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2011 www.selfhelpafrica.org

ANNUAL REPORT


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Our Vision

A RURAL Africa Free From Hunger and Poverty

In 2011, Self Help Africa... Self Help Africa group* trained almost 400,000 smallholder farmers in production, business skills and organisational development. Helped 160,000 farm families to improve harvests. Improved market access for 284,000 smallholder farmers Supported over 800 local farmer organisations Supported microfinance services for over 35,000 people Cover: Thokozie Nyasulu hoes the land on her father’s farm in southern Malawi This page: Charles Manza on his parent’s farm in Katinta village, eastern Zambia Back page: Bringing fuel to market, Hurutu, Ethiopia

* includes activities of Partner Africa. Self Help Africa is a signatory to the Dochas NGO code of conduct on the responsible use of images and messages

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

AFTER THE HARVEST

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e want to change that. In trying to explain to people what Self Help Africa does, I often simply say “we help African smallholder farmers grow more food and sell their surplus”. By growing more food, families can bridge the hunger gap that has so often been a part of their lives. By selling their surplus, they can afford to pay for goods we consider essential - clothes, medicines and school fees. Growing more food is tough but, for many farmers, the hardest part of the year arrives when they look for someone to buy their surplus.

It might seem like a strange question coming from an organisation dedicated to ending hunger, but have you ever eaten food from Africa? If you live in Europe or North America, the chances are that you probably have at some stage in your lifetime, but not regularly.

If it has been a good harvest, the immediate problem is how and where to store the crop. If a farmer has enough storage, the next problem she faces is how to get it to a market. Bringing a 50-kilo bag of maize to the nearest town on the back of a bicycle is one way, but it’s also the surest route to a low price. In Self Help Africa, we’ve been adapting to this market challenge for many years. Part of the solution lies with helping farmers

build better storage facilities; another part involves assisting the development of farmer groups and cooperatives, which can bulk harvests ahead of transport to markets; yet another sees the development of links to new markets, sometimes for new crops. Ultimately, the solution to hunger and poverty in Africa doesn’t rest on the dinner tables of London or Dublin. It rests on the shoulders of Africa’s farmers, who must build new markets across the world, but particularly in Africa, for a range of both new and traditional produce. Self Help Africa is with them every step of the way in this challenge. And because our programmes rely on your support, you are walking with us. From the bottom of my heart, and on behalf of almost 400,000 families across Africa, thank you.

Raymond Jordan

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

WHERE WE

WORK

The bottom line 4

• One in three people in sub-Saharan Africa is hungry • Up to 80% of the population lives in rural areas, where farming is the main source of food and income • Investing in agriculture is up to three times as effective in cutting poverty as investment in any other sector


malawi

ghana SELF HELP AFRICA zambia ANNUAL REPORT 2011

kenya

Below: 19 year old David Banda produces cabbage as a member of Chanika irrigated horticultural group, Malawi

WEST AFRICA

zambia

burkinafaso

zambia

ETHIOPIA

ghana

burkinafaso

kenya

ghana

zambia

burkinafaso

UGANDA Uganda: Over 75% of the country relies on the land for survival. In 2012, Self Help Africa begins work on a major USAID-funded initiative in Uganda, providing support to farming communities in 18 districts across the country. It is one of the largest projects Self Help Africa has ever worked on, and will continue for five years.

ghana

Kenya: The hub for togo East African commerce. The presence here of Self Help Africa’s new sister charity, Partner Africa, gives added impetus to our kenya work with small agri-business and new export markets. New initiatives in Kenya for togo 2012 include work on seed development and cooperative development for tea growers. malawi

ZAMBIA zambia

kenya

MALAWI malawi

togo

zambia Malawi: Known as ‘The Warm Heart of Africa’, Malawi has made significant strides in recent years to cut rural hunger. However, the effects of climate change present particular difficulties for burkinafaso this landlocked Southern African nation. One of Self Help Africa’s key projects here in 2012 takes place in the northern part of the country, working ghana with a number of other organisations to improve farmers’ ability to cope with climate shocks.

zambia

ghana

burkinafaso

kenya

ghana

TOGO, GHANA & BURKINA FASO

malawi

malawi

burkinafaso

togo

malawi

KENYA

malawi

Ethiopia: The second most populous country in Africa. Self Help Africa has been working here since the organisation was founded, almost three decades ago. Our work here in 2012 includes new initiatives in partnership with the private sector, along with consolidation of our largest micro-finance project, now with over 34,000 members.

togo

kenya

West Africa (Burkina Faso, Ghana, Togo): This three-country programme is coordinated from Ouagadougou, the capital of Burkina Faso, and concentrates its efforts on a 400-kilometre area of poor smallholder farming that runs across national boundaries. Water is a key pressure for all communities in the area, and our work here has made significant progress in improving access to water for community household use and for agriculture in 2012.

togo

Zambia: Self Help burkinafaso Africa has completed very significant work across the country in recent years to assist impoverished ghana smallholder farmers improve their access to seeds, in collaboration with local seed research centres. This work with seeds kenya continues, while 2012 also sees further work to assist farmers link to markets and develop privatetogosector linkages to the rural poor.

kenya

togo

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Shelled corn is prepared for grinding in Togo

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

SMALL OBJECT, BIG OUTCOMES Self Help Africa has always had a significant focus on seed. Like the seed itself, our work in this area has grown and flourished, and we are now at the forefront of a trans-African initiative for the sector.

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his work seeks to tackle a serious challenge for African smallholder farmers - access to superior variety and affordable seed at the right time. For Self Help Africa, the development of local seed enterprises offers a clear path towards improving access, thereby improving both food security and rural incomes.

In Ethiopia, we work with 19 primary seed producer cooperatives that last year had a total of 1,230 members. In Zambia, Self Help Africa works with 10 seed growers associations, as well as a cooperative; over the border in Malawi, our work is of a similar size, while we are rolling out new seed initiatives in Kenya and Uganda.

As an organisation we believe that supporting farmers to produce more and better seed is key to our mission, which is ‘to develop enterprising solutions that enable smallholder farmers to achieve a better quality of life’. Farmers who produce seed are rural entrepreneurs, earning an income from their activity. But they are also helping to boost food security in their local area as they sell improved seeds to other farmers. It’s this win-win in seed multiplication that has encouraged us to scale up our seed initiatives, to reach more farmers and to bring experiences from practice into the policy arena. Self Help Africa collaborates with Wageningen

University as part of a wider initiative with the African Union’s African Seed and Biotechnology Programme (ASBP). Our new initiative will see a significant scaleup of local seed enterprises as part of an integrated seed sector development approach in ten African countries from East, West and Southern Africa. The core programme will take place in six countries where key outcomes will be improved access to quality seed for over 440,000 farmers, with resultant increases in crop production and productivity.

and tubers as well as vegetables, with a particular focus on improved and locally adapted varieties for both the most productive and more marginal areas. Seed producers will benefit from a two-to-three-fold increase in income from their engagement in seed enterprises. Increased use of quality seed will have a wider impact on smallholder farmers’ incomes - with over two million people (farming household members) benefiting from improved food and economic security as a result. That’s real impact and we believe the benefits of this work are sustainable in the long term.

This will be achieved with a range of crops including cereals, legumes, oil crops, roots

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Grading peanuts at the Eastern Province Farmers Cooperative depot in Chipata, Zambia

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Supporting Africa’s teams In management-speak, the acronym TEAM stands for Together Everyone Achieves More. Nowhere is this more apparent than in Africa, where individual smallholder farmers struggle to earn a viable living from the land. Joining up as teams, they become a vast alliance in the fight against hunger and poverty.

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key part of the Self Help Africa’s work is in supporting Africa’s smallholder farmers to organise, and then to facilitate links to local, regional and international market opportunities that can enable them to increase their income and move out of poverty. In Ethiopia, for example, our cooperative development programme has supported a range of cooperatives and unions to address the fundamental problems of increasing agricultural production and productivity against water scarcity, rainfall dependence and market instability for

One of the organisations we’ve supported is the Meki Batu Fruit and Vegetable Grower Farmer Cooperative Union, established in 2002 in Oromia as the first irrigated farmer cooperative union in the country. The union aims to sell its members’ produce to local and foreign markets; supply agricultural inputs and credit; deliver market information; and provide training and support to member farmers.

members, there are now 135 cooperatives in the union with almost 7,000 individual farmer members. The union produces over 50,000 tonnes of vegetable and fruits which are supplied to local market outlets as well as exported to Djibouti and Holland. Hybrid maize seed production is also carried out by the union, meeting 68% of regional seed demand in what is a competitive and lucrative business. Overall the union’s capital base has increased 60-fold over eight years.

From an initial 12 cooperatives with 527

Self Help Africa provided capital for the union

smallholder farmers.

to start up, for irrigation pumps, support to build warehouses, a truck, seed, contribution to staff salaries and training in management, planning and leadership, as well as developing its value chain. The union now operates independently with no further direct support from Self Help Africa. As farmers celebrate the UN International Year of Cooperatives, our experience in Ethiopia and elsewhere suggests that cooperatives are stronger and more resilient when they are linked to viable commercial opportunities. 9


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Self Help Africa’s Mavutu Kamamga conducts a farmer training course in the village of Masumbankhunda, Malawi

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Building ‘the invisible’ Anyone visiting a rural community in Africa will quickly identify the need for increased investment in physical infrastructure - in input supply, irrigation, transport and warehousing, to name just a few of the most critical factors.

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ut there’s another gap on African farms, one that can’t be seen but is keenly felt. Put simply, there’s an information gap at the heart of poor farming productivity. Without access to the internet, without formal farm education and in many cases without any significant literacy training, Africa’s farmers struggle to access the knowledge necessary to adapt their traditional practices. Farm radio and SMS are playing a significant role in filling this gap, but one of the most effective solutions is the development of farmer-to-farmer information flows.

For many years, Self Help Africa has placed farmers at the centre of information and knowledge generation and dissemination. The community-based ‘extension’ system has two major advantages over the use of professional farm advisory services - local farmers have a better grasp both of local conditions and of their neighbour’s abilities, and community advisory services are far cheaper. State-run farm advisory services are chronically under-funded and rarely offer a viable alternative for farmers. A study commissioned by Self Help Africa into farmer-to-farmer extension over the last decade in Ghana, Uganda and Malawi revealed that it delivers cost/benefit ratios

ranging from almost 1:7 to over 1:14, all within a four-year period. Impressive as this return is, it probably undervalues the service, as farmers will continue to benefit from information flows for years more than the simple four-year study cut-off. Farmer-to-farmer extension offers a potentially low-cost and wide-reach alternative in farmer knowledge transfer. The study provides important evidence that community-based extension works and is changing lives. The key challenge is how this potential can be used more effectively and sustainably, ensuring that the extension workers receive continuing support for their work from the community and continuing

training and information flows from research institutes. Finding other ways to ensure continued sustainability of the farm extension system remains high on our priority list. In recent years, a pilot programme in eastern Zambia - in which extension and marketing services are joined together in a single, non-profit entity - is showing promise. The Eastern Province Farmers Cooperative (EPFC) has seen average incomes of participating farmers rise by over 800% in just three years. The challenge now is to replicate and scale up this model.

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Maserat Debebe in the small shop she established in Legaba village, Ethiopia, with support from a savings and credit cooperative.

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Ending poverty through savings & loans There’s one thing that multinational business and small holder farmers have in common - the challenge to raise capital. So many of Africa’s poor are shut out from savings and loan services that many identify increased access to credit as one of the keys to tackling poverty in a sustainable way.

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elf Help Africa has been working with rural savings and credit cooperatives (SACCOs) in Ethiopia, for almost two decades. The Ethiopia programme now supports five SACCO unions, covering 254 individual groups. In total, this amounts to almost 35,000 people whose access to savings and credit facilities is being supported and developed by Self Help Africa. For individual savings and credit groups, low levels of capital restrict not only loan creation, but also the ongoing viability of the savings model itself. Without access to increased capital and training services, these SACCOs are likely to offer both low deposit rates that leave savers worse off in real terms and low

loan rates that undermine profitability. In addition, undisciplined financial practices and poor risk management further hinders their viability and growth. For Self Help Africa, the aim in Ethiopia is to continue supporting the SACCO union structures, rather than working on the development of new individual groups at village level, on the grounds that this offers better prospects for institutional sustainability. Most of our input is focused on training union staff, but revolving funds are offered as incentives to improve loan performance rates. We believe that the five SHA-supported unions include some of the best in Ethiopia,

with the potential not only to have direct and indirect positive impacts on poverty through the services they support, but also to influence development of SACCOs more widely by serving as role models of good practice.

poor. In many cases, this support takes place side-by-side with an intervention in agricultural productivity among a host community. By increasing farm output while also providing access to finance, sustained increases in rural incomes can be achieved.

In 2008 there were already more than 3,000 SACCOs in the country, but only 664 affiliated to one of the 30 unions (including the five supported by SHA). The remainder continue to struggle to access specialist expertise in rural finance.

On a practical level, this means that farmers without collateral or a credit history can access loans to buy a water pump or invest in livestock. In many cases, it allows a farmer to start a small off-farm business, thereby reducing risk and increasing rural resilience. These are not risk-free investments but the repayment rate on loans experienced by the Ethiopian unions - over 98% - is clear evidence of its success.

Outside Ethiopia, our other country programmes support the growth of specialist micro-finance institutions among the rural

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Partner Africa supports African manufacturers to meet the working conditions and standards that are required by Western buyers

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Partnering for Africa’s future An increasing focus on the role of trade in promoting economic development in Africa has led Self Help Africa to establish a new ‘sister’ charity, Partner Africa.

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perating since late 2011, Partner Africa provides a range of services to smallholder farmers, local artisans and homeworkers, as well as national and international companies, aiming to facilitate increased and ethically-responsible trade in Africa. Partner Africa’s services rely on “local people providing local solutions” in four key service areas: Trade Development Projects: These are traditional development activities, carried out under an agreement with an institutional funder and/or through a public private partnership agreement. The focus is on

supporting and developing trade opportunities for those who are not currently able to trade on the international market. These are usually smallholder farmers or local artisans. Ethical Audits & Assessments: Ethical audits are designed for larger, more established bodies, factories, farms, packing houses and plantations. Ethical assessments are focused on smallholder farmer groups, cooperatives, local artisans and home workers groups. All are seeking approval to allow them to sell into global companies. Audits and assessments are carried out on the basis of a company supplier guide or an internationally-recognised code. Partner Africa’s non-profit status gives it a

unique position in this market, as a number of global companies are keen to carry their corporate social responsibility mandate into procurement of audit services from a nonprofit. Community Impact Assessments: Many global buying companies have worked with suppliers for years, investing in the improvement of their ethical trade standards through auditing and corrective action plans. The community impact assessment service allows these global companies to measure the impact of their investment, not only on the factory and its workers, but also on the community at large.

Capacity Building & Training: Partner Africa has a number of valuable training modules. Currently, these training programmes include: • Ethical Trade Awareness Training • Improving Workplace Communication • Supervisor Skills Training • Management Systems for Ethical Trade • SEDEX Supplier Member Training • Joint Body Training/ Worker Committee Training • Fairtrade Requirements • Rainforest Alliance Certified TM Standards Training

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

COUNTRY SPOTLIGHT

ETHIOPIA

Members of Baakka Farmers Cooperative multiply and distribute seed potato to farmers in Holleta, west of Ethiopia’s capital Addis Ababa. The group, who are affiliated to Robi Berega Cooperative Union are pictured attending a farmers field school, where they receive training in nutrition management, disease management and post harvest management of potato - which is now a major food crop in the country.

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Ethiopia success built on coopERATIVEs The programme was selected by the European Commission as its ‘best performer’ across the Food Facility NGO initiatives.

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n 2008, in response to soaring food prices in developing countries, the European Commission agreed to establish a E1bn (£788m) ‘Food Facility’. The facility, which aimed to help address food prices in the developing world, allocated E42m (£33m) in funding for Ethiopia, from which Self Help Africa received E1.3m. (£1m) This funding allowed Self Help Africa to initiate an extremely successful programme, designed to reduce food insecurity in 100,000 households in two regions by the end of 2011. Over a 24-month period, the Agricultural Cooperative Development Programme aimed to increase production of food crops, vegetables and livestock products, by targeting efforts through existing and new farmer groups. In addition, it helped build

local capacity and added permanent infrastructure to assist with harvests. A key part of the programme rested in the local multiplication of improved seed to farmer producers. From an initial consignment of just over 200 tonnes of foundation seed, farmer groups produced 4,800 tonnes of seed for local sale, which in turn benefited over 30,000 farmer households. As a direct result of the initiative, family farm incomes per hectare of land increased by an average of 100%. Over 400 tonnes of improved grain and vegetable seed was also distributed to vulnerable households in the programme area, resulting in a 70% rise in incomes among farm households.

milk processing centres were built and other capital equipment was provided to cooperatives. In addition, over 1,200 farmers were trained in seed production and handling, along with 64 government extension workers and 60 coop staff. Farmer field school and seed multiplication workshops added to our training activities. Overall, the Self Help Africa programme has been a significant success, contributing to alleviating food insecurity for 100,000 households. Following its mid-term evaluation, the programme was selected by the European Commission as its ‘best performer’ across the Food Facility NGO initiatives. As a result, our Ethiopia country director, Dr Wubshet Berhanu, travelled to Brussels to speak to selected audiences about its success.

As part of the infrastructure work, seven seed storage depots and two

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

COUNTRY SPOTLIGHT

UGANDA

Weeding the land in Kayunga, Uganda. The Community Connector programme will assist agricultural extension across the country

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Connecting to cut hunger in UgandA The ultimate project target populations are vulnerable children below age five, with special emphasis on children below age two, and vulnerable women.

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onnecting agriculture and nutrition in an ambitious programme for Uganda is the focus for Self Help Africa’s first major intervention under USAID’s Feed the Future initiative. Joining with a range of US and Ugandan partners for the Uganda Community Connector (UCC) Project, Self Help Africa will work in 18 districts across the country to increase food production by working with government agencies, farmer groups and community-based organisations as well as the private sector. A large US-based organisation, FHI360, leads the project, to which Self Help Africa will supply technical assistance, primarily on agriculture. Local organisations VEDCO and BRAC will focus on implementation while two regional universities, Gulu and Mbarara, will provide training and research inputs. Despite its rich agricultural resources,

a growing economy and a government commitment to building on progress, nearly eight million Ugandans live in poverty. Of these, 90% reside in rural areas where access to quality land varies and vulnerable populations face serious food insecurity and malnutrition. Over time, these circumstances have taken an enormous toll on Uganda’s development and productivity. The underlying causes of undernutrition and food insecurity in Uganda remain complex, with poverty as both a cause and result, exacerbated by the remoteness and isolation of most of Uganda’s rural farmers. UCC aims to connect district subcounty and community authorities from different sectors, with community groups representing poor households, for the particular benefit of women and children in those homes.

The ultimate project target populations are vulnerable children below age five, with special emphasis on children below age two, and vulnerable women, particularly pregnant and lactating women. These women are likely to be smallholder subsistence farmers with few purchased inputs and technology, limited market orientation, and vulnerability to risk and household-level shocks such as acute or chronic illness. Using the SHA-developed Household Economic Assessment tool, the project will focus on groups identified as “very poor” and “poor”, with the goal of moving these households beyond subsistence and up the rural socio-economic and nutrition ladder. Working initially with six districts in the north and south-west of the country in 2012, the project will expand to 18 districts throughout Uganda by the end of the project cycle in 2016. The total budget for the intervention is $24m.

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

COUNTRY SPOTLIGHT

MALAWI

Irrigating the land in Malawi with a treadle pump: The DISCOVER programme is helping farmers to adapt to climate change

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Discovering local solutions to climate change By project end, DISCOVER aims to have increased and diversified crop and livestock production, while also improving family diets in up to 40,000 households in the region.

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elf Help Africa has joined a number of other international organisations in an innovative project to help communities in Malawi adapt to climate change. The four-member consortium - which also includes Concern Universal, GOAL and Cooperazione Internazionale - has come together to implement the new project, entitled Developing Innovative Solutions with Communities to Overcome Vulnerability through Enhanced Resilience (DISCOVER), over a five-year period. Every year in Malawi, tens if not hundreds of thousands of people face food insecurity as a result of climatic hazards. These episodes generally recur - affecting the same communities and individuals each year - and have been increasing in magnitude over the past decades as a result of climate change. Working in six districts in the northern part of Malawi, DISCOVER aims to

strengthen community capacity to cope with climate change, directly benefitting almost 300,000 people as a result. It builds on the long experience of the four agencies in implementing communitybased livelihoods programmes and so is firmly rooted in an understanding of ‘what works’ in a Malawian context. The consortium has worked to ensure that the initiative has been designed alongside community members in response to the practical challenges of climate change. The project aims to nurture practical, locally-devised adaptation activities and to combine these with the creation of a network of well-resourced committees at village, area and district level. This ensures real local ownership of project activities - a connection that will help long-term sustainability of the intervention. The project also features inputs from other organisations with a diverse range of specialised skills, such as

SolarAid’s experience with microsolar entrepreneurship, Concern Universal Microfinance work in rural microfinance and Clioma’s expertise in low carbon technology and carbon financing. By project end, DISCOVER aims to have increased and diversified crop and livestock production, while also improving family diets in up to 40,000 households in the region. In addition, 60,000 households will be using fuel-efficient stoves, tapping into global carbon financing and supporting the planting of over 10 million trees. Over 18,000 people will have access to rural microfinance services for the first time, while thousands more will have received small business training. DISCOVER is supported by the UK’s Department for International Development, along with Irish Aid and the Norwegian Embassy.

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

On the road to Kayunga, Uganda. Self Help Africa is using the Individual Household Method to measure impact in a new nutrition and agriculture project in 18 districts across the country

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Measuring our success Measuring the impact of our work has always been critical, and Self Help Africa has continued to develop new ways in which to show how our interventions deliver results for beneficiaries and value for money for donors.

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recent collaboration with the UK-based Evidence for Development has led to our adoption of the Individual Household Method (IHM) as the tool to monitor the impact of our interventions on wealth, food security and smallholder production. In common with any household budget survey, the IHM involves the collection of household income data. However, the IHM differs from other approaches in (i) the method of data collection (a semi structured interview, rather than a standard questionnaire format is used) and (ii) the use of specialised software, which allows data checking and analysis to be carried out at the time of collection. Taken together, these reduce the risk of errors in data collection and allow any errors to be identified and corrected. During the 1990s, a Household Economy Approach (HEA) was developed as a predictive model for famine, and it is

used widely across Africa. HEA uses a model based on measurement of the level of entitlement which households actually achieved and their ability to ‘cope’ in a ‘reference’ non-famine year. The data collected for a household includes: 1. Income obtained from crop & livestock production, employment, wild foods and hunting and transfers. 2. Savings and reserves including food stocks, cash savings, tradable assets e.g. livestock. 3. Potential alternative income sources e.g. alternative employment opportunities, increased wild food consumption. This level of detail is sufficient for large area food security assessments, but the data set is not sufficiently detailed for both project design and monitoring and evaluation (M&E). IHM overcomes these limitations and provides a practical

tool that can be used for many development purposes including programme design and M&E. IHM calculates the individual household’s ‘disposable income’ i.e. the cash remaining after household food energy needs have been met. The cost of essential non-food items is set locally. Households that cannot afford these items are shown as ‘below the standard of living threshold’. By using the IHM (twice) as baseline and after the intervention, we can measure the direct impact of our projects on disposable income, food security and production of individual households. Secondly the method can be used to design or improve project interventions, by using open-source software to simulate different intervention possibilities and forecast their expected impact on the different wealth groups.

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

FARMS VITAL TO AFRICA’S FUTURE

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his report sets out to record the financial activities and accomplishments of Self Help Africa during 2011.

It also provides readers with some information about our work, and about some of the issues and challenges that we must address if we are to be successful in our work to eradicate hunger and poverty in Africa. The past year has been a busy one for Self Help Africa. It saw us conclude 15 years of work in Eritrea, and launch new projects in a number of countries. The grave food security crisis that forced hundreds of thousands of people from their homes in the Horn of Africa during 2011 underlined the great vulnerability of people who live off small farms in regions where support services are limited and where the climate is becoming unpredictable. It brought home too the vital role that farmers play across Africa, and how hopeless circumstances can become when communities are driven from their land. During 2011 we launched an important new document – an organisation five-year strategic plan - to map out the future direction, aims and goals of Self Help Africa as we continue to develop our work into our fourth decade in Africa. That plan was the result of months of consultations between

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staff across three different continents – and is being built upon this year as we develop clear strategies for how we work in each of the eight African countries where we now have a presence. Much progress has been made in the fight to eradicate hunger and poverty in Africa – and the emergence of strong and confident new economies in many parts of the continent point the way for others in years to come. Of the ten fastest-growing economies in the world last year, six were in Africa. In Ghana and Ethiopia, that economic growth has been achieved on the foundations of agricultural production. For Self Help Africa, this reinforces our belief that farming and food production is critical not just at household level but also for Africa’s wider economic development. At home, we are grateful for the continuing backing that we receive – from individual supporters, from businesses, and from institutional supporters such as Irish Aid, the European Union, UK Aid and USAID. To our management and staff - in Ireland, UK, USA and across Africa we are grateful for the manner that you go about your business, ensuring that Self Help Africa is as effective as is possible in its work. To our local partners we express

our deep gratitude for the many successful collaborations that are taking place, and the key role you play in enabling more African families to end the cycle of hunger and dependence. I must also express my appreciation for the time, commitment and expertise provided by the members of our board of directors, trustees, advisory and technical panels, our field officers and ambassadors, who all play such a key role in the organisation. To the Irish Farmers Association (IFA) a special word of gratitude is also in order, for your continuing support and backing of Self Help Africa as chosen charity. And finally to all of our donors, we say ‘thank you’. We see every day the results of our work - when families who were once hungry find themselves with a food surplus or an offfarm income. This is truly transformative work and, without your support, it could not continue.

Tom Corcoran Chairman Self Help Africa


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

CONTENTS DIRECTORS AND OTHER INFORMATION

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REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS

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INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT

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CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES

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CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET

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COMPANY BALANCE SHEET

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CONSOLIDATED CASH FLOW STATEMENT

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NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

DIRECTORS & OTHER INFORMATION

DIRECTORS: Tom Corcoran, Chairman Joseph O’Dwyer John Carroll Paula Murray David Martin Jim Kinsella Nigel Clarke James Stafford (resigned 6th March 2012) Sylvia Gavigan (appointed 12th May 2011) Helen Brophy (appointed 20th September 2011) Teddy O’Mahony (appointed 31st August 2011) Micheál O’Connell (appointed 2nd June 2010, resigned 10th February 2011) SECRETARY

Peter McDevitt

CHIEF EXECUTIVE

Ray Jordan

REGISTERED OFFICE

Kingsbridge House, 17-22 Parkgate Street, Dublin 8

REGISTERED NUMBER

105601

CHARITY NUMBER

6663

BANKERS

Bank of Ireland AIB Bank Barclays Bank

SOLICITORS McKeever Rowan Solicitors 5 Harbourmaster Place International Financial Services Centre Dublin 1 Withers LLP 16 Old Bailey, London EC4M 7EG AUDITORS

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Baker Tilly Ryan Glennon Registered Auditors Birr Technology Centre Birr Co. Offaly


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS for the year ended 31st december 2011

The directors present herewith the audited financial statements for the year ending 31st December 2011. Principal activity The company was formed to promote self help development in Africa. The aim of the organisation is to help Africans to become self sufficient by means of long term development projects. The company achieves its objectives by working with and through local people, and using existing local resources. Statement of Directors’ Responsibilities for Financial Statements The directors are responsible for preparing the annual report and the financial statements in accordance with applicable Irish law and Generally Accepted Accounting Practices in Ireland including the accounting standards issued by the Accounting Standards Board and promulgated by the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Ireland. Irish company law requires that the directors prepare financial statements for each financial year, which give a true and fair view of the state of affairs of the company and group and of the income and expenditure of the group for that period. In preparing these statements, the directors are required to: • Select suitable accounting policies and then apply them consistently, • Make judgments and estimates that are reasonable and prudent and • Prepare the financial statements on the going concern basis unless it is inappropriate to presume that the company and group will continue in business The directors confirm that they have complied with the above requirements in preparing these financial statements. The directors are responsible for keeping proper accounting records which disclose with reasonable accuracy at any time the financial position of the company and the group, and to enable them to ensure that the financial statements are prepared in accordance with accounting standards generally accepted in Ireland, and comply with the Companies Act, 1963 to 2009. They are also responsible for safeguarding the assets of the company, and hence for taking reasonable steps for the prevention and detection of fraud and other irregularities. Books and Accounting Records The directors are responsible for ensuring that proper books and accounting records, as outlined in Section 202 of the Companies Act 1990 are kept by the company and the group. To achieve this, the directors have appointed a financial controller who reports to the board to ensure that the requirements of Section 202 are complied with. The books of account are located at the company’s registered office at Self Help Africa, Kingsbridge House, 17-22 Parkgate Street, Dublin 8. Legal Status Self Help Africa is a company incorporated under the Companies Acts, 1963 to 2009, limited by guarantee and not having a share capital. The company is exempt from corporation tax. The objects of the company are charitable in nature with established charitable status (Charity No. 6663). All income is applied solely towards the promotion of the charitable objectives of the company.

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS (Contd.)

Organisational strategy At organisational level, Self Help Africa completed and launched its new Strategic Plan for the period 2011-2015. The main provisions of the plan are set out below. Vision The vision of Self Help Africa is a rural Africa free from poverty and hunger. Mission Self Help Africa’s mission is to develop enterprising solutions that enable smallholder farmers to achieve a better quality of life. Goal Self Help Africa’s goal is to enable 500,000 smallholder farmers make a sustainable improvement in their livelihoods. Values Four core values underpin Self Help Africa’s approach: People helping themselves: We enable smallholder farmers, women and men, to prioritise and plan development within their communities and work together to establish the links they need to prosper. We believe, by understanding local concepts of progress and strengthening existing community groups, that people can be proactive in determining their own development. Viable solutions: We champion practical, low-cost solutions that will have a lasting benefit and are replicable. These solutions aim to be economically, socially, institutionally and environmentally sustainable. We believe markets should work for smallholder farmers and engage with governments, civil society and the private sector to help make this a reality. We support rural communities to organise, develop knowledge, skills and experience to establish the links they need to enable them to continue to prosper. We encourage risk reduction and climate adaptation practices so that today’s solutions reduce vulnerability and build resilience in the long-term. Equality and inclusion: We acknowledge that smallholder farmers are a diverse group of women and men, whose ability to participate in development processes is determined by their access to and tenure of land and resources, age, disability, health and HIV status. We are committed to identifying and removing the barriers that prevent inclusion of more vulnerable groups and ensuring that women and men have equal opportunities to participate and benefit from our programmes. Transparency and accountability: We strive to be an effective actor in development. We are committed to technical excellence and innovation in programmes, achieving recognised quality standards and demonstrating transparency in our relationships with all stakeholders – beneficiaries, partners and donors. We invest in measuring and reporting the progress of our work and its impact, facilitating learning processes and documenting and disseminating good practice to inform decision making for scale up and to influence policy and practice. Strategic objectives Self Help Africa has identified three strategic objectives, which build on the experience of over 25 years working with communities in Africa. For the period 2011-2015, Self Help Africa will:

28


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS (Contd.)

1. Enable smallholders to achieve viable livelihoods from intensification and diversification of agriculture and greater integration into markets 2. Influence others to enable smallholder farmers in Africa to prosper. 3. Strengthen Self Help Africa to ensure we are fit for purpose. Results for the Year The financial results for the year ended 31st December 2011 are as set out in the Consolidated Statement of Financial Activities on page 38. Overall income levels for 2011 totalled e8.25 million, an increase of 16.5% over 2010. There was a net increase in funds of e279,607 in the year which is allocated e432,547 as an increase in unrestricted and e152,940 of a decrease in restricted. The total unrestricted funds balance of e1,590,466 reflects a strong financial position for the organisation at year end. Review of Activities and Future Developments The organisation continues to go from strength to strength and is at a satisfactory level of financial stability. This is particularly noteworthy given that this stability has been achieved in a time of considerable economic uncertainty and insecurity in the wider global economy. At organisational level, Self Help Africa completed and launched its new strategic plan for the period 2011-2015. Financial reporting and operational systems were further improved and the scaling up of our Policy and Strategy team will ensure that there is strong rationale behind the work we do and that the learning we attain from our work will enhance the quality and credibility of our work into the future. Activities During 2011, Self Help Africa reached over 200,000 smallholder farmers and their families in nine countries in Africa enabling them to make significant improvements to farming practice, income and meeting food needs for their families. Ethiopia With 2011 seeing the final year of our five year rural development programmes (RDP), SHA Ethiopia led the way in starting three new partner implemented pilot programmes. One programme is with Valid International, looking at commercially growing ground nuts for Ready to Use Food (RUTF) for treating malnutrition and two others are with local Ethiopia NGOs. Although a major change of direction for the country team, these programmes have proved a great success. SHA Ethiopia implemented throughout 2011 its EU Food Facility programme (ACDP). This programme was selected as the best EU funded Food Facility programme in Ethiopia and as a result the SHA Country Director was invited to Brussels to make a presentation on the work of the programme at a conference organised by the EU. Following this success, SHA Ethiopia was approached by the EU to submit a joint bid in a consortium with Oxfam and IDE for further funding under an extension to this facility. A programme for e4.2 million was approved in early 2012. The savings and credit co-operative (SACCO) programme continues to go from strength to strength and, together with our partners and donors (Terrafina/ILCUF), SHA Ethiopia is designing a new phase to this programme which will start in early 2012.

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS (Contd.)

Eritrea Following fifteen very successful years in Eritrea, SHA completed its last remaining programmes in the country during 2011 and all programmes and assets were handed over to regional governments or the national Government of Eritrea. Kenya Existing RDPs in Rongai and Gill Gil were finalised during the year and preparations commenced on entering new areas of operation. 2012 will see the start of partner led programmes across both our existing areas and expansion to the new provinces of Eastern and Nyanza. The relationship with Baraka College remains strong and we will look to work in partnership with them again in 2012. SHA continues to partner with Act! and Family Health International in Kenya and we are currently working on new programmes with them to start in 2012. Uganda 2011 saw the successful launch of a joint pilot programme with Send A Cow Uganda in a food security and livestock programme in northern Uganda. This programme, funded by trusts and foundations and DFID, will initially run for two years and will be the model of partner led programmes to follow. In addition to this Self Help Africa were approached by Traidlinks (an Irish NGO) looking to develop a community based food supply and production business to supply new private sector business ventures in western Uganda. The private sector partners are committed to sourcing their supplies locally if possible and engaged Traidlinks and Self Help Africa to look at the potential for working with local communities to scale up production. Initial scoping exercises were carried out and we continue to work with both parties in developing this further. In late 2011 Self Help Africa was approached by Family Health international, a major US NGO, to partner with them in a submission for USAID funding (Uganda Community Connector Proposal). Self Help Africa took the role of technical advisors in the proposal. The proposal for $25 million ($3 million allocation for Self Help Africa) was submitted in November 2011 and was successful in the face of strong competition. As this is Self Help Africa’s first successful application for US government funding, it represents a significant boost for SHA Uganda and Self Help Africa as a whole. Malawi SHA Malawi joined Concern Universal, GOAL and Italian NGO, COOPI in a consortium bid for basket donor funding aimed at climate preparedness and food security. The donor funding is managed by DFID, with funds also provided by NORAD and Irish Aid. The consortium submitted a £10 million proposal for activities covering all the districts in Malawi (with SHA Malawi allocated Karonga district in northern Malawi). The proposal was ultimately successful with Self Help Africa receiving an allocation of £2.5 million over 5 years. The One Foundation partnership within Malawi has continued throughout 2011 with a number of projects being successfully completed during the year.

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS (Contd.)

In many ways Malawi has lead the way with linkages to the private sector and looking at farming as a business. Malawi Mangoes Ltd, a private company that produces mango and banana pulp for the fruit juice and smoothie industry has been in discussions with Self Help Africa to investigate ways of establishing local fruit farming co-operatives to supply a proposed new factory in Salima district of Malawi. In addition, SHA Malawi is continuing to discuss with members of the Malawi cotton industry the potential for linking smallholder cotton growers with the private sector. West Africa A five year EU water/food security proposal in Burkina Faso was approved for funding in 2011. This has been a huge success for SHA West Africa and is the result of considerable hard work by both the country team and the programmes department over a number of years. The programme commenced in mid 2011 and is being implemented by Self Help Africa through three local partners. SHA West Africa carried out a localised call for proposals within Togo to source new partners. An extensive assessment, interview and due diligence process was carried out and two local partners were chosen. Both partners have undertaken two successful pilot programmes in Togo in 2011 and will be expanding their work in 2012. West Africa, although still relatively small, continues to be the main driver in sustainable agriculture work throughout Self Help Africa, particularly in the area of climate preparedness and conservation agriculture. Zambia The start of 2011 saw the Zambia team working on the completion reports of three major EU programmes which SHA Zambia had been implementing over the previous five years and were the largest grants we had received to date. All activities on these programmes were successfully completed in the year. SHA Zambia received highly favourable evaluation reports on these programmes and it is hoped to further develop these models in 2012. As a result of our long standing relationship with the EU in Zambia, Self Help Africa was chosen as the lead agency for EU/NGO consultation on the new EU strategy and funding streams for 2012 and beyond. During 2011, SHA Zambia was involved implementing two further EU programmes together with a five year programme for the Big Lottery Fund in the UK. The EU food facility grant (SEEDFS) was successfully completed in November 2011. USAID chose Zambia to be one of the first countries to see the launch of programmes under its Feed the Future funding stream, when it released its ZERS call for proposal in Sept 2011. SHA Zambia also submitted a proposal to the Danish and Finnish Government for a climate preparedness programme which was successful in mid 2011. This is the first time Self Help Africa has received funding from this source and we hope to build on that in 2012. Funding 2011 was the final year of the Irish Government’s multi-annual programme scheme (MAPS). Self Help Africa has been a participant in this programme since its inception in 2003. We received €2.8 million from MAPS in 2011, and are grateful for the continuing support that we receive from Irish Aid. In 2011, Self Help Africa received a major boost by securing of three year funding from DFID (the UK government development agency). In the face of serious competition, our consortium with FARM Africa was successful in contracting for a £1,500,000 per annum funding stream to support Self Help Africa in the implementation of its strategic plan over the next three years.

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS (Contd.)

During 2011 we continued our strong relationship with the European Union and secured a four year contract for a rural water and livelihoods programme in Burkina Faso. For Self Help Africa Inc., our sister organisation in the United States, 2011 was a successful year. The fundraising ball in New York in November improved on its successful financial and profile-raising performance of 2010. More importantly, relationships are being forged both with the US government and with large US based NGOs. The success in accessing five year US government funding in Uganda is largely attributable to the establishment of Self Help Africa Inc. and the development of networks with influential policy makers in the US. We expect the presence in the US to lead to Self Help Africa having greater influence within the sector globally as well as accessing a new reliable stream of donor income to enable our work to attain greater scale. A significant event in the year was Self Help Africa’s establishment of an ethical trade services division. This involved the acquisition of the Ethical Business Services department of UK based NGO, Africa Now. It is housed in a separate UK registered charitable company called Partner Africa, of which Self Help Africa is the sole member. Partner Africa operates as a social enterprise aimed at maximising the development impact of a range of high quality and innovative ethical trade services; auditing, training, capacity building and consulting to the private sector. We believe that this facet of our work will enhance our ability to significantly improve the lives of many African smallholder farmers in a broad variety of ways. At a fundraising level, Self Help Africa performed strongly in 2011. At a time of economic downturn we maintained funding levels across a number of different income streams, and actually grew significantly the backing we are receiving from trusts and foundations. Research and innovation In 2011, Self Help Africa continued to invest in capacity to provide best support to its overseas programmes including the establishment of a technical team, investments in research and innovation and an increased role in scaling out successful approaches to other actors. Building on many years experience of seed production, Self Help Africa joined with Wageningen University of the Netherlands under the auspices of the African Union African Seed and Biotechnology Programme to feed into the development of policy to support integrated seed sector development, Self Help Africa in particular brought the voice of local seed breeders to the process. Future Developments Following a very successful 2011, SHA will continue in 2012 to develop its programmes in line with its 2011-2015 Strategic Plan. To achieve our goal we will continue to work in partnership with local, national and international organisations, be led by the communities we work with and together with others to develop integrated solutions. In 2012 we will look to build and broker strong relationships with a diverse range of organisations in Africa and internationally. We believe that working with and through local organisations will lead to a more autonomous and effective civil society in Africa. We see the establishment of partnerships between civil society and the public and private sectors as key to creating innovative solutions to rural poverty.

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS (Contd.)

In addition Self Help Africa is committed to taking a bottom up approach to support local solutions. In 2012 we will invest time and resources upfront to ensure that clear analysis, participatory planning and good practice inform our programmes. Self Help Africa will continue work in 2012 to develop integrated solutions that are based on the resources available to smallholder farmers and the wider policies, institutions and processes, which influence people’s livelihood strategies and outcomes. Self Help Africa will continue to work with Wageningen University to roll out and further develop integrated seed sector development thinking and promote the role of smallholder farmers in producing quality seed at affordable prices. Reserves Policy Self Help Africa has established and holds reserves sufficient that: - If from time to time through unplanned circumstances there is a short term shortfall in expected revenue or increase in expected expenditure, there shall be sufficient liquid assets held that, if the board so decides, the organisation could meet any deficit arising from such an event from reserves. - In the event a decision is taken to wind down the organisation there shall be sufficient readily accessible net assets such that this winding down can be made in an orderly fashion with the organisation meeting all its obligations, both domestic and programme, in a timely fashion. The target level of reserves is currently set at six months of unrestricted expenditure. The organisation is currently in compliance with this target. The board monitors this target level (and compliance therewith) on an annual basis. Risk Management and internal controls The directors have responsibility for, and are aware of the risks associated with the operating activities of Self Help Africa. They are confident that adequate systems of internal control are in place and that these controls provide reasonable assurance against such risks. Management prepare a risk register which is updated regularly and subject to detailed formal half-yearly reviews by the board. The directors constantly review and adopt policies and procedures that are consistent with best practice and monitor the implementation of these policies through the Finance and Audit Committee (a sub-committee of the board). This committee meets on a regular basis to review financial information and reports, internal and external audit findings, management information systems and internal control systems. In the year, the committee reviewed and recommended for board approval policies on fraud, whistleblowing, conflict of interest and equal opportunities. The members of the committee in 2011 were David Martin (Chair), William Coales, Paula Murray and Colm Dennehy. The committee met twice in 2011 (twice in 2010). The internal control systems aim to ensure compliance with laws and policies, ensure efficient and effective use of Self Help Africa’s resources, safeguard Self Help Africa’s assets and maintain the integrity of financial information produced. Financial information is subject to detailed review at director level allowing for continuous monitoring of Self Help Africa’s operations and financial status. Each of Self Help Africa’s field offices is subject to an annual statutory audit by independent external auditors, in addition to periodic internal audit review. The Programme Advisory Committee (a sub-committee of the board) provides oversight and technical advice and assistance to Self Help Africa’s programme team to ensure operational risks are

33


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS (Contd.)

properly managed and that our work on the ground in Africa is carried out in a manner that is consistent with best practice. The members of the committee in 2011 were Prof Adrian Wood (Chair), Joseph O’ Dwyer, Dr Mariette Asselbergs, Prof Michael Mortimore, Fiona Meehan and Dr James Copestake. The committee met twice in 2011 (twice in 2010). Governance The board is committed to maintaining the highest standards of corporate governance and has determined that Self Help Africa should comply with the basic principles outlined in the “Irish Development NGOs Code of Corporate Governance” (as produced by the Corporate Governance Association of Ireland; partnered with Dóchas). One of the aims of the Finance and Audit Committee is to continue the development of systems within the organisation in order to achieve full compliance with this code. As part of this policy, an effective board and a competent executive management team head the organisation. There is a clear distinction between the roles of the board and the management team to which day-to-day management is delegated. The management team prepares matters for consideration and approval by the board e.g. annual budgets, policy papers. The board then monitors their implementation. On areas such as strategic planning, there is board involvement at all stages of preparation but ultimate approval is the responsibility of the board. The board met on eight occasions in 2011 (six in 2010). The board membership is set out on page 26. New directors receive background and explanatory materials covering the nature and purpose of Self Help Africa to enable them to familiarise themselves with their duties and responsibilities, the Self Help Africa governance framework and its work overseas. Any relevant training requirements of directors are facilitated by the organisation. As a signatory to the Dóchas Code of Conduct on Images and Messages, Self Help Africa reaffirms its commitment to best practice in the communication of images and messages in all our public policy statements. Self Help Africa is grateful for the work of many in making the achievements of the past year possible. Our staff, our partners, our donors, our boards of directors, trustees and subcommittees have all played very valuable and important roles, and we are very grateful to each for their support and commitment. Health and Safety The directors continue to ensure a safe work environment for employees as per the requirements of the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act 2005. Health and Safety policies and procedures are set out in the Self Help Africa Employee Handbook. Important Events since the Year End There were no important events affecting the organisation since the 31st December, 2011. Transactions Involving Directors There were no contracts or arrangements, of any significance in relation to the business of the company in which the directors had any interest, as defined in the Companies Act 1990, during the year ended 31st December 2011.

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS (Contd.)

Service on the board and subcommittees of Self Help Africa is undertaken in an entirely voluntary capacity by all board and subcommittee members. No remuneration or other expenses are paid to any board or subcommittee members for their service. Auditors In accordance with Section 160(2) of the Companies Act, 1963, the auditors Baker Tilly Ryan Glennon, Chartered Accountants, will continue in office.

On behalf of the Board of Directors:

David Martin _________________________ DIRECTOR

Tom Corcoran _________________________ DIRECTOR

Date: 25th May, 2012

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT AUDITORS

REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT AUDITORS We have audited the financial statements of Self Help Africa for the year ended 31st December 2011 which comprise the Consolidated Statement of Financial Activities, Consolidated Balance Sheet, Company Balance Sheet, Consolidated Cash Flow Statement and the related notes. These consolidated financial statements have been prepared under the accounting policies set out therein. RESPECTIVE RESPONSIBILITIES OF DIRECTORS AND AUDITORS The group’s directors are responsible for the preparation of the consolidated financial statements in accordance with applicable law and generally accepted accounting practice in Ireland including the accounting standards issued by the Accounting Standards Board and published by the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Ireland (Generally Accepted Accounting Practice in Ireland). Our responsibility is to audit the consolidated financial statements in accordance with relevant legal and regulatory requirements and International Standards on Auditing (UK and Ireland). This report is made solely to the group’s members, as a body, in accordance with Section 193 of the Companies Act, 1990. Our audit work has been undertaken so that we might state to the group’s members those matters we are required to state to them in an auditor’s report and for no other purpose. To the fullest extent permitted by law, we do not accept or assume responsibility to anyone other than the group and the group’s members as a body, for our audit work, for this report, or for the opinions we have formed. We report to you our opinion as to whether the consolidated financial statements give a true and fair view in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Practice in Ireland and are properly prepared in accordance with the Companies Acts, 1963 to 2009. We also report to you whether in our opinion proper books of account have been kept by the group and whether the information given in the Directors’ Report is consistent with the consolidated financial statements. In addition, we state whether we have obtained all the information and explanations necessary for the purposes of our audit and whether the group’s balance sheet is in agreement with the books of account. We report to the members if, in our opinion, any information specified by law regarding directors’ remuneration and directors’ transactions is not given and, where practicable, include such information in our report. We read the Directors’ Report and consider the implications for our report if we become aware of any apparent misstatement within it. BASIS OF OPINION We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing (UK and Ireland), issued by the Auditing Practices Board. An audit includes examination, on a test basis, of evidence relevant to the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. It also includes an assessment of the significant estimates and judgements made by the directors in the preparation of the financial statements, and of whether the accounting policies are appropriate to the group’s circumstances, consistently applied and adequately disclosed.

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT AUDITORS (Contd.)

We planned and performed our audit so as to obtain all the information and explanations which we considered necessary in order to provide us with sufficient evidence to give reasonable assurance that the financial statements are free from material misstatement, whether caused by fraud or other irregularity or error. In forming our opinion we also evaluated the overall adequacy of the presentation of information in the consolidated financial statements. OPINION In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements give a true and fair view of the state of the group’s affairs at 31st December 2011 and of its surplus for the year then ended and have been properly prepared in accordance with the Companies Acts 1963 to 2009. We have obtained all the information and explanations we considered necessary for the purposes of our audit. In our opinion, proper books of account have been kept by the group. The consolidated financial statements are in agreement with the books of account. In our opinion, the information given in the Directors’ Report is consistent with the consolidated financial statements.

Suzanne O’Neill ________________________ Senior Statutory Auditor (For and on behalf of BAKER TILLY RYAN GLENNON) Registered Auditors, Birr Technology Centre, Birr, Co. Offaly Date: 12th June, 2012

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Consolidated STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2011

Unrestricted Restricted Funds Funds Notes e e

Total Funds 2011 e

Total Funds 2010 e

Incoming resources Income resources from charitable activities - Grant income 3 1,384,566 4,380,805 5,765,371 Income resources from generated funds - Voluntary income 3 1,612,338 643,627 2,255,965 Other Incoming Resources - Interest & investment income 10,326 - 10,326 - Other income 216,326 - 216,326 ------------ ------------ ------------ Total incoming resources 3,223,556 5,024,432 8,247,988 ------------ ------------ ------------

3,283 -----------7,077,046 ------------

Resources expended Charitable activities 4 Costs of generating voluntary income 9 Governance costs 10 Total resources expended

4,905,646 2,168,117

2,293,474 542,186 127,987 ------------ 2,963,647 ------------

5,052,834 - - ------------ 5,052,834 ------------

7,346,308 542,186 127,987 ------------ 8,016,481 ------------

7,409,551 372,015 67,699 ------------7,849,265 ------------

11

259,909

(28,402)

231,507

(772,219)

Loss on revaluations of investment assets Transfers between funds Exchange gain on consolidation Net movement in funds Funds at beginning of year Funds at end of year

(1,840) 135,188 39,290 ------------ 432,547

- (135,188) 10,650 ------------ (152,940)

(1,840) - 49,940 ------------ 279,607

1,997 69,491 -----------(700,731)

1,157,919 ----------- 1,590,466 =======

711,505 ----------- 558,565 =======

1,869,424 ------------ 2,149,031 =======

2,570,155 -----------1,869,424 =======

Net incoming/(outgoing) resources before other recognised gains and losses Other recognised gains and losses

The notes on pages 42 to 54 form an integral part of these financial statements. Approved by the Board on: David Martin _________________________ DIRECTOR Date: 25th May, 2012

38

Tom Corcoran _________________________ DIRECTOR


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Consolidated BALANCE SHEET AS AT 31 DECEMBER 2011

Notes FIXED ASSETS Tangible fixed assets 13 Financial assets 13

2011 e

2010 e

63,884 31,229

15,489 32,260

INTANGIBLE ASSETS Goodwill 14 CURRENT ASSETS Stock Debtors 15 Cash at bank

163,857

-

1,626 650,202 1,682,178 ------------ 2,334,006

1,294 583,472 1,332,661 ------------1,917,427

CREDITORS (Amounts falling due within one year) 16 NET CURRENT ASSETS TOTAL NET ASSETS

(233,871) ------------ 2,100,135 ------------ 2,359,105 =======

(95,752) ------------1,821,675 ------------1,869,424 ========

1,590,466 558,565 210,074 ------------ 2,359,105 =======

1,157,919 711,505 ------------- 1,869,424 =======

REPRESENTED BY: Unrestricted funds 17 Restricted funds 17 Acquisition funding reserve 18 The notes on pages 42 to 54 form an integral part of these financial statements. David Martin _________________________ DIRECTOR

Tom Corcoran _________________________ DIRECTOR

Date: 25th May, 2012

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

COMPANY BALANCE SHEET AS AT 31 DECEMBER 2011

Notes FIXED ASSETS Tangible fixed assets 13 CURRENT ASSETS Debtors 15 Cash at bank

2011 e

2010 e

35,320 -----------

9,926 -------------

213,189 1,244,554 ------------ 1,457,743

205,787 1,137,426 ------------1,343,213

16

(141,884)

(70,043)

NET CURRENT ASSETS

------------ 1,315,859 ------------

------------1,273,170 -------------

TOTAL NET ASSETS

1,351,179 =======

1,283,096 =======

1,217,626 133,553 ------------ 1,351,179 =======

1,058,396 224,700 ------------1,283,096 =======

CREDITORS: Amounts falling due within one year

REPRESENTED BY: Unrestricted funds Restricted funds The notes on pages 42 to 54 form an integral part of these financial statements.

David Martin _________________________ DIRECTOR Date: 25th May, 2012

40

Tom Corcoran _________________________ DIRECTOR


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Consolidated Cash Flow Statement for the year ended 31 December 2011

Notes Net cash inflow/(outflow) from operating activities

19

2011 e

2010 e

356,893

Returns on investments and servicing of finance Deposit interest received Fixed asset investment revaluation Net cash inflow from returns on investments and servicing of finance

10,326 1,840 ------------ 12,166

Capital expenditure Investment funds received re Partner Africa Purchase of goodwill Exchange gain on consolidation of fixed assets Increase/(decrease) in cash

(76,487) 262,592 (204,822) (825) ------------ 349,517 ========

(477,190)

3,283 (1,997) -----------1,286

(12,108) (2,040) ----------(490,052) ========

Reconciliation of net cash flow to movements in net funds Notes Increase/(decrease) in cash in the year 19

2011 e

2010 e

349,517

(490,052)

Cash at bank at beginning of year 20 Cash at bank at end of year 20

1,332,661 ------------- 1,682,178 ========

1,822,713 -----------1,332,661 ========

The notes on pages 42 to 54 form part of these financial statements.

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

1. GROUP TYPE The group is limited by guarantee and does not have any share capital.

2. ACCOUNTING POLICIES a) Basis of preparation The financial statements are prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and Irish statute comprising the Companies Acts 1963 to 2009. They are prepared under the historical cost convention and comply with financial reporting standards of the Accounting Standards Board, as promulgated by The Institute of Chartered Accountants in Ireland. The group has presented the statement of financial activities and the balance sheet in the format set out in “Statement of Recommended Practice (SORP) - Accounting and Reporting by Charities (revised 2008)”. b) Basis of Consolidation The consolidated financial statements incorporate the financial statements of Self Help Africa, Self Help Africa (UK) and Partner Africa, charitable organisations limited by guarantee. Self Help Africa is the sole member of Self Help Africa (UK) and of Partner Africa. The activities of Self Help Africa, Self Help Africa (UK) and Partner Africa are mutually interdependent. The combination of the businesses has been included in the consolidated financial statements using merger accounting rules in line with the criteria stipulated in Financial Reporting Standard No 6 “Acquisitions and Mergers”. In accordance with these provisions the results, assets and liabilities of the individual companies are incorporated in the consolidated financial statements for the whole of the current and prior periods as if the entities had been combined throughout these periods. c) Accounting Currency The currency used in these financial statements is the Euro which is denoted by the symbol e. d) Income Recognition Income consists of government donations and other funds generated by voluntary activities. These are recognised in the financial statements upon receipt into the headquarters accounting system. It is the policy of Self Help Africa to distinguish restricted income from unrestricted. Restricted income refers to funds given subject to conditions imposed by the donor or implied by the nature of the appeal. e) Expenditure Recognition Direct charitable expenditure comprises amounts paid by Self Help Africa to the programme countries for the costs of the development programmes. Governance costs comprise expenditure incurred by Self Help Africa on the strategic management of the charity and compliance with constitutional and statutory requirements. Costs of generating voluntary income comprise all expenditure incurred by Self Help Africa on raising funds for the organisation’s charitable activities.

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SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Contd.)

2. ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Contd.) In notes 5 to 8, expenditure is allocated to organisational strategic objectives in accordance with the proportion of funds spent on each objective in our countries of operation. f) Depreciation of Fixed Assets Tangible assets are stated at cost net of accumulated depreciation. The cost of an asset is made up of the purchase price of the asset plus any costs directly attributable to bringing the asset into working condition for its intended use. Depreciation on fixed assets is charged so as to write off their full cost over their expected useful lives at the following rates:Motor vehicles: Fixtures, fittings & equipment :

33.33% Straight Line 33.33% Straight Line

g) Intangible Fixed Assets Intangible fixed assets are stated at cost less amortisation. The asset is amortised over a period of five years which is management’s best estimate of the asset’s useful economic life. h) Acquisition Funding Reserve The Acquisition Funding Reserve relates to a grant received for the purchase of the Ethical Business Services division of Africa Now. The reserve is released to the Statement of Financial Activities over the expected useful lives of the relevant assets purchased by five equal annual instalments. i) Foreign Currency In the Financial Statements transactions denominated in foreign currencies are recorded in the local currency at actual exchange rates at the date of the transaction. Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are translated using the average rates of exchange prevailing during the accounting period. Any gain or loss arising from a change in exchange rates subsequent to the date of the transaction is included as an exchange gain or loss in the Statement of Financial Activities. j) Taxation The group has received a certificate of recognition of charitable status. Exemption from taxation has been given by the Revenue Commissioners under Section 207 of Taxes Consolidated Act 1997. Irrecoverable value added tax is expensed as incurred. k) Pension schemes The group operates employer sponsored, defined contribution pension schemes. The group’s annual contributions are charged to the statement of financial activities in the period to which they relate.

43


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Contd.)

44

3. INCOMING RESOURCES Grants from Governments and other co-funders

2011 e

2010 e

Irish Aid Department for International Development (UK) - PPA European Union Big Lottery Fund (UK) ICCO Irish League of Credit Unions Department for International Development (UK) - other PACT Kenya Terrafina UNDP Kenya Family Health International Kenya Isle of Man Government Other income UNDP Uganda FAO Uganda

2,810,000 1,252,443 1,182,536 221,229 118,501 72,503 65,455 34,765 - - - - 11,251 (2,006) (1,306) ------------ 5,765,371 ========

2,802,500 1,293,145 199,234 88,117 88,000 33,774 21,619 149,990 108,152 75,966 17,018 21,588 6,543 ------------4,905,646 ========

Voluntary Income

2011 e

2010 e

General Donations Grow Fund (Irish farmers)

2,102,386 153,579 ----------- 2,255,965 ========

1,957,330 210,787 ---------2,168,117 ========


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Contd.)

4.

CHARITABLE ACTIVITIES

2011 e Ethiopia Co-op Development – Food facility 659,188 SACCO Development 359,691 Livelihood Diversification 118,586 Sodo 91,963 Market Innovation programme 26,360 Bedeno 18,696 Hurutu - ------------- Total Ethiopia 1,274,484 -------------

2010 e 855,008 264,216 37,782 90,993 19,622 68,053 4,708 -----------1,340,382 ------------

Eritrea Elabered 75,780 Gogne 41,497 Bee keeping programme 29,662 Emni Haili 12,658 Kimira 7,301 ------------- Total Eritrea 166,898 -------------

157,032 114,900 109,797 96,098 19,321 ----------497,148 -----------

Malawi Kalembo 235,830 Masumba Nkhunda 209,914 FOCUS/Karonga ADD 110,989 COMSIVA 87,194 DISCOVER / Karonga RDP 65,455 Machinga programme 11,443 MAEF programme 10,906 General programme costs - ------------- Total Malawi 731,731 -------------

302,734 309,505 131,405 21,289 ----------764,933 -----------

Kenya

Gilgil Baraka Agricultural College - Kamara/Tenges & Beekeeping Thome Rongai Total Kenya

312,945 71,917 5,427 41,678 ----------- 431,967 -----------

547,810 112,046 37,350 ----------697,206 -----------

45


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Contd.)

4. CHARITABLE ACTIVITIES (Contd.) Uganda

2011 e

2010 e

Kayunga Kumi – Bukedea Amuru Amuria Kamuli Total Uganda Zambia

159,753 141,106 135,726 (1,306) (2,006) ----------- 433,273 -----------

221,677 176,584 75,359 ----------473,620 -----------

FSNV – Food security and nutrition for vulnerable households SEEDSFS Liteta FSSF – Microfinance programme SPEED MAEF ISSD MORE – Market Orientated Rural Enterprise (NWP) MORE – Market Orientated Rural Enterprise (WP) PROP – Project for the Reduction of Poverty Seed security Total Zambia

486,172 430,339 264,125 68,166 46,736 25,664 24,522 - - - - ----------- 1,345,724 -------------

916,783 87,780 384,460 219,376 146,529 31,895 ----------1,786,823 -----------

Trax - Ghana Trax - Togo Burkina Faso

69,968 67,739

37,179 170,795

EU rural water and livelihoods programme A.De.C.Co.L PER Organic Wend Yam A.De.C.Co.L (Phase 2) ASCDIS GADIB Code Utile RAFIA Total West Africa

79,645 70,232 30,185 29,603 27,193 18,174 15,982 13,874 10,428 8,934 ----------- 441,957 -----------

13,068 23,396 25,777 22,828 6,098 ----------299,141 -----------

West Africa Ghana/Togo

46


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Contd.)

4. CHARITABLE ACTIVITIES (Contd.) Other Direct Programme Expenditure Salary Costs Development Education Research, Advocacy, Communications Programme Support Ethical Trade Services Administration Total other direct programme expenditure Total Charitable Activities

2011 e

2010 e

1,078,400 54,485 273,390 328,195 424,668 361,136

687,765 73,941 217,840 330,537 240,215

2,520,274 7,346,308 ========

1,550,298 7,409,551 ========

5. DIRECT CHARITABLE ACTIVITIES BY FUND TYPE

Unrestricted funds e

Restricted funds e

Total 2011 e

Total 2010 e

Food Security Sustainable Rural Livelihoods Building Community Capacity Research, Learning and Advocacy

760,146 1,167,184 330,819 35,325

1,846,955 2,488,705 616,921 100,253

2,607,101 3,655,889 947,740 135,578

2,559,486 3,743,875 964,614 141,576

2,293,474 ========

5,052,834 ========

7,346,308 ========

7,409,551 ========

Staff Costs e

Depreciation e

Other Costs e

Total 2011 e

Total 2010 e

Food Security 404,079 Sustainable Rural Livelihoods 562,347 Building Community Capacity 144,825 Research, Learning and Advocacy 19,378 1,130,629 ========

10,045 13,979 3,601 483 28,108 ========

2,192,977 3,079,563 799,315 115,716 6,187,571 ========

2,607,101 3,655,889 947,741 135,577 7,346,308 ========

2,559,486 3,743,875 964,614 141,576 7,409,551 ========

6. DIRECT CHARITABLE EXPENDITURE BY EXPENDITURE TYPE

47


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Contd.)

7. DIRECT COSTS

Food Security e

Rural Livelihoods e

Community Capacity Building e

Research, Learning & Advocacy e

Total 2011 e

Total 2010 e

1,984,296 377,628 10,045 2,371,969

2,789,150 525,536 13,979 3,328,665

724,521 135,345 3,601 863,467

105,712 18,110 483 124,305

5,603,679 1,056,619 28,108 6,688,406

6,232,877 880,193 13,497 7,126,567

Food Security e

Rural Livelihoods e

Community Capacity Building e

Research, Learning & Advocacy e

Total 2011 e

Total 2010 e

Human Resources Organisational Services and ICT Finance Costs Ethical Trade Service Other Support Costs

32,143 48,520 3,868 75,453 75,147 235,131

44,732 67,524 5,383 105,007 104,579 327,225

11,520 17,390 1,386 27,043 26,934 84,273

1,541 2,326 185 3,619 3,602 11,273

89,936 135,760 10,822 211,122 210,262 657,902

95,786 51,754 3,748 131,696 282,984

2011 e

Staff costs Fundraising and promotion expenses Contract staff Merchandising costs Total cost of generating voluntary income

316,059 188,630 35,027 2,470 ------------ 542,186 ========

Programme Expenditure Wages and Salaries Depreciation

8. SUPPORT COSTS

9. COSTS OF GENERATING VOLUNTARY INCOME

48

2010 e 235,637 122,693 11,400 2,285 ----------372,015 ========


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Contd.)

10. GOVERNANCE COSTS

2011 e

2010 e

Audit fees Staff costs Legal, professional and similar costs General governance costs Total governance costs

30,619 15,234 70,430 11,704 ------------ 127,987 ========

31,140 7,829 28,730 ----------67,699 ========

2011 e

2010 e

28,108 30,619 40,965 (52,518) ______

13,497 31,140 ______

Staff costs are comprised as follows:

2011 e

2010 e

Salary costs Social security Pension Total Staff Costs No employee of the company earns a salary in excess of e100,000. The number of employees whose

1,260,705 123,865 77,352 ------------ 1,461,922 ========

987,346 92,411 82,259 -----------1,162,016 ========

11. NET INCOMING RESOURCES BEFORE OTHER RECOGNISED GAINS AND LOSSES Net incoming resources for the year are stated after charging/(crediting): Depreciation of tangible fixed assets Auditors remuneration Amortisation of intangible assets Credit from acquisition funding reserve

12. STAFF COSTS The average number of employees during the year was 24 (2010 - 20). No employee of the company acts as a director.

remuneration was within the e85,000 to e100,000 band was one. (2010 – 1).

49


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Contd.)

13. TANGIBLE FIXED ASSETS - GROUP Tangible fixed assets Motor vehicles e Cost At 1st January 2011 15,520 Additions - Exchange gain on consolidation 425 ----------- At 31st December 2011 15,945 ----------- Depreciation At 1st January 2011 15,119 Charge for the year 401 Exchange loss on consolidation 425 ----------- At 31st December 2011 15,945 ----------- Net Book Value At 31st December 2011 - ======== At 31st December 2010 401 ========

Furniture, fittings and equipment e

Total e

198,383 76,487 1,102 ------------ 275,972 ------------

213,903 76,487 1,527 -----------291,917 ------------

183,295 27,707 1,086 ------------ 212,088 ------------

198,414 28,108 1,511 -----------228,033 ------------

63,884 ======== 15,088 ========

63,884 ======== 15,489 ========

Subsidiary undertaking

Unlisted Securities

Total

e Market Value At 1st January 2011 2 Revaluations - Exchange gain on consolidation -

e

e

Fixed asset investments

At 31st December 2011

2 ========

Subsidiary undertakings The following was a subsidiary undertaking of the group: Name Harvest Help Trading Ltd (dormant company)

50

Holding 100%

32,258 (1,840) 809 31,227 ========

32,260 (1,840) 809 31,229 ========


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Contd.)

13. TANGIBLE FIXED ASSETS - COMPANY Tangible fixed assets Cost At 1st January 2011 Additions Disposals At 31st December 2011 Depreciation At 1st January 2011 Charge for the year Disposals At 31st December 2011 Net Book Value At 31st December 2011 At 31st December 2010 14. INTANGIBLE ASSETS

Furniture, fittings and equipment e 158,092 48,000 - ------------ 206,092 ------------

Total e 158,092 48,000 -----------206,092 ------------

148,166 22,606 - ------------ 170,772 ------------

148,166 22,606 -----------170,772 ------------

35,320 ====== 9,926 ======

35,320 ====== 9,926 ======

Goodwill Cost Additions At 31st December 2011 Amortisation Charge for the year At 31st December 2011 Net Book Value At 31st December 2011

Total e 204,822 -----------204,822 -----------40,965 -----------40,965 -----------163,857 =======

G oodwill was purchased as part of the acquisition of the Ethical Business Services division of Africa Now. This business unit is now contained within a separate company limited by guarantee called Partner Africa. Self Help Africa is the sole member of Partner Africa.

51


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Contd.)

15. DEBTORS

Group 2011 e

Group 2010 e

Company 2011 e

Company 2010 e

- - 424,422 225,780 650,202

- 110,000 444,885 28,587 583,472

193,735 - - 19,454 213,189

81,435 110,000 14,352 205,787

Group 2011 e

Group 2010 e

Company 2011 e

Company 2010 e

233,871

95,752

141,884

70,043

Unrestricted e

Restricted e

2011 e

2010 e

Balance at beginning of year 1,157,919 711,505 Net movement in funds 432,547 (152,940) Balance at end of year 1,590,466 558,565 Acquisition Funding Reserve (note 18) Total year end reserves

1,869,424 279,607 2,149,031 210,074 2,359,105

2,570,155 (700,731) 1,869,424 1,869,424

Due from group undertakings Due from Self Help Africa Inc. Accrued income Sundry debtors & prepayments

16. CREDITORS – Amounts falling due within one year

Trade creditors and accruals

17. MOVEMENT ON RESERVES

18. ACQUISITION FUNDING RESERVE

2011

e

Reserve established for acquisition Credit for the period Balance at end of year

262,592 (52,518) 210,074

The acquisition funding reserve arises from the company’s acquisition of the Ethical Business Division of Africa Now. The funding of this investment is amortised to unrestricted funds over the same period as management’s best estimate of the economic lives of the assets acquired.

52


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Contd.)

19. RECONCILIATION OF OPERATING SURPLUS TO NET CASH OUTFLOW FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

2011 e

2010 e

Operating surplus/(deficit) Depreciation Amortisation of purchased goodwill Amortisation of acquisition funding reserve Movement in debtors Movement in creditors (Loss)/gain on revaluations of investment assets Exchange gain on consolidation Net cash inflow/outflow from operating activities

221,181 28,108 40,965 (52,518) (67,062) 138,119 (1,840) 49,940 356,893

(775,502) 13,497 238,620 (25,425) 1,997 69,491 (477,190)

20. ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN NET FUNDS

Cash at bank and in hand Net funds

At 31.12.2010 e

Cash Flows e

Other Changes e

At 31.12.2011 e

1,332,661 -------------- 1,332,661 ========

349,516 ---------- 349,516 ========

- ---------- - ========

1,682,177 -----------1,682,177 ========

21. SELF HELP AFRICA INC. S elf Help Africa Inc is a not for profit organisation registered in the United States of America. Self Help Africa Inc. is governed by an independent board of directors which retains full control over the financial and operating policies of the company. During the year, Self Help Africa advanced grants amounting to e108,417 to Self Help Africa, Inc. Loan funding of e110,000 that was outstanding at the start of the year has been fully offset by costs incurred by Self Help Africa Inc on behalf of Self Help Africa. The grants advanced are included in the expenditure of Self Help Africa and analysed according to the purposes for which the funds were applied.

22. PENSION SCHEME T he charity operates an employer sponsored, defined contribution pension scheme. During the year, the charity made contributions in respect of its employees. The assets of the scheme are held separately from those of the charity, in externally managed funds. The pension expense for the year amounted to e72,908, (2010: e82,259).

53


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Contd.)

23. LEGAL STATUS OF COMPANY (i) In accordance with Section 24 of the Companies Act, 1963, the company is exempt from including the word “Limited” in its name. The company is limited by guarantee and has no share capital. (ii) The company, as a charity, is exempt from the reporting and disclosure requirements of the Companies (Amendment) Act 1986.

24. POST BALANCE SHEET EVENTS There are no significant events since the period end, which would have an impact on financial position as at the balance sheet date.

25. CONTINGENT LIABILITIES There are no contingent liabilities at the balance sheet date.

26. COMPARATIVES Comparative amounts have been regrouped, where necessary, on the same basis as those for the current year.

27. APPROVAL OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS The board of directors approved the financial statements and authorised them for issue on 25th May 2012

54


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

NOTES

55


SELF HELP AFRICA ANNUAL REPORT 2011

NOTES

56


USA Self Help Africa Inc. 41 Union Square West, Suite 631 New York, NY 10003, USA Tel. +1 212 206 0847 ETHIOPIA Yeka Subcity, K.14, H.No. 300 Kenenissa Bekele Street Megenagna; Off Adwa Square to Shola Market Tel. +251 116-620659 KENYA PO Box 2248 Code 20100, Nakuru, Tel. +254 O51 2212291 MALAWI PO Box B-495 Lilongwe, Tel. +265 1750568 UGANDA P.O Box 34429, Plot 44 Ministers’ Village, Ntinda, Kampala Tel. +256 414 286305 WEST AFRICA 12 PO Box 315, Ougadougou 12, Burkina Faso Tel. +226 50 36 89 60

Memory and Moofat Magombo at work on their farm in Mabwera village, Malawi

ZAMBIA 33 Cnr Joseph Mwilwa and Great East Road Rhodespark Lusaka Tel: +260 211 236604


“Self Help Africa has been a long-time partner in the fight against hunger and extreme poverty... Farmers are the backbone of Africa. You believe in them and you invest in them. You link farmers with markets. You work with them in improving their practices and building up their capacity for achieving sustainability. There is no better work.” Michael D Higgins, President of Ireland, May 5, 2012

www.selfhelpafrica.org

IRELAND Kingsbridge House, Parkgate Street, Dublin 8. Tel 1850 757678

UK Westgate House, Hills Lane, Shrewsbury SY1 1QU, UK Tel +44 (0) 1743 277170

3rd Floor, Fitzroy House 18-22 Ashwin Street London E8 3DL Tel: +44 (0) 20 3051 8637

Self Help Africa - Annual Report 2011  

Annual report of Self Help Africa, international development agency working to support rural communities in Africa to eradicate hunger and...

Self Help Africa - Annual Report 2011  

Annual report of Self Help Africa, international development agency working to support rural communities in Africa to eradicate hunger and...

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