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The Social Media effect

From hiring to firing: An employer’s guide Christian M Rocca


• 175 million registered Twitter users • 95 million Tweets per day

• 100 million users of Linked-In • 750 million Facebook users

• 7 billion pieces of content shared on Facebook weekly


Challenges facing employers: • Excessive use of social media leading to loss of productivity; • Risk of reputational damage/unwanted litigation to the business; • Avoiding inappropriate use/abuse of social media without upsetting employment relations. Workers aged 18-24 years are the most regular users of social networking sites, with one in five (21%) claiming to engage with them several times an hour.


Hiring • Use of SM can be a useful recruitment tool According to the director of Internet privacy and safety for Microsoft, 41% of surveyed HR professionals in the UK have rejected a candidate based on online reputation information. A recent report from a well known HR firm states that in the UK 53% of Employers use social networks to recruit candidates


Hiring • Use of SM can be a useful recruitment tool

• Be conscious of DP issues The Information Commissioner’s Office recommends limiting screening of applicants to an examination of the genuinely public aspects of their life such as qualifications or work history and, where possible, avoiding ‘private-public’ aspects found on sites such as Facebook. Where employers do use social media in recruitment Data Protection Act 1998 principles will apply.


Hiring • Use of SM can be a useful recruitment tool

• Be conscious of DP issues

• Be consistent • Obtain consent

• Record reasoning


Hiring • Use of SM can be a useful recruitment tool

• Be conscious of DP issues

• Be consistent • Obtain consent


Hiring • Use of SM can be a useful recruitment tool

• Be conscious of DP issues

• Be consistent • Obtain consent

• Record reasoning


Managing • To block or not to block? According to a recent survey carried out by a leading law firm in UK over 50% of companies now block access to social media sites. Research by web security firm ScanSafe shows that more than a third of its corporate customers block social networking sites - up from 17 per cent this time last year. The report suggests that companies are beginning to wake up to the security and productivity problems associated with staff using social networking sites at work.


Managing • To block or not to block?

• To monitor or not to monitor? The Employment Practices Data Protection Code suggest carrying out an Impact assessment: • identify the purpose(s) behind monitoring and benefits it is likely to deliver; • identify any likely adverse impact of monitoring arrangement considering alternatives; • take into account the obligations arising and judge whether monitoring is justified.


Managing • To block or not to block?

• To monitor or not to monitor? • Can I use the information? • How do I use the information?


Firing • The

stewardess and the school teacher

• The hairdresser

• The supermarket on YouTube • the probation officer

• The barmaid


Confidentiality, client lists and contacts • When

is confidentiality lost?

• To whom does the information belong? • Inclusion of express contractual provisions in contracts. • Distinction between contacts established and used during the course of employment and business contacts that have been forged or reinforced through social networking sites?


Drafting the policy • What

is your social media strategy? Affects four key groups – employees, customers and prospects, business partners and the social web; • Have a clear idea of the purpose of any initiative before it is implemented; • Who should write and revise the supporting policy and who will be responsible and accountable for it? • Do you need a communications plan and training scheme in order to inform employees of their responsibilities? • Who will enforce the policy and how?


The Social Media effect

From hiring to firing: An employer’s guide Thank You



Social Media in the Workplace