of great suggestions to consider when doing so. I’m not entirely sure when I will get around to generating my bucket list. Hopefully I will do it soon. In the meantime, I have been chipping away at my generic everyday list of things to do. Just to illustrate how pragmatic I am, I used a recent week of vacation to attend to these dull but necessary to-dos that just keep piling up. Sadly, I have no “honey” to delegate any of these. I finally got my tires switched over on the car, bought a new lawn mower, harvested the cherry crop, dealt with some recycling that required special attention, began working on a home reno project that I have been putting off, and went to the lab for some routine tests. I know how to vacation don’t I? Sometimes I think I haven’t bothered producing a bucket list because the truth is some things stay on our to-do lists for a lifetime—the life-long challenges where the accomplishment of the goal remains elusive. I seem to have more than one of those lifelong challenges. I have no idea what the solution is for those other than to abandon the goal or just keep on trying. I guess the main thing is not having any regrets when all is said and done.

The

Connector Voices of Experience connectornews.ca Telephone: 250-374-7467 Office Hours: Monday – Friday 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Please address all correspondence to:

The Connector 1365B Dalhousie Drive Kamloops, B.C. V2C 5P6

Advertising Sales: Darlene Kawa 778.471.7528 darlene@connectornews.ca Editor: Moneca Jantzen editor@connectornews.ca Graphic Designer: Erin Johnson 778.471.7513 creative@connectornews.ca

The Connector is a monthly newspaper dedicated to inform, serve and entertain adults 45 and over. We aim to publish on the last Friday of each month and copy/booking deadlines are either the 2nd or 3rd Thursdays of each month. Please request a publishing schedule for specific information. The Connector is published by Kamloops This Week, part of the Aberdeen Publishing Group. Letters to the Editor must be signed and have a phone number (your phone number will not be printed unless requested). Other submissions are gratefully received although The Connector reserves the right to edit all material and to refuse any material deemed unsuitable for this publication. Articles, group and event listings will run in the newspaper as time and space permit. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from The Connector. The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of The Connector, Kamloops This Week or the staff thereof. Subscriptions are $35 per year in Canada. Any error which appears in an advertisement will be adjusted as to only the amount of space in which the error occurred. The content of each advertisement is the responsibility of the advertiser. The Connector recommends prudent consumer discretion.


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Bratislava & Devin Castle “A word written in stone is not easily erased.” ― Slovakian Proverb

It was stressful arriving at the hectic train station in Bratislava. No taxis were available and few people spoke English. The eventual taxi ride made it all worthwhile. The driver took delight in doubling as a tour guide, pointing out landmarks and giving insight into the Slovakian city. She enthusiastically touted Devin Castle as her favourite mustsee attraction.

But first, I set out to explore my temporary home: Old Town — a well-preserved medieval walled city with a wonderful European holiday ambiance. I began with a bumpy tram ride through the cobblestone streets. It’s an ideal way to relax and get oriented. Despite its small area, there’s much to see — churches, towers, museums, shops, galleries and an open square featuring gorgeous architecture, statues and fountains. Dining

options are endless, with bakeries, gelato stands, outdoor cafes and bars. Many offer traditional Slovakian fare. The dominating feature of Bratislava is the picturesque castle perched high on the overlooking hill. The origins of the massive four-towered building date back to the 13th Century. The impressive grounds offer stunning views of the city and the Danube. Inside is a museum, exhibiting a detailed history of the castle and the Slovak people, from prehistory, through the Middle Ages, war and revolution to the present. The next day, eager to explore the ruins of Devin Castle, I boarded a local bus and made the short journey to Devin. A full day is needed to appreciate this fascinating site, so rich with history and scenic beauty. Devin Castle’s first settlement dates back to the 5th century B.C. Initially a boundary fortress, it then served as a military station and trade centre. Later the Romans left their mark, as did the Great Moravian Empire. Many rulers, additions and rebuilds later, the castle finally met its demise in 1809, when Napoleon’s army blew it up. Czechoslovakia took ownership in 1939 and it was declared a national cultural monument in 1961. Entering the complex, I began the challenging ascent. My first stop was at the remains of a 4th century Christian church. Further along I had a good chuckle at the braying castle donkey and admired the pastoral view of sheep grazing on the sloping fields. Reaching the lower castle, I was intrigued to find the columns of Roman ruins. After replenishing my water bottle at the medieval well, I continued the climb

to the middle and upper castles and the watchtower. These otherworldly ruins sit on a rugged cliff in the Little Carpathian Mountains, which buffer Slovakia and Austria. The panoramic vistas of the Morava and Danube Rivers here are so dizzyingly amazing I couldn’t bear to leave. After a peaceful and inspiring rest, I began the descent. Reaching the lower grounds, I took the forest path to discover the remnants of an ammunition store and gatekeeper’s house. Leaving the fortress, I browsed the vendors, sampled local wines and enjoyed a river walk around the base of the castle, watching

river life flow by and craning my neck to see the lofty ruins above, which I had so reluctantly left. While exploring these ancient places, there are always epic movies playing in my mind. I see the ghostly apparitions of kings and commoners, merchants and guards dressed in period garb. I envision a fleet of fierce invaders fast approaching on the river to storm the castle. Such stories surely are written in these old stones! If these walls could talk, what tales they would tell — and wandering dreamily through this mystical place I swear I could hear them whispering to me.

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August 2018

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Community garden big attraction to bees in park

A bee and a mosquito got together and had a baby bee-squito. I hear that if it stings you, it’s a bee-itch.

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citizen scientists counted pollinators in the containers and flower beds around Sandman Centre and all the way to the Community Gardens at the west end of the park. Within a time limit of 20 minutes, 269 pollinators were counted. But, what was interesting, of those 269, more than half (139) were counted in the Community Garden. It turns out that those beautiful geraniums and petunias that we use as bedding plants have very little to offer to pollinators. Pollinators need flowers that that have easily accessible pollen (provides protein) and nectar (provides carbohydrates). Geraniums and petunias have nutrition bred out of them – they only provide good looks. On the other hand, the Community Garden was packed with tasty and nutritious flowers: oregano, a flowering broccoli, strawberries, flowering onions, coriander, cosmos, sunflowers and borage. Why count pollinators in Kamloops? You’ve probably heard that 1 in 3

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Elaine Sedgman is a Master Gardener with the Thompson Shuswap chapter of the Master Gardeners Association of BC, growing.mgabc.org, as well as a vibrant member of the KFPC Network. Find KFPC in the following ways: kamloops foodpolicycouncil.com, info@kamloopsfoodpoli cycouncil.com or 250-851-6111.

Workers and consumers are losers in trade wars

r e n ta l s

Scooters

bites of food we eat is courtesy of insect pollination. Ninety percent of the world’s wild plants depend on pollinators to reproduce. We hope that by doing these surveys, we gain a greater understanding and awareness of pollinator needs in our city. We also hope that this three-year study will create baseline observational data and knowledge of our green spaces that will help with future decisionmaking in our parks. So let’s get started by planting more nectar and pollen rich flowers in our own gardens, as well our city parks. To learn more about our native pollinators and how to support them, go to the city of Kamloops website and search Pollinators City of Kamloops.

The U.S. President has called trade deals with countries such as Canada, the worst the United States has ever signed. To date, all efforts to successfully renegotiate NAFTA have failed and there are reports now out of Mexico that nothing will be finalized before the end of the year. In the meantime, the United States decided to impose tariffs on Canadian steel and aluminum imports. And now, they have threatened to impose tariffs on auto imports as well. TD Bank is warning that 160,000 jobs in the auto sector are at risk – this means that 20 percent of all

manufacturing jobs in Canada could be lost. These tariffs have created uncertainty in our steel, aluminum and auto industries, and they have left many Canadian workers worried about what will become of their jobs. Canada, in response to these tariffs, placed retaliatory counter tariffs against a variety of U.S. imported and produced goods on July 1. The list of U.S.A. produced items that would be subject to a 10 percent tariff was extensive and included common grocery store items such as yogurt, coffee, pizza, ketchup, mustard, mayonnaise, soups, dishwasher detergent and some appliances. On July 10, the Liberals announced that mustard made in the United States would be removed from the tariff list because Canada is the largest producer of mustard seed in the world. The mustard seed example shows the degree that the United States and

Canadian economies have come to work together as a result of free trade. By eliminating this tariff the Canadian mustard seed industry will remain competitive. Obviously many Canadians will face higher prices in grocery stores as a result of these tariff increases. It has been suggested that the Liberals, where possible, have attempted to strategically implement these tariffs to maximize political impact on the home states where these items are produced. Hopefully these retaliatory tariff changes do not encourage further retaliation from the United States against more Canadian produced goods as the U.S. market remains Canada’s largest trading partner. One thing is for certain, consumers lose when tariffs are implemented. I believe that we should all stand united in the hope that we can soon see a return to the NAFTA table and a successful agreement.


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A closer look at volatility If you’re an investor, you know the impact that volatility can have on your portfolio. Ups and downs in financial markets, individual securities and even mutual funds can have you smiling one day, worried the next. However, it is possible to manage volatility so price fluctuations won’t be such a concern. When you understand volatility and how it works, you can take steps to manage its impact. Volatility is important because it is a measure of risk and potential reward. It is the tendency of securities to rise and fall over a short period.

Large swings equal high volatility. More moderate swings represent lower volatility. The higher the volatility, the greater the potential for shortterm returns and the greater the risk that your investment will decline in value over a short period. If you have the potential to make a lot of money you often have the potential to lose a lot as well. Less volatile investments may not have the same potential for windfall profits, but they usually don’t have the same degree of downside risk. You can gauge the volatility of an investment by examining its price history. For example, if a stock has a tendency to fluctuate considerably over a short time, it is volatile. This is especially the case if

the price movements are out of sync with the market. While you might expect stocks to move up and down with general market conditions, a volatile stock will often fluctuate even in times of generally stable markets. A low-volatility stock will vary in price much less. Its price moves may be more gradual, and it may even move in tandem with a market index most of the time. Should you be concerned about the volatility of an investment? If you want to assess potential risk before investing for the short term, the answer is yes. If you’re willing to take on more risk to earn potentially higher returns, more volatile investments might be suitable for your portfolio. If you want low volatility, with the

tradeoff of lower returns potential, look for lower volatility investments. You should also be concerned about the overall volatility of your portfolio-in other words, how much the value of your portfolio fluctuates and over what period of time. This is easily managed by ensuring your portfolio is well diversified. Hold individual investments that vary in their degree of volatility, as well as including all major assets classes in your portfolio. Individual asset classes don’t always move in tandem, and they seldom fluctuate to the same degree at the same time. You can also reduce volatility worries by focusing on the longterm. With a longer investment horizon, temporary fluctuations

don’t matter as much. You reduce volatility risk and take advantage of the fact that over the longterm, the direction of markets is generally up. You can even take advantage of volatility to enhance returns. If you invest at regular intervals-through a periodic investment plan, for instance-volatility can work in your favor because your regular investment amount will buy more when prices

dip. This technique is known as “dollar cost averaging,” and it can lower your cost of investing. Ask your financial advisor for help in assessing and managing the volatility of your portfolio. Member Canadian Investor Protection Fund. Member – Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada.

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THE FAMILY FRATERNITY

Power of Attorney and Property

A Power of Attorney can be a very comforting tool for your future. When done properly, and appointed to the right person, this document can take so much stress off of your shoulders. There are several instances when preparing a Power of Attorney can help, such as when you are out of town and trying to close a real estate deal or when you are planning for incapacity and may need your house sold for you. This document grants a lot of power, and as such, it is important to lay out exactly the type of power the person you appoint as Attorney will gain. When it comes to your real estate, there are

several restrictions you should put into place in order to protect you and your assets. The LTSA, also known as the Land Title and Survey Authority, is the division of the Government that records and registers every private property transaction, including sales, mortgages, and other legal interests (also known as charges) such as rights of way or liens. There are strict rules put into place about how the Power of Attorney must be worded in order to be accepted by the Registrar at the Land Title Office. The Attorney is not able to transfer the property to his/ herself without the Power of Attorney expressly allowing that specific transaction. The Power of Attorney is only effective for land title purposes for three years from the date it was executed unless it specifically outlines the exemption to this rule in the Power of Attorney or, if its powers are meant to endure beyond your incapacity, be registered with the LTSA within three (3) years of

execution. So long as the Power of Attorney is drawn up properly there are generally no issues with using it to conduct real estate transactions. That being said, it still may be prudent to confirm with the lender that they are willing to complete the deal using a Power of Attorney and what their requirements may be. Different lenders will generally have different rules about the use of Powers of Attorney in real estate contracts. Requirements may range from the way signatures are witnessed to more personal information regarding the relationship of you and the Attorney being disclosed, all with the intent and purpose of protecting your assets. When the Attorney commences any dealings with the Land Titles Office, they will have to register the Power of Attorney and prove their identity to sign on your behalf. They Attorney may not delegate their power unless the Power of Attorney states

that the delegation is acceptable. Sometimes situations change and it is important to note that you can revoke a Power of Attorney, but you must let the Attorney know in writing that their authority is revoked or they may not be aware that their power has ended. Importantly, all Powers of Attorney are terminated by operation of law if you pass away, the Attorney claims bankruptcy or the Attorney is convicted of fraud. Even if the Power of Attorney says ‘enduring’, its powers do not remain in effect after you die. Upon your death, the power to act on your behalf passes to the person you have appointed as your Executor in your Last Will and Testament. Your Attorney and your Executor may be the same person, but they must have the appropriate estate planning documents to act.

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How to treat a sunburn

It is common knowledge that sunburn is caused by having too much exposure to UV radiation for a period of time. The sun gives off three wavelengths of ultraviolet light: UVA, UVB and UVC. UVC light doesn’t reach the Earth’s surface. Skin damage is caused by both UVA and UVB rays. Sunburns can cause damage to the DNA of skin and contribute to

skin cancers, including deadly melanoma. Sunburns can also cause premature aging of skin. It is important to know that up to 60 percent of the human adult body is water: skin contains 64 percent water. Even our bones contains 31 percent water. Dehydration of skin and body can cause significant harm. Everyone burns little bit differently and it depends on a combination of skin type, the sun intensity and time exposed to the sun. A blonde-haired, blueeyed person with fair skin burns faster than an olive-complexioned

person. Sunburn can be mild causing red and irritated skin or it can be severe and result in swelling and blisters. It can also cause flu type symptoms such as fever with chills, nausea, headache, and weakness. What to do if you do get sunburn: 1) Get out of the sun immediately 2) Drink lots of water 3) Take an antiinflammatory such as Ibuprofen every 4-6 hours 4) Don’t peel or burst the blisters! 5) Bath or shower in cool water and pat dry and apply moisturizer

6) Mix in a couple scoops of baking soda to the bath water. This will help relieve the itching and inflammation and allow the skin to retain moisture 7) Use moisturizers with aloe, glycerin, or hyaluronic acid. Avoid lotions with petroleum jelly which can trap heat in skin 8) Avoid topical anesthetics that contain lidocaine and benzocaine 9) Use an over-thecounter hydrocortisone topical cream for painful sunburns 10) Apply a cold compress (use a few ice cubes wrapped in a towel) directly to the

burn. Leave it on for several minutes, and reapply several times a day as needed 11) Eat lots of hydrating foods such as watermelon, cantaloupe or honeydew 12) Wear loose, breathable clothing made of cotton 13) See a physician for open skin which can cause possible skin infection Prevention is key. Remember that getting a sunburn, just once every two years, can triple your risk of melanoma skin cancer. It doesn’t have to be raw, peeling or blistering. If

the skin is pink or red in the sun, it’s sunburn. Wear sunscreen, limit exposure between 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., wear sunglasses, hat and protective clothing.

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Understanding Behaviour: Wed., Aug. 8, 1 – 3 p.m. Changes in the brain due to Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia often appear to us as changes in the person’s behavior. Caregivers will learn how to understand behavior as a form of communication and explore strategies for determining what the person with Dementia might be trying to communicate, finding ways to decrease the occurrence of behaviours that concern us and responding in supportive ways.

Society of B.C. This session is only intended for people experiencing early symptoms of dementia, as well as family members or friends who have recently begun supporting a person with dementia.

ister 250-377-8200. Email: info. kamloops@alzheimerbc.org. Preregistration is required. Programs with insufficient registrants will be cancelled.

Minds in Motion: A fitness and social activity program for Dementia Dialogues: people with early symptons Warning Signs and of Alzheimer’s disease or Diagnosis: Thur., Sept. 20 1 – 3 another dementia and a care p.m. Dementia Dialogues and partner. Includes 45-60 minutes interactive learning opportunities of exercise led by a certified for family caregivers to connect fitness instructor, followed by an with one another and increase hour of social time with activities their knowledge about dementia and light refreshments. New Dementia Dialogues: and caregiving skills. Each participants are encouraged to Transitions Along the session is an opportunity to learn visit the community centre for Journey Tue., Aug. 14, 10 a.m. - about a different caregiving topic information or to register. 12 noon. Dementia dialogues are followed by a guided discussion. Minds in Motion: Kamloops, interactive learning opportunities These informal sessions are 8 Wednesdays Aug. 1 – Sept. 19, for family caregivers to connect facilitated to allow caregivers to Sept. 26 – Nov. 14, 2:30 p.m. – with one another and increase share their experiences and to 4:30 p.m. For registration in the their knowledge about dementia. take home practical information. program, please call the John Tod And caregiving skills. Each Dealing with the Diagnosis: Centre YMCA at 250-554-9622, session is an opportunity to learn What Are the Warning Signs 150 Wood St., North Kamloops. about a different caregiving topic for Alzheimer’s Disease and For questions regarding the followed by a guided discussion. How Do We Get A Diagnosis: program, please contact 250These informal sessions are Learn about the 10 Warning 377-8200. Cost: $35 per pair, facilitated to allow caregivers to Signs and the differences prorated for 8 week session. share their experiences and to between dementia and delirium. Kamloops Volunteer Alzheimer take home practical information. Understanding the process of Society of B.C., Kamloops, getting a diagnosis and navigating Transitions Along the B.C. V2C 5K6 Phone: 250the health care system. Dementia Journey: How Can 377-8200 Fax: 250-377-8484 We Survive the Changes of Your Voice Matters: info.kamloops@alzheimerbc. Dementia • Understanding Advocacy Tips for Family org Twitter: @AlzheimerBC the Process of Change • Caregivers: Tue., Sept. 25, Facebook: AlzheimerBC Learn About Resources 10 a.m. – noon. When we need Charitable Registration Number: • Hear Experiences from support, it helps if we have an 11878 4891 RR0001 Other Caregivers • Getting understanding of how to speak No one should have to make to Know Dementia: Tue., up and ask for what we need in the uphill journey of dementia Sept. 18 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. This the most effective way. In this introductory session reviews basic workshop, participants will learn. alone. Participate in the Climb for Alzheimer’s on Sept. 30 and raise information about Alzheimer’s How to become more successful disease and other dementias advocates for themselves and the funds for support, education and advocacy for families making the and the impact of receiving person they are caring for, with journey, and to enable research a diagnosis. Participants will a particular focus on residential that will advance knowledge of learn about the different types care advocacy. the disease. Who will you climb of support available throughout All workshops will take place at for? Register as an individual or the dementia journey, including the Alzheimer Resource Centre with a team by visiting alzbc.org/ an introduction to programs and #405 235 1st Avenue. Call to regclimb-2018. services offered by the Alzheimer


August 2018

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MUSIC IN THE PARK 2018 Macdonald Park Wednesdays 7 pm, weather permitting Aug 1 Dodie Goldney & Nicole Clay Songs of Joni Mitchell Aug 8 Suzie & Jon Soulful Duo Aug 15 Mama Soul Soul Aug 22 100 mile house Award Winning Duo Aug 29 Dave Coalmine Band Folk Pop Rock

Aug 1 Major Funk & The Employment Funky Funk Aug 2 Devon Coyote Roots Rock & Blues Aug 3 Trama Rock - Former Trooper Members Aug 4 Sugar Brown Blues sugarbrownmusic.com Aug 5 Sam Spades Contemporary Roots Rock unique 100 mile house have shared their Aug 6 Rube Band Ambassadors of Fun e of brand of transatlantic folk at som Aug 7 Lauren Mayell Young Country Canada’s biggest festivals. Aug 8 Cruise Control 70s 80s 90s Rock Aug 9 Hillside Outlaws Country Rock hillsideoutlaws.com Aug 10 Ribfest Presents: The Hip Show The Best Tragically Hip Tribute Aug 11 Ribfest Presents: Eagle Eyes Tribute to The Eagles Aug 12 Ribfest Presents: The Beatles Experience A Tribute to the Beatles Aug 13 Nova Scotiables East Coast Aug 14 Metal Stiletto Multi Female Tribute Aug 15 Blackdaze The Ultimate Black Sabbath Tribute Aug 16 The Faceplants New Rock Aug 17 The Dimplers Swedish Brother Band Aug 18 Punch Drunk Cabaret Rockabilly Aug 19 Blue Voodoo Blues Aug 20 The Angie Heinze Band Killer Rock Aug 21 Swing Cat Bounce Blues Swing Aug 22 Johnny McCuaig Bagpipe Rock Aug 23 Mike MacKenzie Blues Rock Aug 24 Brisas del Palmar South American Ensemble Aug 25 The Bigger Picture Classic Rock Aug 26 Lester McLean R&B Aug 27 Caleb Hart Reggae Aug 28 Anita Eccleston Girl with a Horn Aug 29 Bourbon Street Backbeat New Orleans Eagle Eyes, who hail from Vancouve r Island, Aug 30 Earthbound World Music are a must see! Aug 31 DeLorean 80s Rock

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Winners of the 2018 Dr. Robert and Elma Schemenauer Writing Awards Submitted by Elma Schemenauer Barbara Ballé and Ward Pycock, both of Kamloops, received the 2018 Dr. Robert and Elma Schemenauer Writing Awards at the Interior Authors Group summer social held 20 July, 2018. Barbara Ballé won in the category Writing with a Nature Theme. Her poem “Urban Crow” is a fresh and winsome portrayal of a bird seen regularly in Kamloops, corvus brachyrhynchos. The poem admits he’s a scavenger and a nuisance. But he’s so much more. He’s a black Icarus working his mighty wings toward the sun. He’s a father helping his mate raise a noisy brood—his claim to eternity. Most of all, he’s a dreamer longing to give voice to a song rather than harsh caws. Every day, the crow almost feels this song in his beak, but never manages to produce it. Ballé’s poem tells us that our dreams and aspirations are important. Even if we never reach our loftiest goals, simply having them gives meaning to our existence and lifts us above the humdrum of everyday life. Ward Pycock won in the category Writing with a Kamloops and Area Theme. His novel The Solstice Sphere is set mostly in Kamloops, past and present. Among historical topics explored are Overlanders heading for the Cariboo Gold Rush, their interaction with indigenous

(native) people, pioneer days in Kamloops, and the Tranquille tuberculosis sanatorium. Among the novel’s timeless themes and topics are family relationships, coming of age, bereavement, addiction, and homelessness. There’s an element of magic, which focuses on the solstice sphere. This is a special Christmas bulb that, when immersed in water, transports people to other times and places. Through the novel, readers get to go along for the ride. The Solstice Sphere is suitable for adults, young adults, and older children. One judge said: “A great way to learn about history is through stories and this certainly does that. Wish I could have read this to my children when they were younger!” Both the Kamloops Theme and Nature Theme Awards consist of a cash prize to the winner, a certificate, and a press release issued to local media. Accompanying each Award is a cash donation to the IAG to support its growth and educational activities. The yearly deadline for submissions is 21 March. Each Award will be issued annually to a member in good standing of the IAG. There is no fee to enter. For more about the Awards, please see http://elmams.wix.com/ Awards.

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For caring, friendly real estate service call ED at RE/MAX 250-374-3331 Here is a true bucket list option for anyone that has a trip to India on their list. The Happyness Centre at 203-242 Victoria Street, is presenting an information session on Thurs., Aug. 9 at 6-7 p.m. This particular India adventure is planned for January 7-22, 2019 and will feature much more than a vacation.

Some of the potentially transformative activities included are running, walking, yoga, meditation, ceremonies, teachings, talks, “happyness” tools, discussion, laughter and fun. Registration is limited. Please RSVP to joberry@ telus.net or srimadhuji@gmail.com or contact FMI.

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August 2018

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Touchstone what did we land here to learn? we hike through the hills looking for answers longing for homes that we left long ago surrounded by the silent sentries of aspens always watching over us, shaking and quivering in mirth, oh we are so funny when all we have to really do is let go and trust, all is home and our roots are holding all that we need they have the wisdom and they whisper you are always home – listen Bitterroot

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Nathan Greenfield is a military historian who experiences the “… joy of uncovering forgotten stories.” This book reveals triumphs and defeats of Canadian “soldiers, sailors, airmen and merchant mariners” who become Prisoners of War (POW’s) of Nazi Germany during World War II. Short chapters describe the circumstances of capture, confinement, and in some cases, escape. Each narrative is personal and powerful, the details precise, often horrifying, and paradoxically, awe-inspiring: in brutal circumstances colleagues, men, women and children, civilians under occupation, and even a few military enemies risk not only their lives but the lives of loved ones to assist prisoners of war. The scope of this book is large, with an emphasis on Dieppe (August 19, 1942), where Canadians comprised 5,000 of the 6,000 troops, with only 2,200 Canadians returning. (The many lessons learned from Dieppe contribute to the Allies’ planning for D Day, June 6, 1944.) Almost 2,000 Canadians become

POW’s at the battle of Dieppe. The Forgotten tells the stories of men like Ian MacDonald from Halifax, NS, detained by the Gestapo, who later survives the Hunger March at the war’s end; Norman Reid from Sidney, B.C., an engineer who escapes to occupied Yugoslavia; and Edward Carter-Edwards from Smithville, ON, who is shot down, held at a Gestapo prison in Paris, and later imprisoned in the Buchenwald concentration camp with 26 other Canadians. It is incredible that some survive shackling, torture, starvation, forced labour, and mass murder. One of the most difficult things for the prisoners to endure is stifling boredom, but they find ways to keep alert. Even something as dangerous as building tunnels (as portrayed in the movie The Great Escape) aids morale in the detention camps, engaging the men mentally and offering the hope of escape, or at least the satisfaction of defiance. Card-playing, home-grown theatre and smoking also help pass time. Letters from home

sustain the heart; Red Cross parcels sustain the body. Catholic Oblates and Sacred Heart Brothers, themselves Canadian prisoners, join other religious leaders to offer spiritual support. Under extreme duress human ingenuity prevails; for example, Klim cans (of pork) are transformed into “blowers” that use a miniscule amount of fuel to heat water for tea or bitter coffee substitutes, and there is a photo of at least one Klim can in use as a chalice. Illicit radios are hidden in clever places, breaking the void of war news. In spite of egregious methods to undermine the physical and mental health of the prisoners, the comradeship of the men, looking out for each other, as well as military and personal discipline, are factors that tip the balance between life and death to favour life. The Forgotten: Canadian POWS, Escapers and Evaders in Europe, 1939-45 illuminates what would otherwise be the untold experiences of Canadians in WWII in Europe. Some readers may find the format challenging—short spotlights on an individual then on to another­­—but the strategy of then showing what happens to these individuals through each of the war years gives a strong sense of what it was like to endure year after year of imprisonment. The content is disturbing at times, but the sheer power of the men’s stories helps us to better understand the significance of the events at Dieppe in August of 1942. Nathan M. Greenfield is the author of awardwinning The Damned, about Canadians at the Battle of Hong Kong in WWII, The Reckoning about WWI, and other books. His work includes articles for Canadian Geographic and Maclean’s. He lives in Ottawa.


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READER SURVEY Thank you for your continued support of The Connector and our advertisers. This month, we want to hear from you! All information collected in this survey will be kept strictly confidential. If you choose to provide your contact information, it will not be tied to your survey responses in any way. You can scan and email this page to darlene@ seniorconnector.com, drop it off or mail it by September 30, 2018. Do you live in Kamloops? q Yes q Other _______________ Which generation are you? q Xennial (1975-’85) q Generation X (1965-’79) q Baby Boomer (1946-’64) q Silent Generation (1925-’45) q Greatest Generation (1910-’24) Are you employed? q Full-time q Part-time q Unemployed q Retired q Disabled What type of dwelling do you live in? q Single Family q Multi-Family q Townhouse q Apartment q Mobile q Seniors’ Residence q Other _____________________ Do you plan on downsizing? q Yes q No q Already have Do you plan on completing any major home repairs or renovations? q No q Yes (please specify) _____________________ Do you have aging parents? q Yes q No Are you a caregiver for aging parents? q Yes q No Do you have pets? q Yes q No

Do you shop online? q Yes q No What products do you purchase online? _____________________ Do you use social networks? q Facebook q Twitter q Instagram q Other __________

Are you a snowbird? q Yes q No Do you plan on traveling in the next 6 months? q Yes q No Where do you plan on traveling? q Within BC q Within Canada q Outside Canada How do you plan on traveling? q Airplane q Train q Bus q RV q Other What kind of recreation do you participate in? ________________ ____________________________ Where do you get your news from? q Newspaper q Internet q TV Where do you pick up The Connector? _______________ Overall how do you like our paper? ______________________ Do you use the services or products advertised in The Connector? q Yes q No Are any services or products that you would like represented in The Connector? __________________ ____________________________

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Complete our survey and be entered to win a $50 gift certificate to Minos Greek Restaurant

In the next year, do you plan on purchasing: q Home q Vacation home q Automobile q Recreation vehicle q Appliances q Indoor or outdoor furniture q Art, antiques or decorative ware q Mobile phone q Computer or laptop q Ereader or tablet q Storage device q Printer q Camera q TV q Home theatre equipment q Wearable technology (eg. Fitbit, smartwatch) q Smart home technology (eg. lighting, speakers, thermostats, video doorbells, security alarms, sleep tech) q Fitness equipment q Mobility Aids q Healthcare Equipment q Hearing Aids q Eye wear q Games, toys or drones q Charitable donations Do you or will you use the following services: q Eye care q Hearing care q General health practitioner q Alternative health practitioner q Pharmacy q Plastic Surgeon q Medical Alert q Estate planning q Funeral/ Cremation pre-planning q Recreation facilities q Gym q Hair Stylist q Nail Salon q Spa q Tanning Salon q Yard Maintenance q Snow removal q Dry-cleaning q Housekeeping q Security System q Financial Planner q Tax Expert q Lawyer q Travel Agent q Mover q Storage q Real Estate Agent q Jeweller q Computer Technician q Grocery Deliveryq Food Delivery q Pet sitter/Kennel q Pet groomer

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August 2018

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Top ten experiences in British Columbia Continued from page 1 wineries. Guests can enjoy fine cuisine and wine pairing on their beautiful outdoor covered deck overlooking the Okanagan Lake. Ruby Blues – Located on the Naramata wine trail near Penticton, this fun winery features a custom painted hippy style Volkswagen van, rock and roll music and custom designed red stilettos for sale. You can book a wine tour or do a self-guided tour on the various wine trails. Chase Waterfalls Some of the most beautiful waterfalls in the world are scattered throughout B.C. In fact,

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Della Falls in Strathcona Provincial Park on Vancouver Island is among the tallest in Canada. It is mandatory for any waterfall enthusiast to visit the most popular falls such as Helmcken Falls in Wells Gray Provincial Park, Takakkaw Falls in Yoho National Park, Kinuseo Falls in Monkman Park and Shannon Falls, Brandywine Falls and Alexander Falls near Whistler. However, there are hundreds of little known falls that you can swim in, slide down, walk behind, hike to and ice climb on. Take a Hike Every summer tourists from all over the

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world descend on our province to enjoy B.C.’s best hiking trails. We are home to seven national parks including Yoho National Park, Glacier National Park, Kootenay National Park, Mount Revelstoke National Park, Pacific Rim National Park, Gulf Islands National Park and Gwaii Haanas National Park. We also have many provincial and regional parks with plenty of marked trails. My favourite hikes are the ones with a reward at the end. I have hiked to hoodoos, glaciers, alpine lakes, balancing rocks, dinosaur footprints, abandoned mines, caves, cliffs, hot springs and

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Clockwise from top: Mascot Mine tour, waterfall slide, Revelstoke Dam. countless waterfalls. Some of my favourites include hiking through alpine lakes and meadows to the top of Trophy Mountain in Wells Gray Park, hiking to the glacier at Joffre Lakes near Pemberton and hiking though the Painted Bluffs on Kamloops Lake. I have hiked over 100 trails in B.C. and barely hit the tip of the iceberg. Visit one of our many tourist offices, grab some free trail maps and take a hike. Explore an Abandoned Mine In 1858, gold was found along the banks of the Thompson River just east of Lytton, triggering the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush. Victoria was transformed into a tent city as prospectors, speculators, land agents, and outfitters flooded in from around the world to seek their fortunes. B.C. has a rich mining history with abandoned mines scattered throughout the province waiting to be explored. Some of these abandoned mines have been transformed into museums where people can learn about this golden time in B.C.

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history. Britannia Mine Museum in Howe Sound and Mascot Mine in Hedley are both well worth a visit. Bike along the old Kettle Valley Railroad The Kettle Valley Railway opened in 1915. It operated across southern British Columbia, west of Midway to Rock Creek, and then north to Myra Canyon, down to Penticton over to Princeton, Coalmont, Brookmere, Coquihalla and finally to Hope where it connected to the main Canadian Pacific Railway line. It was abandoned in portions starting in 1961. The surviving portion west of Penticton saw their last train in 1989. Much of the railroad’s original route has been converted to a multi-use recreational trail, known as the Kettle Valley Rail Trail. With countless trestles and tunnels and environs ranging from cool mountain forests to Canada’s only pocket desert, the 600 km KVR route offers cyclists the adventure of a lifetime. Some of the must see

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sections of this trail are the Myra Canyon Trestles in Kelowna, the Othello Tunnels near Hope and the Kettle Valley Steam Railway near Summerland where people can hop aboard an authentic steam engine. Find the Perfect Place to Paddle Kayaking and canoeing are popular sports for British Columbians and one of the best ways to explore our many lakes and waterways. At the top of any paddlers bucket list is the 7-day long canoe circuit through Bowron Provincial Park in the Cariboo Mountains. This 116 km route traverses multiple lakes and rivers with short portages between waterways. For those wanting a day trip, Clearwater Lake in Wells Gray Park, the Lightning Lakes in Manning Park and Emerald Lake in Yoho National Park are all must-paddle lakes that provide boat rentals. There are hundreds of other lakes large and small (and many with free camping) waiting to be explored.

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Clockwise from top left: Barkerville, Lussier Hotspring and Dirty Laundry Winery. on a B.C. road trip be sure to check out some of the many historical sites along the way. Drive Through a Lava Bed Some of our most unique hidden gems are located in Northern B.C. One of my favourites is Nisga’a Memorial Lava Bed Provincial Park in the Nass River valley. Located about 80 kilometres north of Terrace, this is the site of Canada’s most recent volcanic eruption around 1700, A.D. The park was established in 1992 and is the first in B.C. to be jointly managed by the government and a First Nation. A selfguided driving tour will take you to waterfalls, pools, cinder cones, tree moulds, lava tubes, spatter cones, a lavadammed lake, caves and other features created by the lava flows. The park serves as a memorial to the 2,000 people killed in this geological disaster. Large lava flows dammed the Nass River and destroyed the two Nisga villages of Wii Lax K’abit and Lax Ksiluux. If you are lucky you may even spot a Spirit Bear. This rare subspecies of the American black bear is officially called the Kermode bear. It lives in the Central and North Coast regions of British Columbia. While most Kermode bears are black,

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Uncover B.C.’s Hidden History British Columbia is a treasure trove of hidden history. Discover the history of the First Nations, the fur trading posts, gold rushes, railroad construction, ranching and farming in B.C. There are lots of museums, ghost towns and outposts waiting to be explored. Some of the major attractions include: Fort Langley (a former fur trading post), Barkerville (a gold rush town in the Cariboo), Hat Creek Ranch (a coach house near Cache Creek), O’Keefe’s Ranch (near Vernon), Fort Steele (a gold rush boom town in the Kootenays) and Secwepemc Museum in Kamloops. Step back in time to the Wild West with a stage coach ride, a western photo shoot or a court trial with Judge Begby the Hanging Judge. Try your hand at gold panning or just wander through the preserved buildings, check out the artifacts or climb inside an indigenous winter pit house. Next time you go

PETER

MILOBAR MLA

there are between 100 and 500 completely white bears. Local tradition considers it good luck to spot a white Spirit Bear. If you don’t spot one, you can always visit Clover the Spirit Bear at the Kamloops Wildlife Park. Soak in a Natural Hot Spring There is nothing more blissful than a soak in a natural hot spring. B.C. has a wealth of hot springs. Some have been commercially developed and others remain hidden in the forests near rivers. British Columbians love to pack up their RVs and take one of the Hot Spring Circle Routes. Hot Spring Resorts such as Fairmont,

1

Radium, Nakusp, and Halcyon offer RV and camping spots. My favourites are the little known undeveloped hot springs. I like to keep these secret but I will share one of the better known ones with you. Lussier Hot Springs are located next to the Lussier River in Whiteswan Provincial Park. The springs are accessed by a dusty gravel road. From the parking area a short walk down to the river takes you to the pools. Pools built into rock terraces collect the water while maintaining a natural feel. For more information, visit www. TeresatheTraveler.ca or pick up a Teresa the Traveler book at Chapters in Kamloops. Titles include: Take a Hike, Chasing Waterfalls, Perfect Places to Paddle, Hidden History, Wine Your Way through the Interior of B.C. and Waterfalls, Hot Springs and Swimming Holes.

The 69th annual

North Thompson Fall Fair &

BCRA ‘Polaris’ Championship

Rodeo Finals

Barriere, B.C. • September 1, 2, 3, 2018 JOIN US: Friday, Aug. 31 at 1:30 p.m.

for a

Wildcard Rodeo

qualifier

Hosted by BCRA & Great West Equipment

We’re Beefin’ It Up – With Cowboy Boots & Country Roots!

“Fun For The Whole Herd” • BCRA Polaris Championship Rodeo Finals • Laughing Logger Lumberjack Shows • Pony Chariot & Chuckwagon Racing • Lawn Tractor Races • Parades • Dances • Cowboy Concert • Entertainment • Kid’s Zone • Magician • Clown • BINGO • Concessions • Commercial Booths • 4-H Competitions • Exhibit Hall • Livestock Shows • & more... Admission: $15 adults • $10 Seniors /Students 3-Day Pass $40 • 10 & Under Free Parking FREE • Weekend Dry Camping $40

**SORRY – LEAVE YOUR DOGS AT HOME!**

www,fallfair-rodeo.com

Happy & Safe BC Day!

Happy BC Day! Photo: Tristan Semeniuk

KamloopsNorth Thompson

TODD

STONE MLA

KamloopsSouth Thompson

MILOBAR: 618B Tranquille Rd., Kamloops, BC • T: 250-554-5413 • F: 250-554-5417 • peter.milobar.mla@leg.bc.ca STONE: 446 Victoria St., Kamloops, BC • T: 250-374-2880 • F: 250-377-3448 • todd.stone.mla@leg.bc.ca

250.372.8811 • info@cfelaw.ca Downtown Kamloops - #300 - 125 Fourth Avenue

C F E L AW. C A


August 2018

Page 14

Take precautions when skies are smoky A significant and recent grassfire on the south side of Thompson River in Kamloops serves as a reminder to all residents to look after their lung health when they are living in close vicinity to a fire. Wildfires are a regular part of summer in British Columbia. With wildfires comes the potential for wildfire smoke pollution in and around communities across the Interior. The best way to deal with smoke pollution is to be prepared and take measures to reduce your exposure to smoke. Smoke affects each person differently, based on his or her health, age and exposure. Smoke exposure can be particularly concerning for infants, the elderly and those who have underlying medical conditions such as lung conditions (asthma/COPD) or heart disease as well as pregnant women. These individuals should watch for any change in symptoms that may be due to smoke exposure. If any symptoms are noted, affected individuals should take steps to reduce their exposure to smoke and if necessary see their physician or local walk-in clinic. People with severe symptoms should present themselves to the nearest Emergency Department. The following can reduce the health risks associated with wildfire smoke: • Reduce outdoor activity on smoky days. • Find a clean air shelter such as large public buildings like libraries, community centres and shopping malls as they often have cleaner, cooler air than smaller buildings or the outdoors. See "Coping” page 17

Hair Clips salon

Professional Hair Care & Styling

Seniors’ Community Centre Update Submitted by Penny Ouchi First of all, we would like to extend kudos to all our firefighters whether in the air or on the ground for protecting our City and beyond as they work endless hours facing the many challenges of the numerous fires within our province. For our summer schedule, Chair Fitness will be taking a break for the month of August and resuming the beginning of September. Chair Yoga, Table Tennis and many of the card games are continuing throughout the summer. Please don’t hesitate to give us a call if you’re not sure if your particular program is happening during the summer. Modern Square Dance Lessons will begin again on Thur., Sept. 13 at 7 p.m. for 10 weeks. No partner necessary - just come out and join in the fun. High Country Achievers ToastMasters continue to meet on Thursday evenings at the Centre at 7 p.m. Come meet some new people. NOTE: For the month of July and August we will be closed on

Centre Hours: Tue-Fri: 8:30 am - 4 pm Weddings & private functions: Anytime!

We do haircuts, perms & colours

430 - 500 Notre Dame Drive, Columbia Square Plaza (Beside Bed, Bath & Beyond)

MONDAY

TUESDAY

Oasis Cafe: Open Tue-Fri: 8:30 am until 1 pm Dinners on Tue & Thur 5:30 pm

SCC closed Mondays in July

6

EVERY MONDAY Weightwatchers 5:30 pm

KAREN

WE WanT YoU!

BC DAY

12

13

Open Monday to Saturday 9 am - 5 pm

250.828.0708 19

(Formerly Goessman Denture Clinic)

A Proud Tradition of Denture Crafts

540 Seymour Street, Kamloops V2C 2G9 Phone: 250-372-5110 • Fax: 250-372-3429 Email: desertgardens@hotmail.com Website: www.desertgardens.ca

AUGUST 2018 Calendar of Events SUNDAY

26

20

27

at the front reception desk, feel free to drop by and pick one up. Make your reservation early by calling (250) 372-5110. It’s time once again to mark your calendar for our Annual Fall Fair. This family fun event will take place on Sat., Sept. 15th. Everyone is invited to enter an exhibit of their choice for judging. Entry forms are available at the front desk. Some ideas are baking/canning, fancywork, floral creations, fruits and vegetables from your garden, art, woodwork, Lego creations and quilting to name a few. Mark your calendar and plan to attend this fun-filled day with entertainment and food galore. Have a wonderful month and we hope you will join us soon at the Seniors’ Community Centre @ Desert Gardens for some fun and socializing. We will be setting some tables and chairs outside for that sunny morning coffee. Come check it out. Everyone is welcome. Until next month enjoy this hot summer sunshine as too soon it will be that white stuff again.

Our usual Tuesday and Thursday night dinners at 5:30 p.m. will be continuing throughout the summer. Menus for the month are available

Seniors’ Community Centre

5 SHAUNA

Mondays (July 2nd up to and including August 27th). The Ladies Auxiliary Gift Shoppe will also be closed on Mondays for July and August.

7 KAMLOOPS BLAZERS BOOSTER CLUB DINNER 6:30 PM

14

EVERY TUESDAY

Chair Fitness 9:30 am Coffee Club 10 am Weightwatchers 11:30 am Kiwanis Club 11:45 am Grape Vine 12 pm Bridge 1 pm 21 SCC Dinner Party 5:30 pm Table Tennis 7 pm

28

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

EVERY WEDNESDAY1

EVERY THURSDAY2 Toastmasters 7 am Chair Fitness 9:30 Coffee Club 10 am Gamblers Anonymous 11 am Grape Vine 12 pm Table Tennis 12:30 pm SCC Dinner Party 9 5:30 pm Toastmasters 7 pm Gamblers Anonymous 7 pm

EVERY FRIDAY

Coffee Club 10 am Chair Yoga 11 am Scrabble 1 pm Mahjong 1 pm Two Toonie Tea 2:30 pm

8

SATURDAY

3

4

10

11

Weightwatchers 9 am Coffee Club 10 am TGIF 10 am Chair Yoga 11 am Mahjong 1 pm Cribbage 1pm

15

16

17

18

22

23

24

25

29

30

LINDY IN THE LOOPS 7 PM

31

ROBBY JAROUDI • ROY JAROUDI • ALLEN E. GOESSMAN

PERSONALIZED & PROFESSIONAL DENTURE SERVICE • Complete Dentures • Repairs • Dentures Over Implants • Partial Dentures

Two great locations to serve you better! 10-2025 Granite Ave. Merritt, BC 1-888-374-9443

603 St. Paul Street Kamloops, BC 250-374-9443

Seniors Healthy Living • Questions about your medications? • Having trouble remembering to take your medications? • Do you know what compounded medications are? “Your prescriptions & compounding specialist”

FREE DELIVERY

ZOSTAVAX

(Shingles Vaccine)

& TRAVEL

VACCINES #10 -1380 Summit Drive • 250-851-3131 glovers@medicinecentre.com • www.gloversmedicinecentre.ca

Give us a call or drop by our pharmacy and see for yourself how we may be able to help.


August 2018

Page 15

North Shore Community Centre June Update

ROASTED GARLIC BEEF TENDERLOIN CHILL: 1 HR. • GRILL: 2–3 HR

3 1/2–4 pound beef tenderloin roast, trimmed 1 stick unsalted butter, softened but not melted 1 whole head of garlic 1 small shallot, minced 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1 1/2 tablespoons red wine reduction 2 tablespoons fresh rosemary, minced 1 tablespoon canola oil 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper

Submitted by Cathryn Oginski

you heat the grill to 250°F. Remove the tenderloin from the plastic wrap and carefully wrap it in aluminum foil, making sure the juices and melted butter will not leak out when rotating while on the grill. Remember, you’re basically making a buttery, herbaceous flavor packet for your tenderloin to slow roast inside. Place the tenderloin in the Char-Broil Roast and Grill Rib Rack on the center of your grill, and slow cook for 2 to 3 hours until the desired internal temperature has been reached. Flip tenderloin every 30 minutes or so, for a flavourful butter-baste. Start checking at 2 hours, as ours was done at 2 hours and 20 minutes. Remove at 125°F for rare or 130°F for medium rare. Keep in mind we are reverse-searing the tenderloin, so it will continue to cook a bit then. Let sit at room temperature for 10 minutes and increase the heat on the grill to medium-high heat. Carefully remove the tenderloin from the foil, reserving all of the juices that have collected inside. Sear tenderloin on the grill until the meat is well-browned on all sides. Transfer tenderloin to a cutting board and allow to rest for 5 minutes. Slice into 1/2-inch slices and drizzle with reserved cooking juices.

Preheat the grill to around 400°F. Take an entire head of garlic and cut the top third completely off. Place the garlic on a piece of aluminum foil. Drizzle with extra-virgin olive oil and sprinkle with salt. Wrap tightly in foil and place over indirect heat on the grill for 35 to 40 minutes. Carefully remove and unwrap, and squeeze the softened cloves out of the bulb and into a bowl. Mash with a fork and set aside. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan bring 1/3 cup red wine to a low simmer. Simmer uncovered until thickened and reduced to 2 tablespoons or so. With paper towels, pat the tenderloin dry. Fold the tapered ends of the tenderloin under itself then secure tightly with cooking twine. Continue to tightly tie the tenderloin in sections so it forms a uniform shape. This will guarantee even cooking. Cream together the butter, roasted garlic, 1 1/2 tablespoons red wine reduction, Worcestershire sauce, shallot, rosemary, Dijon mustard, salt, and pepper until well combined. Using cold, wet hands to keep the butter from sticking, pat the butter all over the tenderloin. Cover in plastic wrap and chill in the refrigerator for 1 hour or up to a day. Let tenderloin come to room temperature while

Happy B.C Day everyone! We hope everyone is having a great summer and enjoying these warm days. We wish to remind all that the North Shore Community Centre will be closed Mon., Aug. 6. Come on down for the remaining days in the month and get in some stretching with Fitness Fun for Seniors on Tuesdays or ramp up your heartrate with some fancy moves in Zumba with Laurie Monday and Wednesday evenings. We invite you to mark down Thurs., Aug. 16 on your calendar and come down and enjoy Hot Dog Day with us. This fundraiser runs from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. and is always a crowd favourite. The funds raised go towards keeping the Community Centre operational with lowered costs so more people can enjoy the benefits of activities held

Home Support Services

Source: Char-Broil Great Book of Grilling: 300 Tasty Recipes for Every Meal available on Amazon.ca 452 – 730 Cottonwood Ave Kamloops V2B 8M6

North Shore Community Centre

Phone: 250-376-4777 • Fax: 250-376-4792 E-mail: info@nsccs.ca 8:30 am to 4:30 pm Monday to Thursday 8:30 am to 12 noon Friday

AUGUST 2018 Calendar of Events -

SUNDAY

MONDAY

5

TUESDAY

6 BC Day

19

26

7 Fitness Fun for Seniors 1:15 pm Ukulele 1:30 pm

Centre Closed

12

WEDNESDAY

20

21 Fitness Fun for Seniors 1:15 pm Ukulele 1:30 pm

FRIDAY

Footcare 9 am 1 Yoga 9 am Joe the Egg Man 9:30 am Chair Yoga 10:30 am Carpet Bowling 12:45 pm Weightwatchers 5 pm Zumba 6:15 pm

Diabetic Clinic 9 am Cribbage 1 pm Bridge 7 pm

Footcare 9 am 8 Yoga 9 am Chair Yoga 10:30 am Carpet Bowling 12:45 pm Weightwatchers 5 pm Zumba 6:15 pm

Diabetic Clinic 9 am Cribbage 1 pm Bridge 7 pm

13 14 Yoga 9 am 15 Beginner Yoga 9 am Joe the Egg Man 9:30 am Fitness Fun Chair Yoga 10:30 am Chair Yoga 10:30 am Carpet Bowling 12:45 pm for Seniors 1:15 pm Carpet Bowling 12:45 pm Zumba 6:15 pm Ukulele Group 1:30 pm Weightwatchers 5 pm Yoga 7 pm Zumba 6:15 pm Beginner Yoga 9 am Chair Yoga 10:30 am Carpet Bowling 12:45 pm Zumba 6:15 pm Yoga 7 pm

THURSDAY

22

Yoga 9 am Chair Yoga 10:30 am Cotton Pickers 1 pm Weightwatchers 5 pm Zumba 6:15 pm

27 28 Yoga 9 am 29 Beginner Yoga 9 am Joe the Egg Man 9:30 am Fitness Fun Chair Yoga 10:30 am Chair Yoga 10:30 am Carpet Bowling 12:45 pm for Seniors 1:15 pm Carpet Bowling 12:45 pm Zumba 6:15 pm Ukulele Group 1:30 pm Weightwatchers 5 pm Yoga 7 pm Zumba 6:15 pm

2

SATURDAY 3

Hair by Loreen 9 am Yoga 9 am Chair Yoga 10:30 am

9

16

Diabetic Clinic 9 am Cribbage 1 pm Bridge 7 pm Hot Dog Day 11 am

23 Diabetic Clinic 9 am Cribbage 1 pm Bridge 7 pm

30 Diabetic Clinic 9 am Cribbage 1 pm Bridge 7 pm

4 Weightwatchers 8 am

10 Hair by Loreen 9 am Yoga 9 am Chair Yoga 10:30 am

250.377.8225 drakeCremation.com

Proud to sponsor the Desert Gardens Calendar

250.852.3212

Bradwins

Weightwatchers 8 am

25 Weightwatchers 8 am

31

Suites Now Available

ONE-BEDROOM UNITS

• Apartment living for seniors • Beautiful gardens (790 square feet & up) • Walking distance to North Shore shopping • One block from McArthur Island • Within the same for more information or complex as the to book an appointment North Shore Community Centre #307-730 Cottonwood Ave. & the Moose Lodge Kamloops, BC V2B 8M6 • Suites for purchase (life-lease) nkshca@shaw.ca • SAFER (wait list)

Call 250-376-4777

wHat makes Us dIFFeRent? PLENTY! 210 Lansdowne st., kamLoops

Call for a free in-home assessment • DVA

18

Hair by Loreen 9 am Yoga 9 am Chair Yoga 10:30 am

• 100% LOCALLY OWNED & AFFORDABLE • OUR UNIQUE PRICE SATISFACTION GUARANTEE • SIGNIFICANT DISCOUNTS IF YOU PRE-PAY • NO UPSELL AND NO HIDDEN SURPRISES • WE TAKE CARE OF MANY THINGS FOR FREE, INCLUDING THE CPP APPLICATION

Full Service Care Since 2009

Weightwatchers 8 am

24 Hair by Loreen 9 am Yoga 9 am Chair Yoga 10:30 am

• House Cleaning • Personal Care (bathing, grooming) • Companion Care (at home & institutions) • Palliative & Compassionate Care • Meal Prep, Med Distribution, Wound Management • Transportation & Shopping • Continuous Care Weekly, bi-weekly, monthly or one time

11

17 Hair by Loreen 9 am Yoga 9 am Chair Yoga 10:30 am

here at the Centre. We would like to thank all our volunteers who help out not just during the summer but all year round. Without the help from people like our volunteers, things wouldn’t run as smoothly. If you yourself would like to become a volunteer in either the Maple Room coffee area or our front desk, please stop by the office during operating hours or call 250-3764777. We would love to hear from you! We will be returning shortly to our fall schedule in September with activities such as Bridge, Woodcarving, and the Kamloops Adult Learning classes starting up. If interested in a certain activity, please come by the office or give us a call at 250-376-4777 to verify the dates of the activities you are interested in.

dRake smItH, msw

President

www.nkshca.webs.com


August 2018

Page 16

Give it a Try (For Free) Initiative

A Joint Venture of the B. C. Recreation and Parks Association and the BC Seniors Games Society Submitted by Joanne Laroque In March of this year Mae Webster, a Director of the Merritt Senior Citizens Association and Felicity Peat, Recreation Programmer for the City of Merritt Recreation Department applied for a joint BCRPA/BCSGS Give It a Try Grant. The BCRPA represents the various Recreation and Parks Departments around B.C. The BCSG Society puts on the 55+ B.C. Games each year and is represented locally by the Zone 8 Board. The criteria for the grant monies awarded to the Senior Centre and to the Recreation Department were Hit, Throw, Move, and Play. Our main objective was to encourage seniors of all ages to participate and try something new. Our secondary objective was to encourage members of the senior community including our organization members to participate in the upcoming 55+ Games in September to be held in Kimberley. We started with seven events and built it up

Chase Seniors Centre AUGUST 2018 Calendar of Events SUNDAY

MONDAY

5

12

19

26

to 12 to be inclusive of members of our association who have participated in past 55+ Games. • Pickle Ball April 5 instructor Brian Dafoe • Crib April 23 Shirley Vezina • Whist May 9 Terry Neilson • Carpet Bowling May 16 Merle Boyes • Floor Curling May 17 Kathy Jackson • Darts May 18 Lorne and Maria Tillotson • Archery May 22 B. J. Moore • Lawn Bowling and

Bocce May 29 Joe Geil and Jamie Ballam • Horseshoes June 7th Lorne and Maria Tillotson • Slow Pitch June 16 Lisa Dewinter • Track and Field June 19 Phyllis and Wally Ebare The Merritt Senior Centre was given the opportunity to advertise the upcoming games in September (11-15) in Kimberley/Cranbrook, plus create interest for upcoming 2019 Games in Kelowna. Our Team at the center Continued on page 20

TUESDAY

FRIDAY

4

Guys & Gals 8 9 Wood Carving Exercise 9 am 9 am Pool/Snooker 1 pm Drop In Carpet Canasta 1 pm Bowling 10 am Jam Session 7 pm

10

11

16 Wood Carving 9 am Drop In Carpet Bowling 10 am Club Mtg 1 pm

Exercise 9 am Crib 1 pm

20 Guys & Gals Exercise 8:30 am Pool/Snooker 1 pm Canasta 1 pm

21 Guys & Gals22 Wood Carving 23 Bells & Bows Exercise 9 am 9 am 10 am Pool/Snooker 1 pm Drop In Carpet Bingo 1 pm Canasta 1 pm Bowling 10 am Jam Session 7 pm

Exercise 9 am Crib 1 pm

27 Guys & Gals Exercise 8:30 am Pool/Snooker 1 pm Canasta 1 pm

28 Bells & Bows 10 am Bingo 1 pm

29

Exercise 9 am Crib 1 pm 17

30

AUGUST 2018 Calendar of Events MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

1

Bridge 7 pm

5

6

BC Day

12

13

31

20

Bridge 7 pm

21

27

29

TUESDAY

18

24

25

30

31

Phone: 250-675-5358

7

Pool 1 pm 13

AA 8 pm

14

Pool 1 pm 20

AA 8 pm

21

Pool 1 pm 27

AA 8 pm

17

President: Ralph Lutes 250-675-5485 Hall Bookings: H. Skulmoski 250-675-2126

WEDNESDAY

6

AA 8 pm

26

11

Breakfast sponsored by Jo-Gal 8 - 11 am

Passchendaele Road, Sorrento, B.C.

THURSDAY

Pool 1 pm

19

4

Table Tennis 1 - 3 pm

1

12

SATURDAY

Arts & Crafts Group 10 am Bring lunch!

MONDAY

BC Day

10

23

Bridge 7 pm

AUGUST 2018 Calendar of Events -

5

3

Table Tennis 1 - 3 pm

Bingo 7 pm

Sorrento Drop-In Society SUNDAY

FRIDAY

16

22

28

Squilax/Anglemont

Table Tennis 1 - 3 pm

15

Arts Group 10 am Bring lunch!

Lakeview Centre

9

Bridge 7 pm

14

25

Table Tennis 1 - 3 pm

8

Arts Group 10 am Bring lunch!

Table Tennis 1-3 pm

2

Bingo 7 pm

7 Arts & Crafts Group 10 am Bring lunch!

Table Tennis 1-3 pm

THURSDAY

18

24

Lakeview Community Centre Society SUNDAY

SATURDAY

Exercise 9 am3 Mini Crib Register at 10:30 am Start 11 am

14 Guys & Gals15 Bells & Bows Exercise 9 am 10 am Pool/Snooker 1 pm Bingo 1 pm Canasta 1 pm Jam Session 7 pm

Table Tennis 1-3 pm

1607 GREENFIELD AVENUE | 250•554-9244

7

THURSDAY

13 Guys & Gals Exercise 8:30 am Pool/Snooker 1 pm Canasta 1 pm

26

LIMITED ROOMS AVAILABLE

WEDNESDAY

2 Guys & Gals 1 Wood Carving Exercise 9 am 9 am Pool/Snooker 1 pm Drop In Carpet Canasta 1 pm Bowling 10 am Jam Session 7 pm

Bells & Bows 10 am Bingo 1 pm

Table Tennis 1-3 pm

COMFORT & SECURITY IN A BEAUTIFUL SETTING

Open 8:30 to 11:30 am, 1:00 to 4:30 pm

BC Day 6 Guys & Gals Exercise 8:30 am Pool/Snooker 1 pm Canasta 1 pm

19

We are a home that offers an active social life, nutritious meals and a carefree lifestyle. For more information on our unique, home-style assisted living residence, call or email activecare1607@gmail.com.

Chase Creekside Seniors

542 Shuswap Avenue • 250-679-8522

28

Pool 1 pm

2

Pool 1 pm 15

Pool 1 pm 22

Pool 1 pm 29

9

Pool 1 pm 16

Pool 1 pm 23

Pool 1 pm 30

Pool 1 pm

SATURDAY

3

4

Core Tight Exercise 10 am

Pool 1 pm 8

Pool 1 pm

FRIDAY

10

11

Core Tight Exercise 10 am 17

18

Core Tight Exercise 10 am 24

Core Tight Exercise 10 am 31

Core Tight Exercise 10 am

25


August 2018

Page 17

Trend towards multigenerational living Brock Activity Centre

9A - 1800 Tranquille Road

Kamloops, B.C. V2B 3L9 info@csikamloops.ca • 778-470-6000

AUGUST 2018 Calendar of Events SUNDAY

Hours: Monday to Friday, 9 am - 4 pm

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY 1

Lunch 11:30 am - 1 pm Cribbage 1 pm

5

6 BC Day Closed

12

19

7 Rentals only until 4 pm BINGO 6 pm

13

Chair Fitness 10 am Lunch 11:30 am - 1 pm Pound Fitness 7 pm

14 Rentals only until 4 pm BINGO 6 pm

20

26

27

Sunday Night Dance Chair Fitness 10 am 7:30 - 11 pm Lunch 11:30 am - 1 pm $10 at the door Pound Fitness 7 pm

Rentals only until 4 pm BINGO 6 pm

Rentals only until 4 pm BINGO 6 pm

15 Lunch 11:30 am - 1 pm Cribbage 1 pm

21

Chair Fitness 10 am Lunch 11:30 am - 1 pm Pound Fitness 7 pm

8 Lunch 11:30 am - 1 pm Cribbage 1 pm

28

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

OFFICE HOURS: 2 PM - 4 PM • MON-FRI P: 250-374-1742 F: 250-374-1708 Secretary@kamloopslegion.com

5

Lounge Open 12 pm - 7 pm Meat Draw 2:30 pm

12

Lounge Open 12 pm - 7 pm

13 Lounge Open 2 pm - 7 pm

Meat Draw 2:30 pm

19

Lounge Open 2 - 11 pm

Crib 2 pm Everyone Welcome!

Lounge Open 2 pm - 7 pm

22 Lounge Open 2 pm - 7 pm

28 Lounge Open 2 pm - 7 pm

Lounge Closed

Meat Draw 2:30 pm

21

27

15 Lounge Open 2 pm - 7 pm

Lounge Open 2 pm - 7 pm

Lounge Closed

8 Lounge Open 2 pm - 7 pm

14

20

26

Lounge Open 2 - 11 pm

7 Lounge Open 2 pm - 7 pm

Lounge Closed

1

Lounge Open 2 pm - 7 pm

6 BC Day

29 Lounge Open 2 pm - 7 pm

Revelstoke Seniors MONDAY

TUESDAY

Kitchen closed for renovations July 16 - August 31 Office will remain open 5

11

16

17

18

24

25

Chair Fitness 10 am Stitchers Club 9 am Lunch 11:30 am -1 pm Bridge 1 pm Canasta 1 pm

23

30

Office Hours: 2 pm to - 4 pm Monday - Friday

THURSDAY Lounge Open 2 pm - 11 pm Crib 7 pm Darts 7:30 pm Lounge Open 2 pm - 11 pm Crib 7 pm Darts 7:30 pm

2

9

16

Lounge Open 2 pm - 11 pm Executive Mtg 4:30 pm Crib 7 pm Darts 7:30 pm

23

Lounge Open 2 pm - 11 pm Crib 7 pm Darts 7:30 pm

30

Lounge Open 2 pm - 11 pm Crib 7 pm Darts 7:30 pm

Chair Fitness 10 am Lunch 11:30 am -1 pm Canasta 1 pm

31

Chair Fitness 10 am Lunch 11:30 am -1 pm Canasta 1 pm

425 Lansdowne St.

Kamloops, B.C. V2C 1Y2 FRIDAY

3

Lounge Open 2 pm - 7 pm Crib 2 pm Everyone welcome to play

10

Lounge Open 2 pm - 7 pm Crib 2 pm Everyone welcome to play

17

Lounge Open 2 pm - 7 pm Crib 2 pm Everyone welcome to play

24

Lounge Open 2 pm - 7 pm Crib 2 pm Everyone welcome to play

SATURDAY Lounge Open 12 pm - 7 pm

4

Meat Draw 2:30 pm

11

Lounge Open 12 pm - 7 pm Meat Draw 2:30 pm

18

Lounge Open 12 pm - 7 pm Meat Draw 2:30 pm

25

Lounge Open 12 pm - 7 pm

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

1

FRIDAY

2

`

4

• Pay attention to local air quality reports and the conditions around you as smoke concentrations may vary and change over short periods and over small distances. A heavy bluish-white haze, possibly accompanied by the smell of smoke, is an indication smoke concentrations are higher than usual. Check the Air Quality Health Index in your area.

Phone and place your grocery & prescription orders.

FREE DELIVERY (with minimum $35 order)

Available every Thursday 9 - 11:30 am

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BC Day

• Consider purchasing a commercially available HEPA (high efficiency particulate air) filter and creating a filtered air room in your house. • Travel to areas with better air quality – conditions can greatly vary across geographic areas and elevations. • People with asthma or other chronic illness should activate their asthma or personal care plan.

Better at Home in conjunction with Canada Safeway will help you with your shopping. Two options available: phone-in or in-store. You can shop on your own or have the help of a friendly volunteer.

SATURDAY

3

Continued from page 14

Grocery Shopping Assistance

Meat Draw 2:30 pm

31

Lounge Open 2 pm - 7 pm Crib 2 pm Everyone welcome to play

kitchenette and single-car garage. There’s a separate entrance, as well as a door into the main home, so occupants can retain their privacy while also being close to family. Horsham, Pa.-based Toll Brothers offers options to make many of its models multigenerational. Buyers can personalize their homes by adding extra master bedrooms on the first floor, for example. And Sunrise, Fla.-based GL Homes, which builds both family homes as well as active-adult homes for buyers over 55, recently tested the market with a new approach—the multigenerational community. “We never really envisioned that we would make this a multigenerational community but we do know that retirees who don’t want a 55+ community really have a void in the marketplace at an affordable price,” says Jill DiDonna, a GL senior vice president. “There are a fair number of older people who still want to live in a mixed community with families.” Even if you don’t currently need a multigenerational home, if you’re planning to buy, you might want to consider your future needs. Source: YourHome1Source. com, America’s Resource on Homeownership®.

Coping with poor air quality due to fires

Office: 250-374-1742

Phone: 250-837-9456 www.revelstokeseniors.ca

AUGUST 2018 Calendar of Events SUNDAY

10

Stitchers Club 9 am Bridge 1 pm

AUGUST 2018 Calendar of Events MONDAY

9

Chair Fitness 10 am Stitchers Club 9 am Potluck Lunch Bridge 1 pm 12 pm Canasta 1 pm

29

Royal Canadian Legion Br. #52 SUNDAY

4

Stitchers Club 9 am Bridge 1 pm

Lunch 11:30 am - 1 pm Cribbage 1 pm

SATURDAY 3

Chair Fitness 10 am Lunch Stitchers Club 9 am 11:30 am -1 pm Bridge 1 pm Canasta 1 pm

22

Lunch 11:30 am - 1 pm Cribbage 1 pm

FRIDAY 2

High housing costs. Rising interest rates. The obligations of the so-called sandwich generation.All of these factors are driving a new trend in housing: multigenerational living. Whether it’s college graduates coming home to live in mom and dad’s basement, or aging parents moving in with their children to avoid the cost of senior housing, statistics show that more and more people are living in multigenerational households. According to a Pew Research Center report released in April, the number of Americans living in multigenerational family households has continued to rise. In 2016, a record 64 million people, or 20 percent of the U.S. population, lived with multiple generations under one roof, up from 51.5 million, or 17 percent of the population, in 2009. Although many families make do with their existing homes, others are driving demand for new homes specifically intended for the multigenerational family. And builders are responding. Miami-based Lennar Corp. builds multigenerational homes under the brand “NextGen – The Home Within a Home.” Currently available in 13 states, a typical NextGen floor plan includes a private living room, bedroom, full bath,

Call and join the free service where good friendships are made over coffee and cookies.

For more information please call

250.828.0600


August 2018

Page 18

By Rita Joan Dozlaw In 1962, newlyweds Don and Jay packed up to move from New York State to Alberta, Canada. The young bride had just learned to drive and planned to closely follow behind their house trailer which Don was pulling with his truck. The highwaysdepartment helped them arrange permits, patrol cars and flagmen. “They warned me about everything from bridges to tunnel clearances,” Don said as he mounted a ‘Caution Wide Load’ sign. “Stay right behind this sign and keep sight of me, honey” he urged. Prone to joke, he asked, “Can you do that or do I need an extra permit that says, ‘Keep Wife in Tow’?” Calmly, Jay responded. “I’m not a wide load. Don’t worry, Donny, I’ll be close behind.” They hugged then perused the municipal ordinances to cross four provinces. “It’s going to be great traveling through Canada!” Kidding, he said, “…But, we can’t be squatters on the railroad tracks in Saskatchewan!” Waving a permit, he clarified, “There’s a new amendment for truckers about obstructions at crossings,” and he laughed. Excitedly, they grabbed one last kiss then climbed into their separate vehicles. Don sang, “On the road again…” as though he was inside the trailer’s shower stall. The miniconvoy crossed into Canada with no problems. Hopefully, we’ll reach Toronto before the storm, Don thought, on seeing the ominous clouds. The early afternoon sky felt like nightfall when it turned murky charcoal and released wind and rain.

Monster transport trucks crowded Highway 401 further obliterating the couple’s view of each other. In his mind, Don predicted Jay would know to take the ramp going west but, Jay missed seeing the exit her husband took and confidently continued northeast on 401 through the city of Toronto… towards Quebec! Her visibility was compromised by sheets of rain, a fogged windshield and frantic wipers. By dusk, hopelessly disoriented and lost, she felt cold as ice and shivered with fear so stifling she couldn’t breathe. Wisely, she pulled off the highway intending only to warm up under her plaid car blanket and wait out the storm. Suddenly awakened, she sat bolt upright and blinked in horror at the image of a dark stranger rapping sharply on the window. Blinding lights swirled in the rear view mirror so she rolled the window down. “I’m officer Banks. Why are you stopped, Ma’am?” “I’m lost. I’ve been… I was following my husband, but…” “Where are you headed?” “Alberta.” “Describe his vehicle, please.” “He’s in a red truck pulling our pink house trailer.” Constable Banks from the traffic division of the municipal police department took notes. “You’re a long way from the turn-off to go west. That’s out of my jurisdiction, so I’ll radio local officers to be on the look-out for your husband.” Then, Banks gave Jay verbal directions to get back through Toronto. Jay drove fast and fitfully but had not fully comprehended the directions. She feared, besides being lost, she risked running into the flooded ditch. Don, I need you, she wept in a stupor as she drove onto some gravel, stopped and laid over the seat. Meanwhile, since transit after dark was prohibited, Don pulled onto a service road near the junction to See "Overpass to Hope" page 21

601 BANCROFT

Ashcroft-Cache Creek Senior Society

Ashcroft, B.C. 250-453-9828

AUGUST 2018 Calendar of Events SUNDAY

MONDAY

Patricia Kilt, President

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

OPEN ON TUESDAYS, FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS 5

6

13

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26

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2

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21 Carpet Bowling & Cards 12 - 4 pm

22

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BC Day

6

Adult Support 9:30 am to 1 pm 12

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

7

Carpet Bowling 9:30 am

13

26

5

28

314-141 Victoria St. | inhomecarehomesupport.ca

250-851-0078

TUESDAY

6

12

13 Carpet Bowling 1-3 pm

26

20

29

WEDNESDAY

7

27

1

Bingo 12:30 - 4 pm

4

11

Parking Lot Flea Market 8:30 am

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Whole Health Footcare 24

30

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Parking Lot Flea Market 8:30 am

31

Evergreen Acres (unless otherwise noted)

14

8

9

15

22 Crib 1pm Legion

28

THURSDAY

Crib 1pm Legion

Learn and Lunch, Upper Clearwater Crib 1pm Legion

21

Phone: 250-674-8185

2 Carpet Bowling 1-3 pm Writer’s Circle 2 pm Library

Crib 1pm Legion

Carpet Bowling 1-3 pm

Carpet Bowling 1-3 pm

25

Carpet Bowling 9:30 am

Carpet Bowling 1-3 pm

19 3rd Sunday Social 12:30 Wells Gray Inn

Serving Kamloops since 1994 | Offering 24/7 Care

BC Day

Bingo 12:30 - 4 pm

SATURDAY

9 Adult Support 8 Bingo 10 9:30 am to 1 pm Carpet Bowling Doors Open 5:30 pm Early Bird Games Canasta, Pool & 9:30 am 6:30 pm Fun Cards Regular Bingo 7 pm 1:30 pm

Clearwater Seniors’ Activities MONDAY

18

3

14

27

Adult Support 9:30 am to 1 pm

Bingo 12:30 - 4 pm

31

FRIDAY

Adult Support15 Whole Health16 9:30 am to 1 pm Footcare Adult Support Carpet Bowling Canasta, Pool & 9:30 am to 1 pm 9:30 am Carpet Bowling Fun Cards 9:30 am 1:30 pm 19 20 21 Adult Support22 23 9:30 am to 1 pm Adult Support Carpet Bowling Canasta, Pool & Carpet Bowling 9:30 am to 1 pm 9:30 am 9:30 am Fun Cards 1:30 pm

SUNDAY

• Respite care • Personalized, continuous care • Mobile chair massage • Snow removal

24 Carpet Bowling & Cards 12 - 4 pm

11

Box 791 Barriere V0E 1E0

AUGUST 2018 Calendar of Events -

• Personal care • Companion care • Housekeeping • Meal preparation • Transportation

17 Carpet Bowling & Cards 12 - 4 pm

2 Adult Support 1 9:30 am to 1 pm Carpet Bowling Canasta, Pool & 9:30 am Fun Cards 1:30 pm 5

Closed

4431 Barriere Town Road

AUGUST 2018 Calendar of Events TUESDAY

4

Carpet Bowling & Cards 12 - 4 pm

Barriere & District Seniors Society MONDAY

SATURDAY

10

30

Carpet Bowling & Cards 12 - 4 pm

SUNDAY

3

Carpet Bowling & Cards 12 - 4 pm

14 Carpet Bowling & Cards 12 - 4 pm

27

FRIDAY

Carpet Bowling & Cards 12 - 4 pm

Carpet Bowling & Cards 12 - 4 pm

BC Day

12

1

29 Crib 1pm Legion

Carpet Bowling 1-3 pm

FRIDAY

3

Hike: Meet @ Strawberry Moose 8:30 am Darts 7 pm Legion

Hike: Meet 10 @ Strawberry Moose 8:30 am Darts, 7 pm @ Legion

16 17 Carpet Bowling Hike: Meet @ Strawberry 1-3 pm Moose 8:30 am Writer’s Circle Darts 7 pm Legion 2 pm Library 23 Carpet Bowling 1-3 pm

24 Hike: Meet @ Strawberry Moose 8:30 am Darts, 7 pm @ Legion

30 Carpet Bowling 1-3 pm Book Club 2pm Library

Hike: Meet 31 @ Strawberry Moose 8:30 am Darts, 7 pm @ Legion

SATURDAY

4

Dinner 5pm @ Legion

11 Meat Draw @ Legion 3 - 5 pm

18 Dinner 5pm @ Legion

25 Meat Draw @ Legion 3 - 5 pm


August 2018

Page 19

Respecting Your Elders?

Crossword by Adrian Powell 1 2 3 Crossword

13 Table Tennis 8:30 am Keep Fit 10:45 am Crib 1:30 pm

19

14 Weightwatchers 8:30 am Weightwatchers 5:30 pm

20 Table Tennis 8:30 am Keep Fit 10:45 am Crib 1:30 pm

26

21 Weightwatchers 8:30 am Weightwatchers 5:30 pm

27 Table Tennis 8:30 am Keep Fit 10:45 am Crib 1:30 pm

28 Weightwatchers 8:30 am Weightwatchers 5:30 pm

Social Bridge 1:30 pm Table Tennis 2pm Crib 7 pm

15 Table Tennis 8:30 am Canasta 10 am Keep Fit 10:30 am

22 Table Tennis 8:30 am Canasta 10 am Keep Fit 10:30 am

Social Bridge 1 pm Table Tennis 2pm Crib 7 pm

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TUESDAY

Salmon Arm, B.C. V1E 1H1

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

1

Foot Care (by appt. only) 5

6

12

19

26

7

Foot Care (by appt. only)

BC Day Office Closed

Monday 13 Morning Market Caregiver Support Group 10 am

14

Foot Care (by appt. only)

Monday Morning Market

Foot Care (by appt. only)

20

Monday 27 Morning Market Caregiver Support Group 10 am

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Foot Care (by appt. only)

Day Away

TUESDAY

9

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15

16 Day Away Good Food Box Pick Up 1pm Board Meeting

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Foot Care (by appt. only)

Foot Care (by appt. only) 22

Foot Care (by appt. only)

Foot Care (by appt. only)

Spiritualist Church 10:30 am - 1 pm

12 Spiritualist Church 10:30 am - 1 pm

19 Spiritualist Church 10:30 am - 1 pm

26 Spiritualist Church 10:30 am - 1 pm

Mt. Ida Painters 9 am - 2 pm

13 Mt. Ida Painters 9 am - 2 pm

20 Mt. Ida Painters 9 am - 2 pm

27 Mt. Ida Painters 9 am - 2 pm

1

Day Away

23

Day Away

Day Away

29

WEDNESDAY

30

Day Away

31

Day Away

31 Hudson Ave. NE, Box 1552 Salmon Arm, V1E 4P6 250-832-3015

THURSDAY

2

FRIDAY

3

7

8

Painting Group 8:30 am - 2 pm

14 Painting Group 8:30 am - 2 pm

21

15 Director’s Meeting 10 - 11 am

22

Painting Group 8:30 am - 2 pm

16

10

Carving 9 am - 12 noon

29 Potluck Dinner 5 pm

30 Carving 9 am - 12 noon

11 Bingo

Doors open 4 pm Walk Ins: 6 pm

17

18 Bingo

Carving 9 am - 12 noon

23

4

Doors open 4 pm Walk Ins: 6 pm

Carving 9 am - 12 noon

Painting Group 8:30 am - 2 pm

28

9

SATURDAY

Bingo

Carving 9 am - 12 noon

6 BC Day

4

8

Bingo Manager, Wendy Bond ..............................250-253-3506 Carvers, Olena Bramble ......................................250-803-9688 Computer Class, Darcy Calkins...........................250-463-4555 Hall Rentals, Olena Bramble ...............................250-803-9688 Mount Ida Painters, Olena Bramble ....................250-803-9688 Seniors Outreach, Leanne or Brenda ...................250-833-4136 Spiritualist Church, Gloria Makey ........................250-832-8058 Tuesday Painting, Ross Chester .........................250-832-3579

5

3

Day Away

AUGUST 2018 Calendar of Events MONDAY

SATURDAY

2

Shuswap Lake Senior Citizens Society SUNDAY

62

49

51

52

Doors open 4 pm Walk Ins: 6 pm

24

First Annual Active Agers Open House 9 am - 4 pm

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Doors open 4 pm Walk Ins: 6 pm

DROP-IN POOL

Mon Tue Thur Fri 10 am - 2 pm

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ACROSS 52 France's ___ Blanc 34 Schnozzes 52 France's Blancof Usher's 34 creator Schnozzes 1ACROSS Ghanaian city of 53 ___ House 35 Victoria Cross 1 Ghanaian cityplus of 53 House56 of Usher's 2 million Blood creator donation 35 Victoria Cross recipient, often million plus recipient, often 37 The young Vader 6 2Reggae great Peter ___56 Blood donation spokesperson, maybe? 6 Reggae greatatPeter maybe? 37 The young Vader 10 Postings the ___ race track spokesperson, 59 James Bay native, often 38 Site of the last Ol 10 Postings at the race track 59 James Bay native, often 38 Site of the last Olympics, briefly 14 Atoll material 60 Oxidized iron, basically 39 ___ diem 14 Atoll material 60 Oxidized iron, basically 39 ___ diem 15 Something Spaniards spend 61 Bob Marley was one 41 dish Spicy bean-based 15 Something Spaniards spend 61 Bob Marley was one 41 Spicy bean-based 16 Scarfmaterial material Hand-waving or f 16 Scarf 62 Fixed 62 timeFixed period time period 42 Hand-waving or42 finger-pointing 17 Napoleon Solo's TV show 17 Napoleon Solo's TV show 63 Gels 63 Gels 43 Natural fertilizer43 Natural fertilizer 20 She's a real Praise 44 Handy kitchen de 20 She's a real pig pig 64 Praise64 to the hilt to the hilt44 Handy kitchen device 21 Thousandths an inch 45 WWII convoy thre 21 Thousandths of anofinch 45 WWII convoy threats 22 Storefodder fodder 22 Store DOWN DOWN 46 Hunger pain 46 Hunger pain 23 Justaverage average Takes 23 Just 1 Takes1a movie rolea movie role 47 Work jointly 47 Work jointly 24 George's "Rumble in salmon 51 List entry 24 George's "Rumble in 2 Silvery2 Pacific Silvery Pacific salmon 51 List entry the foe foe 3 Galleon's complement complement 52 More than 50%52 More than 50% theJungle" Jungle" 3 Galleon's 25 400 on the portcullisthe portcullis 53 Time gone by 53 Time gone by 25 400metres metres ontrack the track4 Smash4 theSmash 26 Thomas D'Arcy McGee or 5 One way serveway pie to serve 54 pie "I think we're ___ 26 Thomas D'Arcy McGee or 5 toOne 54something!" "I think we're ___ John A.A. Macdonald 6 Non-stick coating 55 Shorthand for unnamed others for un John Macdonald 6 Non-stick coating 55 Shorthand 31 Forearm bones 7 Yours and mine 57 Stick in a poolroom 31 Forearm bones 7 Yours and mine 57 Stick in a poolroo 32 The ladylady 8 "No seats left" theatre 58 Not very strict 58 Not very strict 32 Therajah's rajah's 8 "No seats sign left" theatre sign 33 Bring in the sheaves 9 ___ Security in the US 33 Bring in the sheaves 9 ___ Security in the USSOLUTION TO PUZZLE 34 Pottery fragment 10 Holds title to SOLUTION TO PU 34 Pottery fragment 10 Holds title to 36 Speed "The Enterprise" 11 Compliant 36 might Speed "The Enterprise" 11 Compliant travel at 12 Buck might crowning travel atpoints 12 Buck 40 Career 13 Insomniac's craving 40 Career benefactor crowning points18 Decree 13___ Insomniac's craving 42 Aladdin's 42 Aladdin's 18 Decree ___ 43 Lady with twobenefactor dozen brilliant, 19 Amalgamate 43 well-behaved Lady with two dozen brilliant, 19 with Amalgamate children, 23 Get testy well-behaved children, 24 At some 23 distance Get testy with perhaps? 47 Toothpaste tube top 26 Stole 24 material perhaps? At some distance 48 U.N. agcy. dealing withtop 27 "Grand26 ___Stole Opry" material 47 Toothpaste tube conditions Spenser's 48 working U.N. agcy. dealing with 28 Heroine 27of"Grand ___ Opry" 49 Deep voicedconditions fellow "The Faerie Queene" of Spenser's working 28 Heroine 50 "Long Journey 29 Snake's place? 49 DeepDay's voiced fellow "The Faerie Queene" Night" writer Journey 30 Axe handlers 50 Into "Long Day's 29 Snake's place? Into Night" writer 30 Axe handlers

SUDOKU

MONDAY

48

51

37 42 38

O D D S WOO L N C L E S I L E L A P H E R E W A R P E N I E R I O R S P O E L A N T A S T A X T O L

SUNDAY

62

Phone 250-832-7000 Fax 250-833-0550 Office Hours: 9 am - 3 pm

AUGUST 2018 Calendar of Events -

45

56

320A Second Ave. NE

Seniors’ Resource Centre - Salmon Arm

42

59 59

36

46

39

30

36

45

38

30

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34 41 35

48

47

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29

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Canasta 10 am

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Canasta 10 am

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29 Table Tennis 8:30 am Canasta 10 am Keep Fit 10:30 am

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16 Social Bridge 1:30 pm Table Tennis 2pm Crib 7 pm

20

11

O D D S W O O L

12

Table Tennis 8:30 am Canasta 10 am Keep Fit 10:30 am

9

10

U N I T E

Weightwatchers 8:30 am Weightwatchers 5:30 pm

Table Tennis 8:30 am Keep Fit 10:45 am Crib 1:30 pm

8

9

15

20

Canasta 10 am

8

18

14

4

15

T E E E N F P I L S O I N

BC Day

7

SATURDAY

7

H O M E L A N D

6

Social Bridge 1 pm Table Tennis 2pm Crib 7 pm

3

6

17

www.5thAveSeniors.org FRIDAY

5

13

P

5

2

4

P A N G

Table Tennis 8:30 am Canasta 10 am Keep Fit 10:30 am

THURSDAY

3

G E S T U R E

1

2

O S U R R O S A G F R A A R S S U B O A T S

WEDNESDAY

1

M O S T

TUESDAY

14

12

E S H RE M E R L O E L T E C A R LU S E

MONDAY

by Adrian Powell

11

A C C R A U N C L C O R A L N S I L T H E M A I O WL AM S T H ES RO E F OE U N D U W L NAA RE EE ANP I R I A OC MS O T H A PP OI NL EA I NL UA NST TI RX ETE O T E R M

SUNDAY

6

G R E S C T O U A R C E

AUGUST 2018 Calendar of Events -

7 8 9 10 Respecting Your Elders?

5

T O S H E U R O F R O M I L S E O A L I N G F A R A N H A R D E S R S U P O B A M O N C O A G U S T E T S

OFFICE HOURS MON-FRI 10 AM-2 PM SUMMER HOURS (JUNE 18): MON-WED-FRI 10 AM-2 PM RAINBOW CAFE CLOSED FOR THE SUMMER

4


August 2018

Page 20

Logan Lake Seniors 50+

Drop-in Centre 80 – 150 Opal Village Centre Mall

AUGUST 2018 Calendar of Events SUNDAY

Give it a Try (For Free) Initiative (Continued from page 16) for co-organizing the event included President Ed Collins, Vice Pres. Nellie Holuboch, Treasurer Pam McCurry, Secretary Joanne Atkinson and director Joanne Larocque and member Shirley Vezina. City of Merritt, Recreation Department, Recreation Programmer Felicity Peat and Director of Zone 8 55+ Games, Russ Reid. Each event followed with refreshments and an opportunity to fill out a survey form provided by the 55+ BC Games grant program. Three prizes were awarded 1.Dale Hamm – Membership to Merritt Senior Centre 2. Bev Stanich and Noreen Leidenius - gift certificate to try a program offered by the City’s Recreation Department. We advertised through the local newspapers, radio, posted flyers around town i.e., library, supermarket, announcements at our monthly meetings, and message board provided by the Recreation Department. The attendance fluctuated for each event. Those who attended had fun. Highlights of the games included Mary Lowen Seniors Member age 82 trying Carpet Bowling and Floor curling for the first time. Darts - Senior member Noreen Leidenius, first time giving it a try won one game. Archery - Senior member Shirley Vezina legally blind hitting the target. Senior member Verna Rose with a little

encouragement hits a bull’s eye 2 times. Non-member Cliff Shackelly familiar with archery came out to give it a try and signed up to play in the games in September. Horseshoes - Mary Dickie, now 91, a gold medalist in the 55+ Games 2008 won the horse shoe game played at our Center. Slow Pitch put on by Lisa DeWinter with the Merritt Mixed League and the Recreation Department saw Francoise Mastin 82 years win a trophy for best player striking out 2 times followed by a home run. The game was modified to give seniors brave enough to come and try and have fun. It was a great time for all ages. We have approached the Rec Dept. to do it again in Sept. Track and Field - Phyllis Ebare a 4 time medalist in 2017 at the 55+ Games provided instruction along with her husband on shot put, javelin, discus and power walking, may start up a program in the fall. The Grant monies given by Zone 8 of the BCSGS and the City of Merritt, Recreation Department went to purchase yellow carpet balls for sight impaired and for new card tables used for crib and whist at the Merritt Senior Centre. We certainly hope that this Give It a Try Program will continue to help seniors become more active and enjoy life in the coming years.

5

12

19

SUNDAY

MONDAY

2449 Trans Canada Hwy. E., Kamloops, BC V2C 4A9 www.SouthThompsonRV.com

Open 9 am - 3 pm Bingo 1 - 3 pm

4

Games Night 6 - 10 pm

Games Night 6 - 10 pm

16 Open 9 am - noon

17 Open 9 am - 3 pm Bingo 1 - 3 pm

Games Night 6 - 10 pm

23

24 Open 9 am - 3 pm Bingo 1 - 3 pm

Open 9 am - noon 30

Open 9 am - noon

11

18

25

Games Night 6 - 10 pm

31 Open 9 am - 3 pm Bingo 1 - 3 pm

THE MERRITT SENIORS ASSOC. and O.A.P.O. Br. #168 1675 Tutill Court • Ed Collins, President

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

2

3

4

9

10

11

16

17

18

23

24

25

30

31

Carpet Bowling 1:30 pm

5

6

BC Day

12

Doors open at 11 am

13

20 Crib 1:30 pm

26

14 Bingo 1 pm

Doors open at 11 am

Crib 1:30 pm

19

7 Bingo 1 pm

Crib 1:30 pm

21 Bingo 1 pm

Doors open at 11 am

27

8 Carpet Bowling 1:30 pm

15 Carpet Bowling 1:30 pm

22 Carpet Bowling 1:30 pm

28 Bingo 1 pm

Crib 1:30 pm

Doors open at 11 am

29 Carpet Bowling 1:30 pm

Savona and Area 50+

O.A.P.O Branch #129

6605 Buie Road/Savona Access Rd

AUGUST 2018 Calendar of Events SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

Donna Schwieger 250-373-2334

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY 1

Exercise 8:30 am Coffee 9 am UPS 7 pm

19

250-374-4949

Toll Free: 1-800-555-8373

SATURDAY 3

10 Open 9 am - 3 pm Bingo 1 - 3 pm

29

Drop-in Bowling 10 am - 2 pm

TUESDAY

9

Open 9 am - noon

1

12

“On the Auto Mile”

28

AUGUST 2018 Calendar of Events -

BC Day

6

Savona Weight Loss Club 8:15 am

Tel:

Drop-in Bowling 10 am - 2 pm

Open 9 am - noon

Open 9 am - noon

22

Merritt Senior Centre

5

We’ll eliminate all the problems for you!

15

Drop-in Bowling 10 am - 2 pm

21

27

Open 9 am - noon

Pot Luck 5 pm

14

Open 9 am - noon

CLOSED

FRIDAY 2

8

Drop-in Bowling 10 am - 2 pm

Open 9 am - noon

20

26

Drop-in Bowling 10 am - 2 pm 7

13

THURSDAY 1

Open 9 am - noon

Open 9 am - noon

Save the difficulty & inconvenience of trying to sell your RV by yourself! • Strangers coming to your home • Length of time to sell your unit • The right price to ask Don’t • Legalities of selling want to consign? • Wasting your free time We’ll • Clean-up & detail costs buy your • Etc., etc., etc. unit!

WEDNESDAY

6

BC Day CLOSED

TRAILERS • COACHES • CAMPERS • 5TH WHEELS • MOTOR HOMES

Are you concerned about:

TUESDAY

SIGN UP FOR OUR FALL BOWLING LEAGUE

CONSIGNMENTS WELCOME

Remember, we will also trade UP or DOWN to get you the unit you want!

MONDAY

26

13

Savona Weight Loss Club 8:15 am

20

Savona Weight Loss Club 8:15 am

14

Exercise 8:30 am Coffee 9 am

Exercise 8:30 am Coffee 9 am

27 Savona Weight Loss Club 8:15 am

7

Exercise 8:30 am Coffee 9 am

21

28 Exercise 8:30 am Coffee 9 am

8

Exercise 8:30 am Coffee 9 am UPS 7 pm

15

FRIDAY 2

Exercise 8:30 am Coffee 9 am

9 Exercise 8:30 am Coffee 9 am

16

Exercise 8:30 am Coffee 9 am UPS 7 pm

Exercise 8:30 am Coffee 9 am

22

23

Exercise 8:30 am Coffee 9 am UPS 7 pm

29 Exercise 8:30 am Coffee 9 am UPS 7 pm

Exercise 8:30 am Coffee 9 am

SATURDAY 3

4

Exercise 8:30 am Coffee 9 am Crib 7 pm

10

11

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18

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Exercise 8:30 am Coffee 9 am Crib 7 pm

Exercise 8:30 am Coffee 9 am Crib 7 pm

Exercise 8:30 am Coffee 9 am Crib 7 pm

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Exercise 8:30 am Coffee 9 am

Exercise 8:30 am Coffee 9 am Crib 7 pm


August 2018

Page 21

Murray doesn’t like the idea of cremation or burial. What else is there?

Editor’s Note: The following describes a process of dealing with human remains that may strike some as quite graphic. If you are sensitive to reading such material please proceed with caution or read no further. Few of us like to think about it, but the question is real and it’s inevitable. When we die, a funeral director is going to ask our family whether we should be cremated or buried. In Kamloops, 90 percent answer “cremation.” In fact, it’s usually one of the first words I hear when family members walk through the door: “Murray wants to be cremated.” Period.

End of discussion, or so they think. But there’s a new kid on the block, an alternative to burial or cremation. Actually, it’s not that new at all. Discovered about 100 years ago, the process uses a mixture of special salts and water (and perhaps a couple of other ingredients). The mixture is poured into a chamber that looks sort of like the Friendship 7 space ship that John Glenn flew in 1962. Add Murray. Gently heat and agitate. Wait a few hours and you’re left with Murray’s bones, a few dental fillings or other metals, and a brown liquid. The bones can be crushed into ash and returned to the family, just like with cremation. The fillings and other metals (hips, gold teeth, etc.) can be removed, set aside and – I presume – returned to the family if they wish. But what becomes of the liquid? Most of the time it goes down the drain to the sewage treatment plant. I’ve read that some people capture it

and spread it on their garden. For all you gardeners out there, do you think this would help your tomato yield or your gardenias to bloom? Or, would it make you less inclined to garden at all? Proponents of this process say that it uses less energy, produces less carbon dioxide and other pollutants (e.g. mercury), and is a “kinder, gentler alternative to cremation.” One thing is certain: if a funeral home is thinking of offering this service (called alkaline hydrolysis, resomation and other terms) it’s a big investment and a huge gamble. The unit costs hundreds of thousands of dollars. It’s not legal everywhere (in Canada, Saskatchewan is the only province that has approved it to date), and so far there doesn’t seem to be a great demand for it. What do you think of this idea? In the end, that’s the most important question.

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Continued from page 18 Manitoba and waited impatiently for Jay. Agonised that she was a noshow, he called on a local resident who graciously invited him in to phone the Ontario Provincial Police. Time dragged on and no tips came in to the municipal police, nor did the provincial police have any leads on Jay. Ultimately, the O.P.P. dispatched info about her to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Only marginally conscious, Jay picked up on a screaming siren. Flashing lights broke into her nightmare and reflected off the R.C.M.P officer’s wide-brimmed hat, red tunic and tall shiny boots as he approached to confirm her identity. “Are you Jay McLean and is your husband Don?” Tearfully, she gulped and nodded. “It’s been hours since a municipal constable named Banks spotted you on the shoulder of the route to Quebec.” To calm the near hysterical young woman, he added, “I have good news; we found your husband! Late tonight, I should say early this morning, I got a call that two constables working in the same office – one, on Don’s search for you, and one on yours – compared notes over coffee. They put two and two together and realized they were both searching for you guys!” The officer drew a sketchy map for Jay to follow and wished her God speed. Haunted by self-doubt, Jay’s breathing quickened as she drove the

excruciating distance back through Toronto. Finally, heading west with hope, she gathered composure… until distant shadows caused her intense anguish. She screamed out loud, “No, oh no, Don!” She recognized the truck and trailer parked eight lanes over – facing the opposite direction! Overwhelmed by a bittersweet sense of doom and hope, she drove on—her eyes piercing the dark in search of an exit. The rain finally let up, and as she crossed a brightly lit overpass, the hope lifted her spirits and the doom passed. She headed straight back down the highway to the illusive service road. “There you are!” Don called, and Jay collapsed in his arms. “Where was your ‘Keep Wife in Tow’ permit when we needed it, Donny? I was so lost!” “I know. The R.C.M.P. told me they were preparing an ‘All Points Alert’ as a pre-curser to eventually declaring you a ‘missing person’!” “No!” “Yes!” The couple clung to each other and heartily thanked the local fellow. Inside the home on wheels, Don and Jay cuddled and slept the rest of the night. A week later, celebrating their successful journey across the country to Edmonton, their glasses clinked in a toast to the ‘wife in tow’.

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778-471-7528

1365B Dalhousie Drive, Kamloops, BC V2C 5P6


August 2018

Page 22

What’s in your bucket?

Sacred Heart Cathedral

Weekend Masses Saturday 7 pm Sunday 8:30 am 11:30 am, 6 pm Confession Times Wed 5:15-5:35 pm Saturday 4-5 pm Sunday 5:30-6 pm or by appointment

COMMUNITY CHURCH

255 Nicola Street • 250-372-2581 www.sacredheartkamloops.org

344 Poplar

UNITED CHURCHES OF CANADA

A Place to Belong!

Kamloops United Church

Sunday Service 11:00 am Sunday School 11:45 am

Please check out our website for any upcoming events

250-554-1611 www.kamsa.ca

Weekday Masses Monday 6:30 pm Tuesday - Friday 9 am & 6:30 pm Saturday 9 am

www.kamloopsunited.ca 421 St. Paul St. • Sundays 10 am Rev. Bruce Comrie

Mt. Paul United Church

Be careful what you wish for! Those wishes, those desires, those “to do” lists that make their way on to your bucket list can be life-changing, so be careful! Over ten years ago I tossed the desire to walk the Camino in Spain into my bucket. Three years ago I was finally able to live that wish and walked thirty consecutive days on various paths, roads and trails across Spain. It was a lifechanging experience. My perception of the world – and of myself – shifted. I am a different person because of this one “bucket list” adventure. The original “bucket list” comes from a movie about two men who are

told they are terminal and who set off on a series of adventures, racing the clock to accomplish all those adventures they were too busy to get around to doing. Bucket lists can be filled with fun, crazy things to do, places to see, people to meet. And sometimes in the pursuit of a goal our lives can be shifted. Walking the Camino is considered a deeply spiritual experience as pilgrims follow a route across northern Spain to Santiago de Compostela, where the bones of St. James allegedly sit beneath the floor of the Cathedral. This pilgrimage route has been walked by millions of people for a wide variety of reasons. I walked to seek a deeper connection with the Holy. And I found it. But not in the places one would expect. While I loved the old churches and cathedrals I visited along they way, I found the solitude of walking in the

natural world every day – through forests, along streams, up and down steep mountainous trails, through small villages and often serenaded by cuckoos – connected me with God in way I had not experienced before. Something shifted in me as I traversed Spain on foot and I have never been the same. Now when I read the stories of Jesus I pay attention to the fact that Jesus was outside more than he was inside. He didn’t build a “church” and center his ministry there. He walked around the countryside and touched lives in a way that made a difference. So often when we hear the word church we think of buildings. I think “church” is better defined as a community of people who seek to follow the way of Jesus. If you reached into my bucket today and pulled out my list, you would see “wild church” written there. This is the way I am choosing to define my desire to see the church

move outside the walls of its buildings – back into the natural world. Our Christian story began in a garden. I want to see it return to that “wild” space, the space where I experienced God in a lifechanging, life-giving way as I took a pilgrimage walk three years ago. Our natural world holds much wisdom for us. It can nurture our spirits and our souls. If you are interested in joining me as I see how this bucket list item reveals itself, I invite you meet with me on Sat., Aug. 11 at 10 a.m. at the Waterfront Park labyrinth between Pioneer and Riverside Parks. For more information, check out our website. Rev LeAnn Blackert ministers with the congregation of Mount Paul United Church on the north shore of Kamloops (www. mtpauluc.ca) and loves hanging out in the wilderness!

www.mtpauluc.ca 140 Laburnum St. • Sundays 10 am Rev. LeAnn Blackert

Plura Hills United Church

www.plurahillsunited.com 2090 Pacific Way • Sundays 10 am

Kamloops Highland Games Society – Various Positions as follows – Board Member – Oneyear commitment, help organize and carry out Highland Games (July) and Robbie Burns Dinner (January). Kamloops Therapeutic Riding Association – KTRA Summer Kids Camps Horse Leader (13+) to tack up horses, lead horses into arena, assist with mounting and leading kid’s horses.

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80th Provincial Winter Fair – Kid Zone with Petting Zoo Volunteers and Parking Volunteer from Sept. 21-24. Volunteers will provide general supervision and direct activities.

Hot Nite in the City Society– Hot Nite in the City Show and Shine - Various Positions as follows – Barricade Volunteers for pick up, set up, removal and return. Security Volunteers at 3rd for rotating shifts from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Other Avenue barricades from 9 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. or 4:30 to 6 p.m. Phoenix Centre – Story Harvester (19+) to assist in harvesting stories by way of administering an electronic survey with people who choose to participate. Salvation Army Thrift Store – Urgently requires Volunteers Sort & process donations, price items, assist customers with purchases. Monday through Saturday shifts available, 9:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Two-hour minimum shift.

Canadian Mental Health Association Clubhouse – Certified Yoga Instructor to hold a 45 minutes class twice a month. Hours 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. The Clubhouse program provides stability, competence, and selfesteem, enabling individuals with serious and persistent mental illness to participate as fully as possible within the community. Volunteer Kamloops has partnered with Kamloops Timeraiser (13+) – Marketing and Communications Person. Interview volunteers, artists, agencies, for stories and does social media posts. Must be persistent, a good writer, and able to take high quality pictures.

FOR THESE AND MANY OTHER POSITIONS PLEASE APPLY ONLINE AT: www.volunteerkamloops.org | 250-372-8313 We are a non-profit charity supporting community volunteering. Volunteer Kamloops acknowledges the support of the Province of British Columbia and the Interior Health Authority

26 Years in Kamloops

Dr. Stephen DeWitt, DeWitt Dr. Stephen

DeWitt, DPM

Podiatrist, Foot Surgeon • Thick and Difficult Nails

• Arch Heel and Bunion Pain

• Ingrown Nail Surgery

• Plantar Warts and Corns

• Diabetic Foot Care

• Custom Molded Orthotics

250-374-7495 #380-546 St. Paul St. Kamloops, BC

Dr. DeWitt is accepting neW patients


August 2018

Page 23

Excelsior Rebekah Lodge No.23: General meeting second Tuesday of every month 7:30 p.m. Regular meeting fourth Tuesday of every month at 7:30 p.m. 423 Tranquille Rd. If you have kidney-related issues and questions, and would like to chat with someone who has been there, the Kamloops Kidney Support Group is here for you. We meet on the second Saturday of each month at Romeo’s Kitchen in the Coast Kamloops Hotel and Conference Centre, 1250 Rogers Way and on the second Wednesday of each month at Denny’s, 898 Tranquille Rd. at 10 a.m. You won’t get any medical advice from us, but we are here to share our experiences, whether you may be pre-dialysis or on dialysis, a kidney donor or a recipient, a family member, or anything in between. FMI call Edna Humphreys at 250-376-6361, Dorothy Drinnan at 250-5732988, or Margaret Thompson at 250-819-3135. Mutliple Myeloma Support Group for Kamloops and Region. Meetings will be scheduled at the Kamloops Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre once an agenda is in place for a meeting and/or a speaker have been arranged. If you are interested, please contact one of the following people and provide us with your email address (or phone number) and we will notify you of future meetings. Bob T.: ridgerunner@telus. net 250-376-3292; Anne E. akevenrude@shaw.

ca 250-372-8077; Bob H. rhamaguchi@shaw.ca 250-374-6754. The Afternoon Auxiliary to RIH Thrift Seller is open Monday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Located at 146 Victoria St. We welcome you to come shop, donate or volunteer. Aberdeen Lions Club meets on the second and fourth Tuesday of the month at noon. Meetings are held at 9-A 1800 Tranquille Rd. New members welcome. Call 250-828-1765. Alzheimer Caregiver and Early Support Stage groups meets the second Thursday of the month, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. and the fourth Thursday of the month, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Alzheimer Society Resource Centre, 405, 235 – 1st Ave. For more information please contact Tara Hildebrand, support and education coordinator Alzheimer Society of B.C. at 250-377-8200. Brock Central Lions Club meets the first and third Thursday of the month at 6 p.m. Meetings are held at the Centre for Seniors, 9-A 1800 Tranquille Rd. Call 250-3710115. Army Navy & Airforce Veterans in Canada - Unit 290. ANAVETS by the river is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping veterans and the community. We are located at #9-177 Tranquille Rd. Contact info: 250554-2455 anavets290.ca. The club is open 7 days a week. On Wednesdays fun darts starts at 1 p.m. and welcomes everyone. We have our karaoke on Friday nights at 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday meat draws at 3 p.m.

Everyone is welcome. Council of Canadians meets at 5.30 p.m. on the second Wednesday of every month at the Smorgasbord Deli, 225 - 7th Ave. Please join us. Call Anita or Dalton at 250-377-0055 or 250377-0055. You can also visit kamloops canadians.ca. Chronic Pain Association of Kamloops meets the last Wednesday of each month at noon at People In Motion, 182B Tranquille Rd., for resources, support and fellowship. There is parking in the back.Call Ashley at 778-257-1986 or email: ash. westen@gmail.com. Tuesday afternoon cribbage takes place at 1:30 p.m. at McArthur Park Lawn Bowling clubhouse, next to Norbrock Stadium. Come for crib, coffee & good company. Free parking. Call 250-5790228, 250-579-8259 or 250376-0917. Fraternal Order of Eagles Aerie 3453 & Ladies Auxiliary Welcomes you, 755 Tranquille Rd. Join us. Big Jim Horse Races Wednesday at 4 p.m., Darts Thursday at 7 p.m. Wii League Bowling Friday at 6 p.m. Meat Draws Saturday & Sunday at 3 p.m. Karaoke w/Michelle Sunday at 7 p.m. FMI 250-376-4633. Do you enjoy singing in harmony and a great variety of songs? Kamloops Happy Choristers invites new members who are 55 and over for a social atmosphere and a chance to sing for senior residences and public concerts. We meet every Wednesday from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Heritage House. For more information call Sharon at 250-579-9505.

Kamloops Duplicate Bridge Club meets at Heritage House every Monday at 7 p.m. Beginner and open games. Every Tuesday at 7 p.m. for intermediate games. Friday 12:30 p.m. open game. Thursday at 7 p.m., at Cottonwood, intermediate and open games. FMI visit website kamloopsduplicate bridgeclub.ca Kamloops Elks Lodge #44 meets at 7:30 p.m. every second Thursday of each month at 784-B Victoria St. We have served the community since 1920. You are invited to come and meet the members. New members are welcome. The hall is also available for gatherings, meetings, etc. For any inquiries please call 250-3722737 or 250-573-4632. Kamloops Floor Curlers meet Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Heritage House, top floor, Riverside Park. New members always welcome. Free parking for members. No special equipment needed. New teams are drawn each day. There are two games and coffee each day. The group runs all year. Call Kay at 250376-0917, Kay at 250-8280819 or Liz at 250-372-5493. Kamloops Heritage Model Railroad Club meets on the first Friday of each month at 7 p.m. Come and investigate a great hobby. Call 250-5543233 FMI. Kamloops Prostate Cancer Support Group meet at 10 a.m. on the third Saturday of the month at The Seniors Activity Centre, 9A-1800 Tranquille Rd. Phone 250-376-4011 or email larubekam1947@gmail.com

Fresh Healthy Local LARGEST SELECTION OF KAMLOOPS GROWN PRODUCE!

Kamloops Stamp Club meets at 2 p.m. on the second Tuesday of each month at Mt. Paul United Church, 140 Laburnum. Contact 250-3141021. The world famous Kamloops Rube Band practices on Monday evenings (except holidays), 7:30 p.m. at the Kamloops Yacht Club, 1140 River St. New members with playing experience are invited to drop by and join the band, having fun with music. FMI, please call Jordan Amon at 250-572-6271. Kamloops Stroke Recovery Branch meets at Riverbend Seniors Community at 10:30-1 p.m. on the 2nd, 3rd and 4th Wednesday of the month. Email: kmshelton@hotmail. com or phone: 250-377-1961. Kamloops United Church Thrift Store has come home to 421 St. Paul Street. Contact number: 250-372-3020. We are located in a brand new addition to the church. North Kamloops Elks Lodge #469, #102-1121 12th St., 250-376-2924 (leave message). Meet the third Tuesday of the month at 7.30 p.m. New members welcome. Crib tournaments every Wednesday, 7 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m. The Kamloops Breast Cancer Support Group meets at Kamloops United Church - Ponderosa Room the 3rd Monday of each month at 7 p.m. The support group is for all women at any stage of their breast cancer journey whether newly diagnosed or years out of treatment. The Kamloops Tai Chi Club is a member-driven non profit group. We meet Tuesday evenings,

7-8:30 p.m., St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, 1136 6th Ave. Experience the benefits of tai chi & qigong: increased flexibility, balance and agility. To join our class, email: info@ kamloops taichiclub.com. Kamloops Garden Club meets on the 4th Wednesday of the month at Heritage House on Lorne St. Riverside Park, 7 p.m. Guest speakers cover a range of interesting topics relating to gardening. Please join us. Contact Judy at 250-374-4181 FMI. Riverside Lawn Bowling Club Come try lawn bowling. Free Lessons. Phone Bruce or Laurel at 250-554-5177 for information. McArthur Park Lawn Bowling invites new bowlers to try lawn bowling free. Lawn Bowling is low impact, easy to learn and very affordable. There is something for everyone; drop-in social bowling, leagues and tournaments with a little competitiveness, and Provincials, 55+ Games, and Nationals for the more serious bowler. The Lawn Bowling facility situated at McArthur Island, is open from May to September for more information call: Brenda 250579-5775, Ron 250-319-3255 or Al 778-470-6047. Ping-Pong is billed as a brain sport. It is also said it could be the elixir of youth and it brings a lot more to the table. We meet Tuesdays 7 to 9 p.m. and Thursdays 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. at Desert Garden Community Centre, 540 Seymour Street. We welcome more players. Drop in fee is $2. Having fun is something we did all the time, why change with age? FMI call 250-372-3965.

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One prize drawn monthly. Original entry form only - no facsimiles accepted. *One entry per person per month. Must agree to photo and name being used in The Connector Newspaper.


August 2018

Page 24

7 high-tech reasons you should finally deal with your hearing loss 1 They’re cool, sleek, discreet and virtually invisible. New technologies are all about function, style, and effortless living. The latest hearing aids offer all three. The designs are incredibly attractive with smooth, modern contours. And they’re much smaller than even conventional Bluetooth earpieces. Many of the latest hearing aids are so tiny, they sit discreetly and comfortably inside the ear canal, out of sight. You might say that aesthetically, hearing aids have had a complete makeover.

accordingly. For the record, it’s not by chance that the latest state-of-the-art hearing aids are so adaptable to changing noise scenarios. Recordings of virtually every imaginable listening situation have been used to create algorithms and “train” these amazing minicomputers for your ears. They capture the natural richness and variation of speech, so it’s easier to follow the conversation wherever you are. Let’s face it, one of the most pesky aspects of not hearing as well as you once did is not catching everything people are saying. New technologies not only help you decipher speech details in music and noise, but they better preserve and clarify the more subtle sounds of language — like the consonants B, S, F, T, and Z — so you can really follow what someone is saying. No faking. You can hear from all directions — even when scoping out what’s in the fridge. Advanced directional microphone technology lets you hear from the back and side — something really important when driving a car. But it also makes it easier to hear voices more clearly in other everyday settings — like when your head is in the fridge and your significant other is talking at your back. Yes, that’s one great feature. Digital, Bluetooth, and wireless capabilities keep you connected when it counts. Digital, wireless hearing aids are the now the norm. That means many new technologies let you stream sound directly into your hearing aids — at the perfect volume — from your smartphone, laptop, conference-room speakerphone, home entertainment system, and other Bluetooth devices. Music, phone calls, podcasts, videos, whatever you listen to through your iPhone (or iPad and iPod for that matter), you can listen to through many hearing aids. Some even let you control the volume and other personalized sound settings with an app on your smartphone. Several types of wireless accessories give you a listening boost by bridging the gap between you and the speaker, making it easier to hear in loud or large places. Using a wireless minimicrophone — with cool, contoured designs, some even looking like a pen— placed on the restaurant or conference-room table, or near anyone you want to hear, makes it feel like they’re speaking directly and clearly into your ears, no matter how noisy the setting. You adjust the volume.

3

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They cut out background noise so you hear what you want to hear. Even with the best of hearing, it’s tough to hear people when it’s noisy. But many state-of-the-art hearing aids not only reduce unwanted noise, they also scan the listening environment and automatically adapt to it — even in wind. There are hearing aids that can actually “geo-tag” a location. So if it’s convenient for you to network at a certain coffee shop, your hearing aids will know when you’re there and adjust themselves

5

today’s greater-than-ever audio-processing goes hand-in-hand with less battery usage. Some hearing aids are even rechargeable, eliminating the need to change batteries altogether. But the convenience and comfort don’t end there. Some brands let you set up reminders for things like appointments or taking medicine. Perhaps the most “peace-of-mind-preserving” life hack, though, is leading-edge technology that helps sooth the ringing in your ears (tinnitus) in a way that suits you. There are even more disruptive hearing technologies on the horizon. Totally out-of-sight, semipermanent hearing aids that stay in for two to three months let you shower and sleep in them, no fuss. Perhaps the most futuristic glimpse of hearing aids is tied to recent ground-breaking studies revealing a significant link between untreated hearing loss and dementia. Hearing aid manufacturers are deep in the trenches working to create future break-through technologies that will make it as easy as possible for the brain to decode speech and other sounds. Reducing cognitive load — that is, drawing fewer resources from the brain just to “hear” — is a very good thing. After all, we really do hear with our brains and not with our ears. Some hearing aids with these technologies are already available. Yes, leading-edge hearing aids are here to help you keep your mind sharp and your life easier by hearing your best at every age — starting today.

7 6

State-of-the-art comfort and convenience mean you’ll always want to use them. Super-small, super-light, customized, functional, and ergonomically designed, hearing aids today are more comfy than ever — yet tough enough to withstand real life. For most of the newest hearing aids, there’s virtually no feedback or whistling thanks to advances in digital technologies. And most are hypoallergenic with nanotechnology coating to keep them clean and dry. Some are even fully waterproof, so you can swim and shower in them, no problem. Plus,

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The Connector August 2018  
The Connector August 2018  
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