Page 1

The Selma

Times-Journal

March 2010


Inside Ashford Home N e t t i e ’s C o t t a g e Bjelke Cottage B r i d g e Te n d e r ’ s H o u s e Kelso Cottage Churchview Map of tour sites Kenan House PEW House B r o w n s t o n e ( P a r a n o r m a l To u r ) Church Street United Methodist Church

Page 4 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8,9 Page 10 P a g e 11 Page 13 Page 14

Welcome to Selma It is with great pleasure that we welcome you to the 35th annual Selma Pilgrimage. With Alabama’s largest contiguous historic district, Selma has much to offer visitors seeking to experience history in motion. There are 19 sites on this year ’s Pilgrimage, which guarantee you an amazing and well-rounded glimpse into times gone by. By taking the tour, you will tread the same earth that has witnessed Civil W ar destruction and the civil rights movement. The Queen City continues to evolve, all the while honoring her past. It is our wish that you enjoy your time in Selma during Pilgrimage. You are always welcome here, where history is home. The Selma Times-Journal

Dennis Palmer



Publisher and President

Jay Davis



Vice President and Business Manager

Erica Slone



Advertising Director

Ashley Key



Classified Advertising Manager

Michelle Coleman



Classified Consultant

Jessica Hope



Marketing Consultant

Bill Tomey



Marketing Consultant

Marlene Craft



Marketing Consultant

Karen Lawler



Graphic Artist

Leesha Faulkner



Editor

Brian Tynes



Sports Editor

Laura Fenton



Staff Writer

Chris Wasson



Staff Writer

Shane Gaut



Circulation Director

Tasha Tice



Circulation District Manager

Melissa Miller



Circulation Clerk/Customer Service Contact us:

Cover photo by Dennis Palmer

P.O. Box 611 1018 Water Avenue, Selma AL 36701 Phone: 334.875.2110 Fax: 334.410.1773


4 ★ 2010 PILGRIMAGE

Ashford BY CHRIS WASSON THE SELMA TIMES-JOURNAL

Selma’s Pilg rimage will have many unique homes, but none may be as breathtaking as Ashford. Julian Smith, a businessman and surveyor in Selma, b uilt Ashford from 1899-1903. Ashford is a neoclassi-

cal home with colonnades sur rounding the home on both the inside and the outside, as was popular in tha t time. “The Greek revival became popular after the

World Exposition in Chicago in 1893,” said Dick Hudg ens, an adjunct professor of architecture at the Rural Studio in Gr eensboro.

“Daniel Burnham painted the city w hite and it looked r eally c lassical. After that it was popular.” According to Hudgens the Greek style became more popular in the South due to the practicality of the

high ceilings and porches as well as being a status symbol. Thirty white columns surround the home on the outside , and se ven columns hold the b uilding up inside ofthe home. Current o wner Ra y Delp has completel y restored the home. “The floor and the ceilings ar e original,” said Delp. “We just r ecently finished a second restoration on the ceilings.”

Friday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday 1 to 5 p.m.

Kenan House BY LAURA FENTON SELMA TIMES-JOURNAL

In the middle ofthe parlor, there’s an e verlasting memory of the Civil War. As the onl y stop on the Pilgrimage tour with Ci vil War history, the burn spot on the flooring of Kenan House is one of the many relics of the era on the property. Wilson’s Raiders came through the property and intended to bring do wn the house. “When they left, they piled up all the fur niture and gathered some coal to b urn the house,” said o wner

Friday 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday 1 to 5 p.m.

James Kenan. Slaves came in from the back quarters and quickly put out the fire. “We have also found musket balls and bullets in the backyard with metal detectors,” Kenan said. Kenan took over the house in 1995 after he inherited it fr om his father. Built in the 1840s , the home is furnished with moder n fur niture and has modern conveniences. Traveling south on County Road 37 to Lovers Lane, this area also holds Kenan’s Mill, an 1860s water-powered gristmill. The mill tur ns grain into flour that is sold to grocers. “There’s not a lot of water powered grist mills around,” said Ken Smith, chairman of the Kenan’s Mill Committee. “There’s maybe one other in the entire state.”


2010 PILGRIMAGE ★ 5 The Bjelke family moved into the stucco home in 1990, and since then, both have worked to create a lush garden and cottage decorum. “It was structurally in good shape,” Bjelke said. “We just changed it for our taste.” The home was once pink and g reen before the Bjelkes decided

Bjelke Cottage BY LAURA FENTON SELMA TIMES-JOURNAL

Bjelke Cotta ge b lends the style of a Tudor home and an English g arden with the c limate and landsca ping of 700 Lapsley Ave. Gr eg and J ane Bjelke, current owners of the home, refer to the house as the middle g round of Thomas Kinkade and F airhope because it has the qualities of Kinkade’s cotta ge paintings and the greenery of Fairhope’s scenery. “This is livable,” Greg Bjelke said. “It’ s not a museum. Its nice, but its family friendly. It’s lived in, and we use every inch of it.” Friday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

to repaint it a butter yellow and dark c hocolate. “T hat’s was nice, b ut w e got tir ed of it,” Bjelke said. Visitors ar e encoura ged to stop by the cottage to find out about the discovery made in the y ard of the cotta ge when the house was built.

As the f oundation was poured, items fr om the old King Memorial Hospital were found. Bjelke recommends visiting the home to find out the end of the story.


6 ★ 2010 PILGRIMAGE

Bridge Tender’s House BY LEESHA FAULKNER SELMA TIMES-JOURNAL

Kathi Needham loves the porch of the Bridge Tender’s House overlooking the Alabama River. “It’s so comfortable there,” she said recently. She and her husband, Georg e, bought the str ucture in 1999 fr om a series of public agencies to rework the house into a bed and br eakfast in Lafayette Park next to w here a swing-span bridge once crossed the Alabama River. The Selma Bridg e Co. built the cotta ge in the 1880s for the bridge tender. By 1940 the outdated bridge was replaced by the Edmund Pettus Bridge and the county destroyed the old span bridge. Yet, the cor nerstone remains and visitors can see it from the cottage’s downstairs porch. The Needhams have turned the cottage in a comfortable place to stay awhile. The inside is almost similar to a g allery, showing works from Selma’s artists. On one wall hangs a larg e wooden wheel — the pa ttern used to mak e the gears that once tur ned the bridge’s swing span. Saturday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Kelso Cottage BY CHRIS WASSON THE SELMA TIMES-JOURNAL

H.A. Stollenwerck, a local b usinessman and bank owner, built the K elso

Cottage in 1866 in an Italianate popular during that time. Kelso still has the original floors and F rench windo ws from the cotta ge even now.

Stollenwerk kept the home until his wife died a year later, when it was purchased by Selma’s mayor. Since that time the home has had a varying history during its existence, including being split up and rented out during the early part of the 20th century and going until 1983 when it was bought and r estored by Bob Ed

and Pat Morrow. “They took out the original entry, because they split the house into tw o,” said Nanc y Smith, owner of Kelso Cottage and the organizer of this year’s pilgrimage. “When Bob Ed and Pat Morrow got the house, they restored the original entranceway.” When the Mor rows purchased the home, they decided to open it as a bed and br eakfast. To accommodate the people who came in and out of the house, a second kitc hen was added. Smith has a history tha t is as varied as her home. On display in the home is pottery from an Acoma Indian tribe in New Mexico and wooden bo wls fr om Hawaii.

Saturday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.


2010 PILGRIMAGE ★ 7 BY LAURA FENTON SELMA TIMES-JOURNAL

When Ted Henry bought Churchview in 1976 it was 80 y ears old. “It’s a wonderful old brick Victorian,” Henry said. Once the Henrys mo ved into the home, a fire in August 1977 meant the family needed to rebuild a portion of the home. The home has now been restored to its Victorian grandeur. In addition to rebuilding, the home also has moder nized thr ough the years. “Our house when it was built had a Victorian front porch,” Henry said. A previous o wner took of f the por ch, la ter c hoosing to add one back. But the bric k of the home is w hat mak es it most special. Selma has produced brick since the 1850s, and the Henry fa mily has been in the b usiness f or 65 y ears. T he

brick on Chur chview is most lik ely the same type of brick used on homes today. “The tec hnique in making bric k hasn’t c hanged a lot,” Henry said. It’s the machinery that has been updated, but the raw materials ar e still the same. “

HENRY BRICK COMPANY, INC. Manufacturers of Quality Face Brick 3409 Water Avenue Selma, Alabama 36702 (334) 875-2600 Fax: (334) 875-7842

Real Homes Are Made of Brick! www.henrybrick.com Established 1945

Churchview Friday 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.


ANTIQUES CONSIGNMENT HOME DECOR •GIFTS

1113 Alabamaa Avee • Selma

Historic

1

SELMA

Pilgrimage 1

19

2 miles

2

700 Lapsley St Fri. 9-1

Summerfield Rd Fri. 11-4, Sat. 10-4, Sun. 1-4

4289 Summerfield Rd Fri. & Sun. 1-5

March 18-21, 2010

3

713 Mabry St Fri. & Sat. 10-4, Sun. 1-4

Kenan House

2 37

5

Kenan’s Mill 22

1.4 miles

80

80

Highland Ave

Summerfield Rd

300 Dallas Ave Fri. & Sat. 6-8 pm

18

267-2520

4

627 Church St Fri. 9--1 Sun. 1-5

6 JL Chestnut Blvd

St

ton

St ng r Ki he Lut rtin Ma St ce

en

ren

Law

Gre St

ing

klin

n Fra

sh Wa

St

St

7

St llas

8

17

619 Lauderdale St Sat. 1-5

22

le

Selma Art Guild Show 15

ad

16

Bro

19

t

22

rda

Vintage Sale & Selma Shoppe

Nettie’s Cottage Dallas Ave

hS

18

t St

St ve nA

a arkm

P

on

bry

St

16

Churchview

St

t

us

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sle

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Brownstone Manor

Old Live Oak Cemetery

7

Ma ion

t

Lap

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Un

Kin

710 Dallas Ave Fri. & Sat. 9:30-5:30

urc

F

Kelso Cottage

de

M

Lau

3

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Ch

Bjelke Cottage

od cLe

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17

4 Ave Ashford 5 6 PEW House

Sturdivant Hall

330 Lapsley St Thurs. & Fri. 9-11 pm

Da

Ave

9 Church St. UMC

ve aA

Selm

ve aA

m

ba

Ala

Arts Revive Show

14 Vaughan-Smitherman Ticket Headquarters

13

Old Depot

10

509 Tremont St Sat. 9-1

ve er A

t Wa

11 The Foundry 12 Bridge Tender’s

8

80

327 Church St Fri. & Sun. 1-5

521 Selma Ave Sat. 1-5

15

508 Selma Ave Fri. & Sat. 9-5, Sun. 1-5

14

109 Union St Fri. & Sat. 8:30-4, Sun. 12:30-4

13

1009 Water Ave Fri. & Sat. 12-5, Sun. 1-5

11

12

2 Lafayette Park Sat. 9-1

Mulberry & MLK Sat. 9-5

10

4 Martin Luther King St Fri. & Sat. 10-4, Sun. 1-4

9

214 Church St Fri. & Sat. 10-2. Sun 2-5


10 ★ 2010 PILGRIMAGE

Nettie’s Cottage BY BRIAN TYNES SELMA TIMES-JOURNAL

The pleasant Old Town feel of Nettie’s Cottage is what drew current owner Cecil Gayle to the house, and he said that’s what will draw others to the house during the Pilgrimage. “I’ve always liked this little house ,” Gayle said. “It’s small and very comfortable and easy to heat and cool. It’s a little cottage and it’s a wonderful place to be in town.” Visitors to the house will ha ve the oppor tunity to see a r emodeled kitchen and bathroom that have been completed in the last year. Other highlights of the house tour inc lude drawings and paintings by local ar tists and a studio tha t was used b y a stained glass window designer for Tiffany and Co. Gayle is working on restoring the house’s garden to its former glory, a project he said should be completed by next year. “People have always said what a beautiful y ard the house has,” Gayle said. “T here are azaleas and lots of varieties of camellias in the g arden. We’re just be ginning to bring bac k the design and fill in where the plants have died. It’s going to be beautiful again in about a year or so.” Gayle owned the property next door to Nettie’s Cottage, and

joined the two lots to gether. A larg er brick house once occupied the property as well, in addition to another smaller house that was built to accommodate the Parrish family. Nettie’s Cottage, named f or Nettie Eskridg e, the house’ s second owner was built around 1920 in the c lassic bungalow style. Saturday 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.


2010 PILGRIMAGE ★ 11

PEW House Saturday 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. BY CHRIS WASSON THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Many of the homes on the Pilgrimage tour have a unique history, and the PEW house is no different. The house has serv ed as a home, a church and a recovery center. PEW was named by the current owners to r ecognize the major owners of the home, the Pitts, the Ellwangers and the Weerts. Alexander Pitts , a la wyer from Selma, and his wife J uliet, built the home around 1900. The home went through several o wners bef ore being bought by Walter Ellwanger in

1945. Ellwanger was a Lutheran pastor in charge of the black missions in the South and was the president of the Ala bama Lutheran College, which would later become Concordia College. “We had been looking a t old homes around the area,” said Christine W eerts. “W e sa w

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(PEW house) on a Christmas Eve coming home fr om church. We saw it on a moonlit night and I ima gine it was something of destiny.” When they bought the house, the r eligious W eerts f amily learned a bout the history of the home to their surprise. “My husband and I ar e lifelong Lutherans ,” said Christine W eerts. “So y ou could

imagine how thrilled we were when we were closing on the home and lear ned that it was owned for 30 years by Rev. Walter Ellwanger.” The Weerts immediately began restoring the house. “While the house was w ell built with stunning woodwork, it was a little w orse for wear when we purchased it 10 years ago fr om f oreclosure,” said Weerts. ”We have done all of the inside work ourselves, including two major roof extensions and gutting and r estoring the kitchen and three bathrooms. Every room has been worked on but one. That door will stay closed.” The Weerts have tried to incorporate their r eligious beliefs through out the house, including a church pew, a pump organ and windo ws tha t feature the outline of fish, an early Christian symbol.


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2010 PILGRIMAGE ★ 13

Brownstone (Paranormal)

vestigating," SELMA TIMES-JOURNAL Davies Maggie Davies and the said. The investigation will Black Belt P aranormal be fr om 9 until 11 p .m. Research T eam ha ve a special treat in store for Thursday, March 18 and Friday, March 19. Pilgrimage goers. The house is owned by "We’re taking them on a investigation of Brown- Sam and Angie Golstone Manor ," Da vies son. It's a late 19th said. "Bring y our f lash- century sandlights and r ecording de- stone b uilt in the Neovices." The Blac k Belt P ara- classical style. Several pr onormal R esearch T eam wants to meet the pub lic fessional and show them how they paranormal teams investigate houses and other sites for the out of have documented the ordinary. no less "Guests will ha ve the than unique oppor tunity to three resuse r eal ghost hunting ident equipment and experience for themselves the spirits in thrill of paranormal in- this BY LEESHA FAULKNER

house, w hich has been featured on Ghost Hunters and HGTV.

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Thursday and Friday 9 p.m. to 11 p.m.


14 ★ 2010 PILGRIMAGE

Church Street UMC

Friday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. BY BRIAN TYNES SELMA TIMES-JOURNAL

For 175 years, the cor ner of Dallas A venue and Chur ch Street has been home to the same facility. It’s in its thir d building now, b ut Chur ch Street United Methodist Church has not forgotten a bout its be ginnings. The c hurch is on the pilg rimage tour this year, and its history will

be on display for all to see. “The stained-glass windows are the main attraction,” Fran Pearce, chairman of the history team, said. “W e will ha ve note cards with all the inf ormation about what the window means and who donated it.” The church also has an interesting baptismal. It was gi ven to the c hurch in the 1900s

from the local J ewish synagogue as a thank-you present for allowing the synagogue to use the c hurch’s building for worship. But central to the tour will be the c hurch’s org an, w hich Pearce said underw ent a full restoration 10-15 years ago. The church will commemorate is 175th anni versary with a homecoming service and visit from the bishop on April 18.


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