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Cites & Fly Tying Materials The Risks Sustainable fly tying is a responsibility for us all as fly tyers. Many think this only affects classic Fly Tyers using Speckled Bustard, a Toucan or Indian Crow skin, however CITES affects almost every fly tyer, we simply may not realise! Did you know that peacock is now covered by Cites? Yes! This is not just about grey parrot or Jungle Cock it means that if we carry peacock herl across interna onal borders we risk confisca on and fines or worse. This could be in our fly tying materials or in a fly. It is serious. Imagine… we or one of our colleagues are going fishing to an interna onal loca on and (for example) the Prince Nymph flies ed with Peacock herl is discovered at customs… or fly tyers going to an Interna onal show and are caught with Peacock Herl in their fly tying kit! As fly tyers we must prove the sources of materials if caught travelling interna onally. However, even if we have purchased Peacock Herl from a local breeder from bred stock and have a vet’s cer ficate proving its’ origins how can we prove that the single feather wrapped around our Pheasant Tail Nymph came from that bird? The answer is simple we cannot. Fly tying must move to more synthe c, bred or game related species. We all have responsibility for sustainable fly tying. The use of exo c materials does not improve your tying skills and the list of subs tutes is big enough for everyone to find his or her happiness legally and at a much lower price than many illegal species used. Semperfli is commi ed to synthe cs and game species to support sustainable fly tying. We look at species related to tying classic Salmon Flies, as the pa erns of the 19th Century contain a lot of such material which at the me were not protected. It was a big surprise for us, when we read that the Conven on of Interna onal Trade of Endangered Species, CITES in short, was established as a result of the fly tying community, bringing the Grey Jungle Fowl to the brink of ex nc on. Before we read this, we were genuinely not aware that fly tying could have such a massive consequence on wild life. To us, this was and is shocking. CITES recently announced the addi on of sixteen species to its list of controlled species, Appendix III. Species under Appendix III are subject to enhanced restric ons and require addi onal documenta on upon importa on. Included in the list of amendments are several species of the Phasianidae family; two kinds of Asian pheasants, but most notably, Pavo cristatus (Indian peafowl or blue peafowl) – i.e. peacocks. The peacock popula on is dwindling fast due to habitat loss, contamina on of food sources and poaching. The Indian Peafowl is endangered and the Green Peafowl is nearly, if not absolutely, ex nct. Peacock feathers are widely used in home decor and decora on, mask making and millinery applica ons, costume and theater produc ons, wedding decora on and of course fly tying.

We look back in history and fly tying pa erns and see an amazing array of mammals historically used in fly tying, including various squirrels, the Diana Monkey, Chinchilla, Gray Fox, Brown Bear, Wolverine, Polar Bear, Coyote, Seal, Elk, White‐Tailed Deer, and goat and feathers from birds as diverse as Indian crow, Blue Cha erer, Golden Pheasant, Lady Amherst pheasant, corncrake, toucan, Guinea Fowl, Ocellated Turkey, Merlin, Coot, Baikal teal, Wood Duck, and Scarlet Macaw. The list is endless.

In our different journeys we have probably been to exhibi ons and seen companies and individuals selling Jungle Cock, most of which is illegally harvested, Polar Bear, seal fur or other Peacock Feathers origina ng from Pakistan were already exo cs, How o en have you listed in Appendix III and therefore require a CITES export seen ‘specialists’ that have permit to be legally imported into the US. The change had a stock of Jungle Cock means that peacock feathers coming from other regions will capes arrive? Reality is these also now require a CITES cer ficate of origin issued by the are almost all illegal, CITES enforcing authority of the expor ng country harvested for $1 in India, send to the specialist retailer This is not an issue for me surely? I brought my Peacock who is selling on Facebook from a shop while in Europe and am on a fishing trip to and Ebay for $80 to $250. Alaska. So how do you prove that that Peacock is from a legal source and how do we prove to customs that peacock on the hook is the peacock or in a hank in my tying kit I purchased from that source?

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We have a series of questions we must ask ourselves, is this sustainable, is it legal and are we doing what is right for the future of our hobby and industry. What are we going to leave our children

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Semperfli Fly Tying Guide Spring 2020  

Semperfli Fly Tying Guide Spring 2020, the best in fly tying materials from one of the most innovative companies in the fly tying industry....

Semperfli Fly Tying Guide Spring 2020  

Semperfli Fly Tying Guide Spring 2020, the best in fly tying materials from one of the most innovative companies in the fly tying industry....

Profile for semperfli